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Full text of "Duluth Evening Herald"

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VOLUME XXXIII— NO. 149. ^ 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



ji fm 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 29, 1915. 




SKaOlCT^WO CENTS, 




ARMIES TO MAKE REAL TEST OF GERMAN RESISTANCE 



VETERANS OF THE CIVIL 

WAR PASS IN REVIEW 
BEFORE THE PRESIDENT 



One Hundred Minnesota 

Soldiers Have Place in 

the Great Parade. 



Wilson and Cabinet in Re- 

viev\/ing Stand in Front 

of White House. 



HINISHR Of AVIATION Of 
fRANCf; fIRST IN THE WORID 



BULGARIA TO ENTER 
WAR WITH CENTRAL 
POWERS ON KT. 15 



Twenty Minnesotans Carry; 

Great Flag 20x30 

Feet. 



rn>m The Herald Wa*hInvton Bureau. 

TTashinston, Sept. 29. — One hundred 
Minnesota veterans marched in the 
»rancl parade of the G. A. R. today. 
The event marked the flftieth anni- 
versary of the grand review of 1865, 
when upward of 200.000 seaaoned 
tro^.ps passed before President John- 
son. 

Like Johnson, President Wilson to- 
day paid honor to the men who fought 
for the prestTvation of the Union. The 
president and members of his cabinet 
occupied places in the reviewing stand 
In front of the White House, the chief 
•xecutive standing most of the 
with bared head, as the 

A. 




BESNARD. 



This is the new minister of aviation 

time I of France. Aviation has become so 

veterans of i important a feature of warfare that it 

.. . -.^ t^^,,t ^» tuc n. A I was thouKht necessary to hav a spe- 

the various departments of the G. A. ^.j ^ department to direct It. There- 
R. fikd pjjst. with heads erect and mar- \ ^ ^^, cabinet office was created 

tin! bearing The weather was ideal ; j^„^ Besnard becomes the first minister 
and the veterans were out in full ^ aviation in the world, 
strength. 

Department of Minnesota. j 

At the head of the department of | 
Minnesota, which wa.« twenty-second ' 
m line, was Watson F. Hall of St. Cloud. 
L. W. Sturdlvaiit of Spring Valley, a 
76-ycar-old veteran, held the position 
of right KU'de, a place he occupied at 
the L"S Ang«les encampment. 

In the middle of the Minnesota col- 
umn marched twenty members of the 
order, carrying an American flag, 30 
by 20 feet They were cheered all 
a1(>ng the line of march, which extend- 
ed from the capitol to several blocks 
beyond the White House, about one mile [ 

and a quarter. Judge fc:il Torrance, ' p^ a -i r i i ir nili:.^... 

who was commander-in-chief of the UetailS TOr HalT DiMlOn 
G. A. R. when the veterans met "here 
In 1P02, had a place in the line with 



TO FLOAT BIG 
CREDIT AT 96 



Precise Agreement Con- 
cluded According to Au- 
thoritative Statement. 



Attack Will Be Made on 

Serbia; Will Not Molest 

Greece. 



PRESWM Of CHINA WILL 

m AOffT EMPERORSHIP 



Three Hundred Thousand 

Austro-Germans March 

on Serbia. 



Paris, Sept. 29, 4:45 p. m. — "Bulgaria 
and the central powers have concluded 
a precise agreement, according to au- 
thoritative Information," says the cor- 
respondent at Salonikl, Greece, of the 
Temps. 

"Under this agreement Bulgaria will 
enter the war on Oct. 15." 

The Athens correspondent of the 
Havas News agency says it is now 
expected Bulgaria will begin an at- i 
tack on Serbia within fifteen days. 

Plans for the campaign are now 
being drawn up by the Bulgarian gen- 
eral staff, tho correspondent says, 
with tho assistance of numerous Ger- 
man officers who have arrived in 
Sofia. 

Bulgarian officers say no attack will 
be made on Greece. 




GERMAN CASUALTIES . 
EXCEED 120,000 M A 
SAYS FRENCH RF lORT 



Includes Killed, Wounded 

and Prisoners in Recent 

Allies' Offensive. 



No Interruption in tlie Fight- 
ing in the Champagne 
* District. 



03 

O 

o 



VILIA Ul\mm RfltASED 
AfTfR ARREST BY U. S. OffiCIAlS 



French Continue to Make 

Progress in the Artois 

Region. 



BATTER AWAY 
AT THIRD LINE 
OF DEFENSES 



French Maintaining Their 
Offensive in the Cham- 
pagne District. 



YUAN SHI KAI. 

Honolulu, Sept. 29. — Yuan 



Shi Kal, 



Loan to Allies Are 
Complete. 



(Continued on page 12, third column.) 

NINE K[NERS~StlLL 

ENTOMBED IN MINE | syndicate Will Sell Bonds 
Rescuers Believe They Are ^° the Investors 
Alive and Hope to Reach ^ " 

Pnem Soon. 



Ready to Advance on Serbia. 

London. Sept. 29. — "Three hundred 
thousand Austrian and German troop.s 
have begun an advance on the Serbian 
frontier, in tho direction of Orsova," 
says the Athens correspondent of the 
Exchange Telegraph company. 

■ ■ ^ "-■ 

' Allies' Troops Landed. 

Berlin, Sept. 29, by ^v^rcless to Say- 
vUle. — British and French troops in- 
tended for service in Serbia have been 
landed at Port Kathrin, near Saloniki, 
Greece, according to reports from 
Budapest received by the Frankfurter 
Zeitung, the Overseas News agency 
announces today. 

ALLIES^MlF 
IMPORTANT ACTION 

Attack on Constantinople 

May Begin Any Moment, 

Says British Officer. 



president of China, would not accept 
an emperorship, according to Dr. F. 
J. Goodnow, adviser to the Chinese 
government, who arrived here yester- 
day on the liner Manchuria. Dr. Good- 
now gives Yuan himself as authority 
for tlie declaration. 



GERMAN OENERALS 

ARE DISMISSED 



Two Relieved of Commands 
for Setbaolc -\the 
West. '' 

London, Sept. 29. — German news- 
papers today announced that two gen- 
erals, unnamed, have been dismissed 
I from German commands in the West- 
I em war zone In connection with the 
I recent setback at the hands of the 
French and British, according to a dis- 
patch from Amsterdam to the Ex- 
change Telegraph company. 

"It is probable," the dispatch adds, 
"that a new German oommander-ln- 
chlef of the Western armies soon will 
be appointed. In this connection the 
name of Field Marshal von Hinden- 



Parls, Sept. 29, 2:25 p. m. — German ; 
casualties In the recent offensive of ; 
the French and British, including i 
killed, wounded and prisoners, were 
given officially by the French war of- ' 
flee today as In excess of the strength 
I of three army corps (more than 120,- 
I 000 men). 

' There Is no interruption of the fight- 
; ing in Champagne. 

Progress of the French In the 
Artois region, Northwestern France, 
continues. 

North of Massiges the war office 
says 1,000 Germans surrendered. 

The text of the communication fol- 
lows : 

"The reports which are coming to 
hand make it possible to record each 
day more fully the Importance of the 
success obtained by our recent of- 
fensive movement in the Champagne 
district, combined with that of tho 
allied troops in the Artois district. 
Oernians Lose Over 120,000. 

"The Germans have not only been 
compelled to abandon along an ex- 
tended front certain position.^ strongly 
entrenched In the defense of which 
they had been ordered to resist to tho 
very end, b u t they have s uffered losses 

(Continued on page 6, first column.) 

NOT m¥cTprospegt 

OF SETTLING STRIKE 




Will Be No Relaxation By 

Allies Such as Follov^ed 

Neuve Chapelie. 



Severe Pressure Will Con- 
tinue, Says Field Marshal 
Sir John French. 



I>ansford, Pa., Sept. 29. — After a night 
of feverish activity the men engaged 
In the work of rescuing the nine min- 
ers who were entombed in the Coal- 
dale colliery of the Lehigh Coal & Na- 
vigation company on Monday, had 
failed to reach them today. The two I 
men who yesterday managed to escape 
from the barrier that is holding the 
other mine workers are rapidly recov- 
ering from their experiences. 

Officials of the company still hold 
out hope that Borr.e, if" not all the men 
Imprisoned, will be gotten out alive 
and expect to reach them some time 
today. Rescuers who have been work- 
ing in relays for forty-eight hours 
heard faint sounds during the night 
Which they believe may have been the 
rapping of the men who are behind 
tons of fallen rock and coal. 

FEW PASSENGERS RIDE 
IN FO RT WA YNE CARS 

Fort Wayne, Ind.. Sept. 29. — Twenty 
cars, manntil in part by old employes 
and in part by imported men, were put 
In operation on the city street railway 
lints thi.s morning. There was no re- 
port of disorder during the early hours. 
Few passengers were riding. 

Traction officials declare they will 



Athens, via Paris, Sept. 29. — "I be- 
lieve we are on the eve of the most 

Important operation of the war, namely j burg Is mentioned." 
the landing of troops In Macedonia to 
begin the march not so much on Con- 
stantinople, as on Berlin," said an of- 
ficer attached to the general staff of 



'•^ conttst the validity of the ordinance i dental to the loan's flotation. 



New York, Sept. 29. — Definite forma- 
tion of the big syndicate of bankers 

who will float the half billion dollar i the British army on the Gallipoli pen- 
cred.t loan to Great Britain and ! i-"l,^,,^,^„°eUe"s trZl *° ^'^^'^^ '^^"^ 
France was begun today by J. P. Mor- j ..^jj^ ^^.j, offensive forces are grad- 
gan & Co., aiid other financiers who , ually closing in. The Mesopotamie ex- 
have been associated with them in the ! pedition is approaching nearer to Bag- 

noE-otiations here with the Anelo- i ^«<^ ^^^ ^'"""^ ^^^ Suvla bay-cJaba 
negotiations nerc witn tne A^po I Tepe line an attack on Constantinople 
French financial commission. It Is j j^^g^y begin at any moment." 
proposed to make the syndicate the 
largest of its kind ever seen in this 
country and to include in its mem- 
bership banks, trust companies and 
Individuals from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific. 

In every large city or financial cen- 
ter in the United States there Is to be, 
under the present plan, a group of 
bankers who will act as syndicate 
managers in their section of the 
country. 

Details of Loan. 

Official announcement of the details 
of the loan revealed but- few de- 
partures from the plans previously 
outlined in unofficial reports. Nothing 
Is sal4. about the exclusion of pur- 
chases of war munitions. The most 
surprising feature was the price at 
which the big issue is to be sold to 
the underwriters — 96. Previous re- 
ports had ranged from 97 V^ to 99. 
The bonds will be placed on the mar- 
ket at 98 to the investors. The 2 per 
cent difference in the prices to the 
syndicate and the Investor will pro- 
vide a profit to the syndicate and re- 
imburse them for the expenses Inci- 



DUTCH MAKE SERIOUS 
PROTEST TO GERiViANY 



The Hague, Sept. 29, via London. — 
The Dutch government has made a seri- 
ous protest to Germany concerning the 
passage of German airships over Dutch 
territory. Holland declares it expects 
Germany to take adequate measures to 
avoid violation of Dutch territory In 
the future. 



RAOUL MADERO. 

El Paso Tex., Sept. 29. — Gen. Raoul 
Madero, chief of the Villa government 
forces In Coahuila, arrested last week 
by troops of th< Thirteenth cavalry 
near Presidio, T<x., as he crossed the 
International lin*-, with his staff, ar- 
rived here last night from Alpine, 
Tex., where he and hi.s staff were re- 
leased from arreiit by an order of the 
war department. 



SDME GROUND 
IS RETAKEN 



Neither Manufacturers or 

Union Leaders Make Move 

for Peace in Chicago. 

Chicago, Sept. 29. — Prospects of an 
early settlement of th= strike of sev- 
eral thousand garment workers were 
not bright today as the strikers en- 
tered on the third day of the walkout. 

Neither the manufacturers or union 
leaders had any move for peace, it was 

announced. Efforts of union organi- 
zers to induce employes to stop work 
continued. 

Sidney Hillman, president of the 
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of 
America encouraged the strikers with 
*he statement that victory — Increased 
tvages, shorter hours and arbitration 
will be their ultimate reward. 



Germans Report Recapture t'he'^Rus.ian advanc^o'^^in 

' '^ land and retaken Lutsk. 

of Territory Won By 
British Troops. 



Official Statement By Ger- 
man War Office on War 
Sitjation. 



London, Sept. 29. — The British ara 
battering the third line of the Ger- 
mans in the vicinity of Loos. The 
French are maintaining their offensive 
in Champagne. The Germans in tha 
Argonne apparently have been unabla 
to make important gains and have re- 
frained from infantry attacks. This 
sums up briefly the situation in the 
west as seen In London today. 

No great change in conditions ia 
.^hown but England attaches high im- 
portance to indications that the of- 
fensive of tlie allies Is not to be re- 
laxed, as was predicted In some Quar- 
ters. A short breathing spell has been 
succeeded by the hardest pressure on 
German positions at the points weak- 
ened or shattered by the allied rush. 
Intend to .Maintain Pres«ure. 
That it Is the intention to maintain 
this pressure Is indicated by a tele- 
gram from Field Marshal French to 
the lord ma>or of I.,ondon. thank in|r 
him for his message of good will. Tha 
British commander added that tha 
message encouraged his troops to 
"push the immediate success to a 
really decisive issue." 

This leads the public to believe thera 
is to be no stalemate such as followed 
the battle of Niuve Cliapelle, but that 
with new British forces in the field 
and ample supplies of ammunition Gen. 
Jotfro and Field Marshal French plan 
a real test whether German resi.stanca 
in Francfj ar.d Bdgiiim can be broken. 
RnitM Not DuinK So V^VII. 
Pai.e.sia though encouraged by tho 
progress of her allies in the west, ha» 
not been^doing .■^o well In the last day 

have stemmed 

southern Po- 

The Germana 

are renewing the great movement 

against Dvinsk. 

Bulgaria has not replied to Foreign 
Secretary eJrey.s "frl^^ndly utlmatum.'^ 
but special dispatches from Athens and 
other points says a change Is noted at 
Sofia and that events ore now lesa 




passed by the city council last night 
forbidding the operation of cars except 
by men who have had at least four- 
teen days training on the Fort Wayne 
city lines. 

TURKSARE IN 
FULL RETREAT 



British Troops Win Impor- 
tant Success in Meso- 
• potamia, Asia. 



Announcement Made to 
House of Commons By 
Secretary Chamberlain. 



Denomination* as Low as 9100. 

The bonds will be issued In denomi- 
nations as low as $100, and subscribers 
may pay for them by installment. 

At maturity these bonds will be re- 
payable in cash or convertible Into 
4»A per cent joint Anglo-French bonds, 
redeemable from ten to twenty years 

(Continued on page 12, fourth column.) 

RELIEVES PRESSURE 
ON RUSSIAN UNES 



London, Sept. 29. — The British have 
won an important success in Mesopo- 
tamia. The Turks are In full retreat 
toward Bagdad. 

The British are pursuing the re- 
treating Turks. 

Announcement to this efefct was 



Many German Troops Are 

Transferred From East 

to West Front. 

London, Sept. 29. — A dispatch to the 
Times from Petrograd says: 

"The military critics here note the 

almost Instantaneous relief on the Rus- 
sian front between Dvinsk and Osmi- 
ana on the assumption of the offensive 
by the allies in the west, which re- 
sulted in the withdrawal of the whole 
German guard corps from Vilna, They 
expect this transfer to be followed by 
others. 

"This relief was very welcome, as 
Gen. von Eichhorn's thrust across the 
Russian communications in the region 
of Molodechno was still serious and 
its danger to the Russian retreat not 
entirely ended. 

"The Novoe Vremya's military critic 
expresses the belief that the Germans 
will be obliged to withdraw a complete 
army from this front for the western 



^ , frontier to repair the losses they aL 
made in the house of commons today ( ready have sustained. 

by Austen Chamberlain, secretary of | "Gen. Kuropatkln has been appointed 
atate for India. t6 command an army corps." 




^•^!^ 



- feil 



Berlin. Sept. 29, via London. 4 p. m.— '. 
Recapture from the British of part 
of the territory won from the Ger- 
mans north of Loos w.os announced 
today by the far office. 

French attacks near Souchez and 
Neuvllle are said to have been "partly 
repulsed." 

In the Champagne district, French 
attempts to break through the Ger- 
man lines are said to have been un- 
successful. 

The text of th( statement follows- 

"Western thea:er of war: The ene- 
my's attempts to break through our 
lines continued ivith bitterness in the 
present region of attacks. A count- 
er-attack, following another fruitless 
British attack, hd to the recapture 
of part of the territory we abandoned 
north of Loos." 

A fierce Britisti attack from tho re- 
gion of Loos broke down with heavy 
losses. 

Partly Repnlsed. 

"Repeated and stubborn French at- 
tacks in the region of Souchez and 
Neuville were partly repulsed bv 
strong counter-f ttack.s. 

"In Champagne also all attempts 
of the enemy to break through our 



(Continued on pnge 12. second column.) 

ITALIflrBTrriESHlP 
SUNK BY EXPLOSION 

Benedetto Brin Goes to 

Bottom Following Fire; 

Cause Unknov»/n. 

London, Sept. 29. — A dispatch from 
the StefanI News Agency of Rome 
says that the Italian battleship Bene- 
detto Brln sank following an explosion 
which resulted from the fire on board 
the vessel. The cause of the disaster 
has not been ascertained. 



The announcement last night of tha 
explosion on the Benedetto Brln <}\a 
not malie it clear whether the ves»iel 
had gone down. It was said eight of- 
ficers and 37 9 marines had been saved. 
Something over 300 me?i are still un- 
accounted for. 

The battjesliip Benedetto Brin wa* 
a vessel of 13.427 tons, and in peaca 
times carried a complement of 129 
men. She was completed in 1904 at a 
cost of ?r., 750, 000. 

The battleship, which was of tho 
pre-dreadnaught class, carried four 12- 
inch, four 8-inch and 12 6-lnch guna, 
twenty 12-pounders. two l-poundcra 
and two Maxims. She also was armed 



with four torpedo tubes. The vessel 

(Continued on pige 12, four*h column.) i had a speed of about 20.6 knots an 

hour. 

Rear Admiral Baron Ernesto Rubin 
De Cervin v.as in command of the vcs» 
sel. 



ITALIANS AGAIN SHELL 
HOSPITAL IN GORIZIA 

Berlin. Sept. 2J, by wireless to Tuck- 
erton, N. J. — The Austrian official 
statement of yes terday, as received in 
Berlin today, and given out bv the 
Overseas News { gency, says that the 
Italians have 8 gain shelled the Red 
Cross hospital at Gorizla, although the 
hospital was marked with the Red 
Cross flag. 



This portion rf the Austrian state- 
ment of yesterday was not received 
last night via Lt ndoh, apparently hav- 
ing been deleted by the British censor 



NEW LORD MAYOR OF 
LON DON IS ELECTED 

London, Sept. 29 —Sir Charles Cheer* 
W.akeficld was elected lord mayor of 
London by the council today. 

Sir Charles will succeed Sir Charlea 
Johnston, whose term expires in No- 
vember. The mayor-elect Is an aider- 
man of the city of London, and ha» 
been decorated with the Order of iha 
Legion of Honor. He is head of a Lon- 
don manufacturing company. 



SUMMARY 8F THE WAR NEWS 



German losses In the recent battles The late»t statement of the naxniao 

incident to the < pcuing of the general ««r office Ray* the Kituation arouckd 

offeniilve of the Knten<e nliie** on the Uvin^k. Ik unchanged, but thnt the 

Wentcrii front arc officially CHtlniatcd heavy fl;;htlnK I" continuing:. The cn- 

by the French ivar office nn equaling circling opcratlnuK against the \'ilna 

the strength of three army corps, or region. lio»%cvcr, arc rcpreventcd aa 
more than 12U,(M>> men killed, Mouaded ^ making little headway, 
or captured. 



£>^^ 



^^<^y^^^>^f^^ 



The allied forccH arc continuing 
their progrcKN iigninNt the (>crnian 
line«, their comiaaudcrM report. I'nrlH 
today nnnounccD further advancen in 
the Artoiw rcgloi , ■irhllc north of Mhn- 
KigcR la the Chiimpagne diNtrlct 1,000 
Germans surrendered to the Kreneh, 

The lesNcning for a time of the 
Gerntan prcKSun on the northern half 
of the ItUisNian front Is believed In 
Petrograd mlllti ry elrclers to have 
been due In part to the ivlthdrawal 
of large bodies of troops to reinforce 
tbc German liJ>«a Im the Wcat. 



I In the South the Anstro-Ocrnian 

■ forccM apparently have been streiigth- 
encil and \ Icnna declares thnt the re- 
cent succcHHcit for the Teutons north 
of the Galician border ha^e rc>.ulfed 
ill the breaking of the KuMsinu offen- 

; slve In the Volhynlan fortress region, 
causing a retreat of their armlea 
aloug^ this entire fr<tnt. The ItusMlaos 

\ Ktill appear to have the upper hand 

I in (>alicia. 

I Satisfaction I* expressed In Kngland 
at the KUCCCKs of the loitii neK<»(iatl<Mi<« 
to adJuKt the exchange Kltuailua wltla 

i tbia coiuitry. 



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Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 29, 1915. 



CENSORSHIP BOARD NOT NKDED 

fOR THE DULUTH MOVIE SHOWS 



Commissioner 6. Silberstein 
Writes Woman's Council 
Committee That Moral Tone 
of Local Theaters Is High; 
Managers Will Not Accept 
Suggestive Films; National 
Censorship Meets All Re- 
quirements. 



Enuclrrunt of an ordinance providing 
for a moving: picture censorship board 
Is declared Impracticable ^- ''ommis- 
eloner Silberstein, head of the safety 
division. In commiinirations sent yes- 
terday to representatives of the Wom- 
an's rouncil. 

In letters to Mrs. Harriet L.. Carey 
and Mrd. A. A. Kerr, who composed 
the committee representing the "Wom- 
an's council, the safety commissioner 
declares that but few objectionable 
pictures ever escape the national cen- 
eorship board and that these are never 
accepti'd by Duluth theater operators, 
who are endeavoring: to slve the pub- 
lic clean shows. This information, he 
«tate.«. was griven him by the mana- 
gers theinselves. 

<>a*>«tlon« Own Authority. 

In addition. Commissioner Silberstein 
questions his right to appoint a board 
of censors with power to prosecute un- 
der a city ordinance. The present the- 
ater ordinance, he concludes, is suf- 
ficient to govern the morals in Du- 
luth playhouses and motion picture 
tiieat'Ts. 

The commissioner's letter to the com- 
mittee members follows: 

"The proposal for an amendment to 
the ordinance governing: moving pic- 
tures, submitted to me by your com- 
xnittee, has had my earnest an'' care- 
ful consideration and I have come to 
the conclusion that it would be Im- 
practicable to enact an ordinance pro- 
viding for a board of censors to pass 
upon moving pictures presented to the 
public. 

Produrer.i Careful. 

"I am authoritatively informed that 
only about 5 per cent of the pictures 
now exhibited. Including the most ob- 
jectionable films, escape the scrutiny 



of the national board. I am also In- 
formed by the managers of our own 
playhouses that they cut out any part 
of the films of objectionable nature 
(if they occur) ^^^''^re the films are 
exhibited to the public. 

"The office of the commissioner of 
public safety was established by char- 
ter submitted to the people, and the 
incumbent of tliat office is also chosen 
directly by the people at the polls. It 
is his duty to enforce the laws per- 
taining to his department whenever a 
violation is brought to his attention, 
and if he falls to do so, he is held di- 
rectly responsible to the people. While 
this is true oX the commissioner of pub- 
lic safety it would not be true of a 
board appointed under authority of an 
ordinance enacted by the commission. 
For this reason I would not be dis- 
posed to share the responsibility with 
the proposed board. 

Could Be Overruled. 

"By the terms of the proposed 
amendment, the commissioner would 
be represented on a board of four 
members, three of whom could over- 
rule his best judgment in a given case 
and he would be bound by tlie recom- 
mendation of the so-called advisory 
board. Furthermore, I am not at all 
sure that the city commission or the 
safety commissioner could legally dele- 
gate to the proposed board the power 
to prosecute under the proposed 
amendment. 

"It Is my earnest desire to maintain 
Duluth'.=> standing as a moral city, and 
I am doing everything in my power to 
make It so. While I will welcome the 
recommendations and expressions of 
representatives of organizations or in- 
dividual citizens and desire to co-op- 
erate with them In meeting objections 
that might arise from moving pictures, 
I believe this can be done under the 
present ordinance." 



NOTICE! 



Final notice Is hereby given to 
all perMODj^ viho had I'uibre'llaii 
for repair at the mtore of A. <;i.\- 
GOI.D, 125 Eatti Superior Street, 
I>uluth, MlBji., that Kame will be 
aold for eharfreM unleMti ealled 
for before Friday, Oct. 1, 1915. 

I'mbretlHM may lie obtained at 
631 Manhattan BldKv Duluth, 
ailnn. W. O. UERBY, 

Truittee. 



Weather: I'robably show- 
ers tonight; Thursday part- 
ly cloudy; easterly winds. 






FALL RAIN 

—AND— 

TOP COATS 

CRAVENEHES 
SLIP-ONS 



WOULD PROVIDE 
FOR DEPARTI^EHTS 



Osk Hall BuUding 

Men's Mid Ladies' Umbrellas 



Governor Thinks Some 
Should Be Housed in His- 
torical Society Building. 

St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 29. — OB*clal to 
; The Herald.) — Taking the position that 
the $500,000 appropriated by the leg- 
islature for a new Historical society 
building Is more than ample for the 
needs of the society, Governor Ham- 
mond will endeavor to have several of 
the departments now housed in the 
capltol placed in the new building. 

To consider the subject a meeting 
was held this afternoon attended by 
the governor, the building committee 
of the Historical society and the state 
board of control, which has supervision 
over its construction. The new build- 
ing and how much space the soci- 
ety would need were discussed in full. 

Writing to the board of control yes- 
terday, which body later called a meet- 
ing of the several Interests, Governor 
Hammond said: 

"I place little credence In the state- 
ment that the appropriation Is not suf- 
ficient to build a build'"'*- large 
enough for the purposes. If a half a 
million dollars Is to be expended the 
state, I think, has a right to demand 
that such a building be made as will 
meet the present needs of the state." 

At the present time the state cap- 
itol Is overcrowded and several de- 
partments as a result are housed in 
rented quarters. Governor Hammond 
calls attention to this fact and gives 
i It as his opinion that the Historical 
society building should be so con- 
structed as to care for them. 




105 and 107 West Superior Street 



JAUNTY NEW 





FALL 

UITS! 



— "Out-of-the-ordinary" styles that you 
will find elsewhere. Fur, braid or but- 
ton trimmed and semi-tailored types of 
^Recondra cloth, Cylinder cloth, Radio- 
tex, \'elvet, Corduroy, Vicuna, Velour, 
Poplin, Men's-wear Serge, Broadcloth, 
(iabardine, Whipcords, etc. Especially 
featured are choker collar, the cup col- 
lar, the chin collar and notch collar; la- 
dies' and misses' sizes, extra sizes and 
fashionable stouts. Priced at — 

$29,50, $35, $39,50 
$48,50 t:t:i $85,00 

Popular Priced Suits, 
$19,50, $22.50 and $25.00 




WHERE m m\mm. t$ meeting 




WESLEY M. E. CHURCH, MINNEAPOLIS. 



REV. C. R. OATEN IS SECRETARY 
OF METHODIST CONFERENCE 



Former Dulutli Pastor Is 

Again Given Important 

Position. 



Book Concern Reports the 

Most Successful Year 

in History. 



Minneapolis, Minn., Sept. 29. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The session of 
the Northern Minnesota Mothodlst 
Episcopal conference opened this 
morning at Wesley church with a de- 
votional address by Bishop J. F. Berry, 
who Is to preside at the sessions of 
the conference, the flrst business ses- 
sion of the conference was called at 9 
o'clock when the following officers 
were elected: Secretary, Rev. C. R. 
Oaten, Crookston, Minn., re-elected for 
the eighth year; treasurer, Rev. J. R. 

Davies, Renville, Minn.; statistician. 
Rev. J. S. Kettlewell, Appleton, Minn. 

Districts Superintendents Burns of 
Duluth, Stout of Minneapolis, and .ar- 
ish of Fertrus Falls, rtnd their annual 
reports. 

lll»st Siicc^Mtifal Tear. 

The sum of $2,500 was prt^^enlod to 
the conference as Its part of the an- 
nual profits of the Methodist Book 
Concern, Dr. H. C. Jennings, chief 
book agrent of the concern, reported 
the most successful year in the his- 
tory of the business. 

The sum of $250 wag also presented 
by Br. J. B. Hlni?eley as the confe;-- 
ence's share in the annual dividend of 




REV. 

-♦^ 



t, R. OATEN. 



SILBERSTEIN MAYOR 

lUST FOR A DAY 



It's "Mayor" Silberstein today. 

In the absence of Mayor Prince, Com- 
missioner Silberstein. president of the 
council, is acting as the chief executive 
of Duluth. He also signed the pro- 
ceedings of Monday's council meeting 
for the official publication. 

Mayor Prince left last night for Min- 
neapolis to serve as a witness in a Fed- 
eral court case. He is expected home 
tomorrow. 



OBITUARY 



.ludKe A. R. \»m Clef, 77, nottd edi- 
tor and statesman, died at Cirfcleville, 
Ohio. Sept. 28, after a lingering illness. 
Judge Van Clef was tho senior Demo- 
cratic editor in Ohio. His journalistic 
career began in 1859 and ended with 
his death. For ten years he was a mem- 
ber of the Ohio senate and he also 
served two terms in the house of rep- 
resentatives, his career as a law-maker 
extending from 1871 to 1893. In addi- 
tion to serving as a member of the gen- 
eral assembly, he was probate judge of 
Pickaway county. 



tiie board •«./ conference claimants, of 
which he is the secretary. 

The annual conference sermon was 

§ reached by Rv. J. C. Craig of \Va- 
ena, Minn., and the bishop adminis- 
tered the sacrament to a large com- 
pany gathered 

Over 100 ministers answered to roll 
call at this session, and other dele- 
gates are arriving every hour. 

This afternoon the speakers will be 
Dr. Kerfoot, president of Hamlino 
university, and Dr. Andrew Gillies of 
Hennepin Avenue church. 

The board of Sunday schools will 
hold Its anniversary this evening at 8 
o'clock, Rev. Dr. Edgar Blake of Chi- 
cago delivering the address. 



LAKE BENTON LAWYER 
LOC ATES I N DULUTH 

Harry; E. ^oyle, who has been en- 
gaged fn JtWev practice of law at Lake 
Benton, Minn., for the last three years, 
will, after Oct. 1, become associated 
with BetijanUn M. Goldberg, a well 
known local sittomey. Mr. Boyle and 
his fanfcily llave arrived In the city 
and haye taken up their residence at 
1432 East Third street. 

Mr. Boyle, on Jan. 1, last, was ap- 
pointed- a member of the governor's 
staff, on which he holds a position as 
major. He Is also assistant quarter- 
master .general of the Minnesota Na- 
tional guard. 

Mr. Boyle is the son of James Boylf 
of Eau Claire, Wis., a veteran con- 
ductor 6n the-'Omaha road between Du- 
luth and Eau Claire. 

FARMER HURT IN TIP-OVER. 



Remy do Goamont, the poet, died 
Sept. 29. He was editor of the "M'l'r- 
cure de France" and a director of "Re- 
vue des Idea." He was born In 1855. 



Sam Miller Has Collar Bone Broken 
During Night Ride. 

Sam Miller, aged 52, a Rice Lake 
farmer, sustained a fractured collar 
bone last night when the wagon In 
which he was riding tipped ovor on 
Tenth street between Eighth and Ninth 
avenues east. Ha was thrown out on 
his left shoulder. 

Miller was removed to police head- 
quarters and after being treated by 
Surgeon Harry Klein was taken to thi- 
home of a nephew at 1015 North Sixth 
avenue east. He was on his way home 
after delivering a load of wood in 
Lakeside when the accident happened. 



BEST C ORN G ROWER. 

Arthur Hoese of Mayer Awarded 
Expo Prize for Minnesota. 

.St. Paul Minn.. Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Arthur Hoese of Mayer, 
Minn., has been selected by the Pana- 
ma-Pacific exposition officials as en- 
titled to a medal for being Minnesota's 
best corn grower. The medal will be 
forwarded to G(»%-ernor Hammond, who 
In turn will present it to Mr. Hoese. 

Announcement of the selection was 
made to Governor Hammond today by 
the National Topnotch Farmers' club. 
The club suggt-sts that the presenta- 
tion of tlie medal be made the occasion 
of some big meeting of farmers' clubs 
or agriculture gathering. 

WIFE DE SERfE R~HELD. 

Clinton Curry of Duluth Arrested at 
Peoria, III. 

Two days after Mrs. Clinton Curry 
of Dulutli swore to a warrant charging 
her husband with deserting her and 
two children, Curry was arrested at 
Peoria, 111., and held for local police. 

Chief R. D. McKercher. believing 
that Curry could be found in or near 
Peoria, wired officers In Illinois, with 
the result that the man wanted was 
rounded up In short order. 

Curry has been living with an al- 
leged wife in Peoria, according to po- 
lice, and the charge of wife desertion I 
or child abandonment may be charged i 
to a more serious one later. ( 

Police will be sent to procure extra- 1 
dltion papers at once« I 



"THAT'S 
ALL" 

SHOE REPAIRING 

PONE RIGHT 

At the lowest possible 
prices 

WHILE 

YOU^ 

WAIT 




Shoe 
Repair Co. 



M • «.- 1. i 17— 2nd 

Mam (\>orlts < 



Ave. West 



f Opposite Ke\ Theater 

R,w, ?.•<I.,^,;;^*'^-lst Ave. West 
Brancl,5hop|j Jo_4th Ave. West. 

UXION SHOPS 

n 1 1 



ANNOUNCB CANOIDAa fOR 

GOVERNORSHIP Of ILLINOIS 




lightning. The stage carpenter was 
I given the order. The words w^ere 

spoken, and i istantly a noise which 
> resembled a succession of pistol shots 
i was heard off the wings. 

"What on ea th are you doing, man?" 

shouted the nranager, rushing behind 

the scenes. "Eo you call that thunder? 



It's not a bit like It." 

"Awfully sorry, sir," responded tom 
carpenter, "but the fact is, sir. I 
couldn't hear you because of the storxn. 
That was real thunder, sir." 

Many of the "straw" hats of Europe 
are made of wood. 




FRANK O. LOWDEN. 

Frank O. L<owden has announced 
himself a candidate for governor of 
Illinois. He is a lawyer born in Min- 
nesota. He married the daughter of 
George M. Pullman. He has been a 
member of the Republican National 
committee and a member of congress. 



THAYER COMING 
TO EXAMINE BOOKS 



Expert Accountant Will Go 

Over Records of W. J. 

Riciieson. 

Oscar B, Thayer, expert accountant, 
who established the new auditing sys- 
tem for the works division, will ar- 
rive here the latter part of next week 
to make a special examination of the 
court records of Walter J. Richeson, 
former deputy clerk of the municipal 
court. 

Word has been received by Commis- 
sioner Voss, head of the finance divi- 
sion, that Mr. Thayer Is now await- 
ing his successor in the normal school 
at AVhitewater, Wis., where he Is 
teaching auditing and accounting, and 
that he will arrive In Duluth before 
Oct. 10. 

Two weeks ago the council author- 
ized Commis.sioner Voss to order a 
special examination of Mr. Rtcheson's 
court records to learn the exact short- 
age for the year preceding Aug. 1. 
The finance head wrote Mr. Thayer 
and the latter agreed to make the in- 
vestigation as soon as he could ob- 
tain a successor for his position. 

After he has finished his work on 
the court records, Mr. Thayer will as- 
sume the duties of auditor and ac- 
countant for the public works divi- 
sion, authority for the appointment 
having been given Commissioner Far- 
rell about a month ago. 

THE REAL. THING. 
Pittsburgh Chronicle-Telegraph: It 
appears that at the rehearsal of a play 
a wonderful climax had been reached, 
which was to be heiglitened by the 
effective use of the usual thunder and 




If You 
Could See 



our new Autumn Suits 
and Overcoats you would 
decide at once that your 
last season's garment was 
out of the question. 

Why not pay us a little 
visit and reach your de- 
cision while the season is 
young? 

Nobby Autumn 

Suits and Overcoats 

from $J0 to $35 

For These Rainy Days 

Nobby Slip-ons and 

Balmacaans 

from $5 to $30 

Bostonian Fall Shoes. 




Wiiliamson & MenJenhali 



Qgrr«ot i>reo»/i^ Wvmm ^T ^^ ^"^ 



Every Woman and Miss should stop fo 

think of the wonderful advantages they 
hav(i in buying at the Gidding Estab- 
lishment — with a four-store buying power, 

and an establishment in New York as 

headquarters, where the latest words of 
Fashion are presented to you — Then why 
go to other stores v/hen you know that 

Gidding styles are absolutely correct, 
and quality and prices are right? 

Suits of Individuality 

Clevi^r styles — reproduced from the original models 
featured by our New York establishment — including 
adaptations and our own original ideas — a diversity 
of styles unequaled in any other Duluth establishment 
— of Velvet, Corduroy, Broadcloth, Gabardine, Callot 
checks and novelty fabrics — fur trimmed, braided or 
plain tailored effects. 

$25, $35, $45, $55 upwards 

Fashionable Coats 

Individual styles — for motoring, semi-dress and gen- 
eral utility wear — of fine imported Velour, Corduroy, 
Broadcloth, English Whipcord, Zibeline, Chinchilla, 
novelty mixtures, and water-proof Motor Coats. 

$15, $19, $25, $35 upwards 



Charming 




81 



ouses 



Wonderfully clever 
ideas — for street, 
office and dressy 
wear — striped and 
plaid Taffetas — 
Crepe d e 
Chine, Pussy 
WLUow%Soire 
Silk, Geor- 
gette Crepe 
Chiffon,Nep- 
t u n e Jersey 
and Voile — 
featuring all 
the newest 
ideas and 
colorings. 



Street and Semi -Dress 
$1 to $6.75 



BI 



ouses 



Dressy Blouses $6.75 to $35 
Exclusive Millinery 

Women who seek individuality in their hats can find 
at Gidding's wonderful selections in the latest ideas 
now being worn by the smartest dressed women of 
New York. Every day brings new shipments from 
our ]Nlew York establishment, keeping us in touch 
with the newest styles as they are developed. 

SMART STREET HATS $7.50 to $15 

DRESS HATS $15 to $35 




fe 


m 


















i 














\ 



<-m?^ 



A I <■ ■ I ■ will I ■ I I ■ I II I > • ■ I I I I I ■ i| ■ ■ M # ' ^ " ■■ 




r •! ntT" 



ig'.Jfci ^ 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 20, 1915. 



8 ^r 



f 



You'll Do Better at Kelly's^ 



-+ 







1 

1 








• 








■ 








• 

■ 








i 








■ 














^ . 
















hy You Should Buy a Stewart 



A Stewart will keep you comfortable and burn less coal, giving^ a 
greater heat and more comfort than any other heater made. We'll be 
g-lad to prove this to your entire satisfaction. The floors are kept warm 
by the double heating flue in the base. You don't have to crowd the 
Stewart. Every unit of heat is used and no unused heat passes up the 
chimney. Stewart Heaters have been used for the past thirty winters 
in Duluth and there are more Stewarts in use at the Head of the Lakes 
than all other makes combined. It's because they are the best. 

Don't Buy a No-Name Stove 

When you start out to select a heatin|[( stove, ask the first dealer you come to 
how long he has handled his heating stove and if there is one of the kind he is selling 
now that has been used in Duluth for eight or ten winters. In nine cases out of ten 
he will beat about the bush and try to tell you that his stove is different from the 
others. (A freak construction). Almost any excuse in his eagerness to sell his stove. 
Don't buy a no-name stove. Any old stove will work for one winter, but it is the test 
of time that counts. Be sure it's a Stewart. 

Special— A Stewart for $25.00 




You can buy a .$37.50 Base Burning Stewart Heater with revolving 
firepot and full nickel trimmings — a heater that is guaranteed in 
every way; it has patent duplex grates, large magazine, gas-tight 
doors and air-tight drafts. (Not like cut). It is a double heater 
and is positively one of the greatest stove 
values ever offered here, at 



$25.00 



Bonny Oak Heaters 

This is the famous Stewart Bonny Oak Heater. If 
you want a good heater at a small price, one that burns 
almost any kind of fuel, get one of these. They are 
all well made, heavy cast base, cold rolled steel body, 
nickel trimmings, ash pan — a thoroughly well made 
heater. 

Small size heater, complete; regular ^A. ^K 

value $8.00, special at ^"*«« ^ 

Medium size heater; has 15-inch firepot; Cft 7^ 

regular value $12.n0, special at ^U«€ ^ 

Large size— This heater has a 17-inch firepot, and is 
one of the greatest values ever offered; C 1 O A^ 
regular value $14.50, Kelly's price *P * V.<t*^ 




Ot6Wart IvdIlgC Stewart Steel Range 
with sanitary- base warmnig closet and full nickel 
trim,mings, we are offering now, at C^^^J ftrt 



Terms— $1.00 Per W«ek 

You don't have to wait and pay 
cash for a Stewart, come in and se- 
lect your range or heater and it 
will be promptly delivered to you. 
You can pay in either weekly or 
monthly installments to suit your 
convenience. Every Stewart is sold 
with a written guarantee. 

Trade In Your 
Old Stove 

We'll take your old range, cook 
stove or heater arid will allow you 
all it is worth as part payment on 
a Stewart. It will pay you to take 
advantage of this offer, as the new 
stove will pay for itself in the sav- 
ing of fuel alone. So trade in the 
old stove and get a Stewart. 




^^ggjwBTiMmor^^ 




inters "iHobttS" to 
broaden $er 9rt 



DULUTH ITALIAN 
HGHirS IN EUROPE 




Carlo Bogijio Is Proud of 

Soldiers Sent Out By 

Italy. 



19 last, with the fiif^t detachment of 
reserves called to the colors from 
Northern Minnesota. 

After a short period in the training 
I camps of Southern Italy, he was de-- 
I tailed to the commissary department. 
I Later he was chosen for active serv- 
1 ice at the front, being the fourth of 
I seventy-four lieutenants to be chosen. 



From "somew 
Alps, Carlo Bogfi 
zen now^. first 
jesty'e Fiftieth 
lieri, has writt« 

telling- of the s\ 
riors. 

Angelo Deber 
street, a nephe 
tenant, often re 
letter, and each 
luthian emphas 
Italian troops, 
ditions which p 

"He Is very c« 
triumph over Y 
bernardi, "and ( 

"Where is he 
the Italian Alps 

"Italian Alps' 
uignantly, "mos 
have been In th 
since the war £ 

Lieut Efoggio 



here" in the Southern 
rlo, once a Duluth citi- 
ieutenant in His Ma- 
regiment of Bersag- 
m to Duluth relatives 
iccesses of Italy's war- 

lardi, 210 West Second 
ff of the Italian lieu- 
ceives a card or short 

time the former Du- 
izes the successes of 
and the excellent con- 
evail. 

)nfident that Italy will 
er enemies," said De- 
>f course, he is right." 

stationed now?" "In 
?" he was asked. 
'" said Debernardi in- 
t certainly not! They 
e Austrian Alps almost 
tarted." 

left Duluth on June 



GREEN IS ACQUITTED. 

District Court Jury Frees Virginiair 
on One Count. 

After two hours' deliberation yester-- 
day afternoon a jury before District 
Judge Fesler acquitted Earl T. Green 
of Virginia on one of the three count* 
charging petit larceny which haver 
been hanging over him. The other two' 
cases are pending. 

Green was accused of embezzling^ 
email sums of money from stockhold- 
ers of the Union Savings assoclatlori 
by representing himself to be an ac- 
credited agent of the organization. 



Read The \ 
Herald Wants 



i 



GERALDINE FARRAR 
In "Carmen" "Movies" 

Geraldine Farrar, whose advent in 
the "movies" was a sensation, has ex- 
plained ^vhy she entered the motion 
picture field. Some may have thought 
it was for the enormous sum, whlcli 
was paid to her bv her manager — re- 
ported to be $50,000. Perish the 
thought! It was to broaden herself in 
her art. Miss Farrar says. 



ADDITIONAL 
SPORTS 



SCHOOL CAKfiES 

DESPITE RAIN 



/ 



f. 



MRS. rv/!OHR IWDICTED 

AS AN AC CESSORY 

Providence. R. I., Sept. 29. — Mrs. 
Elizabeth F. Mohr was Indicted here 
today as an ac< essory before the fact 
in connection with the killing of her 
husband. Dr. C. Franklin Mohr, on 
Aug. 31 last, and three negroes, Cecil 
Victor Brown. Henry Spellman and 
George W. Healls. were indicted on 
the charge of murder. Another indict- 
ment charged the negroes with as- 
sault with intent to kill Miss Emily 
G. Burger, and Mrs. Mohr as an ac- 
cessory before the fact. Each of the 
defendants pleaded not guilty. 



HURRICANE SWEEPS 

OVER L OUISIANA 

New Orleans. La.. Sept. 29. — A fore- 
runner of the West Indian hurricane 
was sweeping northward over South- 
eastern Louisiana early today. The 
weather bureau Issued a warning that 
Its center probably would pass be- 
tween New Orleans and Atchafalaya 
bay, eighty miles southwest of here 
and that tho gales probably would 
reach hurricane force and high tides 
prevail. 

At 11 o'clock the wind here had In- 
creased to fifty miles an hour and the 
barometer stood at 29.32. 



BOARD MEESBERS 

WILL BE ACTIVE 



Onyx Brand Fiber Silk Hose al 33c a Pair 





^Qvtnpam/ 




jm 







». .^k^^JaSHIK^ 


f 


' 






24 and 26 West /Superior tSt., N'ear First Ave. West. 



Ol'R showing of newest Auturftn styles is 
unsurpassed in Duluth, either for va- 
riety of styles or lowness in price. 

A Sale of 
Newest Suits 

For Women and Misses— 

Worth $22.50 and $25.00 at 

$19.75 

A fresh shipment of these classy Box 
Coats, styles with fur collars, fur chokers, 
belted and flaring skirts are just what is in 
demand, and at this low price is indeed ex- 
ceptional value not to be overlookod. 

Otlier suitij at $25, $29.75, $35 and $45. 





Will Attend Civil Service 

Examination and Pass 

on Papers. 

In addition to being present at all 
civil service examinations In the fu- 
ture, members of the city's civil serv- 
ice board, at a special meeting this 
morning, decided to assist the secretary 
in marking the test papers. This ac- 
tion Is the first of its kind ever taken 
by a board in Duluth. 

At the meeting this morning de- 
tails were arranged for the examina- 
tions on Friday and Saturday of this 
week and for Oct. 23, when seven fire 
captains will take a test for assist- 
ant fire chief to fill the vacancy caused 
by the death of Fred E. Granzow, 
nearly a month ago. 

The twenty-two applicants for pa- 
trolmen will be given a medical ex- 
amination at 9 o'clock Friday morning 
in the Bertlllon room at police head- 
quarters by Health Director Fahey and 
his assistants. Those receiving 75 per 
cent or better will be entitled to take 
the mental tests at the high school 
Saturday morning, when all the appli- 
cants will be examined. 

At 2 o'clock Friday afternoon the ap- 
plicants for patrolmen will undergo the 
physical examination at the Y. M. C. 
A., while the twelve for meter readers 
and thirteen for meter repairers will 
be given a practical test at the water 
and light department. 

The exajninations at the hfeh school 
will start at 9 o'clock Saturday morn- 
ing, with the members of the board, 
George Parker, M. J. Filiatrault and 



H. W. Nichols, In charge of the appli- 
cants. Ruben Johnson, secretary, will 
direct the examination. 

After the tests the three board mem- 
bers and the secretary ■\vill divide the 
examination paper.*? and correct thein, 
the practice In the past having been to 
turn the entire work over to Secretary 
Johnson. 

It was also decided this morning to 
permit Martin Johnson, captain of the 
salvage corps, to take the examination 
for assistant fire chief on Oct. 23. He 
Is not paid by the city, but, it wes 
pointed out, had been a member of the 
force up to his appointment on the sal- 
vage corps and is still under the direc- 
tion of Chief Randall. There will be 
seven captains who ^^ill take the ex- 
amination. 



LAST DANCE 

OF SEASON AT 

FAIRMONT PARK 

Thursday Evening, Sept. 30th. 

La Brosse orchestra. Door rights. 



amtjassiabor'sf WMt 
^Returns to €urope 



Sale of Coats 
at $15.00 

A very low price for the styles and materials — we offer just 
what is in big demand — Corduroys, White Chinchillas. Fancy 
Heavy Mixtures, some with fur collars — for women and misses. 

PiLk fabric coats In big demand — a big variety here 
in Plushe.s, Corduroys, Novelties, etc., at — 

$25.00, $29.75, $35.00 






New Wool and Silk $ 
Combination Dresses — 

Six pretty styles, special at .■ 



YM 




Six New Styles In 

Serge Skirts 

Black and na\T. all sizes, at 

$1.98 



Latest Styles In Silk and Lace 

Blouses 

$3.15 

Worth $5.00. 



w%%. 



'^- 




LUMBER MEN H OPEFUL 

Noted Officials Pay Brief Visit to 
Duluth. 

George Foster of the" Fifeter-Latlmcr 
Lumber company of Mellen, Wis.; T. 
S. Whitten. general manager of the 
St. Croix Lumber company, one of the 
Hlnes companies, and Isaac Baker, 
right hand man to Edward Hlnes. are 
at the Spalding today. 

All of the visiting lumbermen de- 
clared that there was nothing especial- 
ly significant in their being here. Each 
expressed the hope that the general 
upward trend of business would lend 
its contagion to the lumber Industry, 
stating that there might be a more 
expansive lumber business during the 
fall months. 



Gridiron Contests Will Be 
Staged on Many 
Fields. . 

Play In the Grade School Football 
league will start this afternoon, de- 
spite the rainy weather, J. R. Batch- 
elor, r.icreatlon.il dlrcct'jr, announced 
this noon. 

"We don't want a break In our 

schedule," he Laid, "and the boys will 
play in all kinds of weather." 

This afternoon the Salter and Jef- 
ferson teams will clash at the Chester 
park playground and the Lincoln and 
Bryant clever s at Harrison park. 
The games are scheduled to start at 
4:30 ocJock. 

All the twelve teams In the league 
arc included In the opening games 
:;ch'jdii'od for the remainder of this 
week. The games and grourds follow: 

Salter- Jefferson, Sept. 29, Chester. 

Lincoln-Bryant, Sept. 29. Hnrrli=on. 

Mj.-riit-lrvlng, Sept. 30, Fifty-sec- 
ond. 

Emerson-Lowell, Sept. 30, Heights. 

V/ashbiirn-Monroe, Oct. 1, Harrison. 

Adams-Lakes'de, Oct. 1, CI ester. 

Salter-Lincoln, Oct. 2, Chester. 

Jefferson-Bryant, Oct. 2, HarrLson. 

% CEXTRAI, HIGH CHOOSES *. i 

* CHEER LEAnKR FOR SEASON. * 

*= ^ 

^ Central high Rchool yelled yes- * 
HA terday. -sj; 

^ Or rather the RtndentM yelled. ,^> \ 

'It wvin <ho first good oha'ice they *! 
had had to "open up" and In the ^ I 
4f: openiiis up proersN they M^lerted ^ 
^ H eUoer leader for the coming ^. | 
' Hi football season. ,>^> i 

^if \%'lnnlnBr football tranifi are nee- ^ I 
^ eKK«r>- In a high iichiooi. but a ^ j 
^k cheer loader who can pat hl.s foot ^ [ 
^^ on the high npt^d lever at the *. 
% right time l« an important ad- Ht; 
^ Junct to the team. % 

* Four boy». "Chick" I.e Rtcheanx, * 
^ Howard ChubbuoU. Albert Arm- ^ 
^ fitron<¥ and Clarence Thomas #; 
•jk compett-'d for the honor and Thoin- .-'• 
^ as won out, for the majority of ^ 
%. the l,aOO students liked his gyra- ^ 
-^ tlonn best. % 
^ When the noise subsided, the ^. 
-^ athletic as.iioclation members an- ,^f 
^ nounced their choice. ^ 

*• , . , , * 

MINOR LEAGUES MEET 

IN SAN F RANCISCO 

San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 29. — Presi- 
dent Allan T. Baum of the Paclflo 
Coast baseball league, has received 
word from Secretary Farrell of the 
National Association of Minor Leagues, 
it was made public today, that the 
fifteenth annual convention of the as- 
sociation will meet in this city for 
a three days' ses.'?ion beginning Nov. 
9. Simultaneously there will be a 
meeting of the national board of ar- 
bitration, of which Baum is a mem- 
ber. 

Many major league magnates and 
managers are expected to attend the 
sessions of the association — among 
them the members of the national 
commission. 



% 






MRS. GEORGE T. MARYE. 

Mrs. George T. Marye. wife of tlie 
American ambassador to Russia, Is re- 
turning to Petrograd by way of Nor- 
wav. She travels with the American 
minister to Sweden, Ira Nelson Morris, 
and his wife. Mrs. Marye came from 
Russia a few months ago for a visit 
to her home in California. 



NOT A GOOD JURYMAN. 

Philadelphia Telegraph: Immediate- 
ly on reaching the courtroom In a 
Western town some time since an es- 
teemed citizen who had been drawn 
on the jury arose and addressed the 
judge. 

"Your Honor," he deferentially re- 
marked, "I would consider It a great 
favor If you would excuse me from 
serving on the Jury todav." 

"Have you an especial reason for 
making such a request?" demanded 
the Judge severely. 

"Yes, sir," was the prompt rejoinder 
of the other. "I owe $5 to a man who 
is about to leave town, and I want to 
pay him before he goes, 

"Excused," peremptorily said the 
judge. "We gcn't want anybody on 
the jury who can lie like that." 
_ — » ■ 

Belgium was the fur center of tho 
world before the war. 



Cockroaches 
Rats and Mice 

Nothing is more disagreeable than a home 
infested with vermin. Destroy them with 
Steams' Electric Rat wid Roach Paste, the 
standard exterminator for thirty-five years. 

It kills off rat*, mice and cockroadies in a 
ringle night. Ready for use; no mixing. 
Does cot dIow away liJce powders. 

Direction.* in 15 languages in every package. 

Two sizes : 25c and fl.OO. 

Bold by druggists everywhere. 



SUPERIOR 



ARRES TED A S SPY. 

Superior Young Woman Relates 
Novel Experience She Had Abroad. 

Misses Astrld and Ruth Reitan, 2326 
John avenue, returned yesterday from 
a visit to Norway. While passing 
through England on their return home 
the former was arrested on suspicion 
of being a German spy. She was kept 
under arrest for a short time and was 
released only after being satisfactorily 
identified by friends living in London. 

Miss Reitan said she took the mat- 
ter as a joke. It appears, she said, 
that the police suspected that the Ger- 
man government was sending young 
women spies Into the country and It 
was known that she had been In Ger- 
many at the beginning of the war. 

The young women witnessed the 
sinking of the English cruiser India 
off the coast of Norway. The tor- 
pedoing of the boat could be plainly 
seen from coast towns of Norway, she 
said. Crippled soldiers. In countless 
numbers, are to be seen In the streets 
of England. They are accorded all 
honors possible by the people. She 
said sympathies In Norway are with 
the allies while in Sweden the sym- 
pathies are pro-German. 
^ 

Must Tone Lights. 

An ordinance that will put a ban on 
glaring headlights on automobiles was 
Introduced at the meeting of the city i 
council yesterday afternoon by Mayor i 
J. S. Konkcl. A public hearing, at 1 
which representatives of the Superior i 
Automobile club will be asked to be j 
present, will be called before final ac- 
tion Is taken on the measure. 1 





va* 



; 



^H 




Special Purchase Ribbons 

1,400 yards in fancy and 
plain effects, in every Imag- 
inable color, lovely hair 
bow ribbon as well as 
floral effects for fancy 
work and sashes; values 
up to 65c at 25c per yard. 

Now Is the . 1 ime to Prepare 
for Colder Weather! 

H osiery and Under^vear From tne Best 
Mills in tke United States 

We have a most complete line of Ladies' and Children's Under- 
wear — the best makes All wool, silk and wool, wool and cotton, 
fleeced and all cotton, in all the different styles. Prices, 50c up to 
$12.50. 

Ste'ling Union Suits in silk and wool, at $4.00 and $4.50, in 
all styles. 

Wcol and mercerized, $3.25 and $3.50; all styles. 

Mercerized, at $2.75, in all styles. 

Strotton Union Suits in silk and wool, $3.50. 

Stretton Union Suits in all Australian wool, at $2.75 and $3.00. 

Fine cotton, in all stvles. at $1.00 and $1.50. 

Me rode Union Suits, in all styles, prices, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00 
and $2. 50. 

Children's Underwear, wool and cotton suits at $1.00; gray 
or while. 

Sill: and wool suits at $1.50. Dutch neck, elbow sleeves and 
ankle kngtb. Separate garments, wool and cotton, at 50c. 

Woolen Hosiery for ^A^mter 

Ladies' and Children's Woolen Hose at 25c, 35c, 50c, 75c and $1. 
Ladies' and Children's Cotton Hose, good heavy weight, at 
25c anci 35c. 

A ^^ool Blanket Special 

for toirorrow. Just imagine an all-wool blanket, weighing fr.ll 4-^ 
pounds size 66x80, come in beautiful plaids, at $4.85. Regular 
value $6.50. 

12Vac Outing Flannels, Special at 10c Yard 

Co ne in stripes, checks, plaids and also a plain white French 
twill. 

New Designs in Silkolenes 

Be-t qu^itv, full yard wide, at IIV2C. Also showing beautiful 
line of Colonial sateens, ideal for quilts and drapery purposes, 
special 25c. 
SPECIAL PRICES ON WOOL AND COTTON BATTING. 




-THE^ 



Renown Base Burner 



^s> 






.^ 



^A s^^ 



is a large, massive design base 
burner. Of all things that are 
said about stoves ours is as 
good as any heater on the mar- 
ket and sold at a lower price. 




To see this stove at the price 
we ask and then see the prices 
asked by other. stores you would 
know the reason why we sell so 
many heaters. 



If you intend buying a heater 
this fall, come in and let us 
show you the "RENOWN" and 
give you our very low price on 
this well known stove. 



Price 

$62.00 
$65.00 



The price of 
our med. size is . 

The price of 
our large size. . 



Sold on Easy 

Tirre 

Payments. 





tlitIO WttT SUPEWdft ST. OULUIUlJu^ 



Your Old 

Stove 

Taken Back. 





Op;»i and 1 eaiyfor service 




For the Most Convenient Lamp 
Ever Produced. 

FOR — 

Koadlng 
Sewing 
Shaving 
Drawing, ctr.. 

Get a $2 Wallace 
at the 

Northern 
Electrical Co 

210 WKST FIRST 
STREET. 

Both Phones 2325 




C/' ged/'i trave ing 



t'r 



-i *" W ^ g f H ' ' ■ ' ■» ' ' 3LJiJJ. 't' . << "n m ^ m 



■^m f 




^Wi"^^Pi*i 



t 



^ 



Wednesday, 



THE D4JtrUTH HERALD 



September 29, 1915. 



Says Stomach Trouble of 

Long Standing Has 

Been Relieved. 



KNOWS ITS STUDENTS ARE 
REALWORTH INDUSTRIOUS 

West End Woman Recom- 
mends Tanlac Because of 
Her Own Experience. 



High School Boys and Girls 

Want to Work in Spare 

Time. 



"T am willing to ri^commend Tanlac 
because I knov what it ha.-* done for 
be," Mrs Kdwura J. Langrlois of 2631 
"West Huron atreet told the Tanlac man 
this week. 

Mrs. Lansrlois is ono of the well 
known residents of the West end, ami 
has many friends in the big and grow- 
ing district we^t of the point of rocks. 

"I suffered for a long time from 
Bton»Hch trouble," she told the Tanlac 
man. "I had no appetite and could not 
Bleep at night, and after eating I was 
frequently so troubled with nausea 
that I could not retain the food I had 
eaten. I heard so mucli about Tanlac 
and what it had done that I decided 
to try It. and did sa I now sleep 
much better and am able to eat any- 
thing I desire, and It does not seem to 
bother me. I willingly recommend Tan- 
lac to my friends." 

Tanlac, the famous remedy which 
Mrs. Langlols recommend.'? so highly 
may be purchased In Duluth from the 
atore of William A.'Abbett, "the care- 
ful drug^iist," at 219 West Superior 
street, where Claude J. Meredith, the 
Tanlac man, or one of his aasistants, 
la constantly present to explain its 
merits. , ^ ., 

Tfinlac mar also be procured at tlie 
Abbott branch stores; 101 West Fourth 
atreet and 932 East Second stre<it. — 
Advertisement. 



OFFICE 

FURNITURI 

RIGHT! 



and buv it in Duluth. 
We have the finest 
line of Office Furni- 
ture and Office Appli- 
ances of an,y city in 
the United States. Let 
us call on you. 



CHAIiUBERLAIN- 

TAYLOR 

COMPAMY 

323 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 




Gypsy Boots 




Class in Practical House- 
keeping May Be Inaugu- 
rated This Year. 



School boys are anxious to earn 
money after classes, and girls want a 
course in housework, according to 
Central high school Instructors. 

"There are a number of boys eager 
to obtain positions," said. Principal 
Young, "and I should say that there 
are about twenty-flve boys working 
after hours now. For ordinary work 
they receive 20 cents an hour, or more. 

"We have four or five positions open 
to skilled office help for full time, but 
w© have no one just now whom we 
could recommend as being able to 
meet the requirements." 

Miss Meroe Conlan, in charge of the 
self-help bareau at Central, estimates 
that seventy-five girls earned small 
amounts last year. "One girl made 
$60," she said. "Several of the do- 
mestic science pupils cooked or served 
at small parties, but the majority 
helped with work at private houaes 
and watched the children In the eve- 
ning, for which 16 cents an hour Is 
the usual wage." 

Clans In IIouMekeeplng. 

A special class for girls who want 
to study practical housekeeping may 
be started as an adjunct to the do- 
mestic science classes, according to 
Assistant Supt. W. B. Schilling. 

"The need for such a class Is shown," 
said Mr. Schilling, "by complaints of 
hou.sewives that they are experiencing 
great difficulty in obtaining good do- 
mestic help. 

"As our work will be mostly theo- 
retical, we do not expect to train a 
perfect house servant, but if the class 
Is formed It will succeed In showing 
girls how housework should be done. 

"Of course the establishment of thi.-^ 
class would mean that the price of 
domestic labor will rise, for gradu- 
ates naturally will demand higher 
wages than are paid to those who 
have not had thorough instruction." 

"In certain portions of Europe," he 
added. "Germany especially, there are 
few occupations that cannot be learned 
in the public schools, and In adopting 
an idea of this kind, EKiluth would be 
inaugurating a system which has been 
used with great success in other coun- 
tries." 




URQE NUMBER AT 
LODGE CONVENTION 



|$2.50 $300 $350 $4001 



ST. PAUL -MINNEAPOLIS -DULUTH. 
12a-W«st Superior Street 



$1000 NET INCOME 

On this $l;i.SCO investment. A thor- 
oughly modern two seven-room 
apartment house. RENTED NOW. 
Garage spac^ for three cars. On 
Superior street near Fourteenth av- 
enue east. A good Investment in 
Income producing property. 

ON KENT ROAD 

A Well built, up-to-date home. Fine 
lake view, beautiful grounds, tn 
best residence district. Eight rooms, 
bath, sun room and sleeping porch, 
|10,U00. 



Fully 300 From Duluth and 

Other Cities at D. of H. 

Meetings. 

The district convention of the De- 
gree of Honor, including lodges In Du- 
luth, Two Harbors. Cloquet and range 
cities, opened this afternoon at 2 
o'clock at the Columbia hall. Twentieth 
avenue west and Superior street. The 
opening session was attended by near- 
ly 300 members from Duluth and the 
surrounding cities. 

Mrs. Clara Bender of Buffalo, Mtnn., 
grand chief of honor for Minnesota, 
presided at the opening of the meet- 
ing. During the afternoon reports 
from various lodges on questions sub- 
mitted to them, will be read by dele- 
gates. 

Addresses on subjects relative to the 
Increase of membership and member- 
ship campaigns will be given this aft- 
ernoon by Mrs. Bender and Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Schioeder of St. Paul, past grand 
chief of honor, who as state deputy for 
the order has been spending three 
weeks In Duluth. 

A banquet at which plates have been 
provided for 300 guests, will follow 
the afternoon session. Several dele- 
gates will speak. 

The convention will close with a 
class initiation of fifty new members, 
following which a musical program 
will be given. 

SUFFH£GETpELLS 
DOOM OF LIQUOR 

Dr. McCoy Tells Results 

Attained By Women in 

Other States. 

"The Relation of Temperance to 
Woman Suffrage" was the feature ad- 
dress at the rally of tjbe Women's 
Christian Temperance union held yes- 
terday afternoon and evening at the 
First Norwegian Danish M. E. church. 
Twenty-fourth avenue west and Third 
street. Dr. Mai-y McCoy spoke on thi3 
subject, saying that when woman suf- 
frage was granted, breweries, distiller- 
ies and saloons of the United States 
were sure to ,go and prohibition would 
become universal. 

Dr. McCoy gave a history of suffrage 
in the United States. She pointed out 
that woman suffrage granted in Illi- 
nois a short time ago, resulted In the 
wiping out of 3,200 saloons in the state 
shortly afterward. Four states she 
said had been voted dry after the wom- 
en had been granted the ballot. Dr. 
McCoy said that woman suffrage un- 
questionably would soon be general 
throughout the United States. 

The meetings were presided over by 
Mrs. Joseph Cochran, district president 
of the organization. An Illustrated 
lecture given by Rev. H. A. Ofstle and 
an address by Rev. J. J. Daniels In 
w^hlch he predicted St. Louis countr 
dry next year were Included on the 
program. Rev. W. H. Farrell, pastor 
of the Asbury M. E. church, gave a solo 



$3200 



Buvs a new borate of five rooms in 
Woodland. Bath, glassed-in front 
and rear porch hot water heat, elec- 
tric lights. Near school and cars. 
The price is less than cost. 



CHAS. P. CRAIG & CO. 



rhones 408. 



Sellwuod Bids. 



Easy Work 
Quick Work 
Wonderful Results vdm 

Electric 

LUSTRE 

Starch 

Works Wonders 
Bltw package lOc— At joeat ftrocen 




$1.00 Size 

Listerine 

at 

67c 



$3.50 Size 

Horlick^s 

Malted Milk 



^2M M8c 



Lydia 
finkham's 
C^fnpound 




Headquarters for Silks 




We Give and Redeem Security Vouchers 



50c Size 

CaWornia 

Syrup o/Figs 

33c 



$1.00 Size 
Scott's Emul. 
Cod Liver Oil 

67c 



35c Size 

Fletcher's 

Castoria 

23c 



Duluth^s Greatest Drug and Sundry Sale 

Begins Tomorrow and Continues Friday and Saturday 



Miscellaneous 

25c Mum I Qp 

for only - 1 v 1/ 

$1.00 Glyco Thyme- QQa 

tine O au 

$2.00 De Miracle ^| £^Q 
Hair Remover lPlaU«9 

$1.00 De Miracle Hair OR a 
Remover OvO 

25c Eversweet for | Qp 

Perspiration 1 Ov 

50c Non-Spi for AQp 

Perspiration tOv 

5c Blue Seal Vase- Ag^ 

line tXf 

10c Blue Seal Vase- Q^ 

line OU 

lOc Camphor Ice, tube Qp 
or cake . • • Ou 

25c Bathasweet 17c 

25c Roman Bath Powder. 15c 

2 oz. Glycerine 8c 

50c Sal Hepatica 35c 



$1.00 Sal 
Hepatica- 



69c 



25c Seidlitz Powders. .... 19c 

25c Lysol 19c 

50c Listerine 39c 



Rubber Bathing 
Caps values 

to $1- — 



39c 



Tooth PastCy 

Powders and 

Washes 

25c Colgate's Tooth OAa 
Paste uVV 

25c Sanitol Tooth 17a 

Paste 1 IW 

25c Euthymol Tooth 1 Rp 
Paste I Jv 

25c O. P. C. Peroxide | Cp 
Tooth Paste ••. 1 Jw 

25c Lyons* Tooth | 7^ 

Paste 1 IV 

25c Kolynos' Tooth | Qgx 

Paste lOU 

50c Pebbeco Tooth OH/x 

Paste 010 

25c Dr. Lyons' Tooth | 7|\ 

Powder IfV 

25c Brown's Camphorated 
Tooth Powder I 7l* 

for only ■■•■^ 

25c Sanitol Tooth iHft 

Powder ■■•■^ 

25c Sozodont Tooth ilp 
Powder *"^ 

25c Graves' Tooth | Zp 

Powder *«'*' 

25c Colgate's Tooth j C|» 
Powder .*«'^ 

25c O. P. C. Peroxide I Cp 
Tooth Powder **'^ 

25c Banzai Japanese I C|» 

Tooth Powder '■^^ 

50c Glyco Thymoline QQ|» 
Tooth Wash. «'«'^ 

50c Sanitol Tooth QQ|» 

Wash ^^^ 

50c Lavoris Tooth 9Aa 

Wash vOK, 

25c Dioxogen Tooth | Qa 

Wash '■^^ 

25c Rubifoam Tooth | Ip 
Wash *«^ 

25c Sanitol Tooth 1 7|» 

Wash * ■ ^ 

25c Glyco Thymo- |A^ 

line Tooth Wash ISrV 



$1,00 Size Sanitary 
Rublyer Sheeting— 
put up in sealed 
packages 
54x54-— 



S9c 



36x26 Size 43c 



Soaps 

65c bar Castile Soap, ^Ra 
white and green ....... T V V 

15c cake Spanish Cas- ^Ra 
tile Soap, 2 for bl3\J 

10c cake Jap Rose' tlg^ 

Soap lU 

25c box Colgate's Perfumed 
Toilet Soap — 3 cakes Q 1 1* 
in box oiv 

25c box Williams' Perfumed 
Toilet Soap — 3 cakes Ot g\ 
in box ulv 

3 cakes Juvenile Toilet OR a 
Soap for ttVV 

3 cakes Peroxide ORa 

Toilet Soap for. ..... . aUV 

3 cakes 4711 Violet Glycerine 
Toilet Soap for OR A 

only a%3\j 

3 cakes Colgate's All Of%A 
Round Toilet Soap....fi»ll/ 

10c Williams' Old English 
Elder Flower for Qp 

only 00 

3 cakes Williams' Spe- t\ C -^ 
cial Jersey Cream for. MVV 

2 cakes 4711 Rose'. ORp 
Glycerine Cream, 2 for. CtOlJ 

3 cakes Cashmere Bouquet 
Toilet Soap for f\To 

35c Roger & Gallet OR a 

Toilet Soap u \J\J 

25c Cuticura Toilet; | Qa 

Soap ,:..:;... luu 

25c Woodbury'sToi- | Hg^ 
let Soap 1 lu 

10c Physicians & 7 A 

Surgeons Toilet Sbap. . . I W 

1 cake Pears Scented | Rp 
Toilet Soap 1 JU 

25c Packer's Tar | 7^ 

Soap 1 I V 

10c Olivilo Soap 8c 

10c Palmolive Soap 8c 

25c Sulphur Soap... 17c 



Solid Back Good 
BristleHairBrushes 
Extra 
Special at 



25c 



Hand and Face 
Creams- Lotions 

50c Sempre Giovine ^Q|» 

50c Cuticura Oint- JAp 
ment ^vi* 

50c Hinds Honey OQp 

Almond Cream wJ^V 

15c Meladerma lOP 

25c O. P. C. Peroxide i Hp 

Cream *"^ 

25c O. P. C. Peroxide | Hp 
Cold Cream l«v 

25c Sanitol Cold or 4 Op 
Face Cream lOv 

50c De Meridor OQp 

Cream «^vi/ 

50c Ingram's Milkweed %(kp 

Cream \ . . .OUX^ 

50c Daggett & Rams- /IA|» 

dell Cold Creafti *v^ 

50c Dentoris Lilaca A^i» 

Cream J ...^«'V 

25c Satin Skin. r^ tip 

Cream ...Is.. **^ 

25c Fragrant Frostilla iQp 

Lotion lOv 

50c Pompeian Massage 9Q|» 

Face Cream ^^V 

$1.00 Pompeian Mas- IZp 

sage Face Cream ■ «'^ 

50c Pond's Vanishing 37l* 
Cream •* * ^ 

1-Yb. Jar Opal Theat- CQa 
rical Cold Cream O^Jx, 

Yi-lb, Jar Opal Theat- 9Cp 
rical Cold Cream ^vX, 

50c Stillman's Freckle ^Ip 
Cream <^*v 

50c Palm-OUve JQl* 

Cream .<^*^ 



This semi-annual event— three days of un- 
usual price cutting on all standard make 
toilet preparations— proving more conclus- 
ively our leadership in value giving. 

Supply Your Wants Now! 



Shaving Necessities 

39c 

Silver 

25c 



50c Shaving Brushes 
for only 

Red Cross Triple 
Safety Razor and one 
blade 

25c WiUiams' Shaving Stick, 
Powder, Cream, Paste | Qp 
or Liquid * v U 

25c Colgate's Shaving Stick, 
Powder or Cream Oiio 

for only oUU 

25c Mennen's Shaving 
Cream 



19c 



25c Daggett & Ramsdell 
Shaving Stick with | Qp 
cold cream I v V 

10c Williams' Shaving Cp 
Cup Soap Uw 

25c Sanitol Shaving Stick, 
Powder or Cream 

for only 

10c Stiptic Caustic 

Stick for 

25c Mennen's Talcum | *^p 
for men 1 mv 

25c extra quality 
Bay Rum 



19c 
7c 



17c 



Talcum and Face Powder 



$1.50 Roger & Gallet Bouquet 
de Armours Face ^| |A 
Powder ^1»1^ 

$1.00 Roger & Gallet Per- 
fume Gallia Face OCp 
Powder OoK, 

50c Roger & Gallet Ve- 9Qp 
loute Face Powder .... VeTV 

$1.25 L. T. Pivers Azurea Le 
Trefle Floromaye OQp 

Face Powder Oirl/ 

$1.00 Djer Kiss 
Powder 



25c Roger & Gallet 
Rice Powder 



22c 



60c Djer Kiss 
Powder 



50c La Blache 
Powder 



85c 
50e 
S7c 



50c Palm-Olive Special 9Qp 
Box Face Powder WtrV 

25c Satin Skin 
Powder 



50c Bourgoise Java 
Rice Powder 



19c 
39c 



50c Bourgoise Dora ^C|» 

Powder ^^^ 

35c O. P. C. Peroxide 99|» 
Java Rice Powder uuXf 



50c Pozzoni's Gold OQp 
Box Asst. Powders We/C 

25c Mennen's Talcum |0p 
Powder, all odors M.LV> 

25c Colgate's Talcum f JZp 

Powder, all odors '■ ^^ 

25c Williams' Talcum 1 Cp 
Powders, all odors ■■■tlv 

25c Sanitol Talcum OCa 

Powder, Violet, 2 for . . . ^vV> 

25c Wrisley's Talcum 9C« 
Powder, Violet, 2 for. . . fciwV 

25c Squibbs' Talcum ilp 
Powder, all odors 1 * v 

25c Babcock's Talcum | Cp 
Powder, all odors l«lv 

Large size Family Perfumed 
Talcum Powder, 1^» 

dome top ITC* 

19c Jap Rose Talcum f Aa 

Powder IVL 

25c Roger & Gallet 9Aa 
Talcum Powder ^"L 

25c Djer Kiss Talcum 9ll» 
Powder failv 

50c Derma Viva Liquid QQ^ 
Face Powder ""^ 



Hair Tonic, Etc. 

$1.00 Mary T. Goldman's 
Gray Hair Re- QC^ 

storer •• ^^^ 

$1.00 Newbro's Herpi- "TQ^ 
cide Hair Tonic • i't 

50c Newbro's Herpi- i A^ 
cide Hair Tonic *tVU 

$1.00 Danderine Hair 7Q/» 
Tonic •*'*' 

50c Danderine Hair 
Tonic 



50c E. Burnham's 
Hair Tonic . . . 



$1.00 Crani Hair 
Tonic 



25c Sanitol Hair 
Tonic 



.40c 
35c 
.75c 
19c 



50c Pineaud's Eau de Quinine 
Hair Tonic for OAp 

only *'»'*' 

50c Mennen's Liquid Q^w* 

Shampoo •^ vV 

25c Sanitol Liquid 7fL, 

Shampoo .«^vV 

50c Canthrox ^Qrt 

Shampoo . • - «'•'*' 

10c Wanous Shampoo O^ 
Ba^s .OC 

50c Swedish Dry 
Shampoo 

$1.00 Wyeth's Sago 7Q|> 

and Sulphur • •' v 

50c Wyeth's Sage 
and Sulphur 

50c Palmolive Liqizid ^Q|* 
Shan]i)oo OUl* 



35c 



40c 




Rubber Goods 

$1.50 Comfort Sanitary 
Syringe for Cl 1 

only «pl 1 J 

One special lot of Hot Water 
Bottles & Fountain Syringes 
— guaranteed per- ... . 7C/» 
feet, each f OC 

$1.00 2-quart Guaranteed Hot 
Water Bottles IQt* 

for only I I/C 

$1.00 2-quart Guaranteed 
Fountain 7Q/» 

Syringe I •'v 

$1.25 3-quart Guaranteed 
Fountain (Tl A A 

Syringe «pi.UU 

$1.25 3-quart Guaranteed 

L°A,^"" $1.00 

$1.75 2-quart Guaranteed 
Combination Hot Water Bot- 
tle and Syringe (f1 QC 
for only »pi.i)J 

$1.98 3-quart Guaranteed 
Combination Hot Water Bot- 
tle and Syringe <|*1 Cf\ 
for only ^l.JU 

Combs 

$1.00 Dressing Combs. 76c 
75c Dressing Combs. <50c 
50c Dressing Combs . . 39c 
25c Dressing Combs . . 19c 
25c Fine Dust Combs . 19c 
iSe Men's Dressing Combs. 1 »c 
a5e Me»*s Pocket Comb, in 



Toilet Waters 
and Perfumes 

$1.2,'i L. T. Pivers' Toilet Wa- 
ters, all odors, QQa 
for only Ou U 

$1.5) Djer Kiss Toilet Wa- 
ters, all odors, fl* | t\C 
for only ipiauv 

$1.2 > Djer Kiss 1 A A 
Eau de Toilette. . . t^ i .UU 

$1.53 Roger & Gal- ^1 Oil 
let Violet de Parme iP i iM J 

$1.03 Roger & Gal- QRp 
let Violet de Parme.. OvV 

75c Eau de Cologne, CRa 
No. 4711 VO\j 

75c Jacques Rose RA/\ 

Toilet Water JUl/ 

75c Ed Pineaud's AAo 

Lilac La France Hal/ 

6 oz. Colgate's Lilac RAa 
Imf erial ..JUv 

75c Colgate's Toilet RA/\ 
Water, all odors UQXJ 

50c Colgate's Toilet OHp 
Wa :er, all odors O I ^ 

75c oz. Payan's French Per- 
fumes, all odors, Rflp 
ounce wvv 
$1.0*) oz. Roger & Gallet 
Perfumes, all odors, QRa 

ounce 0\IU 

$1.0<) oz. L. T. Pivers' Per- 
fun-es, all odors, fi^P 

ounce...... Owv» 

$2.03 oz. Rose Pompon Bour- 
jois Perfumes, fi* | RA 

per oz lPi«\lU 

$2.5) oz. Ideal Houbigant 
Per'umes, all fl[0 OR 

odors, oz ipa.bsM 

$2.5) oz. Mary Garden Re- 
gaul Perfumes, $0 AH 

all (.dors M>^.VU 

$1.00 oz. Wrisley's White 
Rose or Violet 7RP 

Pcriumes, oz. t 0\J 

$1.2.) Jicky Gueriain, AA|» 

per ounce W^ 

$2.00 oz. Blue Rose Marshall 

o^'n'^e.r $1.65 

$1.03 oz. Geranium HHn 
d'Eipagne Gueriain. . . I vv 

$1.25 oz. Mumosa Q | AA 
Dore-Le Grand, oz JPl.UU 

$1.0) oz. Muget- 7Rr 

Babcock, oz ■ «iv 

50c oz. American-made Per- 
fumes, all odors, %(kp 
per ounce w vV 



Tooth Brushes 

23c 

Bone 

19c 

Bone 

lOc 
25c 



35c Rubber Set 

Tooth Brushes 

25c Transparent and 
Handle Tooth 
Brushes 

15c Transparent and 
Handle Tooth 
Brushes 



35c Prophylactic 
Tooth Brushes. . 



ALL SORTS OF HAIR. 

BATH, NAIL AND HAND 

BRUSHES 



25c 
190 
39c 
39c 

— Cush- 

$2.25 



$1.50 



35c Bone Handle 

Nail Brushes 

25c Wood Handle 

Nail Brushes 

50c Slip Handle 

Bath Brushes 

50c Best Bristle 
Clothes Brushes. . 

$3.00 Pearson's Rubber Cush- 
ion Hair Brushes 
for only 

$2.50 Pearson's Rubber Cush- 
ion Hair Brushes S* | 7 C 
for only I^lifv 

$2.25 Pearson's Rxibber Cush- 
ion Hair Brushes 
for only 

$1.25 Pearson's Rubber Cush- 
ion Hair Brushes Q | fkCi 
for only l^i>UU 

$^1.00 Pearson's Rubber Cush- 
ion Hair Brushes 
for only 

$1.75 Ideal Rubber Cushion 
Hair Brushes 

for only 

$1.50 Ideal Rubber Cushion 
Hair Brushes 

for only 

$1.25 Ideal Rubber Cushion 
Hair Brushes ff | Afl 

for only »P 1 .WW 

Miscellaneous 

1 yard Sterilized Gauze . . 8c 
5 yards Sterilized Gauze . . 25c 
4-in. 10 yds. Gauze Bandage 

GAUZE BANDAGES. 

4-inch 10 yards 10c 

3-inch 10 yards 8c 

2-inch, 10 yards 4c 

1-inch, 10 yards 2c 



75c 

ushion 

$1.35 

■ Cushion 

$1.19 



ease 



19c 



50c Doan's Kidney 

Pills- ory^ 

at 37c 



Rouges and 
Manicure Goods 

50c Dorin's Rouge, ^7l* 

all shades OIK, 

25c Roger & Gallet Rouge, 
Nov 18-24 Ash of 9|p 
Roses «1^ 

50c Poudre de Rouge ^G|» 
Povrder for only O^v 

25c Rosaline IQtf* 

for only * vv 

25c Lustrite Rose |Qi» 

Tint for l«/t 

25c Satin Skin Rose |(V-» 
Tint i«'1^ 

25c Hess Cherryola |A|» 
for only 1«FV/ 

25c Lustrite Nail Enamel, 
cake or powder, IQ|* 

for only ItFv 

25c De Parker Pray's f(kp 
Naii Enamel *v\, 

25c Perfect Imported | C^* 
Naii Polish, stick Iw^ 

50c Ongaline 9C|» 

for only ...«»efi, 

Manicure Scissors, Sfti* 

all jizes, special ""^ 

SOc Changeable QQ/a 

Chamois Buffer Oux, 

10c Orange Wood Hp 

Manicure Sticks IC 

25c ?'lexible Nail File. ... .17c 
25c Wool Powder Puff. . . 19c 



2 lb Roll Hygienic 
AbsortentCh ^c 
Cotton . . 



25 



$2.00 Pompeiian Olive Oil 

7„r;.^^"r".'°:....$i.69 

$1.00 Pompeiian Olive OU 

rniy'""'.'"' 85c 

50c Pompeiian Olive Oil 
—1 pint for 40 

only ^0\» 



12c 
10c 
15c 
1 5c 

..8c 



1 lb 20-Mulc Team 
Borax 

Yz pint Best Witch 
Hazel 

1 pint Best Witch 
Hazel 

1 quart Household 
Ammonia 

1 piat Household 
Ammonia 

25c Extra Bay 1 7 

Rum 1/C 

25c Carbolic l r 

Salve ijC 

2 oz. Glycerine and 
Rose Water , 

10 tb bag Sea 

Salt. , 

4 oz. Hydrogen 
Peroxide 

8 oz. Hydrogen 
Peroxide 



14 oz. Hjfdrc^en 
Peroxide 



.7c 
17c 
..7c 
.13c 
.21c 



$lPierce's Favorite 

«;r."^:.. 69c 



!■ 




aelection. He waus accompanied on the 
piano by Miss Mabel Thoxsen. 

PLAN EA RLY C LOSING. 

Grocers of West End Will Discuss 
Plans Oct. 8. 

At a meeting to be held by the 
grocer.'* of the West eni on Friday 
evening, Oct. 8, at the Rex hotel, plans 
for the early closing of stores In this 
end ot the city will be fully discussed. 
It la planned to begin on Nov. ). clos- 
ing the stores at 9 o'clock Saturday 
evenings and not later than 6:30 
o'clock on other evenings of the weelt. 

A luncheon will feature the gath- 
ering of the grocers. Arrangements 
for the meeting were made yesterday 
aft«^rnoon by a committee consisting 
of David Olson. C. B. Nunan and Her- 
man Olson. 



Friday evening at the churcli. Twen- 
tieth avenue west and First street. 

Beta council, ."Vo. 2, Modern Samari- 
tans, will enterttiin at a series of 
semi-monthly card socials at the 
Columbia ball this winter. The socbils 
will be held or the second and fourth 
Mondays. 

The Ladles" AuxllL^ry of the Broth- 
erhood of Locomotive Engineers will 
meet Friday afternoon at the Wood- 
man halt, Twenty-lirst avenue west 
and Firs': street. 

De Boer Pitunotng & Heating com- 
pany, 2004 W. Superior St. Lincoln 593. 



evening at Stony Lake on the Chicago 
division. The cars did not go Into the 
ditch and no one was injured n.or was 
any great amount of damage done. 
Mail was transferred to another train 
and taken ta Duluth. The derailed 
train reached Duluth four hours late. 



West End Briefs. 

The Ladies' Aid Society of St. Paul's 
Lutheran church. Twentieth avenue 
West and Third street, will meet In 
the church parlors tomorrow after- 
noon. Mrs. Carl Ouse and Mrs. Martin 
Ouse will be hostesses. 

Mrs. H. Engstrom, 2516 West Third 
street, will entertain tomorrow after- 
noon for the Dorcas Society of the 
Bethany Swedish Lutheran church. 

The choir of the Central Baptist 
church will entertain at a musical 



SOO TR AIN DE RAILED. 

Three Passenger Coaches Leave 
Tracks at Siony Lake; Nobody Kurt. 

Three passenger coaches on train No. 
17 of the Soo line w^ere derailed last 

Yes — Many People 

have told us thfc same rtory — distrcai 
after eating, gases, heartburn. A 

before and after each meal will relieve 
yoa. Scjld oiily by ua — ^25c. 



LOSK UKRTY, 
m KEEPS SHOES 

Police Decide Not to Send 
Prisoner to Work Farm 
Shoeless, Despite Sug- 
gestion of Court. 



Ellas Latvala was brought before 
Judge F; H. Cutting yesterday for 
stealing a pair of shoes from William 
Heime. 

Two hours before Ellas was "in" for 
drunkenness, and was sentenced to the 
work farm for seven daya. Th» petit 



larceny charge ne 

"How about th( 
asked Deputy E. ( 

"Return them • 
er," ordered the 

MacArthur ace 
Jailer Louis Johi 
Heime gets his si 

"I should say 
"Latvala is weari 
propose to undres 
tice." 

"Johnson Is rlj 
Kercher. "He is 
robe any of these 
be expecting too 

When Latvala 
"Black Maria" an 
wards, the shoes 
they were the on 
if they didn't be 

Latvala and He 
Finnish bathhous' 
nue east Friday 
awoke Latvala ' 
Helme's shoes, so 
lie© didn't find t 



tted him thirty days. 
shoes, your honor?" 
I. MacArthur. 
o the original own- 
court. 

ordlngly confronted 
isou with: "See that 
loesv will you?" 
not," was the reply, 
ng them and I don't 
s him to insure jus- 

fht." said Chief Mc- 
n't supposed to dis- 

fellows. That would 
nuch." 

was placed In th« 
i headed work farnx- 

went with him, for 
ly pair he had, even 
long to him. 
ime took a nap In a. 
i on South First ave- 
and when the latter 
vas gone. So were 

wa3 hie watch. Po- 
he watch. 



Inch deep. The n^xt morning h« 
emptied out a mixture of water, oat» 
and drowned rats. He rebaited his 
trap and the next morning he fig- 
ured results and found that he had 
aimlessly but witli malice afore- 
thought, gotten rid ot eighty-niTia 
rats. He declares it will rid a barn 
in a short tune. 



NO PATENT ON THIS. 



Badger, Minn., 
Iowa farmer has 
upon which he c 
which anyone tr 
use. He purcha! 
iron bucket — or 
placed it in the I 
thirds full of v 
the water a lay 



Herald-Rustler: An! 

devised a rat trap 
laims no patent, but 
)ubled with rata can 
(ed a big galvanized 

garbage pail, and 
arn. He filled It two- 
ater and on top of 
}r of chafiCy oatd an 



OLD AGE A CRIME! 

Some peo<3le are young at 60— red 
cheeked, ruddy and vigorous. Others 
are old at 40 — joints beginning to .v«tif- 
fen up a bit; step beginning to lag and 
lose its springiness; occasional touch- 
es of pain in the back; feel tired wltH- 
out cause, and possibly a twinge of 
rheumatic pain. 

In most cases, these are the danger 
signals to warn you that the kidn. ys 
are not promptly doing their work of 
throwing off the poisons that are al- 
ways forming in the body. To negKct 
these natural warnings Is a crime 
against yourself. If you have lliese 
symptoms, you can find prompt relief 
In (lOLD MEDAL Haarlem Oil Cap- 
sules. For more than 200 years, this 
has been the recognized remedy for 
kidney and bladder ailments. 

GOLD MEDAL Haarlem Oil Capsule* 
are imported direct from the labora- 
tories at Haarlem, Holland. Prices ar% 
25c. 50c and $1.00. Get them at vour 
druggist's. Do not take a substitut*. 



i 



41 



I 

! 



■•• 



■* ■>' 






■^-t 



._ V 



> 

I 
I 

■ ■ — i» 1 > ' -TT" 



• 0, •,[ ■*! iMiT 



.^, 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 29, 1915. 



BIG TRANSPORT ii 

PROBABLY SUNK 



Greeks Release Sikhs and 

Gurkhas, Survivors From 

Lost Ship. 

Athene, Sept. 28, via London. Sept. 
29. Thp <;reek government ha.s re- 
leased the Sikh.s and (Uirkhas who 
were survivors of the British trans- . 
port Ramazan. which was sunk by a ^ 
submarine. They were .sent Immediate- 
ly to Malta on the Messag^eries Marl- I 
times steamer Siboni. Many of them | 
had no opportunity even to obtain 
clothing. I 



There has been no previous an- • 
nouncement f>f the sinking of the Ra- ' 
mazon, a steamer of 3.447 tons, al- ' 
though a wireless dispatch from Ber- ' 
lln. Sept. 21, stated that tht Frank- : 
furter Zeltung report* d that a larg ■ i 
British transport from Kgypt for the 
TMrdanelles had been sunk by a Ger- 
man submarine. This vessel could 
hardly have b< en the Ramazan, how- 
ever, for the Frankfort paper said tht- 
vessel in question was a 15,000 steamer 
which had been sunk in the M^'diter- 
rane.in (»ff the island of <'rete. 

The Ramazan evidently was carrying 
Indian troops either to the Gallipoli 
peninsula or to France. The course 
taken might have been through the 
Arabian sea, the Gulf of Aden, the Red 
sea and the Suez canal into the Medi- 
terranean. The fact that the survi- 
vors were landed at Alh* ns makes it 
seem likely the troops were on their 
way to the Dardanelles. 

In addition to the report from Ber- 
lin on Sept. 21, there have been sev- 
eral other unconfirmed announcements 
from German sources of the sinking of 
British transports. 



GERMAN CASUALTIES 
EXCEED 120.000 MEN, 
SAYS F RENC H REPORT 

(Continued from page 1.) 



the total of wliich in killed, wounded 
and prl.soners amounts to more tha»i 
the effective strength of three army 
corps (120,000 men). The total num- 
ber of prisoners is at the present time 
in excess of 23.000 men; the number 
of cannon brought to our rtar is 79. 
Seventeen thou.«and and fifty-five 
private soldiers and 316 officers, taken 

frisoner by us, already have gone 
hrough tlie town of Chalons on their 
w^ay to the points where they are to 
be Interned. 

'•Organized efforts are at present 
under way to ckar up the field of bat- 
tle ard to take definite count of the 
arms of all kinds and of the war ma- 
terial belonging to the artillery and 
Infantry branches which the enemy 
has been compelled to abandon to us. 
Kant of Soufhen. 

"In the Artois district the progre.ss 
reported yesterday to the cast of 
Souc.iez contiiiucd yesterday evening 
and in the course of last night, after 
a etubbom mgapement. we reached 
Hill No. 140. the culminating point of 
the crest."3 of V'my and the orchards to 
the south of this point. The number 
of unwounded prisf)ner.s taken by us 
In the course of thiF flghting is more 
than 300 and the men belong moytlv 
to the two divl-sions of the guard. . 

"In the Champagne district the 
fighting Is going on without respite 
along the entire front. In the region 
to the north of Masslges furth< r 
groups of (Jeiman.^ have .surrendered. 
In this Fector alone the total of pris- 
oners last evening reached 1,000. 
Th'^re lias been no other Important 
action on the remainder of the front. 

"The enemy has bonibarded violent- 
ly our trenches to the north and to the 
south of the Aisne. in the region." of 
the St. Mard forest, of Troyon and of 
Vallly. We responded to this fire with 
energy." 



glass Block 




The Smart nat 
Pictured lier?,. Only 

$5.00 

It is made of good quality 
silk velvet, trimmed with 
large bow of Hatters' 
Plush and Lyons Velvet, 
combined and fastened 
with a steel buckle The 
really smart hat of the 
season; black only. 

AhQtKer Hat 
Similar Styjs $3.98 

Made of velour de norde 
velvet, trimmed with bow 
of same material com- 
bined with silk or ribbon, 

Comes in six colors and 
combinations. 

Special $1.98 

Children's and M i s s e s' 
Black Velvet Hats, Better 
Turbans and Sailor Shapes 



Unusual 
Trimmed 



liatValu^s 



I 



-^ r« 







tbe <Bla$$ Block 



The Shopping Center of D u I u t h 

It IS numan nature — it is business — to place great trust in great strength. 1 iiat 
IS wliy tke Glass Block enjoys the confidence and patronage of Dulutn people, w hy 
Dulutk Avomen kave come to appreciate Glass Block "events — like tomorrows JD rug 
Sale — as Avonderful opportunities to economize pleasantly and profitably. 




Shaving Accessories 

25c Williams' Shaving Cream, 
Powder or Sticks 19<» 

25c Colgate's Shaving Sticks, 
Powder or Cream 20^ 

10c Williams' Barbers' Bar 
Shaving Soap 7f 

Colgate's Barbers' Bar Shav- 
ing Soap 4^ 

50c Imported Bay Rum 39^ 

25^: Imported Bay Rum.... 18^ 

75c Colgate's Lilac Imperial 
for 50< 

75c Pinaud's Lilac Vegetal. 65^ 

25c Mennen's Shaving Cream 
for 17<J 

25c Johnson's Shaving Cream 

for 19<» 

25c Krank's Lather Cream. 19^ 



DeoJorahts 

2Sc Amolin 17 1 

25c Mum 18f 

25c Eversweet 19^ 

5Uc Xonspi 415 f* 



Toilet Wat?rs 

$1.25 Violet or lily's Toilet 
Water 98^ 

75c Evening Jasmine Toilet 

Water 69^ 

75c Pinaud's Lilac Vegetal. 65< 

75c Colgate's Lilac Imperial 

^ for 50 

750 Toilet Waters, assorted 

odors 59fJ 

50c Toilet Waters, assorted 

odors 38^ 

50c Colgate's Toilet Waters 

for 380 

25c Toilet Waters 180 

Azurea, Le Trefle or P"lora- 

mye Toilet Water 980 



Perfumes 

All our best 50c odors, per 

ounce 300 

$1.0(J and $1.50 popular odors, 

per ounce 790 

$1.00 Lysol 790 

50c Lysol 380 

25c Lysol 190 

25c Belladonna or Belladonna 
and Capsicum Plasters, spe- 
cial at 1O0 

$1.00 Fitches Hair Grower.. 850 
$1.00 Pierce's Favorite Pre- 
scription 690 

25c White Pine Cough Syrup 

for 170 

$1.00 Mme. Yale's Fruiticura 
for 650 

Put This Ih Your 
Toilet Cabinet 

Your toilet 
cabinet is not 
complete without 
Listerine — the 
safe antiseptic. 
P r e s c r i bed by 
p h y s i cians and 
surgeons for 30 
years. 

Use Listerine 
to promote per- 
s o n a 1 hj-giene. 
We recommend it 
for use after shav- 
ing, as a dressing 
cuts, burns, 
wounds, prickly 
heat, etc. 
Special price 670 




Face ahd Hahd Lotions 

35c Benzoin & Almond Cream 
at 290 

2Sc Frostilla 170 

50c Hind's Honey & Almond 
Cream 350 

25c Mme. Isabelle's Hand 
Whitener 190 

15c Meladerma 100 

25c Cream of Roses 190 

25c Marshmallow Cream... 160 

$1.50 Oriental Cream. .. .$1.15 

25c Jergen's Benzoin & Al- 
mond Cream 180 

25c Cucumber Cream 180 

50c Bath of Isis 390 

10c Glycerine and Rose Wa- 
ter 80 



Roug?,NailPQlisK?s,Etc. 

25c Satin Skin, Rose Tint.. 180 

25-c Rosaline 180 

50c Elperfecto Brunette 

Rouge for 290 

25c Rouge Lip Sticks 1.90 

iSc Rouge Lin Sticks 110 

50c Brunette Rouge 350 

50c Aubry Sisters' Liquid 
Rouge 390 

25c Lustrite Nail Enamel.... O 
50c Harnish Nail Enamel.. 400 
25c Nail Polish in celluloid 

boxes 160 

5-Oc Steam's Rouge 390 

25c Cutex Cuticle Remover. 210 



TggtK BrusK?s 

25c Tooth Brushes, choice. 160 
25c Rubberset Tooth Brushes, 

all styles 170 

15c Tooth Brushes 80 



Miscellaneous 

lOc Burrough'a Charcoal Tab- 
lets, 2 boxes for 150 

10c Camphor Ice 80 

10c Household Ammonia... 70 
10c Wanous Shampoo Bags. 80 

25c Witch Hazel 150 

10c Blue Seal Vaseline 80 

10c White, Carbolated, Cam- 
phorated or Pomade, tubes 

or jars 80 

10c Peroxide of Hydrogen. . .60 
25c Peroxide of Hydrogen. . 140 
39c Peroxide of Hyd.rogen. .290 

10c Machine Oil 80 

35c Pure Olive Oil 240 

25<: Cascara .\romatic 190 

25c Castor Oil 180 

10c Spirits of Camphor 80 

65c Armour's Extract of Beef 

for 490 

30c Armour's Bouillon Cubes 

for 210 

25c Wright's Silver Cream. 170 

50c Imported Bay Rum 390 

25c Imported Bay Rum 190 

50c Imported Bath Salts... 400 

25c Mentholatum 190 

25c Kondon's Catarrh Jelly.190 
35q Mount Clement Lithia 

Water 290 

$2.25 Abdominal Supporters, 

all sizes $1.79 

$1.50 Abdominal Supporter^, 

all sizes $1.10 

35c box of one dozen Sanitary 

Napkins, special, box.... 270 
2Sc Rubber Lined Case con- 
taining Wash Cloth, spe- 
cial 100 

50c Hinkle's Cascara Carthar- 
tic Pills. 100 in a bottle, 
special 210 



Every lious?Kolcl in DulutK Needs 
At Least On? of TKese It?ms! 

$3.75 Horlick's Malted Milk ^2.85 

75c Mellen's Baby Food . • 53< 

$1.00 Herpicide 69<^ 

$1.00 Swamp Root . .- 69^ 

$1.00 Danderine 68< 

$1.00 Listerine 67f^ 

$1.00 Scott's Emulsion 67< 

$1.00 Lydia Pinkham's Vegetable Compound 69< 

$1.75 SSS. Blood Purifier ^1.28 

35c Fletcher's Castoria 23^ 

50c Doan's Kidney Pills 37< 

60c Williams' Pink Pills 35^ 

S5c Rocky Mountain Tea 28^ 

50c Sal Hepatica 33^ 

50c California Syrup of Figs 33^ 

1 lb. Absorbent Cotton 22<^ 

25c Sal Hepatica • 18^ 

5-yard Package Medicated Gauze 28<f^ 

1 qt. Grape Juice • • 38^ 



Note These Low P 









MMmivE 



lOc Palm-Olive Soap 70 

10c White or Green Castile 

Soap, 3 for 2O0 

10c Jap Rose Soap....,- 80 

4711 Glycerine Soap, 2 for.. 250 
15c Jersey ^ream Soap, ea.ll0 
25c Pears Scented Soap....lS0 

17c P'ears Unscented Soap. 120 
2Sc Packer's Tar Soap... ... 170 

10c Jergcns Violet Glycerine 

Soap, 3 for.. » 210 

3 cakes Juvenile for ........ 250 

10c Maxine fipljlio^ Toilet 

Soap 3 cakes t'fir 190 

10c Woodbury's Facial Soap 

for 180 



nc?s on Toilet Sgaps 

25c Herpicide Shampoo Soap 
at 180 

75c box Cashmere Bouquet 
Soap e9<* 

25c Cuticura Soap 190 

10c Jergens Round Bath Tab- 
let, cake 70 

10c Colgate's Bath Soap, such 
as Big Bath. Elder Flower, 
Brown Windsor or Turkish 

Bath 80 

5c Assorted Perfumed Toilet 

Soap, special, 3 for 1O0 

Long bar Green or White 

Castile Soap 380 

10c Olivilo Soap 80 

25c English Tub Soap, laven- 
der, green or brown, 2 cakes 

for 390 

10c Lemon Castile, each.... 70 
Colgate's Violet, Sandalwood, 
Rose or Heliotrope Toilet 
Soap, special, 3 for 190 



Talcum rowdsrs at ExtraorJinarily Low Pric?s 




25c Colgate's Tal- 
cum, 9 odors. 150 

25c Mennen's. . 120 

25c Williams'... 150 

25c Corolopsis. .150 

25c Mme. Yale's.l50 

25c Trailing Arbu- 
tus, flesh or 
white 180 

25c Lehn & Fink'3 Talcum, 
flesh or white 180 

25c Bathasweet 180 

25c Luxus PerfuTrteel Bath 
^Powder, 1 lb. can 180 

25c Hygenol Violet Talcum 
for . .190 

25c Squibbs* Violet, Carnation 
or Unscented '. . . 170 



15c Violet or Corolopsis Tal- - 

cum Powder 1O0 

1 lb. can Violet Talcum 190 

SOc Hanson & Jenks Rose 

Talcum 39^* 

SOc Harriet Hubbard Ayer"s 

Violet Talcum 390 

25c Roger & Gallet Talcum. 190 
25c 4711 Cologne Talcum.. 190 
25c Johnson & Johnson Baby 

Talcum 180 



Sh 



ampoos 

50c Palm-Olive Shampoo.. 390 
SOc Packer's Liquid Tar 
Shampoo 390 



Unusually Attractive Bargains ih Rubb?r GooJi 




$1.25 Rubber Gldves, best 
quality, all sizes, special.. 690 

$2.25 Guaranteed, seamless 
Water Bottle, dark rubber, 
special at $1.89 

$1.50 2-quart guaranteed Wa- 
ter Bottle 980 

$1.00 2-quart guaranteed Wa- 
ter Bottle ....". 890 



$250 2-quart Combination Wa- 
ter Bottle and Fountain 
Syringe $1.98 

$1.75 very fine quality Combi- 
nation Water Bottle and 
Fountain Syringe, special 
at $1.40 

$1.25 Fountain Syringe, seam- 
less and rapid flow 980 

$1.00 2-quart seamless Foun- 
tain Syringe 790 

$2.00 Fountain Syringe, ma- 
roon rubber, rapid flow and 
guaranteed, special $1.49 



Face Powd?rs 

25c Satin Skin Face Powder 
for 190 

25c Woodbury Face Powder 
for 190 

SOc Pozzoni Face Powder.. 390 

SOc Mme. Isj.belle's Face 
Powder, 2 bo.ves for 390 

SOc Mme. Yale's Face Pow- 
der 350 

SOc Tmogene Fa:e Powder. 390 
SOc La Blache Face Powdcr.390 
SOc Java Rice Powder. .. .350 

$1.00 Djer Kiss Face Powder 

for 890 

SOc French Rice Powder... 290 
25c Rice Powder in packages 

at 190 

Azurea, Le Tr< fie or Flora- 
mye Face Powder, special 

at 980 

SOc Kosmeo PoA-der 390 

SOc Emerald Face Powdcr.390 



D?ntal Preparations 

25c Colgate's Tooth Powder 

for 150 

25c Lyon's Tocth Powder or 

Dental Crcan 170 

25c Sozodont I'owder, Paste 

or Mouth Wa;h 190 

25s: Sanitol Po\.der, Paste or 

Mouth Wash 170 

25c Rubifoam 170 

25c Kolynos Tcoth Paste.. 170 
25c Euthymol Tooth Paste. 170 
25c Dr Graves' Tooth Pow- 
der 150 

25c Colgate's Dental Cream 200 
SOc Pcbecco Tcoth Paste.. 370 
25c PyzoMS Tooth Paste... 190 
25c Arnica Tooth Soap.... 180 
2J>c Brown's Camphorated 
Tooth Powder 180 

25c Mme Yale's Tooth Pow- 
der, 2 for 250 

25c Calox Tooth Powder.. 180 
25c Sheffield Tooth Paste. 170 
SOc Alkalioris Mouth Wash 

for 390 

SOc Lavoris Mcuth Wash.. 370 
$1.00 Glyco Thymoline 890 

Combs ariJ BrusK?s 

25c Unbreakable Dressing 
Combs, coars; or coarse and 
fine, special 190 

SOc Dressing Combs, coarse or 
coarse and fine, special.. 380 

69c Heavy Marcel or Princess 
Comb 490 

15c Fine Comhs 100 

25c Fine Comts 180 

89c and $1.00 Hair Brushes, 
ebony or rosewood backs, 
your choice 790 

$1.25 and $1.50 Hair Brushes, 
five styles, special 980 

SOc Rubber Cushion Brushes, 
single bristle 390 

75c Rubber Cushion Brushes, 
single or double bristle. . .590 

$1.25 Pearson Lubber Cushion 
Brush, double bristle. .. .890 

SOc Narrow Marcel Brush, 
black or white bristle, spe- 
cial at 390 

$1.00 Marcel Biush, perforated 
back, very stiff bristle, spe- 
cial 790 




Face Creams 

25c Woodbury Facial Cream 
for 19<» 

25c Peroxide Cream 170 

25c Sanitol Cold Cream... 190 

SOc Satin Skin 350 

SOc Malvina 350 

SOc Stillman's Freckle Cream 
at 350 

SOc Stearns' Freckle Cream.390 

SOc Aubry Sisters' Cold or 

Greaselcss Cream 390 

SOc Ingram's Milkweed Cream 

for 370 

SOc Daggett & Ramsdell's 

Cream 39<» 

SOc Pompeiian Massnge . . . . S.'O 
75c Pompeiian Massage. .. .570 
$1.00 Mme. Isabelle's Wrinkle 

Cream 59<' 

$1.50 Oriental Cream. .. .$1.15 
SOc Pond's Vanishing or Cold 

Cream 370 

SOc Sempre Giovine 380 

SOc Dr. Chas. Flesh Food..3S0 
y2 lb. Theatrical Cream.... 29c 
SOc Piilm-Olive Cold Cream.390 
25c Williams' Cold Cream.. 190 

SOc Kosmeo Cream 390 

35c Creme Mealy's 250 

75c Peroxide Cream 590 

75c Cold Cream 590 

ilanicure Accessories 

25c Flexible Files 170 

15c FlcNihle Files 90 

SI. 25 Manicure Scissors. . .890 

/5c Manicure Scissors 590 

SOc Manicure Scissors 380 

SOc Flexible Files, with ivory 

handles 350 

50c Cuticle Knives, with ivory 

handles 350 

SOc Ebony or Rosewood Buf- 
fers, removable chamois. 350 
25c Ebony or Rosewood Buf- 
fers, removable chamois. 190 
Orange Sticks, special, cach.l0 
lOc package Long Emery 

Boards 50 

25c package Parker Pray's 

Emery Boards 190 

25c Tweezers 190 



Specials in FrShcfi Ivory 

$2.50 French Ivory Hair 

Brushes, special $1.59 

$2.00 French Ivory Hair 

Brushes, special $1.29 

$1.50 set Con.^isting. Powder 

Box and Hair Receiver to 

match, special, set 980 

$2.25 Powder Box for $1.79 

$2.25 Hair Receiver to match 

at $1.79 

$3.00 Heavy Beveled iland 

Mirror $1.98 

S2.50 Beveled Mirror $179 

$1.25 Dresser Trays. 980 

50c Files, Cuticle Knives or 

Button Hooks, special at. 

each 350 



Misc?!laheous 

1 lb. 20-Mule-Tcam Borax. 110 
75c Pure Norwegian Ccd 

Liver Oil 490 

75c Beef, Iron and Wine. ..590 
SOc Polishing Cloth for silver, 
metal or jewelry, special. 390 

10c can of Lye 80 

$1.00 Caldwell's Syrup of Pep- 
sin 790 

14 lb. bottle Sodium Phos- 
phate 290 

SOc Phillip's Milk of Mag- 
nesia 400 

SOc Lavoris Mouth Wash.. 370 
$1.00 Glyco Thymoline 890 




See Our Melba Toilet Preparations! 

The Melba line of toilet requisites has been 
brought up to its present state of perfection • 
after twenty years of research and experiment- 
ing with the result that every article has met 
with the most popular approval throughout 
the country. 

Melba Cream is a pure oil base of a firm con- 
sistency without the greasy effect, unlike others in appearance. Price, 50c. 

Melba Powder represents the best and most healthful elements pos^ble, to 
be compounded in a face powder; equal to the best foreign powders that 
sell for four times as much. Price, 50c. 

The Lov'me Toilet Water is considered the Romance of Perfumes. The 
most delightful, refreshing and enticing of all toilet waters. 

Melba Perfumes are all perfume value — no duty. ^ 

Complete line of the most exq^uisite odors ever shown in bottles that are 
novel and most beautiful will be on exhibition in our store. ! 




Cold Weather Specials in th? Bas?m?nt! 




Coal Hods 

Extra special prices for 
this sale: 

Japanned 15-in. coal hod, 
.'^clls 23c; special 1 A^ 



Japanned 17-in. coal hod, 
sells 39c; special <^c 

Japanned 17-inch closed 
top ; sells 50c ; spe- OQ^ 
cial at 0*/C 

Perfection Oil Heaters 

Large-size oil heater, nickel- 
trimmed; a heater that gives 
perfect satisfaction; no 
smoke or smell; d»o /*Q 
sale price npO*\JV 




Ash Cans 

— . . -..^^^ Made of heavy galvanized 
Jfi^Tn^^ iron with cover, iron strips 

{\-t-^'.^^^ ^i^^ ^"d heavy iron band 

^%; |;|f;i^45 around bottom of can; holds 

W^ptj.0^ 30 gallons; A No. 1 ash can 

^•Hf^^^ that sells regular at $3.25; 

i^Wi-feM this sale, extra <t*1 OQ 

"^^^^SsMl^ special $l.yO 

Stove Pipes and Elbows 

6-inch stove pipe or elbows, in good 
grade of pipe, your choice, this sale — 
Pipe, 1 2c a l ength; elbov/s 1 2c ea ch. 




SHOP IN THE BASEMENT STORE 
FOR QUALITY AND SERVICE 



r^ 





&' 



<^i ■»! dWJli ..t 'll.JU_ 



^rmmft^m^^im^^^ 



^^im 



6 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 29, 1915. 



Smart Models in 

Fall Styles 
Suits and Coats! 



Special 

Hat 
Values 

Tomorrow 

A beautiful as- 
sortment of 
Trimmed Hats. 
Velvet shapes 
trimmed in os- 
trich feathers, 
tomorrow — 



1 



Pretty 
Tailored Suit 

in Serges, Poplins, 
Broadcloth and Mix- 
tures — 

$14.75 to 
$34.50 

Coats 

in all the new and pop- 
ular fabrics in the most 
stylish models — 

$8.00 to 
$49.50 



OFEIJl M 

Your Credit Is 
Good 



I nue west and Fourth street, tomorrow 
1 evening: at 8 o'clock. The address will 
j be illustrated by the stereopticon. All 
t residents of the community are in- 
I vited. 



Open a 

Charlie 

Account 




DLIUTTHoSVPLRiOfi-VlBGiMU-f-UiUilNO 




Will Give "Kaffee Klatz." 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the "West- 
minster Presbyterian church. Fifty- 
eighth avenue west and Ramsey street, ' 
will entertain tomorrow evening at a 
"Kaffee Klatz," in the parlors of the 
church. The hostesses will be Mrs. . 
Albert Harris, Mrs. tJeorge L. Pinther, j 
and Mrs. (Jeorgo Hakeslejr. i 

West Duluth Briefs. | 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert M»houpt, li)4 | 
North Fifty-fourth avenue west, left j 
today for the Twin Cities and Prince- | 
ton. Minn., where they will spend a > 
month visiting relatives. 

Elliott J. Aman, 626 North Fifty- 
sixth avenue west, is spending a week 
visiting relatives In Chicago. 

Dr. and Mrs. Dunbar F. Llppitt and 
daughter. Portia. 1015 North Central , 
avenue, returned yesterday from a trip! 
to the Panama-Pacific exposition. ! 

Thomas Foubister has left for To- 
ronto to visit relatives. He will be 
gone about a month. \ 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Winkel, 5717 i 
Raleigh street, will leave tomorrow: 
for an extended*- visit to relatives in : 
Kentuckv and other Southern points. ! 
They will be gone about six weeks. 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the ' 
Forbe.s M. E. church of Proctor will I 
m«et In the church parlors tomorrow! 
afternoon. Mesdames Spurbeck, Reed 
and Plumlev will be hostesses. 

Claude Harris of Whitewater, Wis.. 
Is visiting at the home of his uncle, 
Fred Hanson of Proctor. j 

For rent— Four rooms; water, gas. ; 
311 South Fifty-eighth avenue west. 
Four rooms, 210 North Fifty-fourth. 

W^atch repairing. Hurst. West Duluth. 





THE PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORES 



Stores Open 

Late Tomorrow 

Evening. 



221 and 223 WEST FIRST STREET 
326 CENTRAL AVENUE, WEST DULUTH 



We're Pioneers 
in Truthful 
Advertising 



BARGAIN STORES' ANNOUNCEMENT FOR TOMORROW 



F 



ALL AND WINTER GOODS at prices that demand your attention. Remember, 
we are away from the high-rent district and ar-* in a position to ALWAYS SAVE 
YOU MONEY. 



SPECIAL 

Men's Fleeced Lined Union 
Suits, regular $1.50 values — 



tma 



WEST DULUTH 



HKRAIiD BRANCH OFPICKSt 

J. J. Moran, Sl«Mi North Central Avenne, AdvertUlns and SnbncrlptUms. 
4. Jeusen, Fifty-seventh Avenne We«t and Cirand Avenue, DUtrlbatloa. 

Heraid'8 West Duluth reporter may be reached after 
h( -ir of going- to press at Calumet 173-M and Cole 247. 



PART OF CASCO, WIS., 

DES TROYE D BY FIRE j 

Green Bay. Wis.. Sept. 29— The I 
greater portion of the town of Casco | 
in Kewaunee county was destroyed by , 
lire early today. The loss may reacli 
?30,000. Two hotels, the telephone ex- 
Lhange, a blacksmith shop and other 
buildings were burned to the ground. 
There is no fire apparatus in the town , 
which has a population of 400. 



TOO LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 



WOMAN HURT 
BY MARAODE 

Mrs. i\lysen Found Injured 

and Unconscious at 

Winner Residence. 



Monday when the police caused his \ One C^nt a Word Each Insertion. 
arrest on a warrant which was a year Ko Advertisement liess Than 15 CenI 

old. Olson was taken to Proctor where 
he will be given a hearing on the 
larceny charge before the justice of 
the peace. 



RESENT "SLAP" BY 

CITY GOONCIL 



Mysteriously Assaulted 

With Stove Poker; Dresser 

Ransacked forValuables. 



West Duluth police are attempting 
to unravel a mystery connected with 
an assault on Mrs. Nysen, which took 
plac.i last evening at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. N. L. Winner, 104 South For- 
ty-sLxth avenue west, while Mr. and 
Mrs. Winner were attending a show 
downtown. Mrs. Xysen was found ly- 
ing unconscious on the floor of the 
dining room as a result of a blow 
she had received while walking through 

the house to the kitchen for a drink 
of water. 

Mr. and Mrs. Winner left their home 
about 7:30 o'clock according to the story 
told Sergeant Andree and Patrol- 
man Paradise of the West Duluth sta- 
tion. On their return home they found 
Mr.s. Nytien was stretched on the floor 
unconscious. Water w^as thrown in 
her face and she regained conscious- 
ness. 

Mrs. Nysen has been 111 and staying 
at the Winner home for some tinie. 
She was in bed when the couple left. 
Some time after they had gone she 
wanted a drink of water. Going down 
atairs she turned on the light in the 
hall and in going through the dining 
room to the kitchen door, she said she 
was struck on the head, and that is 
the last she remembered until she 
was lesuscltated by the Winners. 
Sideboard Ranaaeked. 

A window was found opi-n in the 
dining room and a drawer In the side- 
board in the dining room had been 
ransacked. It is believed that some- 
one was ransacking the drawer when 
Mrs. Nysen descended the stairs and 
did not have time to get out before 
she made her appearance in the dining 
room. Nothing of value was missed. 

Inve-stlgation and search near the 
premises failed to find any clews as ! 
to who the person was that had en- 
tered the house. Mrs. Nysen was un- I 
able to say what time the assault 
took place. She had a large lump on 
her head where she had been hit. A \ 
stove poker, found lying on the floor, < 
is believed to have been used by the 
burglar In hitting the woman, 
poker was taken from the kitchen, 
which the burglar evidently had gone 
through before making a search for 
valuables in the dining room. 



West Duluth Commercial 

Club Deny Charges of 

Commissioners. 

Members of the West Duluth Com- 
mercial club are of the opinion that 
an unnecessary "slap" was taken at 
the club by the city commissioners 

In relation to the rescinding of an 
emergency fire limit ordinance on Mon- 
day afternoon. It is proposed to bring 
the matter up for discussion at the 
meeting of tile club Friday evening. 
"The commissioners took an unneces- 
sary 'rap' at the club," said W. A. 
Pond, president of the organization, 
' this morning. "Whatever representa- 
I tions there were made to the commis- 
sioners, were not at the request of the 
I club nor in the club's name, whether 
I the man or men who made the re- 
I quest for the change, were memberi 
of the club. The request for remov- 
ing the flre limits from any of the^ 
' present districts has not come up for 
discussion at the club's meeting." 

The commissioners, in refusing to 
remove the flre limits from a part of 
the block between Fifty-seventh and 
Fifty-eighth avenues west on Grand 
avenues, in order to allow the moving 
of an old building to the block, said 
Monday afternoon during their meet- 
ing that several members of the West 
Duluth Commercial club had misrepre- 
sented facts, and this Is what the club 
members are objecting to. 

"These 'slaps' at the club are re- 
sented by the members," said Thomas 
Olafsou this morning. "This subject 
is something that I shall bring up." 



WANTED— YOUNG MAN TO DRIVi: 
single rig. Call about 5:30, 624 Sec- 
(md avenue east. 



tm 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 



Edward Tomlinson and Nellie 
Mooney. 

Henry W. Gauthler and Rose Foley. 

Arthur Demers and Julia L. Larson. 

AV'illiam R. Sweez«.-y t}t Superior, Wis., 
and Ida I. Gorman. 

Ahti Salo and Elma Anderson, both 
of Superior, Wis. 

Joseph D. Murphy and Genevieve A. 
Whal^n. 

X! ! V^V'RDS. PURCHASE Flf'^.M- 
ture, rugs, etc., for your new home 
from Cameron, the factory distribu- 
ter, Salesroom.=i 2110-2112 West Supe- 
rior St. We save you much of the re- 
tailers' proilts. Entire new stock. 

Wedding Announcements — Engraved or 
printed. Consolidated Stamp and 
Printing Co., 14 Fourth avenue west 

14, 18 AND 22K SOLID GOLD WED- 
dlng and engagemeni rings made and 
mounted to order at Henrlckse n's. 

Wedding pictures are a specialty with 
Christensen, 25 West Superior street. 



BIRTHS. 



SMITHViLLE MEN 

C LAIM D AMAGES 

Declare Property Was Dam- 
aged By Cuts to Extent 
of $4,800. 



MEH-^MAN — Mr. and Mr.s. Charles H. 

Mehrman, 1128 West Second street, 

are the parents of a son born Sept. 

18. 
SHAW — The birth of a daughter on 

Sept. 26 has been reported by M»-. 

and Mrs. Edward L. Shaw of 4502 

Rene street. 
COHEN — A son was bom SepL 9 to 

Mr. and Mrs. Hyman S. Cohen, 218 

East Second street. 
SNYDER — A daughter was born Sept. 

23 to Mr. and Mrs. Allison L. Snyder, 

5725 Oneida street. 
RODEROVICH — Mr. and Mrs. Mike 

Roderovlch, 326 South Fifty-seventh 

avenue west, heve reported the 

birth, on Sept. 21, of a son. 
NICHOI.,AS — Mr. and Mrs. Antono 

Nicholas, 723 Garfield avenue, are 

the parents of a son born Sept. 22. 

Engraved and printed birth announce- 
ments. Consolidated Stamp & Print. Co. 



are asked 
owners In 
clerk yes- 



Damages totaling 14,800 
for by Smithville property 
claims filed with the city 
terday afternoon. 

They claim that cuts from 15 to 25 
foet were made in their property, caus- 
ing a reduction In the value of the 
land. The cuts. It is alleged, were 
made In digging for the roadway on 



OLSON M UCH A RRESTED. 

Proctor Husband Freed on Non-Sup- 
port Charge— Rearrested. 

Sam Olson, who Monday afternoon 
was arrested on a charge of non-sup- 
port, preferred by his wife, had his 
case dismissed In police court yester- 
day afternoon. He was later rear- 
rested on a warrant charging him with 
larceny. 

Olson is alleged to have gone to the 
home of his wife In Proctor, after be- 
ing absent for a long period and to 
have stolen a small sum of money, the 
savings of several months, and also to 
have taken a pair of shoes belonging 
to his son. He was not heard of until 



The 1 ^^^^ sides of the Smithville subway. 
' The petitioners and the damages 
they claim follow: Frank E. Macart- 
ney, 1500; Rocco Domvlto, $1,000; Ni- 
cola Gullio, $500; Michael Auda, $1,000; 
Mrs. J. H, Jones, $600, and William 
Heberlee, $1000. 



ALHAMBRA THEATER 

W >diit-siiH>-ThurNday. Sept. 29-30. 

NEPTUr^E'S 
D.^UGHTER 

A welnl, wild, wonderful .npeetaele 
in 7 pa rtM, with Annette Kellermann. 

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 

BROKEN COIN 

SulMttltute willow and kirk and eor- 
nets — Xewtor comedy. 

SUNDAY 

A William Fox >IaNterplec« 

BEHY NANSEN 

The royal nvtrentt. In a pieturized 
vemlon of Tol.<ttui*H great Moclety 
drama, <'A>\.V K.\RK.\I\A," with 
Kdwojrd Jose — (Matinee Jk evening.) 



B. Y. P. U. GIVES BANQUET 

Program Rendered and Officers Are 
Elected. 

The annual banquet of the Baptist 
Young People's Union of the AVest Du- 
luth Baptist church. Fifty-ninth and 
Grand avenues, was held last evening 
in the church clubrooms. The affair 
was attended by about forty members. 

Addresses were given by Rev. R. 
Kdward Sayles, pastor of the First 
Baptist church; Forest Kent. Mrs A 
C. Ritchie. C. J. Hockin and Rev. Her- 
bert Ford. A musical program was 
also given. 

At the annual election Miss Harriet 
Brown was elected president; Arthur 
Erickson, vice president, and Miss Eva 
Larson, secretary-treasurer. The din- 
ner was served by the ladles' aid so- 
ciety. -The church was handsomely 
decorated In autumn colors. 

Pajelta w[ns^Suit. 

A district court jury in Judge En- 
sign's division yesterday afternoon 
awarded Louis Pajetta a verdict in his 
suit against the Northern Pacific Rail- 
way company to establish right to a 
lot In Hunter's Grassy Point addition 
West Duluth. Pajetta claimed that the 
railroad had occupied tils land for 
years. He was awarded $705 damages 
for the use of his proi>€rty for rail- 
road purposes. 



Infant Daughter Dies. 

Zorka, the 6-month-old daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Krlsto Corlija, 226 South 
Fifty-sixth avenue west, died early 
this monilng after a short Illness. The 
funeral was held this afternoon at 1 
o'clock from the family residence, with 
Interment In Oneota cemetery. 
^ 

To Discuss Boy Problem. 

Rev. R. C. We.stenberg of Minne- 
apolis win deliver an address on "That 
Boys of Yours" at the Hazelwood 
Presbyterian church, Thirty-nintii aT*. 



Deaths and Funerals 



Ht.I)l-li':KG — '1 he funtijii for Jacob A. 
Hedberg, age 49, of Arnold, who died 
at St. Luke's hospital Monday after- 
noon, will be held tomorrow after- 
noon at 1:30 o'clock from Olson & 
Hoppeyan undertaking rooms. 2020 
West Superior Ptroet, and at 2 o'clock 
from the First Swedish Baptist 
church, Twenty-second avenue west 
atid Third street. Rev. Swaney Nel- 
son will officiate. Hedberg was a 
member of the stone masons' union, 
which will turn out for the funeral. 
Hedberg Is survived by a. widow and 
six children, two of whom are living 
In California. 



MONUMENTS. 

LARGEST STOCK OF HIGH-GRADB 
monuments In the Northwest; call 
and Inspect before buying elsewhere. 
P. N. Peterson Qranlie Co., 23u E. Sup. 

MONUMENTS to order direct fromTac^ 
torles; you save 20 per « ent. Chas 
Btnson. OfTlc-. 2301 W. 2nd. L in. 334! 

FUNERAL FLOWERS A SPECIALTY" 
Duluth Floral Co.. 121 W. Superior St! 



CARD OF THANKS. 

WE WISH TO THANK OUR RELA- 
tlves. friends and neighbors, as well 
as the W. C. O. F. the K. O. T. M. and 
the L. O. O. M., for their kindness 
shown us during our recent bereave- 
ment In the loss of our wife and 
mother, and for the beautiful floral 
offerings. 

MR. AND MRS. OLIVER DOIRON. 

EDWARD DOIRON, 

FRED DOIRON. 



BUILDING PERMITS. 



To J. Allen Scott, Jr., two 
dwellings on the north side 
of Olney street, between 
Fifty-seventh and Fifty- 
ninth avenues west $ 5,000 

To Daniel Murray, dwelling 
on the north side of Oneida 
street, between P'lfty-sev- 
enth and Fifty-eighth ave- 
nues west 2,500 

To M. N. - Berg, dwelling on 
the rorth side of McCuUoch 
street, between Fortieth 
and Focty-ttrst avenues east 500 

To B^n Beck nan, garage on 
the west side of Twenty-fir.et 
a^ enue east, between Fourth 
and Fifth stietts 500 

To Robert Long, foundation 
under dwelling on the east 
side of Tenth avenue east, 
between Fifth and Sixth 
streets 360 

To Mori^an Pattlson, repairs 
to building on the north side 
of Superior street, between 
Lake and First avenues wtst loo 

To John Magneson, Improve- 
ments to building on the 
east side of Superior street, 
between Second and Third 
avenues ea«t 99 




SPECIAL 

Ladies* Fleeced Lined Hose 
— extra good values — pair — 

1 4c 

SPECIAL 

Cotton and Wool Blankets, 
tomorrow — 

49c to $5.48 

Children's Blankets— 




SPECIAL 

Children's Fleeced Lined Un- 
derwear, all sizes; regular 
50c yalues — 




SPECIAL 

Men's Winter Suits, values 
$10.00 to $25.00— 

$3.98 to $12.48 



SPECIAL 

Sample Lines of Men's Wool 

Shirts and Drawers, 

$1.50 values — 




SPECIAL 

Ladies' Utica Fleeced Union 
Suits — regular $1 values — 




SPECIAL 

Germantown Zephyr Yarn, 
Shetland floss — 




SPECIAL 

Children's Home Knit Wool 
Hose, 35c and 50c values. 

Si/o.s c; to H— I Sizes S«.a to 10— 

23c 29c 



SPECIAL 

Boys' Suits at a saving of 




SPECIAL 

Men's Huavy Wool Union 
Suits, reg liar $3 50 values — 

$ II .98 



SPECIAL 

Ladies' Fall Shoes, lace and 
button — regular $2.50 values 




SPECIAL 

Outing Flannel; all colors — 
regular IC'c values, per yard 



6c 



SPECIAL 

Boys' and Girls' Fall Shoes, 
regular $1.75 values — 



$11. 




SPECIAL 

All kinds of Winter Caps for 

men and boys at Bargain 

Store prices. 



SPECIAL 

Men's Sweaters, regular $2 
values — gray and brown — 

98c 



SPECIAL 

A sample line of Ladies' Fall 

Skirts, values up to $10.00, 

special for Saturday — 

$1.98 to $5.98 



SPECIAL 

Small size Turkish Towels, 
regular 10c values — 




SPECIAL 

Boys' and Girls' Mackinaws 
— good values for $6, special 

$3.48 



SPECIAL 

Men's Heavy Working 

Shirts— 

$1.98 and up 



We Just Quote a Few of the Many Articles on Sale for 

PEOPLE'S BARGAIN STORES 



Tomorrow 



221 and 223 WEST FIRST STREET. 



326 CENTRAL AVENUE, WEST DULUTH 



wm^^'i^^'M 



>:^^^I: 










!!*jeL^> 



DO YOUR NEXT YEAR'S PAVING 

PniTIONING EARLY OR LOSE OUT 



No Pavements Will Be 
Granted Next Year Unless 
Applied for This Season; 
Improvements Held Over 
Will Be Ordered First in 
Spring. 



No pavoment will be ordered for 
next year, unless petitioned for dur- 
ing this coming winter and spring-, 
according to an announcement made 
tliis niornlngr by Commissioner Far- 
rell, head of the public works divi- 
sion. 

Those Innprovements held over from 
tiiis year, he said, will be the first 
ordered In the spring, while the others 
will come In order of their petitions. 
About $500,000 will be spent durlngr 
1916 for BtrQet improvements, he an- 
nounced. 

"We do not want to order pavements 
and then have the property owners 
file protests," the commissioner ex- 
plained. "It is much safer to take 
action on petitions calling for the Im- 
provements, as It avoids unnecessary 
delays and complications. If the own- 
era want a pavement, it is no hard 



task to obtain & sufficient number of 
signatures." 

More Superior Street IrVork. 

Commissioner Farrell received word 
this morningr that a petition is now 
being circulated for the paving of Su- 
perior street, from Sixteenth to Twen- 
ty-third avenue east, the improve- 
ment having been halted by a protest 
petition tiled last spring. Tiie owners, 
it is understood, now want the pave- 
ment laid next summer. 

Residents along Grand avenue are 
still circulating their petition, and 
they expect to have It ready some time 
this winter. In addition to paving 
Grand avenue, from Twenty-ninth to 
Fifty-fourth avenue west, in order to 
give drivers a completely paved road- 
way from the downtown business sec- 
tion to West Duluth, the works head 
proposes to pave Second street, from 
the court house to Fifth avenue east; 
First street, from Twentieth to Thir- 
tieth avenue east, and Thirtietii ave- 
nue west, from Superior to Vernon 
street, petitions for which are now 
on file in the city hall. 

During the winter Mr. Farrell ex- ' 
pectB to receive petitions for the fol- 
lowing pavements, which will be or- 
dered for next summer: Fifth avenue 
west, from Superior street to the 
court hou.se; Third street, from Lake 
to Eighteenth avenue east; Eighth 
street, from Second avenue west to 
Fourteenth avenue east; First street, 
from Sixth to Twenty-third avenue 
east; Central avenue, from Cody street 
to the Missabe right-of-way; Roose- 
velt street, from Fifty-first to Sixty- 
first avenue west; Third avenue east, 
from Michigan to Second street; Sec- 
ond avenue east, from Second to Sixth 
street. 



entertainment has been planned for 
the members. One of the features will 
be a tug-of-'var that had been planned 
for the annuil picnic, but which had to 
be postponed at that time. Delegation^ 
from the Sui)erior lodges will be pres- 
ent to take i>art in this feature. 

Rubber Set Tooth BmsheR, 17c 

Lyon's Tocth Powder, 17c; Mennen'* 
Talcum, 12c. Gray's tomorrow. 



I 



Seeks Heirship Rlghtis. 

In probato court yesterday Mrs. 
Mae E. Pajne filed proceedings by 
which she expects to establish heir- 
ship to the estate of her son, George 
E. Payne, who dk»d Intestate at Eve- 
leth in 1903 The court is asked to 
determine the descent of real estate 
left by Payne. 



Johnson & Kaake, Dentists, 

Have moved to suite 600 Alworth Bldg. 



DANCE 

AT THE OLD ARMORY 



TOMORROW NIGHT 

Given by Company E. Helnter's 
orelkestra. 50 cent* per couple. 
Door rlghbn reserved. 



for 1612.40 claimed as a balance due in 
payment for the yarn. 

Garon is counter-claiming $2.00Q 
damages. The counter-claim Is cased 
on alleged delay in delivering the 
goods, Courtney & Courtney are at 
torneys for the plaintiff company and 
Baldwin, Baldwin & Holmes are de- 
fending. 



WOMAN SUES FOR DAMAGES. 



Alleges She Was Injured on Poorly 
Lighted Path. 

For Injuries which she sustained 
when she tripped and fell over a wire, 
stretched across a path leading to hei 
apartment In Munger terrace. Harriet 
M. Hoover, in district court today, is 
seeking to recover $3,000 damages from 
the Connecticut Mutal Life Insurance 
company, owners and proprietors of 
the building. A jury was drawn to 
try the case in Judge Dancer's division 
this morning. 

The accident complained of occurred 
on the evening of Nov. 9. last, she says. 
In falling, she alleges, she ■was st-- 
verely lacerated about the face and 
neck and sustained serious injuries to 
her knee. She charges the insurance 
company with negligence in not pro-" 
viding a safe and suitably lighted path- 
way to the premises. 

Abbott, McPherran, Lewis & Gilbert 
are representing the plaintiff and Bald- 
win, Baldwin & Holmes are appear- 
ing for the defendant company. 

DULUTHIAPTS FATHER DEAD. 



ftl«»a 



"THf SfLLING [NO Or GRfATKT 
IMPORTANCE," SAYS WAHl 



I want to compliment you on Intro- 
ducing salesmanship In your evening 
classes The real important part of 
any concern Is the selling end. and you 
can do no better service than to help 
sharpen men's wits for ^hat^urpose. 

President, Wahl-Messer Realty Co. 
To W. C. McCarter, 

Principal Duluth Business University, 



City Briefs 



rles of Bible lectures during the past 
summer, was taken down yesterday. 
The tent and other apparatus was tak- 
en to the state headquarters. Pastor 
White win conduct services this eve- 
ning at the church. Seventh avenue 
east and Sixth street. Services will be 
held there regularly on Sundays. 



^'ould Adopt Infant. 

Hugh McCarthy and wife, Laura 
Elizabeth McCarthy today petitioned 
the district court for permission to 
adopt, as their child and legal heir. 
Mary Elizabeth Rom, an infant child, 
now a ward of St. "Mary's hospital. The 
petitioners ask the court to legalize a 
change In the name of the infant from 
Rom to McCarthy. 



Personals 



Typewriter Supplies. 

Best quality, very low prices. 
114. M. I. Stewart company. 



Phones 



DeleRatea Are Selected. 

J O. Erickson, O. I..arson and B. 
Johnson were selected last evening at 
the mee1;lng of the Jackson Farmers 
club at the Jackson school as dele- 
gates to represent the club at the Fed- 
eration of Fajrmers' Clubs annual 
meeting Monday, Nov. 1, at the court- 
house. It was reported at last eve- 
ning's nieetUas that the club ha« 
cleared aboift ?T5 at its annual fair, 
held two weeks ago at the Jackson 

■chool. • 

. ^ 

The Flfst (.'arload of Aeom Heaters, 

coal andj-gasi ranges arrived this morn- 
ing at 6arh«ron Furniture conjpany, 
Salesroo*»«, 2110-2112 West Superior 
street. "Watch for further announce- 
ments. ' 

Tent Servlees Finished. 

The Bible chautauqua tent on West 
Second ajtreet. In which Pastor Stemple 
White of- thi' Seventh Day Adventlsta 
has been holding a thirteen week*' »«- 



Dance at Boat Club. 

What may be the last dance of the ^,^.^^^„ x -i.. «i ^in.. 
(.eason at the EKiluth Boat club w*",}'? F. H. Beckmun of Mir 
held next Saturday evening I' "'« j^^,j ^^ Kimball, S. D.. 
weather continues two more dances c'yiiraen 
win be held, taking place on the two 
following Saturdays. 

Xtmm Called Out of City. 

Commissioner Voss. finance head, 
was called to Virginia last night by 
the sudden illness of his sister-in-law. 
Mr.s. William Voss. He is expected 
home tomorrow morning. 

fl.OO lilsterlne, 97c. 

Pobecco, 37c; 25c Lysol, 17c; 26c Sal 
Hepatica, 15. Gray's semi-annual drugr 
sale. 

Xew Cltlsens For Aitkin. 

R K Doe, naturalization Inspector 
for this district, returned to Duluth 
last night after admitting a class of 
eleven to citizenship at Aitkin, Minn. 
A large number of aliens have been 
given citizenship papers during the 
last few weeks, he 



during 
declares. 



Will Read New By-Laws. 

The first reading of a new set of 
by-laws wlU be the principal business 
taken up tomorrow evening at the 
meeting of the Order of Eagles at their 
hall, 418 West Superior street. FoUow- 
1ns the business session a program of 



F. P. Fentiess, president of the Fen- 
tress-Newton Manufacturing company 
of Detroit, Mich, is In the city, the 
guest of his mother, Mrs. H. A. Fen- 
tress, and sister, Mrs. Carl Swenson, 
of 1001 East Seventh street. 

Frank Guier, traveling passenger 
agent of the Rock Island lines, is in 
Duluth today on general pasenger busi- 
ness. 

At the Spading — C. F. Becker of St. 
Paul, Cr. F. Lathrop of Chicago, J. P. 
Jackson of Chicago, H. C. Roehl of 
Chicago; R. L. Lewis of St. Paul, Edgai 
A. Walz of New York, E. T. Johnson 
of Minneapolis. C, L. Law of Minne- 
apolis, Phil Kieffer of Minneapolis, B. 
K. Cowles of Minneapolis. J. L. King 
of Minneapolis, James Whalen of Port 
Arthur, Willi. im L. Brown- and wife of 
Chicago, C. M. Kirby of Ashland. 

At the Hollmd — E. R. Burton of Chi- 
cago, Charles B. Fitch of Minneapolis, 
G. B. Dana of New York, F. Casey of 
Chicago, Paul M. Hale of Deer wood, 
of Minneapolis, James 
. C. A. Bryan of 
Chicago 

At the McKay — C. Marks of St. Paul. 
T. P. Swanson of Stillwater, E. Watson 
of Chicago, C. Johnson of Chicago, L. 
Kemp of St. Faul, R. M. O'Brien of Min- 
neapolis, Lawrence Brown of Chisholm, 
Mrs. T. F. Price of Grand Forks. 

At the St. Louis — J. Thorne of St. 
Paul, H. M. L''vant of Chicago, W. Wall 
of Fort Win am, H. E. Cady of Fort 
William. J. Binder of St. Paul, J. J. 
Eddy of Chicago. 

At the Lerox — Pal Waters of Erie 
Pa., Henry Smith of Chisholm, W. t' 
Fox of Milwaukee, George Stephenson 
of Eau Claire, Henry Wilson of Winona. 

YARN SI\IArL on TRIAL. 

Duluth Merchant Is Being Sued for 
$612.40 -Has Counter Claim. 

A dispute over a contract for the 
purchase of 8.000 pounds of worsted 
yarn is occui)ying the attention of a 

ry which v as drawn in Judge Fes- 
'8 division of the district court to- 
day. The action Is one in which V. A. 
Straus & Co. «.re suing Israel Garon 



Jur> 
ler'« 



Veteran of Franco-Prussian War 
Passes Away at Winsted, Minn. 

Peter J. Papberg, veteran of th« 
Franco-Prussian war and who saw tha 
.siege of ■ Paris, died near Wlnsted, 
Minn., yesterday. A son, William Is 
an attache of the Duluth postoff ice de- 
partment. Mr. Papberg was 76 ye-ars 
old. 

Two younger brothers of the late 
Mr. Papberg are officers in the German 
army at the present time, as well as a 
number of other relatives who are 
fighting under Kaiser Wilhelm's ban- 
ner. 

Mr. Papberg came to America In 1883, 
with his family, from Cologne. Ger- 
many. There are nine children. Eliza- 
beth. Margaret. Anna, Theresa, Pauline, 
Sophia, Joseph, John and William. All 
of them are married except William, 
the eldest son. 

Funeral services will be held Thurs. 
day at 9 a. m. from the Wlnsted Holj 
Trinity church and interment will be 
in the Catholic cemetery at that place. 

frankliPvoOld' 
duplic ate it s record 

Pupils at the Fr,inklin school, Fifth 
avenue east and .'Seventh street, wan! 
to win this year's banking contest. 

Already the school has 225 depositors 
with a total of between $306 and $400 
on deposit, and by next week they hope 
to bring the total number of depositor* 
up to 300. 

During the entire school term of 
1914-15 the Franklin led all others in 
the city in point of deposits, and they 
are again planning to outdistance their 
competitors. The deposits of all school 
children are kept at the B^lrst National 
bank and monthly records are kept of 
the amounts saved by the children. 

A deposit of one cent is accepted to 
open an account. 



Merton, Wis., Review: Quite a sur- 
prise was given John Palmer when 
he went to bed one evening last week ^ 
He noticed something was out ol" 
place, and soon discovered that six 
pigs had camped there for the night, 
• ■ — -• 

Of fifty farms In Montana, th« 
twenty-flve more profitable ones had 
four Important sources of Incomes 
while the poorer farms averaged 
about two. The better farms wer« -^ 
stock and grain farms. Most of th« 
poorer farms produced only grain. 



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^MPVMMH ■■ I ■ III ■— I ^ «"'• " ■-■ ■ "1 i . . v> - . , ■ I M II . , P ■^■» ■ — — — » I , . , ■ 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 







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September 29, 19 L5. 




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ociet^ ^ OTomen'g Clubs( ^ Jlrt^ic ^ Brama 



^ ■>^nLii~> ^1 — M"^ — 1"^^ T 



Mrs. Cfcorge W. Ruck of 1621 Fast 
Superior street will entertain at lunch- 
eon at the Kitchi Gammi club tomor- 
row. * 

iHonbstbine-lletoP engagement 

M !|[nnoumeb 

Mrs F. Mond.ohine of 22S Norm Kour- | 
teenth avenue east announces the en- i 
cagrement of her daughter, Rosalie, to I 
Ernest Berwin Lewy of Memphis. 
Tenn. | 

In compliment to Miss Mondshine, 
Miss Helen Wetzler, •whose engagement 
to Bernard Monderer of Springfield, 
Mass., has been announced, and Miss 
Dorothy Loeb, whose wedding to 
Ernest T. Hertz of Minneapolis will 
take place Oct. 7. Mrs. David Frel- 
muth and Mrs. Morris Freimuth of East 
Third street entertained at a luncheon 
of eight covers at the Spalding hotel 
today. 

Mr. and Mrs. I.,oui9 S. Loeb of 1123 
East Siiperlor street will entertain at 
dinner in honor of their daughter and 
Mr. Htrtz in the ballroom of the Spald- 
ing hotf^l next Wednesday, the eve- 
ning preceding the wedding. 

Mrs. lAon Selig of 1810 Jefferson 
street will give a luncheon of fift>^en 
covers Tuesday in compliment to Miss 
Ltoeb. 



Wanti Womtn aifio 

to Jle "^repareb" 



at Wiomtn'i ffleeting 

Mr?. John MacLeod will si)eak at the 
women's weekly meeting that will be 
held at the Bethel tomorrow afternoon 
*t 2:30 o'clock. The mothers of the 
Bethel Sundav school pupils are espe- 
cially invited "to attend. An invitation 
Is extended to all the women of the 
city. 

m 

"45ucsts' " Cook JSoofe 

"As an adjunct to hospitality T keep, 
A 'guests' cook book,' which Is simply | 
a memorandum book containing the l 
culinarv whims of my best friends," ! 
wrlte.s a careful housekeeper. "For 
li. stance, the book tells me that Mrs. 
R. l.<! especially fond of macaroni pre- 
pared in a special way. Mrs. R.'s^ fa- 
vorite deassert Is peach cobbler. When 
Mr. and Mrs. R. come for dinner I 
know exactly what dishes will appeal] 
most effectually to their tastes. And , 
MO on down through a list of names. i 

"Whenever any of my friends tells i 
me of a particular like or dislike in 
the matter of foods, table decorations, j 
or even games, I make a mental note r 
of the information and at the first op- ! 
portunity jot it down In the 'guests' 
cook book.' 

"The little volume has proved of 
great value to me and I have lent it 
on one or tv,?o occasions to neighbors 
having the same groxip of friends and 
they have been helped by the store of 
Information." 





-^tK-^m 



■ ^^^i^B I 



5abe l^a^ l^turneb to Jfabor 



illa£(que Collar Jfli Startling ^obeltp— fe|eebe£J 9re 

long for 311 ©ccafiionsi. 



ifligfi STeronimug M 



^uesit of Jfponor 

Mrs. Henry Gagnon of 17 East Fourth 
•treet entertained at a handkerchief 
shower yesterday afternoon for Miss 
Anna Jeronlmus, whose wedding to Roy 
Brldgeman will take place Oct. 20. The 
appointments of the luncheon table 
were pink and white with a centerpiece 
of sweet peas. There were twelve 

g^UestS. 

Miss Jerontmiis w^as the guest of 
honor last evening at a dinner which 
was given bv Mrs. W. R. Cameron of 
617 V4 East Fifth street at ''"'• cabin 
beyond Woodland. 

The women of Pilgrim Congregation- 
al choir will entertain at luncheon at 
the Glass Block tearooms tomorrow for 
Miss Jeronlmus. 

illuseiim iftanikinU ;^f)oto 

Cfiange0 in Somen's! Jf asii)ions( 

There is in the Metropolitan museum 
of New York a collection of dolls about 
fourteen Inches high dressed to show 
the varying styles of feminine garb 
from the Fourteenth century on. A 
writer In the museum bulletin says: 

"The models have been chosen from 
paintings of the old ma.^ters, from 
tapestries, and from standard authors 
on costume. Every detail has been 
carefully worked out and while origi- 
nal materials of the period were not 
available, fabrics have been selected 
correspt.nding In texture and design 
as nearly as possible to those in vogue 
at the dates specified. The figures meas- 
ure about fourteen inches in height, and 
while a uniform model has been used 
throughout the series the difTerence 
In the dressing of the hair and the 
varying lines of the head dress give to 
each an impression of individual charm. 
Borne thirty different styles are Illus- 
trated and while this falls short of 
being a complete series it gives a 
general idea of some of the more sal- 
lent features of women's costume from 
the Middle Ages to the Twentieth cen- 
tury. 

"These dainty manikins that mirror 
the style.g of bygone days are, in a- 
way, quite the equal of the modern 
w^oman in their ability to charm. In- 
different Indeed Is he who can with- 
stand for Instance the fascination of 
the Burgundian lady with her placid 
features surmounted by a towering 




WHY NOT 
TOMORROW ? 



have been putting off 1 
from time to time coming to us | 
for an Eye Examination. Why ] 
not have it done tomorrow? You' 
will have our same thorough eye 
examination whether you pay 
$3, $5 or more for your glasses. 




MRS. MARY LOGAN TUCKER. 

Mrs. Mary Logan Tucker, daughter 
of the Jate Senator Logan of Illinois, 
wants the women to take up prepared- 
ness in an active wny nnd she has sug- 
gested that a camp fo. women be 
established similar to the business 
men's military camp at Plattsburg. 
Mrs. Tucker lives with her mother In 
Washington. She la separated from 
her husband. Col. William F. Tucker 
retired wlio lives in Oregon. 



head dress reflecting the dignity of an 
original who, with the folds of her 
sumptuous robes gathered about her, 
moved with a majesty and beauty of 
her own through the halls of some 
medieval castle; or again the quaint 
Nuremburg maiden whose tranquil 
poise — of a marked contrast to the ex- 
travagant gaiety of the delightful 
beauties of the French court — suggests 
none of the rush and turmoil of the 
Twentieth-century life. 

"In a group of models of this kind 
in which the differ^jnt models are ar- 
ranged in sequence one is impressed 
with the oft-repeated statement that 
there is nothing new under llie sun; 
fashions Invariably repeat themselves 
and any given mode can usually oe 
traced to some type a century or two 
ea-ller. The insatiable demand for 
novelty Is no feminine trait of recent 
development; for In this the Twentieth 
century wonjan in no way differs from 
her for b^ars who brought upon them- 
selves the ridicule of an Eighteenth 
ceNtury rhyn ster, whose following 
lines descry the Instability of the 
fashion of the day. 
" 'Now dresicd in a cap, now naked in 

none; 
Now loose in a mob, now close In a 

Joan; 
Without handkerchief now, now buried 

in ruff; 
Now plain as a Quaker, now all of a 

puff; 
Now^ a shape in neat stays, now a slat- 

ter in jumps; 
Now high in French heels, now low In 

your pjmps; 
Now monatrous In hoop; now traplsh, 

and walking 
With your petticoats clung to your 

heels like a maulkln; 
Like a clock on the tower that shows 

you the weather, 
You are hardly the same for two days 

together.' " 

♦i 

Hiterature department to 

i^olb $o£(tponeb ifleeting 

The meeting of the literature de- 
partment of the Twentieth Century 
club which was postponed from last 
spring will be held tomorrow evening 
at the home of Mrs. A. L. Warner, 
2391 Woodland avenue. The program 
will begin promptly at 8 o'clock. Mrs. 
H. N. MacHarg who was chairman of 
the literature department last season, 
will preside. 

Mrs. Mary Adeline Nelson will read 
a comedv, "The Sprightly Romance of 
Marsac," by Molly Elliott Seawell, and 
Mrs. R. Buchanan Morton will give 
piano and vocal numbers. Mr. Morton 
will plav Mozart's Fanta.-sy in C minor; 
Zamella's "Tempo dl Minuette" and 
Liszt's Sixth Hungarian Rhapsodic. 
Mrs. Morton will sing "Proud Malsie," 
bv Mr. Morton: "Leezie Lindsay." an 
oid Scottish ballad; "O Can She Sew 
Cushions," an old Scottish melody, and 
"Herding Songs." an old Highland 
melody. 

^eebletDorfe ^uilb pan£f 

iSlnnual ^ounbup 

The officers and section pre.'^ldents 
of the Needlework Guild of America 
met yesterday afternoon at the home of 
the president, Mrs. A. W. Hartman, 
2400 East Superior street, to arrange 
for the annual roundup of the guild. 
Clothing for men, women and children 
will be solicited by the section presi- 
dents, who ask that all contributions 
be sent in by Oct. 22 at the latest. In 
order that the roundup may take place 
as soon after that date as possible. 

Ettch section president was urged to 
have a meeting with her directors to 
fill up any vacancies. 

A plan which was followed success- 
fully last vear was proposed for this 
year; that Is, for each contributor to 
give two articles and 10 cents, which 



If you have any jade treasure it and 
wear it. 

A Chicago firm, famous for its beau- 
tiful novelties, is showing to what an 
extent Jade may be employed. 

Handbags, change "purses, party 
bags and all kinds of chatelaines have 
frames of jade. Sometimes the purse 
is of silver mesh, sometimes of taffetas 
of Dresden design, often of softest 
glove kid of delicate pastel hue. The 
jade Is so rich and full of color that it 
makes for striking and elegant money 
carriers. The resourcefulness of the 
designer Is demonstrated by the many 
charming patterns that have been pro- 
duced for the joy and convenience of 
the feminine multitudes. 

There is no limit to the use of jade 
in toilet accessories. Entire sets of 

brushes, combs, mirrors and all the 
other little la-las of the dressing table 
appear in this interesting material. 
Separate shoe horns are displayed, nail 
buffers, clocks, photograph frames and 
everythinig else imaginable planned 
and plotted for the decorative element 
of the boudoir. 

Jade Is also used for lorgnette 
chains, for necklaces and pendants, 
rings and ornamental bar pins. Its 
vogue is quite the proper caper this 
interesting season of surprises in 
dress. 

Stunning coiffure ornaments are of 
jade combined with pearls, and jade 
made smart and elegant by the use of 
brilliants. 

The most Important word in trim- 
mings se-.ms to be tassels or drops. 
Anything that dangles in graceful 
fashion is a smart trimming, and not 
only beaded ornamenis, but silk balls 
or cord and silk materials are made 
into these dangling ornaments which 
are so much in demand Just now. 

Collars are occupying a distinct 
place of honor this season. They are 
extremely varied in form. Perhaps 
the novelty at the head of the list 's 
the Venetian masque collar, which 



each director turns over to her section 
president to buy a woolen blanket for 
her section. 

The garments and bed clothing are 
given each year to institutions and or- 
ganizations engaged in charitable 
work, in proportion to the number of 
persons whom they aid. There is no 
distinction made, regarding creed or 
nationality. Only new articles will be 
acceptable to the guild, which last year 
collected and distributed more than 
4,000 garments. , ^ . , 

The contributors are asked to pin a 
pasteboard card on each article or each 
pair of garments, labeling them plainly 
as boys' or trlrls', men's or women's 
garments. This is to facilitate the dis- 
tributers and to make the lists of the 
presidents balance correctly. 

Each section president is expected 
to be at the place of the roundup on 
the first morning and put into place 
her own collection of garments. "This 
only takes a few minutes of her time 
and aids greatly in systematizing the 

work. 

■ ^ 

0ixsi. 3rbjin iStppointeb ^regibent 

of Ztnt\) IDiJftrict 

Mrs. William T. Coe of Wayzata, 
Minn., the new president of the Min- 
nesota Federation of Women's Clubs, 
who resigned as president of the Tenth 
district to become a candidate for the 
state office, has appointed Mrs. John 
B Irwin of Richfield pres>?nt of the 
Tenth district to complete the unex- 
pired term. .. .. -rrr 

Mrs. Irwin is treasurer of the W^om- 
an's Club of Richfield but as the 
duties of district president are ex- 
acting Mrs. Irwin purposes to resign 
her office of treasurer. She was one 
of the prominent speakers on the 
Tenth district day program at the 
state fair this month. 

— ^ 

iHrsf. Jflaaten Cntertatntf 

for Mvi. llohn Ransom 

Mrs. Gustav Flaaten of 1906 East 
Fifth street, entertained informally 
this afternoon for Mrs. John Ransom 
of Albert Lea, Minn., who is tho Puest 
of her mother. Mrs. J. B. Richards, of 
2321 East First street. 

iHurpt)P=€nbresfs{ ^KHebbins 

in ifltnneapoli£( 

Mis.«» Theresa Murphy of this city 
and John Endress of St. Paul were 
married this week in Minneapolis at 
8:30 o'clock mass at the pro-cathedral. 
Rev. Father Cullen officiating. 

The ceremony was followed by a re- 
ception at the home of the bride. 

Mr and Mrs. Endress left for an 
extended trip in the East, and will be 
at home in St. Paul after Jan. 1. Mr. 
Endress is well known In Duluth. 

■ m ■ 

^cfjumann-Dleink Beligljtfi; 

ILarge l^ubiente 

With a personality as pleasing as 
her voice Mme. Ernestine Schumann- 
Heink sang at the Grand opera house 
at Superior last evening to a large 
audience, which Included prominent 
Duluth musicians. 

Mme. Schumann-Helnk's program In- 
cluded Gt rman, French and English 
songs heavy numbers and lullabys. 



Bernard of Paris is using on so many 
of his best tailored suits. It is high 
and quite startling, actirally cover'! >; 
part of the lower portl»n .."f tho face. 
The chin dlsapp.ars ficm view v/hen 
this collar is worn. The fastening is 
in front with two buttons, but the 
sides and back are even higher than 
the direct front. Tho vciry high flar- 
ing collar slashed at the side Is an- 
other novelty. This style is often 
made of fur. Then there Is the equally 
high collar, braid and button-trimmed, 
that belongs to the reign of James I 
of England. The Garric'.i cape collars, 
finished with a high turnover at the 
baek, are much liked in Paris, wliile 
the simple Puritan and Quaker collars 
of exquisite laces will continue to be 
worn by the woman whose neck is 
short. 

A fashion of recent years that must 
be avoided is the thr«e-quarter sleeve. 
No matter for what lour the garment 
is Intended during the day, the sleeve 
must be long. There's no uncertainty 
there. It may be full or tight, leg-o- 
mutton or prelate, cuffed with muffs 
of fur, or finished with a silk cord; its 
style depends upon the type of blouse, 
but its length depends upon the pres- 
ent law. 

There is no tendency to allow the 
least evidence of fullness at tlie wrist; 
whatever the width at the elbow — 
and it is usually considerable — the 
wrist part fastens in as snugly as a 
glove. Happily this is so, for it is 
one of the best lines a woman can 
adopt if she wants her hand to look 
well. 

The sleeve that Is gjathered to a 
small cap at the shoulder, bulges out 
over the elbow and Is held in below Is 
the one that the majority of French 
designers have sent over. It has taken 
the place of the bell-shaped sleeve 
wliich was featured last winter In 
coats and frocks. Tliat style is out, 
unless it Is occasionally used on a 
luxurious long topcoat of velvet or 
fur. 

Tire eighteenth centuryisleeve, which 
is made of white batiste or organdie 
and ends with a frill over the hand, 
held in place by a tiglit bracelet of 
black velvet ribbon, is- returned to 
fashion. 



She gave the dramatic ones, as "Der 
Erl Konlg," which was one of the 
most popular ones, and "The Cry of 
Rachel," with the fini.sh of an artist 
and showed her versatility by entering 
into the spirit of "Splnnerliedchen" 
and similar light and amusing num- 
bers. 

As few In the audience showed they 
Intended to leave until they had heard 
more, Mme. Schumann-Heink gave 
Carry Jacobs-Bond's "Lullaby," for 
which there had been many requests. 
But to part from her listeners with a 
more cheerful note, she sang "Heilige 
Nacht," which has become one of her 
best-loved numbers. 



leave tonight for a three weeks' trip 
to the California exposition. 

• * • 

Mrs. Fred La Mere of Hancock, Mich- 
is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. 
Huebsch of 618 East First street. 

• • • 

Mrs. Edward Waterhouse of Virginia 
is a guest at the home of Mrs. E. B. 
Dunning, 1712 Jefferson street. 

• • • 

Charles Young of 714 West Fifth 
street will leave Sunday afternoon for 
New York, stopping at Montreal for a 
short visit with relatives. 

• * * 

Mrs. I. Freimuth of 1306 East Second 
street will return Sunday from a three 
weeks' Eastern trip. 

• • • 

Miss Belle Smith of 202 West Third 
street will leave tomorrow for Mar- 
quette, Mich. 

• • * 

Miss Helen Strachan has returned to 
Wallace hall, Macalester college, a?(er 
having spent the week-end with her 
parents. 

• * • 

Mrs. M. C. Littleworth of 719 Seventh 
avenue west is entertaining her daugh- 
ter. Mrs. George' Endres and little 
daughter of'Virginia. Minn. 
« « • 

Miss Caroline Anderson of 321 St. 
Marie street has returned from a ten 
days' visit with friends and relatives in 
Minneapolis. 

• • * 

Miss Stella Phillips of Virginia, 
Minn., is the guept of Mrs. M. P. Or- 
chard of 729 W^est Second street. 

"RIESSIAH'^HORUS 
IN REHEARSALS 



29 West Superior St. 



iW?;'"^ 




Regular $7.60, $6.75 and 15.75 Bags, 
Bp.cial this week Cr r\r\ 

at only s?J.UU 

Regular $5 and 14.50 Bags, 
special this week 



jpeggp JPeat)obp'£i #bs(erbations! 



$3.75 
Dulutk Trunk Co. 

S uperior St., 220 West 



Control in Times of . Peril. 

I have often asked myself Just what 
I would do In case of accident or hor- 
rible disaster. It Is all very well to 
sit back and accuse others of being 
foolish and of losing their heads in 
the face of some 
great peril, but it is 
quite another mat- 
ter to meet a simi- 
lar condition with 
the fortitude and 
coolness which one 
Is wont to ascribe 
to himself when he 
pictures the possi- 
bility of such an 
event overtaking 
him. 

Would we sit 
down and with 
courage born of 
calmness and an 

ambition to save all give ourselves to 
the task In hand without one thought 
of the open door and how simple a 
matter saving himself would be? I'd 
like with all my heart to think that I 
would be among the last to add to the 
crazy panic of such an occasion, but 
I can only Judge of what my conduct j 
would be by my natural Instincts when | 
some slight accident startles me and j 
what the probable course of thousands 
of people would be who firmly believe , 
that they have It within themselve* tol 




restrain themselves should disaster or 
death threaten. 

Recently the shattering of glass on a 
railroad train on which I was riding 
startled every occupant of a car of 
which I was an occupant. Some of 
the passengers in their wild attempts 
at doing something, practically put 
themselves where they could not es- 
cape. I saw a woman with a baby 
trying to get under a seat opposite 
me. The other women had their faces 
pressed into each other's shoulders, 
their hands shielding their heads. The 
man In front of me had risen to his 
feet when the crash came and w^as 
trying to flatten himself against the 
window frame and he was horror- 
stricken. 

The car-full waited breathlessly for 
something to happen. It didn't, and 
by degrees a feeling of security was 
restored. People looked about, some 
sheepishly, others as though they had 
seen a ghost. The cause of the al- 
most panic was the throwing of a 
stone from the outside by a small bay 
and a splintered panel of glass was 
the only damage done. 

When I remembered my own foolish 
first move for safety I felt a slckish 
feeling rise up in me. But I comforted 
myself by the actions of several oth- 
ers in the car who were also not con- 
structed of hero fiber. Yet I may be 
one of those who would unwittingly 
contribute to a panic. Not consoling, 
but true nevertheless. 



illr£(. ilBofiittDicb M €ntertaineb 

< Mrs. Harry Douglass Bostwick of 
Minneapolis was the honor gruest at 
an informal affair given yestertfiiy aft- 
ernoon by Miss Ethel Farmer of 316 
East Third street, and at a bridge 
party of three tables given last eve- 
ning by Mr. and Mrs. August John 
Frey of East Second str6«t. 



Preparation for Winter 

Music Begins i\!ext 

Tuesday Night. 

The first meeting and rehearsal of 
the chorus, which, with the Duluth 
concert orchestra will entertain Du- 
luth music lovers next winter, will 

be held next Tuesday evening at the 
First M. E. church. 

Those interested in the organization 
of the chorus urge all Duluth singers 
to be at the church at 8 o'clock Tues- 
day evening. Those having copies of 
Handel's "Mes.<!iah" are asked to bring 
them. And singers who cannot be 
present and are interested in the 
chorus are asked to send their names 
to H. L. George, Dr. F. W. Spicer or 
F. G. Bradbur>-. Mr. Bradbury will 
direct the chorus. 

With the Apollo club as a nucleus, 
tho promoters of the organization 
hope to assemble a chorus that will 
truly be an expression of the musical 
ability of Duluth people. Like the 
concert orchestra, it will be made up 
entirely of Duluth musicians; the 
soloists will be residents of Duluth 
and every program during the winter 
will give an opportunity to judge of 
Duluth musical talent. 

The organization will be completed 
Tuesday evening and rehearsals will 
be held regularly. It is believed that 
the chorus can be prepared to render 
"The Messiah" by the first concert of 
the Duluth concert orchestra is sched- 
uled, and through the winter months 
there will be frequent programs. The 
support given the concert orchestra 
last winter insures its success this 
year and similar support undoubtedly 
will be given the chorus, the pro- 
moters believe. 



Beb, mk\)iu anb ^lue. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Red, White and Blue society will be 
held at 2:30 o'clock Saturday after- 
noon at the home of Miss Viola Palm- 
qulst, 1225 East Fourth street. 

m 

€benin8 iBnbge ^artp. 

Mrs. E. C. Simmons of 1115 East 
Ninth street was hostess for four 
tables at bridge last evening In honor 
of her sister, Mrs. E. C. Case of Mis- 
soula, Mont. 



ianbertfon-Hafee ?H9ebbing. 

Miss Julia Anderson and Daniel 
Lake were married at 6 o'clock yes- 
terday afternoon by Rev. W. L. Staub 
of Westminster Presbyterian church 
at the home of tl»* bridegroom's 
mother, Mrs. Wescott, 531 West Third 
street. Miss Olga Benson and John 
A. Bulow were the attendants. The 
ceremony was followed by a supper. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lake will make their 
home at 531 West Third street. 



Hobge iHeeting:. 



Fidelity lodge. No. 105, A. O. U. W., 
will entertain at Maccabee hall to- 
morrow evening. John F, Melvln of 
the Edison laboratory will give a 
inu.«ical recital. The aff.ilr will be for 
the members of A. O. U. W. and the 
Degree of Honor. 



Cfjurcti Mntinzi. 



Mrs. A. E. Cutllff of 731 West Sec- 
ond street will entertain the women 
of the Union church Friday afternoon. 
Mrs. M. P. Orchard will be the assist- 
ing hostess. Miss Lillian Bergman 
will give several vocal numbers. Mrs. 
Clara Morton will be the accompanist. 



[amusements 



TONIGHT'S ATTRACTIONS. 



matinee and 
Blindness 



LYCEUM— "On Trial." 

night. 
ORPHEUM-STRAND— 'The 

of Virtue," photoplay. 
REX — "The Incorrigible Dukane," 

photoplaj'. 
ZELDA — "The Cub," photoplay. 
NEW GRAi>JD — Vaudeville and -motion 

pictures. 



"ON TRIAL" WRITTEN 
BY BOY AUTHOR 



^erffonal iflention. 

Dr. and Mrs. W. H. Magle of 1401 
East .Superior street left yesterday for 
Minneapolis. Today they motored to 
Rochester, where Dr. Magle will attend 
the meeting of the State Medical asso- 
ciation. They will return the first of 
next week. ' • 

* • • 

Mrs. Herman Koehler and little son 
of Minneapolis are the guests of Mrs. 
Kchler's aunt, Mrs. Barbara Hibblng, 
of 1830 East Superior street. 

* * • 

Mr. and Mrs. P. S. Anneke of 1801 
East Second street are visiting In 
Glenellyn, 111. 

* • * 

Mrs. J. C. Fitzp^trlrk of Alder. 
Mont.. Is the guest of her sister, Mrs. 
C. F. Elll.«!on of 612 Seventeenth ave- 
nue east. 

* • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest B. Dunning and 
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Dunning will 



The Way They Weave 
the Yam 

EXTRA close weave 
looms arc used to 
weave theyeras into 
the strong silky materials 
that eome to you bearing 
the Derryvale trade-mark. 
Another reaaon why 
every piece of 

Derryvale 

Pure Irish 

Linens 

is f»r*ntMJ to WBih wcU and 
wear loai. aa4 why yoa tlMald 
be sure the Derr^alc trade- 
mark ia oo everr piece of lioea 
ron bay. , 



^.^feimA 



Play Unique in Plan Suc- 
cess Despite Contrary 
Predictions. 

A play without a laugh or a love 
scene! A hero without a big speech! 
"It can't be done!" cried Broadway. 
Then Elmer L. Relzenstein, a boy not 
yet full grown, did It, and the biggest 
theater in Chicago and New York h.is 
not been large enough to hold the 
audiences that crowded to see "On 
Trial" all the last season, and which 
is being presented by Cc'|\n & Har- 
ris at the Lyceum theater all of this 
week, including matinees today and 
Saturday. 

Such instant recognition has not 
been accorded a play within the mem- 
ory of the oldest first nighters, and It 
Is small wonder that contemporary 
writers are bending every endeavor in 
an effort *o produce a play that will 
duplicate or nearly approach the 
triumph scored by that melodramatic 
marvel. 



Theater Gossip. 



That great moral problem play "The 
Blindness of Virtue," will be featured 

at the Orpjjeum- 
PROBLK!»f FLAY AT Strand tonight, 
ORPHEUM-STUAND. and t o m orrow 

matinee and 
night. This six-act photoplay Is not 
only one of intense interest but it 
teaches a great moral lesson. 

Advanced educators have approved 
of this photoplay for its moral teach- 
ings, although there were some of 
narrow mind who criticized It for Its 
frank revelation of the truths of Ufe 
and love. This fact itself caused such 
comment that it drew throngs to the 
play Just as it will to the photoplay. 
A great moral problem play such as 
this strikes a universal chord that 
makes every one discuss Its merits 
and draws them In great crowds to 

£66 it. 

And the photoplay has the merit of 
being even more intensely interesting 
for its teachings. Never for a moment 
was the detail of making the play 
thoroughly interesting to all forgot- 
ten in bringing out the moral le.sson. 

Edna Mayo as Effle. Is shown In 
one of the most charming of charac- 
ters. She carries out the part with an 
Intense Interest that makes it bubble 
and sparkle with life. Bryant W^ash- 
burn plays the role of her sweetheart 
with his customary grip on detail and 
his thorough understanding of char- 
acter. 

a * • 

Thompson Buchanan's story of a cub 
reporter in the mountains of Kentucky, 
at the Zelda today 
<THK CITB" AT and tomorrow, is com- 
THE ZELDA. edy seasoned with 
melodrama. When 
Douglas Fairbanks played Steve Old- 
ham on the stage, there were more 
laughs than thrills In the performance, 
for the incidents in the Whlte-Renlow 
feud could not, of course, be visual- 
ized as they are In Director Maurice 
Tourneur's graphic picture. In the 
screen version of "The Cub," with 
John Hines playing Steve an^ Martha 
Hedman In the role of Alice Renlow, 
the comedy is not sacrificed, although 
the quantity of excitement easily ex- 
ceeds that offered In the original play. 

While Martha Hedman, owing to her 
well earned stage prominence. Is 
starred in the picture, her role, by the 



Announcing 

®i)e (j^pening of €>ur ^ 

i^eUi picture 
department 






Main Floor 



ROWING an attractive new 
line of pictures at popular 
prices. We have endeavored 



•:o choose a stock which is varied 
enough in price and finishes of 
frames to suit your individual taste 
— each one a decoration that will be 
ii credit to your home. 

Wc Invite Yoxir Inspection 



;•. 







■:-ii,-'vn.^ 



•^ GOOD ^^rcvfAr/rc/J?^^ 



EDISON DIAMOND 
DISC PHONOGRAPH 



THE PHONOGRAPH with 
the Ariisfs Tone and the 
diamond needle. 



Full Line Now In. 



'THE HOUSE OF MELODY" 





Jiteinway Pianos U %J Pianola Pianos 

Lf,. f |^ i i , »jiiiun..»i i. jijj^jj i TAlkiwg MaCh i nes vmntin.n. mill. hium.'^ 



3 1 1 West First Street, Duluth 



very nature of 
to that handled 
manner by Mi 
ceived word o 
Whlte-Renlow 
newspaper send 
cause he cann 
and Steve mig 
mountains as 1 
The cub report 
to his reputatio 
lucky fool. His 
that refuses to 
disposed, are r 
laughable and 
elate his unsuc 
main neutral In 
tercafion. His 
the more embai 
two young won 
the other uns< 
avoidable. 

"The Incorrlf 
John Barrymoi 

JOHN BAHRYJ 

IN "THE 

IXCORRKill 

DIJK.VNK/' 2 

THE REX 

responsibility 1 
difficulties are 

Then he bra< 
carries things 
to make your Y 

All through 
of a girl he 
nearly the end 

Of more tha 
the present exc 

TWO HE.\ni-ll* 

AT THE an A 

double headline 
and Holliday 1 
steal comedy, 
the Floor Wal 
of things that 
vllle act popul) 
too.'<, a novelty 
telllgence of 
wonderfully tr 
stunts. Includii 
dancing and pe; 
struments. 

Calloway an( 
singing and t 
Clarence and 
bits of muslc! 
vaudeville offei 
program. 

Florence Roc 
drama. "The Pi 
photoplays. A 
edy, "Hazel's T 
Became of Th 



the story, is secondary 

in a broadly humorous 

•. Hines. Having re- 

f the renewal of the 

feud, the editor of a 

s Steve to cover it be- 

Dt spare anybody else 

ht as well be in the 

safing around the city. 

er proceed.s to live up 

n of being a happy-go- 

autics with tjio donkey 

move, except when so 

diculous enough to be 

audiences will appre- 

;essful attempts to re- 

the White-Renlow al- 

predicament is made 

rassing by affairs with 

len, one sought by him, 

>ught but equally un- 

• • • 

:lble Dukane." in which 
e Is seen at the Rex 

today and tomor- 
lORE row, has fun in 

It and something 
ILE else. He is about 
lT the most trifling 

character in the 

world till real 
alls upon him and real 
encountered. 
•es up and the way he 
before him is enough 
ead swim. 

he clings to the token 
has never seen until 
of the reel. 

• * * 

n ordinary Interest is 
client bill now current 
at the New Grand, 
ERS which closes with 
ND. today's perform- 
ances. The bill Is 
d with Chartres Sisters 
n their miniature mu- 
•The Shop Models and 
■cer," which is brimful 
go to make a vaude- 
ir, and Swain's Cocka- 
demon.':;trating the in- 
Dirds. The birds are 
lined, do all kinds of 
g acrobatics, singing, 
•forming on musical in- 



drama and the eighteenth chapter of 
"The Diamond From the Sky," com- 
plete the program. 

Tomoi row the new bill Is headed bjr 
Prince Charles, one of the most mar- 
velous chimpanzees seen on the stage. 

Jessie Hayward and associate play- 
ers In "The Quitter"; the Three Alar- 
crons, Mexican singers and dancers, 
and the Morton Brothers, paperology 
and harmonica experts, fill out ta» 
vaudeville bill. 

•The Eternal Feminine." a two-re«l 
feature; one of the Helen Holmes sto- 
ries of railroad life, ';The Path of 
Danger"; Charlie Chaplin in one of hti 
best comedies, and the IIearst-Sell» 
News film stories of world's happen- 
ings make up the remainder of th* 
program. 

Rubber Set Tooth Brushes 17c. 

I.yon's Tooth Powder, 17c; Mennen'B 
Talcum, 12c. Gray's tomorrow. 

barnyaroTances 
to be featured 



I Elliott, In a comedy 
alklng specialty, and 
Flo Gould, presenting 

II comedy, are other 
ings on this excellent 

kwell In the three-reel 
irple Night," heads the 
clever George Ade com- 
wo Husbands and What 
em," and a Western 



Duluth Heights Society 

People Will Stage Novel 

Program. 

Residents of Duluth Heights bar* 
put on many novel cntertainmerts In 
years past, each succeeding program 
being deemed the height of eccrntrlo 
jun. Now the promoters of that sec- 
tion of this city, announce that they 
will stage all of the dances of the 
barnyard next Friday evening when 
they will entertain at the fire hall. Th» 
Heights orchestra will furnish the 
music. 

While the program is not yet ready 
for pjblication it is reasonable to 
presume that there will be lit:ted the 
Bovine Paee, the Equine Trot, the 
Rooster Hop, the Lambkin Shift, the 
Rooster Glide, the Porker Waltz and 
the Chicken Dip. 

The promoters of this Jovial card 
are: H. Conki:n, F. Fawcett, B. Dodge, 
B. Harwood, C. Fitzpatrick and Bauer 

brothers. 

■• 

The equatorial semidiameter of th« 
earth is 3,^*63.265 miles and the polar 
semidiametcr is 3,950.158 miles. 



,^*i? of An Ounce To TKc Cup 

made with fresh boiled water*. 




ivill yield more than 250 cups of delicious 
headthful tea to the pound, at a cost of about 
one^four th of a cent per cup. b 96 

Complete satisfaction in every cup. 













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1 


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k 





»■ *^^ i W < (! f lt ". ■ J -'i Uitf ' I 



'P ' '■ !■ ■ I I 



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8 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 29, 1915. 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

AM INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 

rabllahed rvery eveninfc except Snnday bx 
The Ilrrald Company at IJuluth, Minn. 

Both Telephones — Business Office, 321; 
Editorial Rooms. 1126. 

Entered m aecond-elaM nutter at the Duluth po«t«rffice under 
the act ot congress of March 3, ISTO. 

OFnciAL PAPERTafroFmura 

SUBSCKIPTlOIf RATKS — By mall, payable 
In advance, one month, 35 cents; three 
months, $1; six months, J2; one year, $4; 
Saturday Herald, $1 per year; Weekly 
Herald, $1 per year. 

Daily by carrier, city and suburbs. 10 conta 
a week; 46 cents a month. 

Snbwrlbers wlU coota- a fator by making known am cm- 
plalnt of service. , 

WhtTi ch*ngln« the address of your paper. It k lmt>ort»n» 
to sire botJi old and new ad<1rea>eB. 

Tho Duluth Hfrald accepts advertlslnff 
contracts with the distinct guarantee that It 
haa the largest circulation In Minnesota out- 
side the Twin Cities. 




LASTING WAR PROFITS. 

The profits that are being made by mak- 
ing and selling war munitions probably are 
large, but they are not lasting, and they 
may prove demoralizing — for instance ii, 
when the war is over, concerns equipped 
for heavy production of war material de- 
mand, and finance their demand, that this 
country become their patron on a large 
scale. 

But the war is causing certain profitable 
reactions in this country that will prove of 
lasting benefit. 

Some commodities we have let Germany 
furnish us on the supposition that Ger- 
many could do them better than we could 
—a strange admission for this self-suf- 
ficient country to make. The war cut off 
our German supplies of these commodities, 
so now we are producing our own. 

A "national exposition of chemical in- 
dustries," lately held in New York, illus- 
trated some of these lastinof war profits. 
Among the exhibits, and the stories they 
told, were the following:: 

An exhibit of Southern sulphur. Though 
not due wholly to the war, Southern sul- 
phur having begun to displace European 
importations some years back, the war has 
given an impetus to this industry. 

An exhibit of American glass apparatus 
fur delicate laboratory work. Until within 
a few years Germany has furnished all of 
this apparatus, and though the .American 
product antedated the war, the war has in- 
creased its production and sale enormously. 

An exhibit of curved faces for watches 
and clocks. For long these commodities 
came exclusively from Germany. When 
the war shut off the supply American 
manufacturers solved the problem within a 
month, and within two months were pro- 
ducing them cheaper than Germany used 
to sell them. 

An exhibit of fine brushes for painters. 
Germany used to get the hair of Chicago 
steers and turn them into brushes for our 
use; now we are making our own brushes. 

An exhibit of chemicals. Carbolic acid 
is used for explosives, medically, and in 
the making of fertilizers, and we had al- 
ways bought it in Germany and Great 
Britain. War put the price up from 9 cents 
to $1.50 a pound. Mr. Edison knew that 
when the price reached 15 cents in Europe 
carbolic acid v/as made profitably from 
benzol, and that tons of benzol were going 
to waste in the coke-plants of this country. 
Making arrangements with two coke-fac- 
tories, he ty.iilt a carbolic acid factory, and 
is turning out 2,500 pounds a day. 

This country had been importing mil- 
lions of pounds of aniline from Germany. 
These chemicals could also be made from 
wasting benzol. Mr. Edison's aniline fac- 
tory will soon be turning out 2,000,000 
pounda a year. As for dyes, of which ani- 
lines are a base and carbolic acid one of 
many intermediaries, every American dye 
factory has multiplied its facilities for 
manufacture, and new factories have grown 
up. 

Because of the war the government has 
demonstrated the practicability of har- 
vesting vast quantities of potash, formerly 
imported, from Pacific kelp cheaper than 
it can be imported. Many firms are en- 
gaging in this production. 

These industrie.s will last. The old re- 
liance upon German science will never rcr 
turn. The war has shocked our own 
science into applying itself to practical 
ends, and has given rise to many new in- 
dustries. 

The war's end will find this country re- 
lying far less on Europe, and with the 
markets for its products broadened as far 
as it is enterprising and energetic enough 
to broaden them. 

These are lasting war profits, worth in- 
finitely more than the profits gained by 
the manufacture of munitions. Moreover, 
there is no talk of seeking tariff protection 
for these new industries. Most of them 
are established beyond the need of such 
artificial stimulation. 



Now w^e kno'w the weather man had 
something strong-er than a mere calendar 
to use In discouraging the straw hat wear- 
ers. 



BAD BUSINESS ALL AROUND. 

The other day French airmen made a 
raid on Stuttgart, dropping bombs on an 
undefended community. 

The Deutsche Tageszeitung condemns 
this French air raid as "cowardly." So it 
is. It ia not only cowardly but brutal and 
barbarous, the height of callous inhuman- 
ity. It is not only sinister and vicious but 
stupid, because it accomplishes nothing but 
irritation and leaves behind only a veno- 
nunis spirit of revenge. 

^ut what the Deutsche Tageszeitung 



says about French air raids, and all the 
adjectives that may rightly be added, ap- 
ply v/ith equal force to German air raids 
upon undefended British communities. 

Both sides are tarred with the same stick. 
The French say that Germany began it 
and that their raids are in retaliation; and 
probably that's so. But it doesn't help 
France's case in the least to say so; and it 
helps neither side to commit these out- 
rages. 

One of the first things that ought to be 
done after the war, if there reriiains any 
civilization in Europe to do anything, is to 
form a new international agreement limit- 
ing the uses of the air war machines. They 
should not be used on undefended com- 
munities. Invaluable for scouting, they 
have become in other war uses simply the 
most villainous outlaws the world has ever 
known. They have slaughtered women and 
babies, but they have not gained any im- 
portant military advantages, and they have 
added enormously to the bitter savagery 
of the struggle. 

The allies would have had a strong case 
against Germany if they had refrained from 
these outrages on decency. Having de- 
scended to the same level and committed 
the same outrages, they have no case at 
all. Both sides are fiendishly guilty. 



Some people claim they have corns that tell 
them when 11* Is going to rain, but almost 
anybody with com in his garden has an 
article that reminds him daily of the fre- 
quency with which It rained this la,st sum- 
mer. 



IMPROVING THE INCOME TAX LAW. 

The Chicago News and the Chicago Tri- 
bune have been comparing suggestions for 
the improvement of the income ta.x. 

The News makes these proposals: 

That the provision compelling the col- 
lection of the tax at the source be abol- 
ished; and 

That the exemption be reduced to two 
thousand dollars a year. 

Agreeing to both of these, the Tribune 
adds these further suggestions: 

That the surtax upon incomes above 
twenty thousand dollars should be in- 
creased, and that the graduation of the rate 
should be increased. 

Second, that where husband and wife 
both have large incomes, the income should 
be combined for the purpose of supertaxa- 
tion; and 

Third, that when the supertax income is 
spent abroad, as in the case of rich expa- 
triated Americans or of rich women who 
have made foreign alliances, the rate of the 
supertax should be doubled. 

All of these proposals are important, but 
there will be two that will occasion the 
greatest discussion: the proposal to im- 
pose the income tax on people whose in- 
comes are above two thousand dollars, in- 
stead of those above three thousand, and' 
the proposal to increase the surtax and the 
progressive rate of the surtax on incomes 
above twenty thousand dollars. 

There will be some discussion, too, of the 
proposal to double the surta.x on expatri- 
ates who contribute nothing to the coun- 
try's growth but who idle abroad while 
taking large incomes out of its sweat and 
toil, but this discussion will be all one way. 

If the war continues to shut off imports 
and so to curtail tariff revenue enormously, 
more revenue from domestic sources will 
be needed. 

If the country is to engage in preparing 
itself for war on a larger scale, the money 
must be foimd somewhere. 

The income tax, being established and in 
successful operation, offers a very good 
way to raise a good deal of this additional 
revenue. 

When the exemption was placed at three 
thousand — four thousand for married peo- 
ple — there was a strong effort to fix it at 
a lower level. In all probability an attempt 
to lower the exemption will meet with 
strong opposition, but probably it ought to 
prevail. 

Two thousand dollars a year, after the 
deductions are made, is a pretty good in- 
come. To be sure, it is not so good as it 
was before the high cost of living became 
such a problem — particularly before the 
cost of high living became so pronounced 
— but it still is a pretty fair income, and 
those who get it ought to stand a share of 
the expense of government. As the tax is 
only on the surplus above the exemption of 
two thousand, it will not bear heavily on 
anybo4y. but in the aggregate will amount 
to a considerable sum. 

Incomes far above the level of any hu- 
man being's need should be treated on a 
different basis entirely; hence the surtax. 
The proposal to increase both the surtax 
and the rate at which the surtax increases 
as the income mounts will bring bitter pro- 
test from the very rich, but it will also 
bring considerable more revenue and will 
do no harm to anybody. 

As to the doubling of the surtax on ex- 
patriated fortunes, that ought to he ac- 
cepted as a matter of course. 



Talks on Thrift 



Issued by the American Bankera' AasocU**"*^ 




Overheard at the Woman's < gn» iH| 

"Nothing Is ctieap wlilch ti BUi^rfluotM. for lHB|Mp~ does 
not need is dear at a peiinj."— William Pena. ^^ '"*• 

A middle-aged woman wa^s taI)tin|^to a 
group of fellow members ot her^ J(^^: "I 
am much Interested in watching how two 
young married couples are working put their 
household money problems on simllaarSijrln- 
ciples but under different conditlDn»^one 
family on a farm, the other In the^taff she 

aaid. .^.Mr 

"These young friends of mtne •Jti^d at 
the very beginning of their marrle^ llQ; that 
matrimony was to be a partnership In which 
husband and wife would share and share 
alike In both sacrifices and reward*. By 
doing the household work with he» own 
hands and by making a home each of these 
wive.s feels that she earns as much as her 
husband. It is true that their work does not 
bring In as much actual cash as does that of 
'their husbands, but they are able to save 
more and that amounts to the same thing. 
Both couples have growing savings accounts 
in the bank. 

"The fact that this half-and-half, allow- 
ance plan with mutual agreement on apecial 
expenditures works out so well, both In city 
and country, convinces me that It Is the only 
sensible Tiv^y for people to conduct the 
finances of the home." 

"Yes, I believe that, too," said another 
lady present, "and my husband agrees with 
me, as it is the plan upon which we have 
been working for a number of years. By 
the way, my husband has very decided views 
on the subject of saving. You should have 
heard the fatherly advice he gave our pros- 
pective son-in-law last evening. It was 
something like this: 

"'When you are thinking of Indulging in 
some expensive luxury, consider your age. 
Money spent at 60 by a man of some mean.s 
is not like money spent at 25 by a man of 
no means. 

" 'The price of luxuries Is much higher in 
early life than later. If you want some com- 
forts and a few luxuries In old age, gpntrol 
yourself in the earlier years. Get the foun- 
dation of your capital laid early, starting 
with a savings account so that It will have 
time to build Itself from small beginnings 
into a substantial amount. 

" 'You know George Smith was recently 
left $2,500. He was planning to spend It all 
in having a good time. But somebody 
showed him that compound interest would 
double his money in a few years. Then he 
decided not to spend It, but to put it out at 
interest. 

" 'I was talking to him today and he fig- 
ures that before he is really an old man he 
can have over $20,000 Instead of just $2,500, 
entirely from the earnings of that «um be- 
sides whatever he is able to add to it from 
his ow^n earnings and .savings.' 

"Well, after the lecture I heard George say 
to Jessie, 'I'm going to get busy with a sav- 
ings account tomorrow," so I guess the lec- 
ture was worth while." — T. D. MacGregor. 



Our Childhood Folk Lore 



It is a cinch that janitors and office boys 
never will join these military training 
camps; they couldn't humble themselves to 
the positions of mere privates. 

• • 

Colored Evid*n«*^. 

Case and Comment: A well-known lawyer 
was trying to make clear to a legal stu- 
dent the significance of the term "colored 
evidence," meaning by that evidence which 
has been tampered with. 

"The best Illustration I can think of came 
within my observation not long ago," said 
the lawyer. "A physician had said to a 
fair patient: 

"'Madam, you are a little run down. You 
need frequent baths and plenty of fresli 
air, and I advise you to dress in the coolest, 
most comfortable clothes; nothing stiff nor 
formal.' 

"When the lady got home, this is how she 
rendered to her husband the advice given to 
her by the doctor: 

" 'He says I must go to the seashore, do 
plenty of motoring and get some new sum- 
mer gowns.' " 



Walter Prichard Eaton in the Philadelphia 
Evening Ledger: A phase of childhood folk 
lore is found in the catches we were all so 
fond of when young. Who invents them? 
Who has ever seen a new one In the mak- 
ing? Who was the author of the most fa- 
mous, perhaps, of all? You will remember 
it, of course. It was most popular at just 
about the age when you were learning to 
count. You said to another boy or girl, "I 
saw^ a dead horse on Chelsea beach. I 
one it." 

The other boy was supposed to reply, "I 
two it." 

Then you said, "T three it," and so on, 
tin the other fellow affirmed that he "eight 
it," and you screamed with derisive mirth, 
"Oh, ho, Jimmy ate a dead horse!" 

Then there was the "Just like mo" dia- 
logue, which ultimately caused the unsus- 
pecting victim to affirm that he resembled 
a monkey. Another we all recall went as 
follows: 

Adam and Eve and Plnchme all went 
out to swim. Adam and Eve were 
drowTied. Who was saved? 

Nobody was likely to forget that one, 
after it had once been played on him. 

Clifton Johnson has somewhere recorded 
the actual birth of a piece of childhood jingle 
which shows, probably, how a good many 
others have originated. He says that In 
Enfield, Conn., a boy In school wrote some- 
thing on a piece of paper and passed It 
around. The teacher saw the other pupils 
laughing, got hold of the paper and read 
the following couplet about herself: 

Three little mice ran up the stairs ^ 
To hear Miss Blodgett say her prayers. 

This teacher evidently had a real appre- 
ciation of literature, for instead of whip- 
ping the boy she gave him five minutes to 
write two more lines telling what happened 
to the mice, or to Miss Blodgett, a.s thi^aae 
might be. Nothing daunted, the boy turned 
out this sequel: 

When Miss Blodgett said "Amen," 

The three little mice ran down again. 

I quoted that poem In my boyhood with 
the name of my teacher substituted, and 
It never occurred to me that the verses 
were not as old as the very hills. They 
seemed always to have been handed down 
from generation to generation. That is the 
charm of folk lore, whether adult or child- 
ish. Its origins are unknown, and it Is per- 
petuated by wireless. v_ 

• #jf; 

Cro»i»-Pnrpo»e«. 

W'hat sorrow we should beckon unawares. 
What singing nettles in our path would 
grow. 
If God should answer all our thoughtless 
prayers 
Or bring to harvest the poor seed we sow! 

The storm for which you prayed, whose 
kindly shock 
Revived your fields and blessed the faint- 
ing air 
Drove a strong ship upon the cruel rock 
And one I love went down in shipwreck 
there. 

I ask for sunshine on my grapes today; 

You plead for rain to kiss your drooping 
flowers: 
And thus within God's patient hand we lay 

These Intricate cross-purposes of ours. 

I greeted with cold grace and doubting fears 
The guest who proved an angel at my side; 

And. I have shed more bitter burning tears 
Because of hopes fulfilled than prayers 
denied. 

Then be not clamorous, O restful soul. 
But hold my trust in God's eternal plan! 

He view^s our life's dull \v'eavings as a whole; 
Only its tangled threads are seen l^ manl 

Dear Lord, vain repetitions are not meet 
When we would bring our messages to 
Thee, 

Help us to lay them at Thy dear feet 

In acquiescence, not garrulity! 

— Buffalo Express. 
• 

No Objeetlom. 

London Opinion: "Before we take'you on 
the jury, Mr. Smith, we must ask whether 
you have formed any opinion of the prison- 
er's gruilt or innocence." \ 

"No," said Smith, grimly. "No, I ain't 
formed no opinion." 

"And, Mr. Smith, have you, or have you 
not, any conscientious objections to capital 
punishment?" 

"No," said Smith, more grimly stiJl, '^ot 
in this case" r 

• rts il 

Not DanK«rou«. > J \\ 

Washington Post: "You criticize t*i,"' sild 
the Chinese visitor, "yet I see all your 
women have their feet bandaged." .^ . 1 

"That is an epidemic," it was explty^ned to 
him gently, "which broke out in 1814. Thoise 
ard called sp&tA" 



What Are the Six Best 

Novels in the Language? 

From the Phlladeb>til& Pabllo L«d«ar. 



The Philadelphia Public L.edger re- 
cently asked a few of the most dis- 
tinguished novelists of America and 
England to reply to this question: 

"Which, In your opinion, are the six 
best novels in the English language?" 

The answers, showing great diversity 
of opinion, are as follows: 



Fteldlav to Meredith. 

By William J. Locke. 
Here Is a list of the six best novels tn the 
English language: 

"Tom Jones." (Fielding.) 
"Tristram Shandy." (Sterne.) 
"David Copperfield." (Dickens.) 
"Henry Esmond." (Thackeray.) 
"The Cloister and the Hearth." 
(Reade.) 

"The Egoist." (Meredith.) 

I don't know whether "Tristram Shandy" 
can be strictly called a novel. If the rules 
of your game cut It out, then I would re- 
place it by 

"Kenllworth." (Scott.) 
to my mind the most perfect of Scott's 
novels. 

It may be surprising, and it Is to me 
heartrending, to omit Scott from the orig- 
inal list, but I think every one of the novels 
I have chosen is a higher achievement than 
any individual work of Scott. 



A Booster LLst. 

By Meredith Nicholson. 
Midsummer Is the happiest possible sea- 
son for opening a debate as to the six best 
novels In the English language. In January 
I should not fall Into the trap, but In the 
midst of Hoosier com weather I weakly 
yield to temptation. Here ia a list: 

"Tom Jones." 

"Ivanhoe." 

"Vanity Fair." 

"Tale of Two Cities." 

"The Scarlet Letter." 

"The Rise of Silas Lapham.** 

Having set down these titles, I noticed a 
copy of the Atlantic for December last with 
Edward Garnett's gratuitous insult to Amer- 
ican fiction. Perhaps it was the heat; per- 
haps the annoyances and perplexities of farm 
life were responsible; but, at any rate, I sud- 
denly felt myself tingling with patriotism. 

Literary chauvinism attacked me in its 
most virulent form. "Why, I asked myself, 
should I carry water for the English ele- 
phant and neglect the moose, elk and coyote 
in our own menagerie? 

With the thermometer hovering around 96 
and the heat dancing over the young corn 
In my back yard, I shall stand up (all alone 
if need be), make a face at Edward Garnett, 
and burst out singing "The Star Spangled 
Banner." Here Is my revised (and final) 
list: 

"The Scarlet Letter." 

"Huckleberry Finn." 

"The Grandissimes." 

"The Damnation of Theron Ware." 

"The Portrait of a Lady." 

"The Rise of Silas Laphara." 

If Henry James shall have renounced these 
states In favor of England by the time this 
reaches the proofreader, the red-eyed man 
(Emerson's phrase, I think) has full author- 
ity to substitute for "The Portrait of a Lady," 
William Allen White's "A Certain Rich Man," 
and let it go at that. 



A PeminUt Choice. 

By W. L. George. 

You ask me a difficult question, for I am 
not quite sure that there is in the English 
language a great novel as the w^ord "novel" 
is understood abroad. Certainly If perfec- 
tion of form, the cutting away of irrele- 
vancy, and the exclusion of the author from 
the text are the criterion, then there is only 
one English work with claims — "The Way 
of All Flesh," by Samuel Butler. 

And that is inferior to "Madame Bovary" 
(Flaubert), "L'Education Sentimentale" 

(Flaubert), "Une Vie" (do Maupassant), 
"Anna Karcnina" (Tolstoy), "Le Rouge et le 
Noir" (Stendhal). 

The English novel is discursive, tainted 
with sentimentality, and so prone to embody 
moral lectures that it does not easily sum 
up human passion, which seems to me es- 
sential In a "great" book. 

Still, we must take the English novel as 
it is, rather formless but still cosmic In out- 
look, because it does manage to achieve 
power. To my taste here are the best: 

1. "Tom Jones." (Fielding.) 

2. "Tristram Shandy." (Sterne.) 

3. "The Way of All Flesh." (Butler.) 

4. "Vanity Fair." (Thackeray.) 

5. (a bad fifth) "The Mill on the 
Floss." (G. Eliot). 

I am doubtful as to No. 5, and find no 
sixth fit to put In the list. There Is a crowd 
of competitors: "Bleak House," sentimental; 
"Guy Mannerlng," aJtiflclal; "Jane Eyre," 
hectic; "Cranford," loose; "Egoist," pre- 
cocious; "Jude the Obscure," noble but 
• • • George Moore referred to Mr. 
Thomas Hardys style as "pudding," and waa 
not quite wrong. 



No American Novel. 

By Owen Johnson. 

In selecting the six most famous novels In 
the English language, I find with much sur- 
prise, after long consideration, that I am 
conscientiously unable to displace any one of 
the six English novels selected, for the work 
of an American author. The American con- 
tribution to the literature of fiction has 
given. In Edgar Allen Poe and Bert Harte, 
two geniuses who profoundly aiTected the 
development of French as well as English 
fiction in the realm of the short story; while 
In the "Rip Van Winkle" of Washington 
Irving wc have undoubtedly the most fa- 
mous short story In the world, a work which 
has passed Itself Into the sure Immortality 
of a national legend. 

Cooper's "The Spy," Mark Twain's 
"Huckleberry Finn," and likewise "Life on 
the Mississippi" (both rare documents of an 
ephemeral civilization), and Hawthorne's 
"Scarlet Letter" might bo cited as leaders in 
American Action. Hawthorne's "Scarlet Let- 
ter" Is always a convenient peg to hang to, 
yet I cannot but feel that its fame reposes 
on traditional rather than actual arguments. 
Personally, I prefer "The House of the Seven 
Gables." The one American novel which has 
achieved a noted place in international 
libraries is "Uncle Tom's Cabin," but here 
the circumstances of Its writing gave It a 
worth and Interest completely outside the 
literary achievement. 

My first selection Is "Tom Jones." by 
Henry Fielding, a work that for generations 
has stood alone in English fiction in dis- 
passionate verity, yielding nothing to that 
curse of English fiction, middle class senti- 
mentality, which reached its climax In the 
Victorian deluge. 

My second selection Is Thomas Hardy's 
"Tess of the D'Urbervilles," which, after the 
long Middle Ages of emotional cant, dared to 
point the direct way to a significant litera- 
ture. 

For third I would place Daniel De Foe's 
"Robinson Crusoe" as an immortal work, 
which opened up a new empire in fiction. 

For fourth I prefer "The Cloister and the 
Hearth," by Charles Reade, as the most con- 
vincing' historic romance from an English 
pen surpassing "Henry Esmond." which, to 
my 'mind, is rather a finely chiseled monu- 
ment of stvle than a living and convincing 
reincarnation of the part. Walter Scott's 
novels, for the most part, are a succession 
of English seminary heroines wandering 
through, carefully scoured and renovated of 
the past, with encyclopedia trimming. 

For fifth place I select the romance or 
"Lorna Doone," by Blackmore, a much in- 
ferior talent than either Dickens or Thack- 
eray but who produced In this one work a 
masterpiece of bucolic England. 

?or honorable mention I Include "The 
Vicar of Wakefield," which certainly cannot 
be completely eliminated from any such roll 

^'^ForTh'e sixth place I prefer "Vanity Fair," 
bv Thackeray, to "David Copperfield" of 
rharles Dickens— potentially a truer strain 
of romance, by a greater, if cruder, creator 
of buman typ««. 



Keeping Up With 

Minnesota Editors 



Bcattensd Comment* Taken From ^llnnesota Papea. 



He's Overdotng It. 

Virginia Virginian: The nan who works 
so hard that he is almost never at home 
makes a mistake to assumo that his wife 
understands. No woman understands the 
work that involves her perpetual neglect. 



In tbe Light of Hi 

Breckenridge Gazette: And 
Is going to "recognize" Carra 
is about the quickest way tc 
Mr. Carranza will "get his" ) 
some of the fellows who w 
nlzed," and when they get 
Carranza T^-ill be beyond reco 
ways than one. 



jttory. 

now Uncle Sam 
nza. Well, that 

get him killed, 
n jig time from 
ere not "recog- 

done with hlra 
gnition. In more 



As to IMplenaa< 

St. Cloud Times: There a 
about diplomatic questions tl 
do not "understand." Matte 
portance between nations r 
be alow of settlement. How 
"wait till the clouds roll by 
stand" and appreciate the fa 
ernment at Washington had 
we did not possess. "All's 
well." 



re many things 
lat "we" editors 
rs of grave im- 
lust necessarily 
ever, if w^e buf 

we will under- 
cut that the gov- 
information that 

well that ends 



Agreed en One Thing Anyway. 

Preston Times: And Teddy Roosevelt re- 
Iterates that he will have nothing to do 
with the Republican party. The feeling is 
reciprocated, as he will ascertain should hd 
again aspire to the presidency. 



'Where the President E 

Le Sueur News: The jlngc 
tell of the failure of the f 
Wilson and is endeavoring t 
capital out of It. At a tlm 
cern to the country only a 
do this, but let us throw sc 
situation. It Is true that -^ 
cured peace in Mexico. Th« 
to Mr. Wilson from Mr. Taf 
today. It Is unfortunate 
not come to our sister repi 
war with the United States 1 
the people of Mexico thai 
which exists there. And If 
we gain through it what 
failed to bring us? Would it 
us to conquer the unhappy p 
Of course, at any time we 
army into that country, and 
have killed, many soldiers 
a likable policy? If so, it cai 
time. If we charge Mr. Wil 
so far as Mexico is concern< 
failure, we may charge hi 
failure to plunge the United 
Do you want him to do so. 
not. So far as dealing w^itl 
earned, we fall to see how 
failed. The new issues of 
Europe into w^ar, and these 
been niet by Mr. Wilson wit 
time. Again he has failed 
country into the Europear 
want him to do so? The Ne 
see much of good, and littl 
counts as "failure" to charg 
policy of the present admin 



an Failed. 

1st continues to 
)reign policy of 
3 make political 
3 of grave con- 

"jingoist" would 
me light on the 
\re have not se- 
sltuation came 
t, much as it is 
that peace has 
iblic, but would 

e any better for 
1 the rebellion 
we w^ent to war 

diplomacy has 

be a victory for 
eople of Mexico? 

might send an 

kill, as well as 

Would this be 

1 be done at any 

son with failure 

d, the only real 
m with is the 

States into war. 

The News does 

. Europe is con- 

his policy has 

the day plunged 

ame issues have 
iiout war to this 
to plunge this 
war. Do you 
^rs does not. We 
; of failure that 
e on the foreign 
stration. 



Cheering Illm On. 

Hinckley Enterprise: The Askov American 
passed its first milestone last week ana is now 
a fullfledged "legal" newspaper. Brer Peter- 
sen and the American have our congratula- 
tions. 



Michigan Mu.ungs 



Brief Para«rai)ha From Uie WoIT^rlne State Press. 



The People P; 

Hancock Copper Journal: 
remembered in connection v 
of spending millions of dollt 
military expansion is that 1 
comes out of the pockets c 
The big sura paid to ship 
plate manufacturers, cannc 
munition factories all com 
taxes Imposed for revenue 



»y. 

One thing to be 
rith all this talk 
;r3 for naval and 
he cost of It all 
f the taxpayers, 
builders, armor- 
n makers and 
»s out of the 
purposes. 



TcRribly Q.aeiiftte. 

Pontlac Press Gazette: The colonel has 
given us a new word, "Chinafy." He doesn't 
want the United States Chiiiafied. Queuette 
word, isn't it? 



An Old Idea Disproved. 

Calumet News: A New York woman has 
succeeded in going bankrupt to the tune of 
$20,395 liabilities and $415 assets. And yet 
there are men who say women have no tal- 
ent for business. 



Likewise If You Don't. 

Jackson Patriot: It used to be said, "A 
red-headed girl you meet, a white horse in 
the street." but these days If you see a 
red-headed girl you can immediately pre- 
pare to dodge a Ford. 



Some Places Need War. 

Saginaw Courier Herald: ^V'ar Is not with- 
out its benefits. The necessity of moving 
troops and artillery has cj.used the Turks 
to construct 1,122 miles of gravel and 
macadam road. There are some Americans, 
too. who. like the Turks, need a war to 
shock them into road improvement. 



The British Chancellor Evidently. 

Hancock Copper Journal: The British 
chancellor of the exchequer, according to 
a dispatch In the Journal yesterday, pro- 
poses taxing tlie incomes of $650 and over. 
Whoever would think of cal ing $650 an "in- 
come." 



WThcn We All Understand. 

Pontlac Press Gazette: "Russia Needs 
More Money" says a headline. Who can help 
having a fellow-feeling f c r Russia? 



No "Ease" In This 

Marquette Chronicle: It 
said that the action of G: 
things run more smoothly 1 



Grease. 

can hardly be 
■eece will make 
1 the Balkans. 



The Burden Be 

Way for the man with 

Gangway! and give 1 
Don't be a-blockin' tl: 

Saunterln' lazy and 
Life is no picnic for hi 

Work ain't a song or 
Look at the burden he 

Boost for him, give 



arer. 

the burden! 

im a show! 

e sidewalk, 

glow. 

ra, sir; 

a dance. 

carries. 

lim a chance. 



Maybe you never did 

Mavbe you're hatin' 
This ain't the time fo 

He has no heart for 
Look at the sweat on 

Look at the pain in 
Look at his knees as 

Give him a chance w 



like him; 

him now. 
r to quarrel, 

31 row. 
Ills forehead, 

his eyes, 

they quiver, 
hile he tries. 



Say! In your heart, are you plottln' 

Layin' him up on th€ shelf? 
Trlppin' him up so it m ill help you 

Cop off his job for yourself? 
Say! Are you that sort jf mucker, 

Schemin' such HI for to do? 
Then may the whole world be thankful 

He's got the burden, not your 

Man! With that weight Dn his shoulders. 
More than a mortal should bear. 

Lend him a hand, if you're human, 
See that his footway is fair. 

Don't be a-blockin' the sidewalk. 
Don't be for play in' him low. 

Cheer for the man with the burdeni 

Gangway! Give Wood-ow a show! 

— _ • . 

After a Night Oat. 

Judge: "I'm thoroughly ashamed of you. 
I saw you last night. Out with a perfect 
stranger, both drinking, and you didn't even 
know his name." 

"I did know his name. He told me his 
name. Said his name was Norval and that 
him toUxer was in th« flheej^ buslneM.'.' 



Twenty Years Ago 



Vrom The Herald of this date. IBM. 



•••John C. Eden, who has been genera 
agent of the Great Northern railway at the 
Head of the Lakes, will on Oct. 1 become 
assistant general freiglit agent of the same 
companj^ with headquarters at St. Paul, 
succeedi^ Mr. Rogers, resigned. 



•••At the meeting of the Federated Trade« 
assembly last night. Recording Secretary 
Fred H. Lounsberry presented his resigna- 
tion, but the selection of hla successor was 
deferred until next meeting. Fred A. Schulte 
was elected financial secretary for a term 
of three months. 



•••Frank G. Bigelow of Milwaukee and 
Edward McHenry of St. Paul have been ap- 
pointed by Judge Jenkins to succeed Henry 
C. Payne, Thomas F. Oakes and Henry C. 
Rouse as receivers of the Northern Pacific 
railway. Mr. McHenry, who for years past 
has been the chief engineer of the Northern 
Pacific, is to have charge of the operation. 



•••The excursion steamer Comfort, plying 
on Lake Vermilion, was burned to the water's 
edge yesterday. The boat was owned by I. 
A. Felter. Loss, $12,000; no insurance. 

•••John Goodnow has secured the Minne- 
apolis baseball franchise and it is said that 
Arlie Latham, third baseman of the Cincin- 
nati National league team, will manage the 
club for Gooduuw. 



•••Sergeant Moen of the police force died 
yesterday at the Newell house. West Duluth. 
from heart failure, following an attack 
of typhoid fever. He was a native of Nor- 
way and about 38 years of age. 



•••The Daisy mill elevator, located In the 
center of the East end group of mills at 
Superior, was totally destroyed by fire yes- 
terday. It was the finest mill elevator in 
the Northwest, was owned by the E. P. Allis 
company of Milwaukee and contained 80.000 
bushels of wheat. The loss on elevator and 
contents will be about $50,000, fully covered 
by Insurajice. 



•♦•C S. Wilson, who a month ago rods 
on his bicycle to Faribault, a distnnce of 
231 miles, returned to Duluti yesterday. 



•••Nearly all the contracts for materials 
for the new Missabe docks have been let. 
The coast timber, consisting of 1,700,000 feet 
of T^'ashington fir, will be furnished by 
Prescott & Sons Co.. of Windlock, Wash. The 
hardware contract has been divided between 
the Tudor Iron Works of St. Louis and the 
Marshall-Wells Hardware company of Du- 
luth. The contract for furnlshinsj th.? piling 
was let to Jacob Zlmmerma.n of Dulutii. 
-# _ 

Just a Moment 



Dally Strength and Cheer. 

Compiled by John G. Qulnlus. Uie Sunshine Maa. 
"Now we exhort you, brethren, warn them 
that are unruly, comfort the feeble-minded, 
support the weak, be patient toward all 
men." — 1 Thcss. v. 14. 

The little worries which we meet each day 
May He as stumbling-blocks across our way. 
Or we may make them stepping-stones to be 
Of grace, O Lord, to Thee. 

E. Hamilton. 



"Blessed by the Lord. wh» daily loadeth us 
with benefits." — Ps. Ixviil. 19. 

"Nor trust In uncertain riches, but in the 
living God, who giveth us richly all things 
to enjoy." — 1 Tim. vi. 17. 
Source of my life's refreshing springs. 

Whose presence in my heart SMStains me. 
Thy love ordains me pUasajit things, 

Thy mercy orders all that pain.s me. 

— ^A. L. Waring. 



And to bf» true, and speak my soul, when 
I survey the occurrences of my life, and call 
into account the finger of God, I can per- 
ceive nothing but an abyss and mass of 
mercies, either in general to mankind, or In 
particular to myself; and whether ont of the 
prejudice of my aflfectlon, or an inverting 
and partial conceit of His mercies, I know 
not; but those which others term crosses, af- 
flictions, judgments, misfortunes, to me who 
inquire further into them than their visible 
effects, they both appear, and in event have 
ever proved, the secret and dissembled fa- 
vors of His affection. — Sir T. Browne In "Joy 
and Strength." 

Dayton, Ohio. 



A Street in Arms. 

Arnold Bennett in the Saturday Evening 
Post: To the right of the town hall of Arras, 
looking at it from the rear, we saw a curv- 
ing double row of mounds of brick, stone and 
refuse. L^nderstand — these had no resem- 
blance to houses; they had no resemblance 
to anything whatever except mounds of brick, 
stone and refuse. The sight of them acutely 
tickled my curiosity. 

"What Is this?" 

"It is the principal business street in Ar- 
ras." 

The mind could picture It at once — one of 
those narrow, winding streets which in an- 
cient cities perpetuate the most ancient habits 
of the citizens, maintaining their commercial 
pre-eminence in the face of all town plan- 
ning; a street leading to the town hall; & 
dark street full of jewelers' shops and orna-» 
mented women, and correctness and the 
triumph of correctness; a street of the best 
shops, of high rents, of famous names, of 
picturesque signs; a street where the wheels 
of traffic were continually Interlocking — but 
a street which would not under any considera- 
tion have widened itself by a single foot, be- 
cause Its narrowness was part of its pres- 
tige. Well, German gunnery has brought that 
street to an end past all resuscitation. It 
may be rebuilt — it will never be the sam* 
street. 

"^Vhat's the name of the street?" I asked. 

None of the officers In the party could re- 
call the name of the principal busines.-j street 
in Arras, and there was no citizen within 
hall. The very name had gone, like the forma 
of the houses. I have since searched for it 
In guides, encyclopedias and plans; but it haa 
escaped me^ — -withdrawn and lost; for nie, la 
the depths of history. 

» 

The Inexorable Order. 

Kansas City ptar: Numberless are th« 
stories told of George Washington. Upon 
one occasion, while the American army waa 
in camp, Washington heard that the negro 
sentries were not altogether reliable. H« 
determined to test the matter for him.«!<.lf. 
One night, therefore, when the password 
was "Cambridge," the general went out an4 
walked up to a negro sentry. 

"Who goes there?" cried tha sentinel. 

"A friend." was the reply. 

"Advance, friend, and give the counter- 

"Roxburgh," said Washington. 

"No. sah." replied the sr-ldier. 

"Medford," said Washinprton. 

"No. sail," was the respons*. 

"Charleston," said Washington. 

The sentry lost patience. "I tell you, 
Massa "Washington," he said emphatically, 
"no man can go by he/e w^ithcut he say 
•Cambridge.* " 

• 

Knowing. 

Life: What Is knowing something? It ta 
having lived through an actual experience of 
it; of being able to compare it with other 
actual experiences; of misjudging it, and 
then being forced into correcting one's mis- 
judgment; handling it, turning it about and 
looking upon it from all sides, and of medi- 
tating upon It. 

This takes time. That Is why our young 
people know so little. They mistake a glib 
rendering of facts for the real thing. Ther 
think they know, but they don't. 

Amendments. 

Judge: "Could you be satisfied with loy« 
in a cottage?" he asked. 

f'Surely." said she. "If it were at Palm 
Beach in the winter, at Pasadena in the 
spring, at Newport in the sunuuer and at 
L.enox In th« autunin." 



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Wcdncsday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 29, 1916. 



THE OPEN COURT 



(Readers of The Herald are Ir.vlteii to make free u»« 
of this oclumri to esjiress their Ideaa about the topifs 
«f rwifal Interwt, but <liSfU»;'>ri9 ff «ectarlan f*"*" 
lou» differences are barred. Letters m^ist nrt exceed 
too vfcrds— the ahtile nhe better. TT.ey miist be writ- 
ten on cue side of the p«>€T nib', and they must bo 
accomc-anled Jn etery fase by the name and adcresa or 
Uie writer thru«h lh«e neeti n« be publislied. A 
•ieoed leuw la always mwe efffttlfe, however. J 

'TWAS A~FAM0US'VICT0RY. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

1 inclc'e verses on the Battle of j 
Blenhf^im, " which, according to my j 
thinking-, just about parallels some of ! 
the "great victories" in the present i 
European conflict. J. W. S. 

Angora, Minn., Sept. 27. 



"TK« Battle of Dlenlkelm.'* 

It was a summer evening. 

Old Kaspar's work was done. 

And he before his cottage door 
Was sitting in the sun. 

And by htm sported on the green 

His little grandchild, Wilhelmlne. 

She saw her brother, Peterkln, 
Roll something large and round, 

"Which he beside the rivulet 
In playing there had found; 

He came to ask what he had found, 

That was so large and smooth and round. 

• 
Old Kaspar took It from the boy, 

W^ho stood expectant by; 
And then the old man shook his head. 

And with a natural Righ. 
'"Tls some poor fellow's skull," said he, 
"Who fell in the great victory. 

"I find them in the garden. 

For there's many hereabout; 
And often, when I go tr> plough 

The plougshare turns them out; 
For many thousand men," said he, 
"Were alain in that great victory." 

••Now tell us what 'twas all about," 

Young Peterkln he cries; 
"While little Wilhelmlne looks up 

With wonder-waiting eyes; 
"Now tell us all about the war. 
And what they fought each other for.' 

"It was the Engli.'?h," Kaspar cried. 

"TV'ho put th*^ French to rout; 
But what they fought each other for, 

I could not well make out. 
But everybody said," quoth he, 
"That 'twas a famous victory. 

••My father lived at Blenheim then. 

Ton little stream hard by; 
They burned his dwelling to the ground. 

And he was forced to fly; 
So wlt^ his wife and child he fled. 
Nor had he where to rest his head. 

"With f!re and sword the country round 

Was wasted far and wide, 
And many a childing mother then. 

And new-born baby, died; 
But things lilce that, you know, must be 
At every famous victory. 

"Great praise the Duke of Marlboro* 
won. 

And our good Prlnoe "Rugene." 
"Why, 'twas a verv wicked thing!" 

Said little Wilhelmlne. 
"Nay — nay — my little girl." quoth he, 
"It was a famous victory." 

"And everybody praised the duke 
Who this great fight did win." 

"And what good came of it at last?" 
Ouoth little Peterkln. 

"Why. that I cannot tell," said he, 

"But 'twas a famous victor^'." 

— Robert Southey. 



AMERICAN SYSTEM IS 

ROOTED IN PRACTICE 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

It is easy to see how one who Is 
given to superstition should trust in 
charms and divinations, gunpowder 
and hellflre as a system of national 
defen.se. 

But w^e pride ourselves In America 
on being practical, and testing every 
contrivance by its performance. A.s a 
practical people we want a practical 
eystem of national defense. 

We have at present a system of de- 



A^fl^SEMEXTS 




KINDS OF RHEUMATISM 

In popular language the word rheu- 
matism is a term that covers a multi- 
tude of Ills of which pain is the chief 
symptom. 

Articular rheumatism, inflammatory 
rheumatism and rheumatic fever are 
all names for the same disease. Mus- 
cular rheumatism affects the muscles 
and does not spread from one spot to 
another like Inflammatory rheuma- 
Uim. Lvimbago is a form of muscular 
rheumatism. 

Sonne people have rheumatism every 
winter especially those people who in- 
herit a rheumatic tendency. They will 
continue to have recurring attacks un- 
til the blood is built up to a strength 
sufficient to overcome the rheumatic 
poision. External applications and 
drugs that simply relieve the pain are 
useless. Dr. Williams' Pink Pills build 
up the blood and really correct the 
trouble. 

With the poisons in the blood there 
is a continual combat between the 
health forces and the disease. When 
the rheumatic poison prevails the 
blood gets thin rapidiy. When the 
blood is made rich and red by Dr. 
Williams' Pink Pills the poisons are 
destroyed and expelled. 

The free booklet "Building Ip the 
Blood" tells the whole story and the 
diet book "What to Eat" will be sent 
on request by the Dr. Williams Medi- 
cine Co., Schenectady, N. Y. Your own 
druggist sells Dr. Williams' Pink Pills. 



WHISKY IS 
MINUS "KICK" 



Barney Madden Claims 

Brewing Company Sold 

Him Water. 



Gets Verdict When Sued 

for the Saloon He 

Bought. 



ferse that has worked perfectly 
through administration after adminis- 
tration, which has been advanced by 
president after president Xo wider 
scope, which has been pushed by sec- 
retary after secretary to new strength. 

IJncoln, Grant, Cleveland, Roosevelt, 
Wilson, Blaine, Hay, Fish, Bryan and 
many others have built up this Ameri- 
can system of defense until it is suffi- 
cient for any occasion wc can imagine. 

The people have settled on this sys- 
tem of defense. They cling to it as the 
national system. That poet who wrote 
America's message, 
"Peace to the world from ports without 

a gun," 
spoke with insight of the American 
mind. 

Those who wish us to turn from this 
system to that of the Old World them- 
selves testify that this Is the American 
system, and it is approved by the great 
body of " the people. For years they 
complain that they have been urging 
on congress the necessity of prepared- 
ness — and congress would not listen to 
them. 

Now, if anything is certain, it Is 
that congress will do whatever the 
people want when it is urged upon it 
by earnest people, having influential 
papers to speak for them and power- 
ful officers of the government at the 
ear of the congressional committees 
every minute. 

The people may be mistaken in their 
policy, but the fact that the system of 
national defense heretofore established 
is that which the people wished is 
proved by the very vehemence of those 
who urge us to change. Their railing 
at congress is the best sign the people 
have been content with the prevailing 
system. 

They want us to change that system. 
They want us to be prepared the way 
Europe was prepared, to be on guard 
with finger on the trigger, as Europe 
was on guard. 

The burden of proof is on them. 

As a practical people, wo insist that 
they shall prove that a failure is better 
than a success before we follow their 
advice. As a people in whom tradition 
is strong, we shall insist that they 
demonstrate the superiority of the Old 
World apparatus before we abandon 
the simple American system of national 
defense. 

INNOCENT BYSTANDER, 

Duluth. Sept. 28. 

QUESTIONS AND 
ANSWERS 

This department does net pretend t« be Infallible. 
It will endeavor, however, to anawer Questions sent to 
It by readers of Tlie Herald to the best cf Its ability, 
reserving tlie right to Ignore all that are trilUn* or 
of coiicem only to the aue.-tloner, or that ask for ad- 
vice on legal or mefUcal Questl. ns. 

To receive atterition, every Inquiry must bear the 
name and atJdrees of the person sendiiia It. This Is 
■lit wanted for publication, but as au evide&c* of 
;:o id faith. 



When Bernard J. Madden purchased 
the Benedict Vail saloon business at 
L.ake avenue and Superior street from 
the Val Blatz Brewing company a year 
ago, he agreed to pay $875, but soon 
found he had made a bad bargain. 

A Jury in district court aired the 
circumstances of the deal in an action 
brought by the brewing company to re- 
cover $1,009.60 from Madden, and yes- 
terday brought in a verdict in favor 

of the defendant. They found that 
the brewing company was entitled to 
receive nothing. 

Madden testified, among other things, 
that two barrels of gin and whisky, 
for which he agreed to pay $160, de- 
veloped to be only water. The electric 
light fixtures for which he was to 
pay $125 were gone, he said. Evidence 
was also Introduced to show that the 
brewing company had purchased the 
saloon on an execution saJe for $100. 

Madden also claimed that the brew- 
ery overcharged him on his beer ac- 
count from $1 to $1.50 a barrel, and 
did not give him credit for his rent 
when he paid it. The company sought 
to recover $600 rent from him but the 
Jury disallowed the claim. 

Arnold & Arnold appeared as at- 
torneys for the brewing company, and 
Charles McCoy of McCoy & Hanson, 
represented Madden. 

LIKES PLAN OF ~ 

CHECKING AUTOS 



"THE BLINDNESS 
OF VIRTUE" 

Featuring KU.V V >I AVO and 
BRYAN WASUnURN. 

MntineeJi — lOr, nil se»tm. 

.\iK>>t price*! — Mnlii Floor A Boxes, 

25ci Dalcony, 10c. 
Symphony orohCKtra of 12 artlntfi. 



! Fred Pearson, Duluth: Will you 
please give me full information re- 

1 gardlng final naturali:zation papers. 

i What questions will I be asked and 

I what answers must I live? 

Answer — Questions differ more or 
less, according to the judge who holds 
the hearing, but they usually follow 
along general lines. Any person de- 
siring citizenship papers may get full 
information on all these points by ask- 
ing or writing the clerk of the district 
court, courthouse, Duluth, or clerk of 
the United States district court, Duluth. 
J. P. Johnson, clerk of the district 
cotirt, ha« prepared a pamphlet on 
this subject called "How to Become 
Naturalized." These are given away 
to all applicants. 



ALWAYS 
A GOOD 
SHOW 



NEW 



GRAND 



11 A. M. 

INTILi 

11 P. M. 



CHATRES SISTERS & HOLLIDAY 

In 'The S-^ioo Models and the Flotr Walker. ■» 
CLARENCE and FLO GOULD - CALLOWAY and ELLIOT 

SWAIN'S COCKATOOS 

Florence Rockwell In 'The Purple Night.' 
Concert Orchestr*— Phot»,ilay« de Luxe. 



MATS.IOi^"'' 



Seat 



NiTES I0o-2lo 



ANOTHER POPULAR PLAY AND 
PLAYER AT THE 

ZELD A 

T«i <l a J- n II si Tomorr o w. 

JOHN NINES & MARTHA HEDMAN 
In the Comedy-Drama 



66 



T.,augh.v and Thrlllfi. 



99 



Friday and Saturday — ^What you 
have been ^^altlng tor — Mrs. Leslie 
Carter In "The Heart of Marjland." 



S. I.,iberman. Houghton, Mich. — Will 
you kindly answer this question, in 
The Herald? My father came to the 
United States six years ago. T was 
then 16 years of age and he got out his 
first papers as soon bs he g'^>t to the 
United States, with the intention of 
becoming a citizen, but delaying game 
he has not taken out his sfcond pa- 
pers yet, but he will take them out 
in a short time. Am I a citizen, or do 
I have to take out papers for myself? 

Ans. — Your father not being a citi- 
zen of the United States before you 
became of age, it will be necessary 
for you to take out citizenship papers 
for yourself. 

COMPANY CANNOT 
FIX RESALE PRICE 



Safety CommissionerWould 
Help Registration at In- 
terstate Bridge. 

Commissioner Sllbersteln, safety 
head, favors the suggestion that all 
automobiles crossing the interstate 
bridge should be registered with the 
toll collector. 

"It would be a good Idea," he said 
today, "to assist the police in locating 
automobiles involved in accidents in 
either Duluth or Superior. If sucli 
a plan can be carried out, I will gladly 
co-operate with the bridge officials in 
bringing the registration system 
about." 

The plan was proposed by West end 
business men following the accident in 
Superior the other night, when a Min- 
nesota automobile ran over William 
Sweetman as he stepped from a street 
car. The driver of the machine failed 
to stop and continued on his way, al- 
though a pedestrian saw that the au- 
tom.oblle bore -a Minnesota tag. 

It is pointed out that if all cars go- 
ing to or from Superior were registered 
and an accident occurred, the police 
would be able to know all the cars 
that crossed the bridge. Their work 
would be greatly facilitated, especially 
when It is known that a Minnesota or 
Wisconsin car was in an accident in 
Superior or Duluth respectively. 

FIRE PREVENTIOll 

DAY IN SCHOOLS 



REX 



THE THEATER 
BEAl TTFIL 



JOHN BARRYMORE 



-in- 



" Ttie Incorrigible DuRane ** 

YounK' scapesraco — but he doea 

make good, auil he'M eoing (o 

marry the girl. 

••MEAL OF THE NAVY" 

First Installment endit tonight at 

THE LYRIC. 



LYCEUM ™~'- 



ALL WEEK 



Night and Saturday MatinM, 23e. SOo. 75fl 
tl.OO, SI. SO. 



Another Cohan t Harris 

Success 

ON TRIAL 

A Play of Powerful Intensity 



Popular 

Matinee 

Wednesday 

Best 

Saata 

$1.00. 



ORIGINAL CHICAGO CAST. 



Kellogg Toasted Corn 
Flakes Company En- 
joined By Court. 

Detroit, Mich.. Sept. 29.— The Kel- 
logg Toasted Com Flakes company of 
Battle Creek Is permanently enjoined 
from fixing the resale price on its 
product by a consent decree announced 
yesterday In United States district 
court here in the government's anti- 
trust suit against the Kellogg concern. 
The decree takes effect after Oct. 16, 
of this year, and Is considered highly 
Important because it established a pre-, 
cedent against the fixing of resale 
prices on food products. 

The government brought suit against 
the Kellogg company in December, 
1913, alleging the defendants had no 
legal authority to fix the resale prlco 
of their property or to suggest or 
warn jobbers that if they refused to 
carry out the fixed price agreement, 
they would be cut off from further 
supply of toasted corn flakes. 

The defendants contended they were 
not violating tho law, inasmuch as 
the notice to jobbers concerning the 
resale price was printed on a car- 
ton, containing the products which 
had been patented with the notice on. 
The patent, they claimed, made It legal 
for them to handle their product in that 
way. 

According to the decree, however, the 
company is not only permanently en- 
joined from fixing the resale price, but 
it must also refrain from using on its 
cartoons or boxes the notice concern- 
ing the fixed price. 



Observance Will Be Held 

Friday, Oct. 8, This 

Year. 

Schools will observe flre-preventlon 
day, Oct. 8, according to announcement 
yesterday by City Supt. of Schools R. 
E. Denfeld. Definite plans for the pro- 
gram to be presented have not been 
made. 

State Fire Marshal Robert Hagardlne 
has sent to every school superinten- 
dent in Minnesota a copy of Governor 
Hammond's proclamation setting aside 
Saturday, Oct. 9, as fire prevention day. 

Inasmuch as there is no school on 
this day, which Is the anniversary of 
the great Chicago fire in 1871, the 
governor has suggested that schools 
make their observance on the previous 
day. Interest in proper methods of 
fire prevention will be aroused in chil- 
dren by this program, it is hoped. 

C. G. Schulz, state superintendent of 
public instruction, has given permis- 
sion to the fire marshal to send to the 
superintendents of schools material for 
essays, addresses and programs to bo 
presented In the classroom. 

WILL mscuss" 

REMOVAL OF FLAG 

Company C. Will Decide 

Whether to Give Banner 

to County. 

The advisability of giving up the 
flag of Company "C," which followed 
that organization while it served in 
the Fourteenth Minnesota regiment 
during the Spanish war, will prob- 
ably be discussed this everting at the 
meeting of the company at the armory. 
The flag is now being used as ono 
of the decorations of the company's 
club room Veteran organizations v.-ant 
the flag turned over to the Memorial 
hall as a county relic ^ . ^. 

"A committee appoint&d by the com- 
nany some time ago to make inquir- 
ies as to the parting with" the flag, 
renorf^d unfavorably," said First 
I Icut R. C. N«Ieon this morning. "The 
company Is now preparing to move 
to the new armory and expects to use 
thQ flflg for decorating its club room. 

'•The company is without funds to 
riprorate its club room properly, and 
the flag would prove valuable for that 
nurposl. AS I am a member of both 
organizations. I am neutral on the 

""Tavt^y' O.' F?odVn* ind Lieut. Nel- 
son are the only members of Company 
C at the present time who were en- 
listed In the company during the Span. 
!sh war. 



CASTOR I A 

For Infants and Children. 

The Kind You Have Always Bought 



Bears the 
eiffxxatnre of 




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To the appeal of the KlflUMBLES flavor, 
every appetite is that of a hungry boy. 

Not merely a new flavor, but a new kind of flavon 
No one else ever thought of preparing Wheat just this 
way and bringing out its full na tural sweetness. 

KRUMBLES — the whole of the Wheat — cooked, 
"'krumbled" and delicately toasted. 

Take a saucerful of KRUMBLES, with cream or 
milk. See how new the flavor is — and how pleasing! 

The longer you chew KRUMBLES the better it 
tastes. 

KRUMBLES is waiting for you at your grocer's. 



1 (\ cents, in the Kellogg: 
11/ ^A^AXTITE package, 
which keeps the fresh, good 
flavor in— and all other flavors 
out. 



Look for this Signature — 



SLAYER OF WIFE FEELS 
BITTER STING OF REMORSE 



Neighbors Do Not Believe 
Andrew Streem intended 
to Kill. : 



C-harge of Murder Will Be 
Made By County Attor- 
ney Greene. 



Feeling keenly the bitter stings of 
remorse, Andrew Streem, 47 years, ac- 
cused of having shot and killed his 
wife, Mrs. Wllhemena Streem, 46 
years, yesterday about noon nt their 
home on the Luzerne road, spent a 
restless night In the St. Loais county 
jail where he was placed within two 
hours after tho tragedy. 

General circumstances surrounding 
tho death of the woman makes >t un- 
necessary to hold an inquest, accord- 
ing to County Attorney Warren E. 
Greene and Coroner Dr. C. F. McComb; 
but an autopsy will be held sometime 
today and then the prisoner will be 
charged with murder, the degree not 
having been decided upon as yet. 
Killing Not Intentional. 

That Streem had no intention of 
killing his wife Is the belief of the 
neighbors and of Coroner McComb. 
Whisky is blamed for the homicide. 
Streem, according to the neighbors, 
had been Indulging freely in liquor 
and had been In a drunken stupor 
since last Friday. 

Just before the tragedy yesterday 
morning O. W. Haglund, dairyman, 
residing on the Peterson farm on the 
Howard-Gnesen road, two and one- 
half miles distant from the Streem 
home, called at the latter place to 
make his regular morning delivery 
of milk. He says that when he en- 
tered the house, Mrs. ftjeem offered 
him a bottle of beer and that he drank 
part of it. Streem was In the kitchen 
toying with a shotgun. A half -pint 
whisky flask, partially drained, stood 
on the table. Streem was drunk, ac- 
cording to liaglund. 

"As I was leaving the house, some 
cattle were heading Into the garden 
and Mrs. Streem ran to chase them 
away" he said. "Her husband, stand- 
ing in the door with the shotgun in 
his hands, shouted to her to leave the 
cattle alone. As she proceeded on her 
errand, he said: 'If you chase those 
cows I will shoot your The woman 
paid no heed to the threat and in a 
second I heard the report of the gun, 
felt a stinging sensatlori in my back 
which was toward the husband, and 
saw Mrs. Streem fall prostrate in the 
field Blood was spattered on the right 
aide of her forehead. Sb© breathed 



heavily, raised her head for a moment, 
the.*e was a gurgling noise from her 
throat, her head fell back and she 
never moved after that. 

"Streem, stupid from whisky, 
drawled: 'What's matter with the 
wife?' He asked me to pick her up. 1 
told him she was dead. Then he acted 
like an Insane man. He shouted and 
yelled something awful. I wen^ Into 
the bedroom to telephone to the police 
and Streem fell on the bed and rmide 
so much noise that I could not make 
central understand what 1 wanted. I 
then went to Ye English Inn. near 
Calva.'y cemetery, and telephoned 
from there." 

"Fine Fallow When Sober." 

Allen Shaw, carpenter residing at 
721 East Second street, and who owns 
a tract of land near the Streem acres, 
said Streem had been drinking heavily 
since last Friday and for that reason 
was unable to do some fence building 
for him that he intended to do. "Streem 
Is a fine fellow when sober," said Mr. 
Shaw. "When he drinks he Is worth- 
less. He Is a good workman and very 
handy. I do not believe that he in- 
tended to kill his wife." 

Neighbors told of how Streem had 
just bought a large amount of clap- 
board with which to make his little 
home warm and cozy for the long win- 




ter months, 
wood in the 
about the pla 
condition. T 
all the pota' 
vegetables tl 
the winter, tl 
in the house, 
fered, by nei; 
keep him bui 

Added pat! 
of the murd* 
tie Joe, the 
Streems, whc 
milk pans 
place. Upon 
mother pros 
the rough g 
with her bio 
him. First 1 
as the nelgl 
he assumed { 
gan to stra 
house. He i 
money which 
but learned 
It when the 
him to Jail. 
Boy 

W^hen the 
oner had fin 
ing the body, 
examtrilng w 
maltese kitt< 
shaggy monj 
was boosted 
bulance. He 
leave his an 
cause they 
anyway, he > 
with him in 
kitten were 
boy will mal 
ter, Mrs. Jao 
Fourth stree 

Before lea 
Ined Haglun( 
Imbedded In 
left shoulder 
sting he fel 
ceived her f 

The Streer 
i bing a num 
the husband 
About eight 
Duluth, makl 
end. Last J 
their three-8 
road, where 
enacted. Str 
was born in 
Finn. 



^terttttflGum 

The7-point^um 



MrVCHMINT - MO WMAPVCII 
CINNAMON -•UlCWRAMVa 



There was plenty of hard- 
back yard and things 
ce generally were In good 
le little garden contained 
oes, carrots and other 
lat w^ould be needed for 
lere was about $90 in cash 
and Streem had been of- 
?hbors, work sufficient to 
■ y until spring, 
los was lent to the scene 
•r by the presence of lit- 
15-year-old son of the 
had been in town buying 
?(rhen the shooting took 
his return he saw his 
:rate In death, lying on 
round of the open field 
od-stained face turned to 
e wept bitterly and then, 
ibors offered consolation, 
. business-like air and he- 
ighten things about the 
searched the building for 
he knew his mother had, 
:hat his father had taken 
deputy sheriffs escorted 

Take* Pet Away. 

county attorney and cor- 
shed their work of view- 
sketching the grounds and 
itnesses. little Joe, with a 
n under one arm and a 
rrel dog under the other, 
into a seat on the am- 
said he did not want to 
Imal playmates there be- 
might get hungry and, 
fould prefer to h.ave them 
ifte city. Joe, the dog and 
brought to Duluth. The 
ce his home with his sis- 
>b Nystrom of 428 Vis West 

ving, the officers exam- 
\'a back and found a shot 

the flesh, just below the 
blade. This explained the 
I when Mrs. Streem re- 
ntal wound. 

IS were married In Hib- 
ber of years ago, wheie 
was a logging contractor. 
yea,rs ago they moved to 
ng their home in the West 
anuary they moved onto 
ere tract on tlie Luzerne 

yesterday's traeredy was 
eem, according to his son, 
Russia and is a Swedish- 



banqui: t at y , m. c. a. 

Officers and Committeemen Will Out- 



line Year's Work. 



Plans for i 
coming wint 
various comr 
given in hon 
o'clock this ( 

B. C. Wad 
elation, will i 
the last year, 
report on tl 
this winter, 
dent of the { 
the banquet. 

The followl 
Boys' depart 
McCabe and ' 
J. J. Moe an 
E. Congdon i 
Hoshour and 
ployment. H 
Harris; rellg 
Wheeler and 
G. Wilson an 
Matter and 
finance, F. E 



he Y. M. C. A. during tha 
er will be made by the 
ilttces at a banquet to be 

Dr of the members at 6:16 

venlng. 

e, secretary of the asso- 

nake a report on the w^ork 

while the committees will 
le activities outlined for 

Watson S. Moore, presi- 
Esoclation, will preside at 

ng committees will report: 

ment. R. Duncan, W. J. 

,V. D. McLeod; educational, 

d A. G. Turner; physical, 

md A. F. Olson; social, H. 

W. S. Lauterbach; em- 

F. Salyard and S. W. 

lous and extension, B. N. 

J. S. Hauter; membership, 

d C. Oblinger; house, S. B. 

F. A. Hathaway, and 

. Houa*. 



ROTARIANS TO HOLD 

MONTHLY BANQUET 

Duluth Rotarians will hold their 
monthly banquet tomorrow^ evening in 
the ball room of the Spalding hotel. 
Harry W. Zinsmaster, chairman of the 
entertainment committee, has prom- 
ised an interesting and novel program. 

Secretary Gravatt will deliver th* 
principal speech of the evening. He 
will give his own personal impressions 
of the national convention. The ban- 
quet will start at 6:15 o'clock. 

comma¥dant of navy 
yard dies s uddenly 

Philadelphia, Sept. 29. — Capt. John 
J. Knapp. commandant of the 
Philadelphia navy yard, died at tha 
naval hospital here last night from 
apoplexy. He was stricken at his 
desk es he was about to start on his 

physical test walk of ten miles. Sev- 
eral months ago, the commandant suf- 
fered a mild stroke, but quickly re- 
covered and resumed his duties. 

Capt. Knapp was 58 years old and 
graduated from the naval academy In 
1878, having been appointed in 1874 
from Missouri. He served in many 
parts of the world and was commis- 
sioned captain in 1910. He commanded 
the battleship Connecticut and in 1904 
was made a member of the naval ex- 
amining board. He succeeded Rear 
Admiral Benson as commandant of the 
local yard last June. 

Capt. Knapp is survived by a widow 
and one son, who Is a paymaster in 
the navy. 

BED-TIPPING CLOCK 
GIVEN TO UN IVERSITY 

San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 29. — John 
Muir's famous clock which, in addition 
to keeping time, awoke him in tha 
morning by tipping his bed, will be- 
come the property of the University 
of Wisconsin at the close of the Pan- 
ama-Pacific exposition. Mulr invented 
the clock many years ago. The daugh- 
ters of the naturalist have offered the 
clock to the Wisconsin institution, 
which Muir attended in the early six- 
ties, and the gift was accepted. 




MOHAWK 

MADE WITH 
• LIP-OVER OUTTONHOLK 



TIK SLIDES EASILY 




7on 



OLDEST BRAND 



(pilars 



IK 



IN AMERICA 



NITtO «MII>T » CO L L * ■ C O . T • O » M . 1 M 






* r 



*« ^ ■ ■ , .^.. 



V * "^ i > > < e » u .i-fjiatJ- ' . 



y»i»ii, »■ ,»««-» .. ' 11 «■ % 



I ■ ■ < • 



; 




^ 



10 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 29, 1915. 



DULUTH PRIZE-WINNING HffiD 
STAGGERS MONTANA CAnLE M 



FRIENDS TAKE lOY OUT OE LIFE 
FOR POUNDMASTEfh DAVID KOLL 



ships. 



Jean Duluth Farm Entries l^^^^^vj^^^ 
Capture Many Prizes atth'"' 



new 



twenty firsts, seven seconcis, 

•ds and three fourth prizes. 

s anJ Red Polls were the 

entries of the Duluth breeders, 

latter strain being comparatively 

to Montana. When It was au- 

Heiena Show and Their each'^averaged 535 pounds of butter, 

the we.stern cattle men could not be- 
lieve it. Montana cows average about 
90 pounds. 

Content Wlnnem. 
Jean Duluth Millie, advanced regis- 
try. Red Poll, won first prize in both 
the milk and the butter contests, 
which covered two days. One of the 
Guirnseys in the contest has a record 
I of 5.000 pounds of milk in three months 
during which period she established 
i an official record of 616 pounds of 
I butter fat. A Brown Swiss entry has 



Fine Showing Amazes Men 
of Real Cattle Section. 



The exceptional showing mode by 
the Jean l>uluth farm entries of this 
city at the annual cattle show held In 
Helena last week so amazed the Mon- 



lose i% pretty 
some protec- 



"The city's going to 
quick. If I don't get 
tion." 

David Koll. 312 East Eighth street, 
nr.unlcipal poundmaster in gharge of 
the Third district, was telephoning 
lice headquarters and Operator Ralph 
Lutz at once sent a bluecoat on horse- 
back hurrying with the "protection." 

The $2 was saved, for the unruly cow 
was locked up, despite the protests of 
neighbors, and Poundmaster Koll sat 
down to wait for the owner to claim 
the animal and pay the pound fee. 

"I'm losing all my friends," said 



Koll, "since I got this job It seems as 
though' every friend I've had lets his 



cow wander around until I have to put 
her in the.pound." 

"Of ^ou|fse," he added. smiling, 
philosophiolClly, "if you've got a good ".^V"'^;!!}? 
'^'' i job and th* money is coming in O. K., 
Po- you don't. ^&are so much about the 
friends*^ 

"A dollar is your best friend, isn't 
itr- t >' 

Koirs experiences have been many 
and varied since he began the work 
of protecting people's gardens from 
unruly bovines, and once or twice the 
"protection" of the police has come in 
handy. , , . 

Recently an officer found an irate 



citizen astride KoU's neck and the 
poundmaster was reclining on the 
ground in a very undignified position 
for a man of his office. 

"He said he was going to kill me," 
said Koll as he brushed off the dust, 
"and I wouldn't be surprised if he 
meant it. He looked it. 

"He wanted to get his cow out with- 
out paying the $2, but I've got a pat- 
ent lock on that barn door and he 
couldn't open it." 

Although Safety Commissioner Sil- 
bersteln doesn't recommend w^reatling 
matches with citizens as diversion for 
poundmasters, he has taken official 
recognition of Roll's energy by an- 
that he will be k^ot on the 
citv payroll ail winter. Four other 
poundmasters In that district will be 
dismissed Oct. 1. 



from the farm ol Fred Freudenrelch 
and sons in Rlpl 'y town. They had 
thirty acres in Marquis wheat which 
yielded an averaga of forty-five bush- 
els per acre of N>. 1 hard grain. The 
wheat was raised on well cultivated 
clover sod. Bailey and oats also 
reached a high yield on the same farm, 
the former averaging fifty bushels to 
the acre and the latter ninety. 



SUNDAY SCHOOL ENTERTAINS. 



BIG WHE.M YIELD 

IN MORRISON COUNTY 



Little Falls. Minn., 
largest acre yield of 
this year In 



Sept. 29. — The 

wheat reported 

Morrison county is that 



Intermediates ard Seniors of First 
Presbyterian Church Guests. 

Members of th ; Intermediate and 
senior classes of the First Presby- 
terian Sunday school entertained at 
a social in the church parlors last 
evening. About iOO persons attended 
the entertainment. 

J. R, Batchelor, superinteivdent of 
the school, was i i charge of the pro- 
gram, which Included a series of 
games and contests. One of the most 
Interesting was a candy hunt, in 
which four tet^ns, grouped as Yale. 
Harvard, Princeton and Cornell, took 



part. Tale, captained by J. Browiii 
Jr., won with thirteen points; Cornell, 
J. Carsen, captain, second; Princeton, 
N. Marvin, captain, third, and Har- 
vard, L.. A. Marvin, captain fourth. 

The entertainment last night, ac- 
cording to Mr. Batchelor, was th« 
most successful ever given by th« 
school. 

< ■ • 

Building of the New York barg« 
canal made necessary the constructi(Hi 
of forty dams. 

■ ' • — 

Bridge is a popular Indoor game m 
India, among both the Europeans and 
the natives. 
___^ J 



PURE SEIDIITZ POWDERS 

If your doctor recommends you to use S«ldlit2 
Powders, be sur» to get them at Wirth'» Dmo 
Stor«. Wo make a specialty of putting up abso- 
lutely pure Foivdcrs. Pre ;ared from Squib!)'* 
Chemicals on'y. FREE DELIVERY. 

WIRTH'S DRUG STORE 

13 West Superior Street. 



i 



I 

n 



tana cattle men that they have 
yet recovered from the surprise. Mon- 
tana being one of the greatest cattle 
states In the Union, the ranchers of 
that section i.f the country cannot un- 
derstand how St. Louis county, Minn., 
supposed to be a mining and lumber- 
ing center, can raise prize stock. 

The annual cattle show In Montana 

is the last word In this kind of an ex- 
position, the very aristocrats of highly 
bred dairy cows and b'-ef cattle being 
entered ev^ry year. And then to think 
that Duluth should step right In with 
Its herds and grab eleven champion- 




not , a record of 600 pounds of butter. 

j Teddy's Best (bull) was awarded the 

! grand championship for Red Polls. 

; Jean Duluth Millie was second. 

I Rochampton Gov. II (bull) was award- 

i ed the grand championship for Guern- 

sevs, and also won the senior cham- 

j pionship. The junior first and the 

1 grand championship was captured by 

;Ftarli;?ht Excelsior (bull), while Daisy 

i de la Forge (cow) was awarded a first 

' and a senior championship. Williams' 

May Rose (cow) won a senior first 

and grand championship. 

The- Duluth herd has been shipped 
from Helena to Salem. Or., where they 
will show this week, and then go to 
San Francisco, where they are entered 
In the Panama-Pacific exposition and 
will compete against the very best 
cattle from every section of the coun- 
try. 



BAD WEATHER MARS 
INDIAN EXHIBITION 




Annual Fond du Lac Fair 

at Cloquet Closes 

Today- 

CloQiiet, Minn., Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Unfavorable weather 
has marred the second annual fair of 
the Fond du Lac Indians, which closes 
here this evening. The attendance yes- 
terday was very good considering the 
handicap of th^^ cold northeaster, and 
about 500 people were on the fair 
grounds during the day. Probably 200 
of the?).' were Indians, the' residents 
of Cloquet forming the rest of the 
crowd. 

Of special Interest was the fine dis- 
play of vegetables, the root crops being 
rsmarkably good. The potato display 
attracted the most attention in this 
department. The needlework and bead 
work of the women were also very 
fine. A creditable display of poultry 
was also shown. Most of the farm 
animals are being brought In this 
mitrning, many of the Indian farmers 
taking especial pride in their fine draft 
horses. The awards will be announced 
this afternoon. 



Just the thing as a card prize, 
bridge or place favor, or as a 
small remembrance for any oc- 
casion. 



Bagley 

Store ]r] 



TtM 



^ 



ROLFF IS RE-ELECTED 
AT FRISCO PRIMARIES 



ompany 

Jcxi'ciers and Silversmiths 

315 West Superior Street 

Established 18S5 



Low Shoes 

Counted Out 

Comm3R Sense the Referee! 

High Shoes 

Bring Health! 



The New 

Gypsy 

Boot 




For women, 
ful and grac 



Styles are so beauti- 
eful and better than 
ever this house of Good Shoes has 
shown before. 



Men's and Young 
Men's Bigh- 
Grade 




Receives Majority of Votes 

Cast and Does Not Have 

to Run Again. 

San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 29 — Early to- 
day the re-election of James Rolph, Jr., 
at the primaries as mayor of San 
Francisco was conceded by all of his 
opponents in the election. This Is the 
second time that Mr. Rolph has been 
elected In the primaries and is said to 
constitute a record. Under the Cali- 
fornia law a candidate who receives a 

majority of all votes cast for the of- 
fice in the primaries Is elected with- 
out the necessity of running again. 

Eugene E. Schmltz, former mayor, 
who was deposed during the graft 
prosecutions of 1906-07, after his con- 
viction on a charge of extortion, ran 
a poor second, and Supervisor Andrew 
J. Gallagher was far in the rear In 
third place. Xone of the five other 
candidates polled any considerable 
vote. 

At 1 o'clock this morning when the 
registrar's force stopped counting, com- 
plete returns from 189 out of a total of 
651 precincts gave Rolph 16,396 votes; 
Schinitz, 8,059, and Gallagher. 3.401. 



DULUTH MAN 

WED IN CLOQUET 

Cloquet, Minn., Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The marriage of Miss 
Irene Dorland of Couderay, Wis., and 
John A. Buluw of Duluth, took place 
at the Wright hotel In this city to- 
day, where the bride and her mother, 
Mrs. S. Dorland, have been visiting 
with Mr. and Mrs. Joshua Wright. The 
I ceremony was performed in the hotel 
I parlors at 3 o'clock by Rev. T. T. 
I R')an. pastor of Our Saviour's Norwe- 
gian Lutheran church, and the attend- 
ing couple were Mr. and Mrs. John A. 
Berg. The bridal couple left this aft- 
ernoon for a motor trip to Milwau- 
kee, Wis., where they will remain for 
a month before taking up their resi- 
dence in Duluth. 



$1.00 Listerine 67c. 

Pebecco, 37c; 25c Lysol, 17c; 25c Sal 



Hepatica. 15. 
sale. 



Gray's semi-annual drug 



Cherrapongee, In Southwestern 
Assam, i.s one of the rainiest places 
on the glftbe. The precipitation is 458 
inches annually, but in 1861 it was 
nearly double that figure. 



New fall styles in. 
STACY. ADAMS CO. 

'"Xone better." 



HUNTING BOOTS 

for Men and WOiuen. 



222 WEST FIRST STREET. 








Lowest prices of the season Thursday, Friday and Saturday— Mail orders 
promptly filled at advertised prices-Cash with order and sent express collect 



Imported Olive Oil 
—Pure 

We boliove this Is a very superior 
Olive on — ta.ste It. We'll open a 
buttle of it for you to try I 



39c 

for 30c bottle 



69c 

for 75c bottle 




THE STORE FOR SERVICE 

113-115-117-119 West Superior St., Duluth, Minn. 



Peroxide of Hydrogen 



We offer 
your doctor, 
rodt's. 



Mallincki-odt's. Ask 
Ho knows Mallinck- 



rc I 5c 27c 



for 4 oz 
16c bottle 



for 8 oa 
25c bottle 



for 16 oz 
BOc bottle 



CUT OUT THIS AD— Check the Items You Want— Bring in Your List Tomorrow 
—Lay in a Supply Here Now— It Will Be Six Months Till Our Next Big Drug Sale! 

\/0U ARE RIGHT fortunate in being able to buy these goods at these prices, 
Y and we are fortunate to have such a goodly lot to offer at these prices. 



15c 

For 
Wyeth's 

25c 

Sal 
Hepatica 




Fletcher's Castoria 23c 

Stuart's 50c Dyspepsia Wafers. 34c 
50c California Syrup of Figs ... 33c 

50c Canthrox .39c 

1 lb. Absorbent Cotton 23c 

25c Bromo Seltzer 17c 

Horlick's Malted Milk, hospital 

gi^e •• y^.oU 

Horlick's Malted Milk, $1 size. .75c 
25c W itch Hazel, extra strong . . 15c 



L 



These Dollar Prcparations^67c 

$1.00 Listerine 67c 

$1.00 Herpicide 67c 

$1.00 Danderine 67c 

fl m ( $1.00 Scott's Emulsion ... 67c 

II iO } $1.00 Pierce's Favorite 

V ■ V I Prescription 67c 




50c Sal Hepatica 39c 

25c Sal Hepatica 15c 

Hof f ' 3 25c German Liniment . . . 15c 
Carp(;nter's 10c Liquid Court 

Plaster 7c 

25c T iz for tired feet 18c 

50c E'oan's Kidney Pills 37c 

$1.00 Benetol 69c 

50c Packer's Liquid Shampoo. .39c 



lyso! 

25c Ly- 
sol . 17c 

50c Ly- 
sol . 39c 

$1 Ly- 
sol . 79c 



Face Powders 



Tooth 
Preparations 



17c 



25o Calox Tooth Pow- 
der 

25o Soxodoiit Tooth 
Wji«h 

2.'»<! Kubifoam .... 

25c Sanitol Tooth Wash; 

25c Kolyiios TooUi \ 

Paste ] 

25c Sanitol Tootli Paste ' 

25c Dr. Graves' Tooth Powder, .140 

25c Colgate's Tooth Pai,to 20c 

25o Sanitol Tooth Pow- 
der 

25c Ijyon's Tooth Pow- 
der ■ 

25c Listerine Tooth 
Powder 

2.5c Sozodont Tooth Paate 17o 

25c So/odont Liquid 17o 

60c Pel>eeeo Tootli Paste 37c 

25c Euthj-mol Tooth Paste 15c 



50c Carmen 
Powder . . 



17c 



Tooth Brushes 



lOc 



.^5c Rubberset Tooth Bru««hes . . 1 7c 
35c Prophylactic Tooth Brushes.25c 

Tooth Brushes 

Special at 

A special lot of Tooth Brushes, 
tlie surplus lots from an importer, 
various styles, unusually good as- 
sortmente of Uttle lots, a couple of 
gross in all, styles nsually 20c to 
25c or more; special, 10c, during 
tlie Drug Sale. 

Talcum Powders 

25c BatK-'ock's Corylopsljs Tal- 
cum 15o 

25c Jup Rose Talcum Powder. . lOo 
Roman Corylopsis Talcum Pow- 
der lOc 

25c Sanitol Talcum Powder. . . .15c 
2.'>c Bradley's TaUum Powder. 17c 

Mennen's Taleiun Pow<ler 12c 

25c Squibb's Talcum Powder.. 18c 
Colgate's Talcuxu Powder, In all 

odors l-'ic 

25c Riveris Talcum Powder... 18c 

Willianis' Talcum Powder 15c 

25c Trailing Arbutus Talcimi 

Powder 18c 

25c Hygenol Violet Talcum Pow 
der 



12c 



Manicure 
arations 



Prep 



Face I 
39c 

60c La Blache Pow- 
der . . . • 89c 

50c Java Rice Pow- 
der S9c 

25c Satin Skin Pow- 
der 17c 

25c Sanitol Face 
Powder 15o. 

35c Hygienic Peroxide ■ 
Rice Powder .... 15c 

Colonial Rouge or 
Face Powder .... 15cj 

Amber Royal Face 
Powder • $1.75] 



SPECL\L 

SOc 

Pivers 
Azurea, La- 
trefle and 
Floramye 
Face Pow- 
ders, regu- 
larly $L25 



60c Djer 

Kiss Face 
Powder 

50c 



Special ! 



89c 



PiAor's Azurea, Lo Tre- 
(le and Flonuuyo $1.25 
Toilet Waters. 




Toilet Soap 

25c Cutlcura Soap 10c 

17c 4711 Rose Glycerine 13c 

10c Palmollve Soap 7o 

1 Oc Juvenile Soap 8o 

25c Packer's Tar Soap - 

for 15c 

21c Pears Scented 

Soap 15c 

10c Colgate's Natural 

Flower Soap 9c 

25c Pears Unscented 

Soap 12c_ 




7c Special 



THRKK 
cakes of 
Pahi*c>Uve 
Soap free 
with every 
50c jar of 
Palmollve 
Cream at 



39c 



Colgate's 
Natural 
Flower 
Soaps — 

3 for 
2Sc 



4711 Benzoin Glycer 

Ine Soap 

25c Woodbury's 

Facial Soap . . . 
10c Pliysicians & 

Surgeons Soap. 
Cashmere Bouquet 

Soap, per Ik)x . 
40r Kirk's Castile 

Soap, 1 lb bars. 



19c! Bocabelli 
Soap 
7c 

. 7C|' And you are 
lucky to get 
it a t ^ tliat 
price. 



19c 



69c 



29c 



50c Ongaline 39o 

25c LiLStrlte Nail Fjiamel 18o 

2.'>c LusUite Cuticle Ice 18c 

25c Lustrite Nail Bleach- 18c 

1 dozen Emery Boards 9c 

10c Nail Files 7c, 

15c Nail Flics 9C| SPECL\L 

19c Nail Files .12c 15c Iwe Nail 

22c and 25c Nail | Polish in 

Fllos 17c white cellu- 

25c Nail Bru.shes. .17c, loid box at 
3.5c Haiul Brushes. -250 ^ 
50c Manicure Scis- j OC 

sors 39c _ 



50c Changeable Chamois Buffers, 

rosewood or ebony finish 34o 

35c Rosaline 19o 

25c Nail Buffers 17o 

Harriet Hubbard Ayer's Nail 

Polish 25o 

Harriet Hubbard Ayer's Nail 

Bleach 25o 

Harriet Hubbard Ayer's Nail 

Tint 25o 



Special 3 'iSr^2 1 c 

Jap Rose Soap 
Palmollve Soap 
Williams' Jersey Cream 
Kirk's Oatmeal Soap 
Jergeius Bath Tablets 
Peroxide Soap 
Kirk's Violet Soap. 
Physicians & Surgeons Soap 
Rtidiant Glycerine Soap 
Carmel Castile Soap 
Olive Oil Castile Sojip 
Colgate's Elder Flower Soap 



Face Creams and 
Lotions 

Qui Vive Orange Skin Food. . . . 15o 

25c Peroxide CiH^ani 15o 

25c Holmes Frostilla 17o 

Almond Cream .... 25cj 

10c Camphor Ice. . • . 7ci 

60e Hygenol Cleansing 
Cream 30o 

25c Red Rose Cream. 17c 

25c Hygenol Toilet 
Cream 17c 

Melba Skin Cleauser.oOC; 

Melba Skin Maissage j 
Cream 50o, 

Creme Mealy, al- j 

ways .... 25c and OOc^ 

Ayer's Face Cream. 

always $1.00^ 

Ayer's Luxurla Cream, 

always 25c and 50c 

Ayer's Skin and Tissue Build- 
er 50c and $1.00 

Ayer's Aristocratic Cream, al- 
ways 50c and $1.00 

60c Pond's Cream S9c 

$1.50 Oi-iental Creaxu $1.19 

60c Sempre Glovine 37c 

75c Mercolized Wax 65c 

Uudnut's MiiTi clous Cream, al- 
ways sells at 50c 

Ifudnut's Creme Violet, always 
sells at ■ • 

50c Pompeilan Cream 
for 35c 

50c Krank's Pink 

Blush C re<un .... 37c 
75c Pompeilan Cresun 



Household Helps 

6o Chamois Skir s Sc 

10c Chamois Skins 8c 

15f Chamois Si«lns lie 

Colgate's Silver Soap • lOo 

25c Wright's Silver Cream 15c 

10c Eui'eka Cleaning Pads 7c 

lOc bottle Anunonia 7o 

10c Three-ln-O le Oil 7o 

25o Tbree-in-O le 18c 

10c Machine Oil • 7c 

20-Mule Team Borax, the full 

pound package at lOo 

SI. 00 Rubber Gloves 79o 

69c Rubber Gloves 15o 

25c Extract of Witch Hazel, ex- 
tra strong 15o 

Fletcher's Caste ria 23o 

43c Stuart's Dyspepsia Wafers. .340 
60c California Siyrup of Figs. , .33c 

50c Canthrox 39o 

1 lb Absorbent Cotton 23o 

25c Bromo Seltzer 17o 




.60o 



75c Colgate's Li ae Toilet Water.69o 
75c Colgate's I'actylis Toilet 

Water . . . • 69o 

75c Colgate's Eclat Toilet W»ter.69c 
75c Colgate's Violet Toilet Wa- 
ter 69c 

Hudnut's Toilet Water ITiC 

50c Ritksecker'u Toilet Water. .39o 
50c Dentoris Toilet Water... 3!)c 

Djer Kiss Toilet Water $1.48 

All Relger's and Jergen's Per- 
fumes, regularly 50c oz., spe- 
cial, oz 35c 

75e Pinaud's Llac De Frans 

A'egetale 59c 

7f.c Plnnud's Violette De Frans 
Vegetale • . 5yc 

Dressing Combs 

19c Black Rubter Dressing 

Combs • 12o 

Men's 25c Rubber Combs 19c 

35c Rubber Dressing Combs, 

ebony finish 22c 

50c Dressing Combs 39c 

75c Dres.'-ing Combs 59c 

$1.00 Dressing* C'ombs 79c 

$1.25 Dressing Combs 95c 



Miscellaneous 
Specials 

S5c Bath Brushes 25o 

50c Bath Brushes 39c 

A lot of 19c Nail Brushes 12c 



Bath Powd«rs 



25c Batliasweet Powder . 
25c Sanitol Bath Powder. 



17c 
15o 



10c Ammonia, extra strong 7c 

50c Cuticura Ointment 40c 

25c Carbolic Salve 15c 

25c Bay liuui 17c 

3 cakes Magnesia for 5c 

7c for package of six toweLs and 
six soap leaves. 
8c for 5c Chamois 
8c for 10c Chamois 
lie for 15c Chamol.? 
7c for 10c .\rt Gum 
7c for 10c Ammo 
15c for 25c Peroxide 

Ci'eam 
18c for 2.>c >rimi 
18c for 25c Eversweet 



Special 
39c 

a dozen for 
Sanltiiry 
Napkins, 
reg. 50c. 



Special 

iray's Ben- 
zoin and 
Almond 

for . . " 55o Cream, reg- 

25c Satin Skin Cream 1 ularly 35c, 

for 18c special at — 

25c Sanitol Face | ^^^% 

Cream 17ci ^^C 

25c Meloderma lOcJ 



Special 5 



£:''"2lc 



Kirk's White and Green Castile 

Soap 
Corona Oatmeal Soap 
Corona Buttermilk Soap 
Almond Oil Soap 
Witch Ha/.el Soap 
Corona Bouquet Soap 
Bath King Soap 
Every Atom Pure Soap 
Glycerine Soap 
Birthday Complexion Soap 



60c Malvina Cold Cream 37o 

50c Hind's Honey and Ahnond 

Cream • ^^^ 

25o Frostilla ^^^ 

60c Ingram's Milkweed Crejun. .37o 
$1.00 Ingram's Milkweed Cream.79c 
25c American Beauty Cream. . .170 
50c Daggett & Ramsdell Cream. 39o 
S5c Daggett & Ramsdell Cream. 29o 

25c Creme de Meridor 1^° 

60c Stilhnan's Freckle Cream. .34o 

25c Marshmallow Cream loc 

25c Pond's Vanishing Cream.. 17o 

Shaving 
Necessities 

lOc Stvptic Pencils • 7o 

Williams' Shaving Soap .40 

Williams' .Shaving Stick 19o 

Williams' Shaving Powder 19o 

Williams' Shaving Cream 19c 

20c for Colgate's Shaving Crcjun 
20c for Colgate's Shaving Powder 
20c for Colgate's Shaving Stick 

25e Bay Rum for only 17c 

10c Bay Riuu for only 7c 




Hair Brushes 

One lot of Ebony and Rose- 
wood Hair Brushefs, regular- 
ly $1.00 and $1.25, speth.l.69c 

69c Hair Brusiies at 50o 

89c Hair Brusuos at. , 69c 

$1.48 Hair Brushes at 95c 



35c for 50c Pompeilan Cream 
23c for 1 n> Absorlx^nt Cotton 
39e for 50c OngaUnc 
8c for 15c Whisli Brooms 
19c for 25c Rosaline 



Rubber 
Goods 




Hair Tonics and 
Shampoos 

25c .Sanitol Haii Tonic 17o 

50c Canthrox 89o 

oOc Burnhiun's I shampoo 25o 

25c Liquid Gre<'n Soap 17o 

25c Egg Tonic Shampoo .170 

$1.00 Danderino 67o 

$1.00 Hen>Ielde. . . • 67o 

10c Wanous Shuupoo Bags 7c 



$1.00 Challenge 

Hot Water 

Bottles 79o 

$1.50 Wearever 

Hot Water 

Bottles . ..$1.05 
$1.98 Wearever 

Hot Water 

Bottles . ..$1.48 
$1.75 Combina- 
tion Hot Wa- 
ter Bottle 

and Fountain 

Syruige ..$1.39 
$1.98 Combination Hot Water 

Bottle and Fountain SjTinge.$I.69 
$2.25 Combination Hot Water 

Bottle and Fountain Syringc.$1.98 
$2.75 Combination Hot Water 

Bottle and Fountain Syriiige.$2.25 

$1.00 Fountain Sj-rlnge 79c 

$1.48 Fountain Syringe $1.05 

$1.98 Fountain Sj-rlnge $1.48 

82.25 Fountain Syringe $1.98 

50o Rubber Cushion Hair 

Brushes - • • 39o 

1.00 Pearson Hair Brushes. . ..89c 

1.50 Pear.son Hair Brushes. .$1.35 
$2.00 Pearson Hair Brushes. .$1.69 
$2.50 Pearson Hair Brushes. $1.98 
$2.50 Gloria Hair Brushes. . . .81.98 

$1.69 Hair Brushes $1.50 

$1.35 Hair Brushes $1.25 

$1,19 Hair Brushes 95c 




» 






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V 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 29, 1915. 



11 




f 



your needle should be 
busy these fall days ! 

Now is the time for making of wear- 
ables for fall and things for the house 

THESE are days of planning and studying for every woman— we see an increasing interest 
taken in our fashion books at the pattern counter. You will, of course, have some tnmgs 
in your fall wardrobe that will be made at home. Special attention will be. given next 
week to your needs for fall sewing. 

We show this fall an exceptional valne line of $1.03 dress goods 



50-inch FrcRch serge \ 

In colors Burgundy, navy, 
Belgian blue, plum, tan, 
brown, Russian green and 
black 

44-inch Fram cloth 

One of the popular fabrics 
this fall. Russian green, navy 
and black 




50 to 54-in. storm ^ergc 

In all the leading colors. 
Granite Cloth and Hairline 
stripes in both navy and 
black grounds 

44 to 54-inch all wool 
shepherd checks 

In various size checks 




27-inch Poplin in an inex- 
pensive fabric offered for the 
first time this fall — three colors 
besides black — 

15c a yard 

Fniit-of-the-Loom Muslins — 
during this event buy as much 
as you wish at — 

lOe a yard 

27-inch Plaids and Shepherd 
Checks at — 

122C a yard 



velvet corduroys 

and velveteens are 

fashionable 

31-inch Velvet Corduroys- 
colors navy, brown and 
white — 

Si.00 yard 

24:-inch Velveteen in colors 
gold brown, navy and black 

$1.00 yard 

These are very popular suit, 

coat and suit fabrics for 

fall wear. 



30 pieces of Fancy and Plain 
Voiles, 40 inches wide. There 
are coin dots, stripes and floral 
patterns — close-out price — 

19c a yard 

lOc Outing Flannels in pink 
and blue checks and stripes — 
plain white also — 

8^^c a yard 

36-inch Novelty Plaids and 
Black and White Checks, at — 

25c a yard 



PORE DECLINES OFFER OF PALACE IN SPAIN 



Sponging dress fabrics by our patented process adds 

to the appearance of a garment 

Besides insuring against shrlnkagre. do you know that scientific sponging: of the goods that goes 
Into an outer garment adds to the wear of the garm^'nt? It makes the garment proof against rain spots 
— of course, puckered seams are eliminated. The gument will retain its shape a great deal longer if 
the fabric is given a proper sponging before being cuf. We want you to become familiar w^ith the 
advantages of sponged dress fabrics, and so, while thi usual price is 5c a j-ard for sponging and reflnishing 
of most dre^s goods, we shall, during Sewing Week, 'i>onge and reflnlsh all dress goods bought here free. 
This means about a 5% saving to you in the cost of the garment. 



IL: 



silks are the style supremacy 

for the new season and here you will find them in many instances 
at prices less than last season. 

36-inch Chiffon Faille Silks in light colors and ^Qp 

black and white OU%^ 

When w© buy again we'll have to pay an advance of 20% for these silks. 

U'e show a really wonderful 
$1 Black Messa- 

line at 

36-inch Crepe de Chine 
a good value 50C 

Besides black and white 
we have maize, salmon and 
Belgian blue. 



an Inexpensive 
silk 

that has enjoyed great pop- 
ularity is our 36-inch Aledo 
Silk at — 



79e 



^rice* Ovr Attraction 



m 




1 




J/v Avi. H S SuMuaa Jr. Dulutm, 



New colors have been 
added so we now have 
smoke, navy, sky, Russian 
green, pea g:reen, French 
rose, pink, maize, helio, Bel- 
gian blue and white 



Jj 




PALACE OF THE ESCURIAL. 

Rome, via Paris, Sept. 29. — The king I Lorenzo, near Madrid, to Pope Bene- 
of .Spain last May offered the Escurial I diet, as a residence should the pontiff 
palace, part of the monastery of San i decide to leave Italy. The Vatican now 

OCCURS IN SPECIAL STOCKS 



announces that, tiiough grateful to the 
king and the Spanish epi.scopacy. the 
pontiff has no intention of leaving 
Rome. 



stock was 
lation. 



due rierely to war specu- 



Speculators on Buying Side 

While Traders Sell 

Liberally. 

Market Is Battle Royal Be- 
tween These Two 
Elements. 



Pacific being In demand at gains of 1 
to 2 points. 

Sales at 1 o'clock were well beyond 
the 1,000.000 mark. 



WHEN MADAME 
WIFE GOES AWAY 
FOR A VACATION 



F. 0. E. 

Duluth Aerie No. 79 will hold an 
Important meeting: Thursday eve- 
ning, Sept. 30tii, followed by social 
&es»>ion. Be sure and come. 

V. M. GR.VDY, W. P. 



WHERE. OH WHERE ARE 

THE HEBREW CHILDREN? 



Chelsea, Mass., Said to Have the 
Highest Percentage of Jews — 
There Are Only 78,000 in Pal- 
estine and Half the 10,000,000 
in Europe Live in Russia— Over 
2.000,000 in Austria-Hungary. 



Edward R. Bushnell in Philadelphia 
Lodger: "Where and what is the mo.st 
Jewish city in the United States? Chel- ' 
sea. Mass., was stamped with that dis- | 
tinction at the recent session of the 
convention of the Federation of Ameri- 
can Zoni-sts. Twenty-nve per cent of. 
Its population of 40,000 are Jews. 

Nuiiierically, N»^w York has the great- 1 
est .Jewish population either in the j 
United States or the world, but the i 

firoportion of Jews there is sligrhtly be, 
ow that of Chelsea. Nearly half of 
the Jews in America, and one-twelfth 
of all the world contains, live within 
the confines of Greater New York. 
Nevertheless, thfir proportion of Now 
York's entire p<-pulation Is only about 
16 per cent. 

The extent to which the Jewish peo- 
ple maintain their racial Integrity 
though scattered to the four corners of 
the earth still remains the most as- 
tounding thing in the history of nation- 
building. From the time of their bond- 
age in Egypt, their flight through the 
•wilderness into the promised land, and 
their wonderful expansion during the 
reigns of David and Solomon, followed 
by th^lr subjugation at the hands of 
the Greeks and Romans, this integrity 
never S"fEered. And even during the 
last 2.000 years, as they have gone 
■with civilization into every quarter of 
the globe, they have always been a 
distinct people. 

The study of their world-wide dis- 
tribution forms a subject of gripping 
interest. Roughly speaking, tliere are 
about 12.000,000 Jews today. Every 
country has its quota. 

Only 78,0O0 In Palestine. 
Palestine, the original home of the 
Jews, numerically does not contain 
many Jews, but in proportion to the 
entire population of that country it 
leads the world. The latest statistics 

five Palestine a Jewish population of 
8,000 out of a total population of 
850,000. This give.s the Jewish race In 
Pale.atin© a percentage of 22.29 of the 
entire population, though its total of 
78,000 la hardly half the entire Jewish 
population of Philadelphia. In certain 
parts of Africa and Asia the Jewish 
population, although numerically small, 
is proportionately high. Tunis, in 
Africa ranks next to Palestine, with 
a Jewfsh population of 108,000 out of a 
total of 1.928,217. or 5.62 per cent. 

Europe, of course, contains the great 
bulk of the world's Jewish population, 
there being approximately 10,000,000 
Bcattered throughout that continent of 
nearly 500,000,000 people. Russia fur- 



nishes a home for more than half of 
Europe's Jews. There are 5,215,805 of 
this race living under the Czar's au- 
thority. Then comes Austria with 
1,113,687, and Hungary with 932,406. 
Germany has 615,021. 

Of all these European countries, how- 
ever, Koumania contains the greatest 
percentage of Jews. There are 259,- 
015 there out of a total population of 
5,956,690, a percentage of 4.52. The Jew- 
ish proportion in Austria-Hungary, 
which includes Bosnia-Herzegovina, is 
4.42. that of Russia, 4.16. 

Portugal probably contains the 



aJHoulb Separate 
jFrom pop ?|u«banb 



V 




smallest percentage of Jews of any of 
the civilized countries. Out of this 
country's total population of 5,423.182 
there are to be found only 481 Jews 
representing but .01 per cent. In Spain 
there are about 4,000 Jews out of a to- 
tal population of 19,588,688, or .02 of 
1 per cent. 

Atlanta and th« Frank Cacp. 

The Jews are not an agricultural peo- 
ple, a fact which explains why In this 
country most of them have found their' 
homes in the great cities. Outside of 
New York, of course. Philadelphia, 
Chicago and Boston contain the great- 
est number. The Jewish population of 
Philadelphia is estimated at about 150 - 
000, or a little less than 10 per cent of 
the entire population. St. Louis, with 
a total population of 687,029, contains 
45,000 Jews, with the same number 
credited to Cleveland out of a popula- 
tion of 560,663. San Pranclaco, with 
416,912 inhabitants, contains a Jewish 
population of 30,000. 

Atlanta, Ga., thrown Into a state of 
turmoil over the trial and conviction 
for murder of Leo F^ank, has a Jew- 
ish population of only 4.200 out of a 
total population of 154,839. This case 
attracted nation-wide notoriety, and 
the charge was freely made that much 
of the agitation against either the re- 
trial of Frank or the commutation of 
his sentence from death to life Impris- 
onment was of an anti-Semitic origin 
Yet the proportion of Jews in Atlanta 
is extremely small. 

The number of Jews In the small 
towns of the United States Is almost 
negligible. An estimate made by the 
Industrial Removal office shows that 
fifty of the principal cities of the Unit- 
ed State.s, not counting New York. Chi- 
cago, Philadelphia and Boston, contain 
only 287,100 Jews. 



New York, Sept. tP. — Settlement of 
the main features of the $500,000,000 
International credit or loan was made 
the occasion of another wild move- 
ment In special stocks today. The 
trading was again of a highly specu- 
lative and professional character, the 
former element being prominent on the 
buying side, while traders sold liberal- 
ly. In fact, the market resolved Itself 
into a battle royal between these two 
elements. 

As usual. Interest centered wholly 

In the specialties which hare recently 
scored extraordinary gains, railways 
and other Investment Issues being eith- 
er neglected or slightly lower. The 
few exceptions to this rule were Atchi- 
son and Erie, the letter's fractional 
gain presumably resulting from the 
company's highly favoraile August 
earnings. 

Advances in War Shares. 

Advances in the more prominent war 
shares ranged from 7 to 12 points, this 
group Including .Baldwin Locomotive, 
LackawBJina Steel and Tennessee Cop- 
per. Other noteworthy features In- 
cluded Colorado Fuel, Railway Steel 
Spring, Pressed Steel Car and Ameri- 
can Locomotive, which ro.^e from 3 to 
almost 8 points, while half a score of 
lesser Issues were higher by 2 to 3 
points. 

United States Steel, which retained 
its place as a market guide, manifested 
a backward tendency in the early deal- 
ings, but later advanced to equal its 
recent high prices. 

Heavy Transaettons. 

Transactions in the first hour ap- 
proximated the huge total of 450,000 
shares, exceeding all recent records. 
Activity diminished slightly In the sec- 
ond hour, by which time some of the 
more volatile stocks had reached 5 to 
10 i)o!nts while others of similar des- 
cription moved to new lieights. 

Crucible Steel assumed the center of 
the stage at this juncture and con- 
tinued to monopolize attention by Its 
further rise to 109%, a total of 8V2, 
Lackawanna Steel's rise to 94*4 rep- 
resenting a total gain of 13. Sloss- 
Sheffield Steel was conspicuous 
among the secondary Issues of Its class 
by a rise of 8 to 65. 

ReaetionH Follovr. 

The usual reactions cf 3 to 5 points 
followed the rise in these l.ssues, but 
trading became more active as the 
afternoon ses.sion trot under way. 

Confidence was heightened by a re- 
newal of activity in representative 
railways. Union Pabiflc, Reading, Le- 
high Valley, St. Pattl and Southern 



INVESTIGATIONS 
BEGIN AT ARDMORE 



Three Attempts to Fix 

Blame for Explosion of 

Gasoline. 

Ardmore, Okla., Sept. 29.— There were 
three separate Investigations under 
way here today to fix the blame for 
Monday's explosion which cost forty- 
seven lives and a property loss of over 
$1,000,000. 

The first Investigation was set in 
motion yesterday afternoon by Russell 
Brown, city attorneyr when he peti- 
tioned the state corporation commis- 
sion, whose commissioner. George A. 
Henshaw, was in this city. Brown al- 
leged negllge'nce on the part of the 
Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe railroad in 
the alleged violation of several pro- 
visions of the Interstate commerce 
commission's regulations In regard to 
the handling of gasoline and other ex- 
plosives. 

The second Investigation was started 
this morning. By this inquiry the 
state fire marshal's department Is ex- 
pected to attempt to determine the 
cause of the fire following the dis- 
aster. City officials today were en- 
gaged principally In taking testimony 

The third Inquiry was by the coro- 
ner's jury for this (Carter) county. 
This body will investigate the deaths 
of the more than two Bcore persons. 

There remains but one unidentified 
victim — a man. His body is burned 
beyond recognition. Physicians say 
there are three Injured persons In 
sanatoriums who probably will die. 



NO INTENTION OF ♦ 

GIVING UP CONTROL 



Denver. Colo., Sept. 29. — John D. 
Rockefeller, Jr., today said the Rocke- 
feller Interests had no Intention of 
giving up control of tlie 
Fuel & Iron company. He denied any 
knowledge of a prospective merger 
with the Hill or any other Interests, 
and expressed the belief that the re^ 
cent spectacular rise in the company's 



First She Tries to Give a 
Few Instructions, But 
Finds She Can't Remem- 
ber a Thing She Intended 
to Say. 

Kansas City S(ar: My wife is going 
to the country ior a few days to see 
if she can't get a little rest. She left 
this morning, bu : before going she had 
to give me my Instructions. Thus: 

"Do you thinK. I had better take 
Eleanor and Brother or Just Brother?" 

"If you are going for a rest take 
only Brother." 

"Yes," I know, but I hate to leave 
poor Eleanor behind, and what will I 
do with Laddie?' 

"Take him wlh you. by all means." 

"Yes, but he might get In a fight 
with those horrid old dogs, or one of 
those cows mlgli'- kick him or he might 
fall in the creeli. I'll be so worried 
about the poor dog, I believe I'll — do 
you think I ou?ht to take Broth«r's 
jumpers, I'm taking six white dresses 
for him " 

"No, for goodnsss sake take six pairs 

of Jumpers and one " 

The Water Under the Ice Box. 

"Which suitca.'ie do you think 1 ought 
— oh! I forgot I0 tell you to be sure 
and empty the water under the ice- 
box. It might rjn all over — and I just 
know you will 1( t tliose awful chicken.'^ 
come into the yird and eat our toma- 
toes as they ripen. There are two 
about ready to eat. And don't forget 
to pick the swe;t peas every evening; 
you knf)w If you don't they won't 
bloom any more. 

"Did I tell you about my climbing 
rose? It is getting so high It needs a 

trellis. Be sur* to build it and 

A Few M >re InMtmotionn. 

"What shall 1 do with this butter? 
You sure are a bonehead, bringing 
homo a pound of butter when you 
knew I was going away today. Sell 
It to mother? ^Veli, I should say not. 
I will give it to her for taking care of 
Carol and — do you think this bacon 
will spoil if I leave it in the Ice box? 
I Just know yoj will forget to leave 
tlie key over the door so the iceman 
can get in. Do rou think he will steal 
anything? He las always appeared to 
be a very nice nan, but he has a wife 
and seven children and you know ice- 
men don't have very much. Can't you 
do ^something lor Brother? He ha.^ 
been crying for ten minutes and I'm 
trying to get you some brtakfast. Oh, 
I'm so nervou3--please talce that fon- 
found< d baby aid make him shut up. 
I'm just abou^iirazy. 

Lofatlng the Clean Socks. 

"I put three pair of clean socks for 
you In the riglit hand corner of the 
lower drawer in the dresser and there 
are two clean union suits under your 
shirts. If you need any more socks 
get them out cf my dalning basket. 
There are severil pair there that only 



American J^rintesijai ^ailsi to 
Join ||u£{bantr in Italian ^erbice 



HERR- 



MRS. DOROTHY GATES 
MAN. 
The suit to annul the marriage of 
Dorothy Oates. known to the stage as 
Dorothy Phillips, to Philip Herrman, 
son of James S. Herrman. a wealthy 
builder, will come up In the courts 
soon. Dorothy is a chorus girl at the 
Winter Garden, and as she Is only 18, 
she is represented in the proceedings 
by a guardian. Her husband is Just 
her age. He is a Harvard student, and 
she says she married him because he 
threatened to commit auicide If she 
would QOt. 



HOUSE OF SEVEN 

GA BLES A MUSEUM 

Beatrice Hitchcock In the New York 

i Evening Post: You have doubtless re- 
ceived from many of your readers a 
correction as to the present state of 
the House of the Seven Gables. 

So far from being "virtually uncared 
for," it Is a perfect treasure h»use of 
colonial wares and furnishings. Set In 
its charming garden, with the fresh 
breeze from the sea blowing its mus- 

' lin curtains, and the sunlight bright- 
ening the old pleecs of mahogany, it 
is a charming vision no traveler for- 
tunate enough to stumble upon It Is 
likely to forget. 

Through the courtesy of the ladies 

I who now use the old plage as a settle- 
ment house. It Is open to the public 

! every day; In the tiny shop Is all the 
stock that Hawthorne described — 
even the barley sugar sticks In glass 
jars! Much of the furniture is that 
original to the house — all has been re- 
stored witii discretion and fine feel- 
ing. Every touch is perfect, it is an 
evocation of the past — all so truly 
"dans la note." 

The little counting-house In the gar- 
den (where one may have tea amid 
the flowers) is Just as some merchant 
of old Salem left It — Its treasures, 
relics of all the Seven Seas, and the 
master's own desk, with the seven 
secret drawers. The charming post- 
cards on sale at the house could not 
be bettered as illustrations. 




I _CopTri«hi by ih« B»ln Newi Serrice. 

PRINCESS ROSPIGLIOSI. 

Princess Rospigliosl who was Miss Stallo of Cincinnati sailed for Naples 
on the Dante Allghieri with her little son Prince Camilla. She socs to join 
her husband who i« ixu bia country's service. 



Colorado! have a few lltte holes__ 

Oh! My goolness! There goes the 
milk. Why die n't you take Brother 
when I told yoi to? Now he has up- 
set the milk bo:tle and spilled all the 
milk on his cleai dress and now I have 
to — can't you siop laughing for once 
and help me? I'm Just going crazy and 
here It is time for you to go to work, 
and your lunch isn't packed yet. 
And, Dearie, My Fern! 
"Oh, heavens, there comes Joe. I 
wonder what is wrong now? I'll bet 
something has happened and they don't 
want me to come. 

"Hello, Joe, tha buggy will be here at 
10 o'clock to take me out? But listen, 
do you think I had better — Oh, you're 
In a hurry and have to go, but listen, 
listen, J-O-S-E-P-H. 

"Now, there, he ras gone, and I 
wanted to ask nlm if he thooigiit the 
cows would bother Laddie and whether 
I ought to take dresses or Jumpers for 

the cliildren and whether 

"For goodness sake, come and tie up 
this lunch. The string isn't long 

enough and it k« eps slipping, and I 

"There's Eleai or crying. She wants 
her breakfast aid you haven't even 

gone 

"I'm so worried about Carol. Do you 
think she will b< lonesome at mother's? 
Do you think I had better take her, 
too? But there s so many to take care 
of and you said I was to enjoy myself 
and 

i "Oh, my fern. Please don't forget to 

j water it, because It is doing so nicely 

I now 

I "Now I Can't Remember!" 

"And the gra.^s needs cutting and 
you ought to fit the screen door and 
get some wire for the back fence and 
fix the gate to <eep out the dogs and 
be sure and don't eat any pork because 
It makes pimpli^s in the summer and 
drink cold milk or ice tea, and leave 
thf> coffee alone and your clean collars 
fire in the uppor left hand drawer I 
didn't have time to put them In the 
collar box and be sure to keep the 
piano closed and don't let the kids 
play on the fror.t porch and take good 
care of your Palm Beach suit because 
we are not going to wash Monday and 
be sure and ha^'e those nails fixed in 
your white shoe* they are always tear- 
ing your socks and making more work 
for me and be sure and pay Eugene 
for the butter before you spend the 
money and don't spend all that dollar 
and leave the pantry window down 
from the top so the rain won't beat 
In and be sure and close all the win- 
dows when you leave in the morning 
except the bathroom window leave that 
open a little bit because if the rain 
does beat In it ^vlU all go in the bath- 
tub and be sure and train all the loose 
ends of my vines every night and 
straighten up those two tomato plants 



NowThat 

The Revue 

Is Ov§r 

And you've seen the 
gorgeous assemblage of 
suits and coats on the 
Second Floor, we're going 
to do a typically daring 
thing — something wholly 
characteristic of Glass 
Block mer chandising 
methods : — 

Wc re Readjushng 
Prices On Fall Suits 

And the price reduction 
includes all sorts of the 
very newest and smartest 
styles, too. (Suits that 
have been selling for $;iO 
will go at $24.75, for in- 
stance.) 
Why? 

Because it's the Glass 
Block rule to win busi- 
ness, not by huge profits, 
but by pleased customers. 
And we're going to please 
a lot of women tomorrow 

6la$$ Block 



that the dogs knocked over and don't 
forget — 

"My goodness, here It is twenty min- 
utes to eight and you ought to be at 
th.» office, and I had a few things to 
tell you to do while I was gone and 
now I can't remember a tiling!" 

A spoil ed' QU ARREL 

Chicago News: "Mrs. Barkley."' 
Darkley looked severely over the top 
of his paper at his better half, who 
was darning a sock. She did not stir 
an eyelash. 

"Woman!" Mrs. Barkley sighed and 
inserted lier darning ball Into another 
sock. 

"Molly!" She sat up and took notice. 

"Did you speak to m*", James?" 

"I wished to ask you if you under- 
stand anything at all of the principle 
of refrigeration." 

"I do. I understand all about It. But 
if you have your heart set upon ex- 
pounding It. go ahead; I'll try to ap- 
pear interested." 

"A refrigerator Is for the purpose of 
keeping meats and vegetables from 
spoiling. The cold air thrown off by 
the melting of tlie Ice in a refrigerator 
circulates downward. Hot air, you 
kn<'W, rises — " 

"I linow; there is a quantity of it 
rising now." 

"And the cold air settling to the 
bottom of the refrigerator, takes the 
jjlace of the warm air whicii has gone 
up—" 

"Oh. dear! Everything is going up 
nowadays. Toull have to let me have 
some more money. My allowance is 
all spent and I have not paid the 
girl." 

"For heaven's sake, when I am try- 
ing to be pleasant and entertaining, 
and putting myself on your level — " 

"You always wers some climber, 
James." 

"The man came with the ice Just now, 
and when I opened the top of the re- 
frigerator for him I found a piece of 
ice about the size of an egg In the ice 
chamber." 

"Yes; you did not need to be a Slier- 
lock Holmes to do that. I always keep 
the ice in the Ice chamber." 

"There you go! I also found a bottls 
of milk, three tomatoes, one pale pickle, 
three cucumbers, six ears of corn, a 
head of lettuce, a head of cabbage, a 
dozen eggs, a pineapple — " 

"You are a good provider." 

"Half a dozen lemons and some other 
Junk. I have told you time and again 
tliat the ice compartment Is for ice — 
I-C-E — Ice! But I have been unable to 
convince you. I have at last hit upon a 
plan to compel you to put such things 
In the compartments whore they be- 
long — " 

"I defy you! Do your worst!" 

"I had the Iceman fill every other 
compartment of the box Jam up with 
ice and leave the ice compartment 
empty, and I'll bet that tomorrow you 
will have the garbage where it be- 
longs — " 

"And you'll be buying new paper for 
the rooms downstairs. If you had any 
sense you'd know that Ice will melt 
and run all over the house, as I'll bet 
It Is doing right now! Just for that, 
vou shan't go to that card parly to- 
night!" 

"What card—" 

"I heard you tell Jinx over the phone 
that you would engineer a quarrel with 
me and then flounce out of the house. 
I refuse to quarrel with you." 

m • m 

BEST PLACE FOR REPAIRS. 
Philadelphia Public Ledger: Two 
small boys were having a s0mewh.1t 
rough struggle, and when one received 
j an unexpectedly hard blow he ex- 
[ claimed: 

I "If you don't look out you'll end up 
I In a piace that begins with H and ends 
i with L!" 

A school teacher who was passing, 
' on hearing the remark, scolded the boy 
I geverelv for what he had said. 

"Well," replied the boy, after a 
I pause, "I'm sure I don't know what 
you're talking about. I am talking 
[about a •hospital.'" 







f*' * j ii >L^if :.x ' 



' 



















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1 








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Wednesday, 



THE DULUTjH HERALD 



September 29, 1915.' 



MARINE 



WRECKED VESSEL 
IN BAD CONDITION 



The Steamer Lackawanna, 

Ashore on Gull Island, 

Has Sprung Leak. 

Mackinaw City, Mich.. Sept. 29. — 
Reports received hf re from the steam- 
er Lackawanna ashore on Gull Island 
reef. Lake Michigan, say the vessel is 
In bad condition, her bow being- high 
on the shoal and her stern low in the 
water. Her wheel, rudder and shoe 
are broken, and she Is said to be leak- 
ing considerably. One side of the ves- 
eel aft and her cabins were smashed 
by the heavy seas. 

Work of lightering the Lackawan- 
na's cargo of corn continued yester- 
day. 

Can't Raltte Steamer. 

Port Huron, Mich., Sept. 29. — A wire- 
less messaKe from the wrecking tug 
6. M. Fisher in Lake Huron says there 
is little hope that the steamer West- 
ern Star, which sank recently at Rob- 
ertson's rock, Georgian bay, can be 
raised this fall. 



Wind and Weather on Lakes. 

The following were wind and .weath- 
er conditions on the Great Lakes at 

7 o'clock this morning', as reported by 
the weather bureau: 

Portage (Lake Superior) — Southeast, 
clear, 8 miles. 

Whitefish Point (Lake Superior) — 
East, clear, 12 miles. 

Middle Island (Lake Huron) — North- 
east, clear. 10 miles. 

PJum Island (Lake Michigan) — 
Northeast, partly cloudy, 12 miles. 

Duluth — Northeast, raining. 10 miles. 

Port Arthur — North, partly cloudy, 

8 mllos. 

Sault — Northeast, clear, 4 miles. 



Sault Passages. 



SauU Ste. Marie. Mich., Sept. 29. — 
(Special to The Herald.) — I'p: Algon- 
quin, 10:30; Baker, 11; Andaste. Sher- 
win, 11:30; Athabasca, noon; Watt, 
Marsala, 12:30 p. m. ; Sonora, 4:30; 
Cort. Nasmyth, 6: Marlska, 6:30; Leo- 
pold, 6; Mariposa, Krupp, 7:30 last 
night; Billines, Robt-rt Wallace, 8:30; 
Ccuiby, Paipoonge, 11:30; Glenlyon, 
1:30 a. m.; Pellett, 2; Delaware, 3:30; 
Butler. 8:30: Nve. Trimble, Chas. War- 
ner. Keefe. 9:30; Mataafa, 10. 

Down: Crescent City. 11; OJanah 
Northern Queen, 11:30; Yates, 12:36 
p. m.: North Star Nottingham, 1:30; 
Coralia, Smeaton. Alfred Mitchell, 
Block, (sn-.all) Livingstone, 3:30; Fitch, 
Maltland. Hagarty, Joshua Rhodes, 6; 



James Davidson, Jacobs, Widlar, 6; 
Filbert. 7; Snyder 7:30 last night; 
Mahoning, 8; Matthews, 10:30; John 
Barium. Panay, 11; (.-^mall) Miller, 
Uhrig, 2:30; John Reiss, Meacham. 3:30; 
Saxon. 6; Morrell, 5:30; Mary Elphlcke, 
7; Denmark, cuylar Adams, 8:30; As- 
pinibola, JenkinP, 10. 



I :z 



Detroit Passages. 

Detroit. Mich.. Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Up: Susquehanna, noon, 
Tuesday; Black. 12:40 p. m.; Lyman C. 
Smith. Donnf-r. Frontenac, 12:45; Chat- 
tanooga, Saxona. 12:60; Maricopa, Mar- 
tha, 3:20: Victory, 4; Gratwlck, 4:20; 
Jenks, 6:40; Seneca, 6; Niagara, 6:35; 
Venus, 7:20; Hill. 7:30; Mo- 
hawk, 8; Leonard Miller, 9; Philip 
Minch. 10:10; Luzon. Stackhouse. 11:30; 
Hines and consort. 11:40; Christopher, 
1:50 a. m. Wednesday; Wilpen, 2; Get- 
tysburg. Anderson, 2:15; Atikokan, 
3:40; Clement, 4:20; Tioga, 4:40; Kopp, 
4:50; Norton, 5; Corrigan, 5:40; Stein- 
brenner. 5:60; Edenborn. 6:15; Gates, 
7:15; Rensselaer. 8; Maruba. 8:20; El- 
ba. 8:30; W. W. Roger, 8:40; Alle- 
gheney. (arrived), Charles- Hubbard. 
9:20; Livingstone, (big), Quire, 10:30; 
J. C. Wallace, 11; Craig, 11:10. 

Down: Calcite, 12:20 p. m. Tuesday: 
Dinkey. 12:50; Frick. 1:20; Alpena. 
Ohl. 3; Toltec. Godfrey. 3:10; Adriatic, 
3:16; Duluth, 4; Ashley. 4:20: F. C. 
Ball, 4:40; Truesdale, 5:20; H. Mc- 
Gregor. 5:40; Bunsen. Earllng. 6; 
Mitchell, Chickamauga. 6:30; Barlow. 
7; Nettleton. 7:35; Utica, 7:40; Davock, 
Corsica, Pollock, 8; Codorus. 9:30; 
Sellwood. Wisconsin, 10; Wilkinson, 
Corey 10:15; Lagonda. 10:40; Mcin- 
tosh, 12:10 a. m. Wednesday; Dunham. 
12:30; Wyandotte. Sirlus. 12:60; Ball 
Bros.. 1:15; Frank Pravey, 1:40; Bope. 
3:40; Geo. King. Bottsford. 4:20; Yose- 
mlte. 4:30; Sierra. 4:40; Van Hise, 4:50; 
Olcott, Gary. 6:15; Cole. 6:40; Jim 
Brown. 5:50; Hawgood. 6:26; O. E. 
Parks. 6:40; Wente and barges. 6:60; 
Pierce. Howard Hanna. Jr., 7; Stewart, 
8; Spokane, 10; W. F. White. 10:50. 

. — ^ -— 

Port of Duluth. 

Arrivals— M. C. Smith, Wickwlre. 
Price McKinnoy, W. L. King, Troy, 
Griffin. Harvester. Averill. coal; F. G. 
Hartwell, George Barnum. H. H. 
Rogers, George W. Perkins, light for 
ore; North Sea, merchandise; Parks 
Foster, light for grain; Sam Morse, 
lime. 

Departures — H. H. Rogers. La Belle. 
W. P. Snyder. George W. Perkins, 
George Barnum, Midland King, C. W. 
Watson. Marcia. D. Houghton, ore; Sel- 
wyn Eddy. Lewlston, George W. Pea- 
vey, grain. 

ALLIED ARMIES TO 
MAKE REAL TEST OF 
GERM AN RE SISTANCE 

(Continued from page 1.) 



likely to take a turn unfavorable to 
the Entente powers. 

British Statement. 

London. Sept. 29.— An official com- 
munication just made public dealing 
with the operations In France Tuesday, 



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says that In the heavy fighting around 
Loos, the British have taken excep- 
tionally strong German lines of 
trenches and bomb-proof shelters sev- 
eral hundred yards in extent. 

Havin.|f taken "the German second 
line, the statement says, the Drrtn«rr 
Bj-e row after the third line of 
trenches. 

In all. more than 3.000 prisoners have 
been taken and 21 guns and 40 machine 
guns iiave been captured and others 
dfstroyed. Referring to the redoubts 
taken, the statement says: 

"The enemy's lines taken by us are 
exceptionally strong. They conpL^t of 
a double front line, which included two 
large works named by him. the Hohen- 
zollem and Kai.ser Wilhelm redoubts. 
These consisted of a network of 
trenches and bomb-proof shelters sev- 
eral hundred yards in txtent. The sec- 
ond line ran Just west of Loos. 

"We are now closely engaged with 
th-e enemy's third line. 

"Our aeroplanes today bombed the 
railway line near Betaume. wrecking 
a train. They also da-maged the rail- 
way near Achlet Le Grand (Pas De Car- 
lals)." 

Many Oermanii Drovrn. 

The Times Petrograd correspondent 
says: "A report which has been con- 
flrmpd from a good quarter Is that the 
Forty-first German army corps was 
overtaken by the flooding of the Pin«k 
marshes and, being unable to escape, 
nearly the whole of the corps per- 
ished." 

Reuter's correspondent at the Brit- 
ish headquarters in France, in a de- 
scription of the bombardment which 
preceded Saturday's attack on the 
Germans, says: 

Parapet* Melt Axrmr- 

"The German lines became smoth- 
ered in dust, their parapets melted 
away and their barbed wire entangle- 
ments disappeared. Those sleeping 
thirty or fortj' miles away were 
awakened by the dull rumbling, while 
even at that distance the displacement 
of air was clearly felt. 

"At the outset the weather pros- 
pects were not favorable, but before 
midnight a change set in and the 
morning broke dull but fine, with a 
slight mist, which was reminiscent of 
the opening days of the Aisne and 
and Neuve Chapelle battles. 

"Most of the German prisoners were 
taken in the village of Loos. The vil- 
lage was surrounded on three sides, 
and the Germans were forced to sur- 
render when' their ammunition ran 
out. They said their losses had been 
heavy, entire regiments having been 
wiped out." 



Anntrian Statement. 

Vienna, Sept. 29, via London. — The 
war office today made public the fol- 
lowing official communication: 

"As the Austro-Hungarian forces on 
the Styr threatened to surround the 
enemy he was compelled to abandon 
his offensive in the Volhynla fortress 
district, which he had undertaken with 
great sacrifices. 

"The Russian retreat continued the 
whole of the day of Monday. The 
enem.y's army already is behind the 
Putillowkan river, with our armies 
in pursuit. In rear guard engage- 
ments east of Lutsk, our troops cap- 
tured four Russian officers and 600 
men. 

"On the Ikwa and in East Galicla 
the situation is unchanged. 

"Italian front: Early Tuesday on the 
Dolomites front, the enemy's attack 
against Colderbois was repulsed with 
hand grenades. On the Doberdo sector 
an attack on the Mcnte Selbusi 
failed. 

"Southeastern theater: Our gun fire 
has disturbed the enemy's fortifica- 
tion works on the lower Save. The 
fortress guns from Belgrade fired 
some shots at SemJln, but all went 
astray." 

— > 
German Vleir of Attack. 

Berlin. Sept. 29, via London. — Bern- 
hardt Kellerman Athor, correspondent 
of the Tageblatt, telegraphs from the 
German army headquarters on the 
Western front: 

"With a prodigious expenditure of 
amniunition, with fourteen or fifteen 
divi»»ions, including part of Kitchener's 
army and. Indian troops, the British as- 
sum.ed the offensive on the right wing. 
The preparations, which required time, 
were costly and thorough, but the re- 
sults achieved were scarcely worth 
mentioning. 

"They opened an artillery fire like 
drum beats on the 20th, and for four 
days maintained a steady roar against 
our trenches, some sections of which 
were perfectly curtained with fire. 
They prepared for the attack from 
Armentleres to the Lorette heights, and 
it commenced on the 25th. The chief 
blow was struck northeast of Fro- 
melles, which was repelled with heavy 
los.<»e9. An attack was also made w^esl 
of Angres, which partly penetrated our 
trendies, but the Germans counter- 
attacked and ousted the British. Sim- 
ilar results followed attacks at Glven- 
chy and Festubert. 

Germans Retire. 

"The only results of consequence 
were achieved south of La Bassee 
canal. There the Germans had to retire 
Into their second line positions, but 
returned to the attack and recaptured 
part of the trenches lost. At the same 
time fho French attacked from the 
Lorette heights to Rivieres, southward 
of Arras, having prepared previously 
for days with a storm of shells. All 
our positions from Armentieres to be- 
low Arras, except unimportant sec- 
tors, were fully held. Another attack 
near Guinchy was repulsed. Our troops 
are ready." 



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IFOR FALL Mil WINTER 



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— "the kind real boys wear." 
The fabrics are wool — the 
patterns are the very latest, 
and we have them at prices 
within reach of every purse. 
We want to place particular 
emphasis on our 



BOYS' NORFOLKS 

in fancies and blue serges — 
two pairs of C/l OC 

knickers ^Hra%l3 

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KENNEY-ANKER CO 

409 and 411 West Superior Street. 



VETERANS OF THE CIVIL 
WAR PASS IN REVIEW 
BEFORE THE P RESIDENT 

(Continued from page 1.) 

the other officers and past officers of 
the orgranizatlon. Gen. William L© 
Due of Hastingrs, who is 96 years old, 
was in a carriage with other veterans 
who were unable to cover the route 
on foot. 

^ — 

Thousands See Parade. 
Washington, Sept. 29 — Historic Penn- 
sylvania, avenue, up whicli the vic- 
torious Union army marched fifty 
years ago, for review by President An- 
drew Johnson, was lined early today 
with thousands who braved a sharp 
wind to see the remnant of that legion 
march from the capitol to the White 
House to be reviewed by President 
Wilson. 

The grand parade and piesldentlal 
review v/as the crowning event of the 
annual reunion of the Grand Army of 
the Republic. It was In conrunemcra- 
tion of the grand review after the close 
of the Civil war. 

President Wilson, accompanied by 
military and naval aides, left the 
White House to take his place In the 
reviewing stand when guns fired on 
the Mall announced the start of the 
procession. 

Greetc^d 'Wittt CKe«ni. 
The president was greeted with 
cheers as he entered his box and took 
a place on the spot President Johnson 
reviewed the union troops at the close 
of the Civil war. 

Secretaries Garrison and Daniels oc- 
cupied seats to the left and right, 
respectively, of the president and be- 
hind him were grouped other members 
of the cablcet. Others in the presl- 

j dent's Immediate party were Miss 

I Helen Woodrow Bones, Col. David J. 

I Palmer, commander-in-chief of the O. 

! A. R.; William F. Gude, chairman of 

j the general citizens' committee, and 
Lieut. Gen. Nelson A. Miles, grand mar- 

I shal of the parade, who took a place 

E. G. Hudson's Statement. 

E. G. Hudson, Chamblee, Ga., wrltea: 
"Last year I bought and tried Foley 
Cathartic Tablets. I have tried many 
cathartics, but for a thorough cleansing 
movement of the bowels without the 
slightest inconvenience or sickening, I 
bel'eve the Foley Cathartic Tablet the 
best on earth. It's a perfect cathartic, 
with no bad effects." Everybody suf- 
fers occasionally from indigestion or 
constipation, so Mr. Hudson's exper- 
ience is worth remembering. Stout 
persons say these tablets relieve that 
i "heavy" reeling. Sold everywhere. 



there after the head of the parade iil*-6 
passed. - -" 

At the president's reviewing stand 
was a guard of hqjforfof soldiers, sail- 
ors and marine?, v i 

Flags WiiTe. 

DLrectJy over tlv*- p*-t-aidenfs box a 
\niii< AiVitrrlcan flag fluttered and be- 
side it were the ftiHga-of the secretary 
of war and the secretary of the navy. 
A part of his box was draped with 
flags used in the war. 

Other boxes in the president's stand 
were occupied by. Civil war nurses. 

The court of honor ^in front of the 
White House was decorated with flags 
and green and white bunting and the 
stands were packed with government 
officials, members of the diplomatic 
corps, relatives and friends of the 
veterans. 

Excitement, exhaustion and minor 
mishaps took a few veterans out of the 
line of march. The regular army am- 
bulances patrolling the line of march 
carried them to hospitals. 

Welcomed by Prenldent. 

Veterans were formally welcomed to 
the capital lost night bv President Wil- 
son, who told them their battles fifty 
years ago were fought that the great- 
est Instrumentality for the uplift of 
mankind the worVd has ever seen 
might not be Impaired. 

The president spolte amid scenes of 
patriotic fervor in the crowded con- 
vention hall, into which the old cen- 
sus building had been converted. He 
said, in part: 

Preiiidfnt'M .4ddre««. 

"It Is a singular thing that men of 
a single generation should have wit- 
nessed what you have witnessed in 
the crowded fifty years which you 
celebrate tonight. You took part when 
you were young men in a struggle the 
meaning of which I dare say you 
thought would not be re\»ealed during 
your lifetime, and yet more has hap- 
pened in the making of this nation in 
your lifetime than has ever happened 
in the making of any other nation In 
the lifetime of a dozen generations. 

"The nation in which you now live, 
i.? not the nation for whose union you 
fought. You have seen many things 
which have made this nation one of 
the representative nations of the world 
with regard to the modern spirit of 
thait world, and you have the satis- 
faction which I dare say, few soldler.«i 
have ever had, of looking back upon 
a war absolutely unique In this that, 
instead of destroying it healed; that 
instead of making permanent division, 
it made a permanent union. This na- 
tion was from the beginning a spirit- 
ual enterprise, and you have seen the 
spirits of the two once divided sec- 
tions of this country absolutely united. 
A war which seemed as if it had the 
seed of every kind of bitterness In It. 
has seen a single generation put bit- 
terness absolutely out of its heart 
and you feel, as I am sure, the men 
who fought against you feel, that you 
were comrades even then, though you 
did not know it, and that now you 
know that you are com.rados In a com- 
mon lovo for a country which vou are 
equally eager to serve. 

Everybody May Take Pride. 

"This is a miracle of the spirit so 
far as national history is concerned. 
This is one of the very few wars in 
which in one sense, everybody en- 
gaged may take pride. Some wars are 
to be regretted; some wars mar the 
annals of history; but Eome wars con- 
trasted with those make those annal." 
distinguished, show that the spirit of 
man sometimes pprings to great en- 
terprises that are even greater than 
his own mind had conceived. 

"You set the nation free for that 
great career of development, of unham- 
pered development, which the world 
has witnessed .<!ince tho Civil war. But 
for my own part, I would not be proud 
of the extraordinary development of 
this country, qf its extraordinary de- 
velopment In material wealth and fi- 
nancial power, did I not believe that 
the people of the United States wished 
all of this power devoted to ideal 
ends. There have been other nations 
as rich as we; there have been other 
nations as powerful; there have been 
other nations as spirited, but I hope 
we shall never forget that we created 
this nation, not to serve ourselves, but 
to serve mankind. 
D*\oted to Principles of Haman 

"I hope I may say without an 
cation of criticism upon any 
great people in the world, that 
always seemed to me that the 
of the United States wished to 
garded to be devoted to the promotion 
of particular principles of human right 
The United States was fotmded not to 
provide free homes, but to assert hu- 
man rights. This flag meant a great 
enterprise of the human spirit. No- 
body, no large bodies of men In the 
time that flag was first set up be- 
lieved with a very firm belief in the 
efficacy of democracy. Do you realize 
that only so long ago as the time 
of the American revolution democracv 
was regarded as an experiment in the 
world, and we were regarded as rash 
experimenters. But we not only be- 
lieved in it; we showed our belieif was 
well founded and that a nation as 
powerful as any in the world, could be 
erected upon the will of the people; 
that Indeed there was a power in such 
a nation that dwelt In no other nation 
unless also In that other nation the 
spirit of the people prevailed. 
Haa Been Practicable. 

"We now know and the world knows 
that the thing which we then under- 
took, rash as It seemed, has been prac- 
ticable, and that we ha,ve set up in 
the world a government maintained 
and promoted by the general conscience 
and general conviction. 

"So I stand here cot to welcome 
you to the nation's capital, as If I 
were your host, but merely to welcome 
you to your own capital, because I am 
proud to be your servant. I hope I 
shall catch, as I hope we shall all 
catch from the spirit of this occasion 
a new consecration to the high duties 
of American citizenship." 

Charles F. Shermart, cammander-in- 
chief of the Sons of Veterans, one of 
the speakers who IfoTlowed the presi- 
dent, declared that the sons of men 
who fought for their country In the 
Civil war are ready now to do their 
full duty In the same way, If called up- 
on by the president. 

SOME GROUND 

IS RETAKEN 

(Continued from page 1.) 




Right. 

inipli- 
other 
It has 
people 
be re- 



Ladies' 
Neckwear 



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received in all the 
newest things at 25c, 
35c and 50c. 



''WHCRC VALUES REIQN SUPREMr* 




mom: 




21 and 23 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



Short 


Lengths 


3,000 yards of plain 


and fancy Outing 


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the piece, on ."'i^eclal 


Bale tomorrow. 



The Ready-to-Wear Department Has Values 
Exceptional Meivit Arranged for 
Thursday Selling 

NEW FALL DRESSES— ]n combinations of silk and wool materials, 
plain and plaid silk taffeta and serge combinations, in the new fall colors 
and black; lovelv new late stvlefi — three exceptional values are on sale for 
Thursday at $7.50, $10.50^and $15.00. 

MANUFACTURERS' SAMPLE SUITS— A splendid assortment of 
the best styles of the season, made up in magnificent materials, fur and 
braid trimmed; all the new fall :olors are well represented. These suits 
now on sale at a substantial saving of 25 per cent. Prices run from $17.50 
to $45.00— the sale prices from $12.50 to $22.50. 

.EXTRA SPECIAL— New F^ll Skirts, in all-wool serge, navy and 
black — on sale Thursday for $1.98. 

FLANNELETTE SLEEPING GARMENTS— Th^ famous Bright- 
on Carlsbad Sleeping Garments; also the Dove Brand. We are featuring 
these two great brands of sleeping garments — they are authoritatively mentioned 
as the best brands in the world. Special \ alues on sale Thursday at 50^, 75^, 98^, 
$1.19 and $1.50. See these garments n window display. 

SILK PETTICOATS — A special purchase at a great bargain; made up of 
double warp pure silk messaline; wide s\A'eep and deep flounce; in the new fall col- 
ors, also pink, light blue and white. The greatest bargain ever offered in Silk Petti- 
coats, on sale Thursday for $1.59 each. 




Hi' 



New Millinery 
Underpriced 

Untrimmed Hats 

In fine silk velvet, in all the newest 

shapes; values up to ^1 QA 

$4.00— your choice at qfAm^%9 

Untrimmed Shapes 

In a clever variety of Turbans, smart 
Sailors, Tricornes, Continentals, Pokes 
and roll side back brims, and hatters' 
plush hats, in a big assortment; regular 
values up to $2.50— QSC 

sale price ^ . . . ^^^ 

Gir/s' and Children's 
Tams 

In this line tomorrow we offer you an 
unexcelled variety in velvets, corduroys, 
velveteens and cloths, in values up to 
$10.00 — special sale price, ^Q^ 

each *1r^ %^ 






Extra Special Values in 

Children's, Women's and 

Misses' Sweaters 

BOYS' JERSEYS AND SWEATERS 
— In wool and worsted navy, oxford, 
cardinal and maroon 4^*? ^%^% 

shades, at only 4>X« W 

BOYS' SWEATERS— In heavy rope 
stitch, plain and storm collars, for boys 
up to 16 years — priced at ^^ 9CI 
$4.00 down to -^A-^^ 

WOMEN'S AND MEN'S HEAVY 
WOOL SWEATERS— Storm collars. 
We offer some splendid ^O Q18 
values, from $6.50, $5 to. '4>^»^W 

BIG SPECIAL IN MEN'S NIGHT 
SHIRTS— 69c Men's Outing Flannel 
Night Shirts, made with regular and 
military collars and low neck; Crt#* 
sizes up to 20, at only ^vCr 

WOMEN'S 50c VESTS AND PANTS 
AT 39c — Women's Fleeced Vests and 
Pants, vests come high neck, long and 
short sleeves; Dutch neck, short sleeve<, 
and low neck, no sleeves ; full 
bleached — special at only. . . . 





lines were unsuccessful. The only re- 
sult has been that the enemy has not 
yet been driven out of our trenches 
northwest of Souchez, extending ever 
a distance of 100 meters. 

"Constantly advancing waves of 
French attacking troops broke down 
before the Inflexible resistance of 
Baden battalions, Rhineland Reserve 
Regiment No. 66 and Westphalian In- 
fantry Regiment No. 168. 

"The heavy losses which the enemy 
incurred during often repeated storm 
attacks against the hills at Massiges 
were in vain. Attempts of the French 
to recapture trenches which they lost 
at La Fille Morte failed. 

AcroplnneM Shot Down. 

"In Flanders, two British aeroplanes 
were shot down. The occupants were 
made prisoners. 

"Eastern theater of war: Army group 
of Field Marshal von Hindenburg: The 
attack southwest of Dvlnsk has ad- 
vanced as far as the region of Lake 
Swenton. 

"After having effectively supported 
the operations of Gen. von Eichhorn 
by advancing against the flank of the 
enemy, our cavalry left the district 
near and east of Vileika. The enemy 
remained inactive west of Vllelka. Be- 
tween Smorgon and Wischnew our 
troops are advancing victoriously. 

"Army group of Gen. von Linsingen: 
The Russians have been driven behind 
Kormin and Putil owlca." 

TO FLOArBIG 

CREDIT AT 96 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Anglo-French loan is to be issued In 
the United States was about in line 
with the expectations of British fi- 
nanciers. Though the yield is a shade 
higher than had been looked for orig- 
inally in some quarters, the general 
opinion is that heroic measures were 
necessary to remove the deadlock In 
exchange transactions which had been 
allowed to continue for so long. 

It is felt here that the advantage 
rests with America In obtaining such 
a good rate of Interest and facilities 
for Its export trade, although England 
also reaps benefit by the postponement 
for at least five years of payment of 
the debit for goods received. 

The question of exchange Is now of 
first Importance. Belief is expressed 
in banking and exchange circles that 
further measures will be necessary to 
bring the rale more nearly to a nor- 
mal figure. It is known that a good 
deal of money Is being held for re- 
mittance as soon as cable transfers 
reach $4.80. 

Gold Still Going; Out. 

Gold is still going out and will con- 
tinue to go in payment of munitions. 

The loan now arranged will cancel 
part of the advertised trade balance, 
but in view of the coming shipments 
of cotton and grain, which will swell 
this balance, persons in close touch 
with the exchange situation here ar« 
of the opinion that further action will 
be necessary. At the same time the 
slow but gradual improvement of the 
British export trade and a reduction 
In the importation of luxuries as a re- 
sult of the newly arranged tariff 
schedule will help the situation. 

Much more might be done by the 
sale of further amounts, of American 
pecurltles, of which a very large total 
is still held here. In the meantime, 
dealers, pending a more definite rise 
in exchange are adopting a cautious 
attitude, keeping their books even. It 
Is understood bankers are keeping 
small balances in New York, antici- 
pating a rise in exchange. Consequent- 
ly any large orders which may come 



on the niarket \ 
clable effect. Thi.- 
morning when tl 
forced the cable i 
buyers then appe 
cllne to \,ixyi, bu 
steadier at 4.71*4. 

No C 

London represer 

financial houses d 

i ment on the term 

absence of news 

flees. A promine 

expressed the opii 

I French commisslo 

I view of the str 

] America. This is 

•Britain has negoti 

; though the excha 

I ered only a frac 

I money ha^ not : 

I The high yield i 

upon, this banker 

\ on the credits o) 

asmuch as short 



ill have an appre- 
1 was noticeable this 
,e sale of $500,000 
ate to 4.72 7^. Some 
ared, cau?lng a de- 
t the rate later was 



>mnient. 

tatlves of American 
id not care to com- 
9 of the loan In the 
from their head of- 
nt English banker 
lion that the Anglo- 
n had done well in 
ong opposition in 

the first loan Great 
ated abroad, and al- 
age rate has recov- 
tion at present, the 
'et been paid over, 
nust not be looked 

said, as a reflection 
Great Britain, in- 

term bonds always 



DUKE or MECKltNBURG STRELITZ 
NOW COMMANDIiR IN GERMAN ARMY 



yield more than long term loans, and 
Americans are accustomed to a high- 
rate of interest on short issues. 



MONUMENT TO WALKER 
UNVEI LED I N KANSAS 

Kansas City, Kan., Sept. 29. — A mon- 
ument to the memor>' of William 
AValker, fia-st territorial governor of 
Kansas and Nebra^ska, was unveiled 
today at Kansas City, Kansas. The 
monument marxs the grave of the pio- 
neer executive in Oak Grove cemetery 
in that city. Governor Walker was a 
Wyandotte Indian and came west in 
1843 when his tribe moved from Upper 
Sandusky, Ohio, and established a new 
home at the junction of the Missouri 
and Kansas rivers, founding the town 
of Wyandotte, which afterward became 
Kansas City, Kan. 



I 



thereafter by the two governments 
Jointly and severally. 

Sir Henry Babington Smith, a mem- 
ber of the commission, made public 
the announcement. 

About tkm Expected. 

London, Sept. 29. — The definite an- 
nouncement of the terma on which the 



I TO END CATARRHAL , 

^ DEAFNESS AND t 

HEAD NOISES 



If you have Catarrhal Deafness 
or head noises go to your drug- 
gist and getn ounce of Parmmt 
(double strength), and add to it 
1^ pint of hot water and 4 
ounces of granulated sugar. Take 
1 tablespoonful four times a day. 

This will often bring Quick 
relief from the distressing head 
noises. Clogged nostrils should 
open, breathing become easy and 
the mucus stop dropping into 
the throat. It is easy to pre- 
pare, costs little and is pleasant 
to take. Any one who has Ca- 
tarrhal Deafness or head noises 
Bhould give this prescription a 
trial. 



JiM|H|M|HM.+4-l'<^'MM!"M-l«: •J^"MH'**H 




An Inside Bath 
Makes You Look 
and Feel Fresh 



1 



Says a glass cf hot water with 

phosphate before breakfast 

keeps Illness away. 



This excellent, common-serrse 

health measure being 

adopted by millions. 



DUKE OF MECKLENBURG 
STRELITZ. 



The Grand Duk 
Mecklenburg Strel 
ers of the states c 
who is commandii 
army during the v 
until 1907 had a fe 
ment but in that 
was granted to, 
now make their 
legislative body ce 
tag. It Is compost 
town magistrates. 



5 Adolf Frledrich of 
itz la one of the rul- 
f the German empire 
ig in the German 
'orld war. His duchy 
udal form of govern- 
year a constitution 
:he people and they 
3wn laws through a 
lied the diet or land- 
d of land owners and 



Physicians the world over recom- 
mend the inside bath, claiming this la 
of vastly more importance than outside 
cleanliness, because the skin pores do 
not absorb impurities into the blood, 
causing ill health, while the pores in 
the ten yards of bowels do. 

Men and women are urged to drink 
each morning, before breakfast, a 
glass of hot water with a teaspoonful 
of limestone phosphate in it, as a 
harmless means of helping to wash 
from the stomach, liver, kidneys and 
bowels the previous day's indigestible 
material, poisons, sour bile and toxins; 
thus cleansing, sweetening and purify- 
ing the entire alimentary canal before 
putting more food Into the stomach. 

Just as soap and hot water cleanse 
and freshen the skin, so hot water and 
limestone phosphate act on the ellm- 
inatlve organs. 

Those who ^^'ake up with bad breath, 
coated tongue, nasty taste or have a 
dull, aching head, sallow complexion, 
acid stomach; others who are subject 
to bilious attacks or constipation, 
should obtain a quarter pound of lime- 
stone phosphate at the drug store. This 
will cost very little but is sufficient to 
demonstrate the value of inside bath- 
ing. Those who continue it each morn- 
ing are assured of pronounced results, 
both in regard to health and appear- 
ance. 






> 



Big Specials In Thursday Offerings | J_ 



4 



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1 


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1 ' 










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mtir^ 



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J il.ilriiT 



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Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



ON THE IRON RANGES 



OFFICIAL MAP OF THE WEATHER 




September 29, 19: L5 



STATE EXAMINER TO PROBE 
THE FINANCES OF NIBBING 



Acts on Petition By Ten 

Taxpayers of the 

Village. 



Books and Records to Be 

Given Thorough 

Examination. 



Hlbbinff. Minn., Sept. 29.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The officials of the vH- 
laere of Hibbing were grK'en a surprise 
late yesterday afternoon when Public 
Examiner Andrew E. Fritz, accom- 
panied by Deputy Examiners Cederberg- 
and Davis, appeared at the village hall 
and announced that an examination 
■would be made of all tha books and 
records of the villagfe during the past 
etx yt-ars. Mr. Fritz and his assastants 
arrived here about 4:30 p. m. from Vir- 
ginia. Treasurer Gelaelman had left 
his office for the day, but returned 
promptly when notified of the ex- 
aminers' presence. Mr. Fritz stated 
that, having: received a petition signed 
by ten Hlbblngr taxpayt^rs requesting 
him to examinp the books and records 
of the villag-e, he desired to count the 
cash and look over the treasurer's 
books. Mr. Geiselman promptly pro- 
duced the books, and the cash on hand 
having been counted, the examination 
■was started. 

Probe to Be Thuroa^h. 

Examiner Fritz says he does not 
Icnow how long it will take to complete 
the examination, but it is his intention 
to make a thorough probe Into all the 
books and records of the village, and 
If it is necessary more expert account- 
ants will be engaged to rush the work. 

The village council at its regular 
meeting last night passed a resolution 
Instructing all officers and employes of 
the village to lend every asalstanc to 
the public examiners on their work. 
Mayor Power also expressed his desire 
for a thorough examination of the 
books and records and said he was con- 
fident that everthing would be -found 
In good shape. 

Statement By Rxamtner. 

In explanation of his action, Public 
Examiner Fritz said: ^„„„^ 

"It is the intention of the depart- 
ment of the public examiner to prob.> 
th- books, papers and records of nib- 
bing covering a period of the la.st six 
y^ars I place the period at six years 
because, as it is no doubt generally 
known. It la cot possible to recover 
In -ivil actions after the cause has run 
m>re than six years. It Is no doubt 
generally known that the statute or 
limitations in criminal actions sets In 
after three vears. Just how long the 
InvesMgation will take it Is not possi- 
ble to toll. I expect to be here for 
ab )at a wetk and I consider It most 
probable that the work of my deputies 
will require at least six woks. I ex- 
pect to come to Hibblng frequently 
djrin^f that period. The time of this 
in .'e.stlgatloTT depends upon what we 
•bump Into.' If the time runs into an 



aJTMually Long period we may need 
extr& heli> for Depafejes Cederberg 
and Davis. 

"The Ume limit of the investigation 
necessarily wlU dei>«id upon the ease 
with ■which the system of records here 
can be checked-. No report or part of a 
report or the general report wlU be 
given out until the work la completed. 
It will then be submitted to the vil- 
lage authorities alone il everything Is 
found to be 'regular' and right. If not, 
th'- report goes to the governor, to the 
county attorney and to the village 
officers. We are not permitted even 
then to give out the facts. They must 
come from the governor first, prefer- 
ably, or th© other authorities who 
have them. 

"The power vested In the office of 
the public examiner for an investi- 
gation of this kind is recited in sec 



LEAVES CHILD 
TO DIEIN ROAD 

Auto Badly Injures Leslie 

Taggart at Kelly 

Lake. 



Identity of Driver Not Yet 

Learned — Boy May 

Die. 



Hibblng. Mioii.. Sept. 2.3. — (Special to 



lieu »ii aci;- tw. tj- u\t .. ... 

tlon 3234. chapter 18 of th© revised; ^ •** Herald.)— Lealie Taggart. the 6- 
I statutes, 1912. i Xear-old son of Guy Taggart of Kel- 

I "Examinatiana by this department ley Lake, was run over and badly In- 

I of village townships, cities (other 4„r»,i K,r o„ ... i 

I than St. Paul and Minneapolis) and ^ I ^ unknown automobUa yes- 

achool districts are made only oa I ^raa>' afternoon and brutally left to 

I '^*'.V^!''^"- ^ . , j lie in the road at the outskirts of that 

Hut the examinations we make of v111»b-«» tu^ /.v,ii^ ^» *i n i, 

• state departments, institutions, county ^ ^!, ^^ ''^"^ ^'^^ fin.ally seen by 
offices, as well aa of county fairs, |"^^' Marguerite Bowers and the au- 



; firemen's relief funds, freight lines, ex- 

1 press and telephone companies a>re re- 

j quired uncfer the law annually. 

I "As I have stated, the investigation, 

petitioned for by ten Hibbing taxpay- 

I ers, will go into the cash receipts and 

disbursements for the last six years" 

Powev la C»nftde«t. 

Mayor Power says he Is confident 

that the examination by the atate of- 

ftcials will show that the records of 

the village are well kept and that 



thorities notified, who at once rtxshod 

him to the Adama hospital in this 
city. 

No details of the affair are known 
here, but officials are checking up au- 
tomobiles that were in Kelley Lake 
yesterday and it la probable that the 
driver of the machine will be located. 
Kelley Lake is a small ore station a 
few miles south of h«re. 

It was said at the hospital today that 
the boy la internally injured and that 






fo^p^lment of Agriculture, Weathei' Bureau 

* • • * . ; (^'arle^X M ajr vin. Chiel V^ 

.• . *• • r .'•.'-■.• r-' . * y' ^^~" 

'liVLight Fi 
HF-rHcavy Fr 



ena 





f . . • -.vJii. --. . .. «A. 



\ 



_/ 









00 



■^. 






V 



FORECAST TWJ, T F. M. 
THlTlStiyAT 

Wnr DtUuHi. SinjerU^r and liciniti, 
fticJurtftig tlie Misiul)«. mad Vemilllun 
Ir n ranaes: ProhaWy shnwore to- 
night; 'I'iiucadBtr Danlf cloiuij- neaXh- 
«r; sllgiit cliaRBBs til temppratui*; 
lirfiit to niixleraW e«st»rl> wrinds, b*- 
comiuc vaiiaiileg 




•-^.^^ r-' 



^^-> 



V 




EXPLANATORY NOTES 

Ob«cn:Tli..;^ liiki^i ai » * Mt., .ciciiiy-firii racHJiaii lime Aif pnatun m^arttt to aca l-vd Ison.as^corriuiuoiu ItfiBSl mm ihroo»li nomu ol cuml ai> ni 
!«!>« Ilimiii^i itwiiu ••! c<|iiiil UTu^Miratmu. Q duai, ^ pattt}" duady; ^ .-i"...i- D „.„ c .-.,.-. a* . _.:_:. . " ' ' "\"' 



01 lucii'iir iffi'ic 111 !•«»* _'4 liuJin^ 



cloudjc. R fain, S snow; M n!poit musiog AiruHS (ly uiil, U,c uiml 



WIND SCALE. 

Miles Per Hour 

tlm to 3 

ght air 3 to 8 

srtit breeze 8 ^o 13 

Male bneaei ... 12 to 18 
uderate breeio. 18 to 23 
-esh breeze. . . .2S to 28 
Tiins breeae: ... 28 to 34 
oderate g.ile. . .34 u> 40 

-esli gale 4^) to 48 

rong gale 48 to 50 

lu:la gals. SO t» 65 

orm 65 t» 75 

urrlcano Over 75 

. W. RICHARDSON. 

Bftuift. (IsornEiiMS jSolUa fines): 
iSlindcd areas kbuw j>icci)>itatiuii 



orary, that Ls to say, dependent upon 
scholarship qualifications. 

A professional club has been or- 
ganized by the members of the high 
school faculty for educational pur- 
poses. The club will meet on Wednes- 
day evening once in three weeks, the 
only study at present to be directed 
toward "Moral Education." 

Musical work is well under way and 
the Boys' and Girls' Glee club and 
the Boys' quartet have been selected 
after the usual try-out of freshmen 
voices. The quartet consists of .Toe 
uzelka, first tenor; W^erner Koivunen. 
second tenor; Pete Grosso, first bass: 
tarl Johnson, second bass. The high 
school orchestra has been organized 
under the Joint direction of Miss Park 
and Edward Hagen, the former at the 
piano, the latter second violin. 

CHISHOLM TEACHERS 
j TO DANCE FRIDAY 

I 

I Chl.sholm, Minn.. Sept. 29. — (Special 
I to The Herald.) — The annual teach- 
ers' reception, which serves as a get- 
I together function for parents and 
I teachers as well as for old and new 
I members of the staff, will be held at 
I the new high school g:>'mna.sium on 
Friday evening. Oct. 1. Dancing will 
be in order from 9 o'clock until mid- 
night. Sim's orchestra will furnish the 
music. 



VIRGINIA CHAPTER 

MASO NS ELECT 

Virginia,. Minn., Sept. 29. — At a meet- 
j ing of Virginia chapter Royal Arch 
j Masons, held last evening, the follow- 
1 ing officers were elected for the ensu- 
1 ing year: W. J. Archer, high priest; D. 
i W. Stebblna, king; G. L. Simons, scribe; 
Ben. Hoyer, captain of host; H. S. Gil- 
lespie, principal soJourn<^r; W. D. New- 
comb, royal arch captain: C. T. Ek- 
fitrand, secretary; James Cudllp. treas- 
urer, and O. I. Williams is the past 
high priest 



until i,^ «.,.» v.! y ' ,-,.-- •-"•, Great Northern 

I until ne and his deputies appeared at - « 

! 5r*. village halL It is true enough Flf pi f^VU Ul ■ Bl "^ffc 
I t^^.^.we are glad to have them here, i t¥tl_feTM MAM TD 

1 "We feel that the result of a thor- ^"^^^ ■ ■■ ■mMH iU 
' ougJi examination of the books and lUm IBI ■All I MliV«« 

«fa.^, records of the village of IllbWns WED III MILL CITY 

' will clarify a good many of the e^-ron^ WW *»■* IU Bi ll li Ul I I 

j eous Impressions that the public 
' might have as ta conditions hero in 
' Hibbing. While I am not familiar to 
! any great extent with the books of the 
I different departments of the vil^Age, I 

am satlsfled tliat during the present 

administration since the year 1913, 

there will be nothing In the report of 
I aueh examination damaging to the ad- 
ministration, and we are only too glad 

to have an opportunity of giving to 

th>? public a complete report as to the 

status In connection with the flnancx?s 

of the village. 

"As to oar conduct of the village 

affairs we Invite publicity and would 
j ask that the public await the result 
I of the present examination. Every 

possible assistance will be given to 

the examiners so that they may get at 

every detail of the affairs of the vil- 
lage. Every employe of the village 

will be Instructed to assist the gentle 



V. R. Prince to Marry Miss 

Alma Swanson, Former 

Teacher, Saturday. 

Eveleth. Minn.. Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — V. R. Prtncw left to- 
day for Minneapolis, where he will be 
married Saturday to Misa Alma M. 
Swanson, formerly a teacher in the 
Evel&th schools. Hl» parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. S. A. Prince and daughters, 
Evelyn and Jeane, will leave Friday 
for Minneapolia to attend the wed- 
ding. 

Mr. Prince U assistant district au- 
, .. .. ^ ,, - I Perlntendent for the Prudential In- 

1 men to the full extent of theisi abil- surance company and Is tn charge of 
; Ity and every officer will be rea>dy to the Virginia office. Mias Swanson 



render any information and assistance 
: he can give." 

Will Aid E:xamln«^rs. 

i The village council, at Its regular 
I meeting last night, adopted the fol- 
lowing resolution: 

I "All officers and employes of the 

I village of Hibblng are hereby In- 

: atructed to lend every assistance to 

the atate officers in their work, and 



taught mathematics in the Eveleth 
high school during 1911, 19-12 and 
1918. 

The wedding will take place Satur- 
day at 4 o'clock In the afternoon at 
the home of the bride's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. John Swanson at 3150 Pleas- 
ant avenue. Only a few relatives will 
be present. 

Mr. and Mrs. Prince will return the 



To be really op- 
^•.Aswitf iM-iMtiMt ttmtatic, after the 
MilTLYR.OWt promise of fair 
-' ■ r Weather, one. must 
admix that while 
today la rainy, the 
raia la not dis- 
agreeable for it is. 
at least, warm. So 
comlitions might 
be much worse, an* 
the matter of fair 
weather is simply a 
caae of hope de- 
ferred. 

A year ago today 
was sunny and warm. The sun rose 
this morning at 6:04 and will set at 
5:52, giving eleven hours and. forty- 
eight minutes of sunlight. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"Somewhat cooler weather prevails 
Ln Central and Northwestern states. 
Freezing temperatures occurred thL* 
morning in Northern Montana and 
Southern Alberta, and there were light 
to heavy fro.sta fn New: York, Pennsyl- 
vania, Ohio, Michigan. Southern Wis- 
consin and Idaho. Rains fell during 
Tuesday or last night over South At- 
lantic states, Lonlaianft, Tennessee, Ar- 
kansas, OTtlahouia, Kan.<(as, Kentucky, 
New Mexico, Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa, 
Eastern Michigan, Minnesota, the Da- 
kotas, Wyoming-, Saskatchewan and 
Manitoba. A diatuxbance of consider- 
able intensity is centered over the GiUf 
of Mexico, New Orleans reporting a 
forty-mile east gale." 



temperature^ i 



I frost tonight; rislnj 

I Thursday. 

I Montana — Generally fair tonight and 

I Thursday; warmer tonight. 

! Lower Michigan — Fair tonight and 

, Thursday; frost tonight. 

fpper Michigan — Fair in east and 
probaljly ah'jwers In west portions to- 
night and Thursday; frost in east por- 
tion tonight. 



ably a return game with' the Superior 
i city team 



-« Temperatures. 

Following wer.' the highest temper- 
atures in the last twenty- four hours 
and the- lo-weat In the last twelve, end- 
ing at 7 a. m.: 



The linieup is 
R. Erickson; fu 
M. McCurdy; r; 
captain; quarte: 
and T. SuUivai 
left guard, A. CI 
left tackle, A. ] 
McLaughlin, a 
guard. Bud Gii 
right tackl-e, A 
i H. Freeman. 



as follows: Left half, 
llback, A. Johnson and 
ght half, H. Johnson, 
back, A. Filiatrault, 
.; center, G. Coleman; 
iHstensen and C. Clark; 
3ahlstrom; left end, B. 
id A. Sullivan; right 
iter and H. Swanson; 
Peglow; relght end, 



High Low 



Abilene 90 



68 





LOOK OLD 



Look Young By Darkening 

Gray Hair With Q-Ban— 

No Dye — Harmless, 



If your hair is gray, faded, wispy, 
thin, prematurely gray, or streaked 
with gray, you will look tw^elve or fif- 
teen years younger if you darken your 
gray hair by shampooing your hair 
and scalp a few times with Q-Ban Hair 
Color Restorer. It is harnjless and not 
a dye, but acts on the roots, makes 
gray hair healthy, turning all your 
g-ray hair to a beautiful, lustrous, soft, 
natural dark shade, darkening your 
gray hair and entire head of hair so 
evenly and naturally that no one need 
suspect you use Q-Ban. Besides, Q-Ban 
stops dandruff. Itching scalp and fall- 
ing hair, promotes Its growth. Guar- 
anteed to give satisfaction or money 
refunded. Only 50c for a big 7-oz. 
bottle at Orpheum Pharmacy, 281 East 
Superior St.. Duluth, Minn. Out-of- 
town folks supplied by mall. 




to particularly call their attention to ' ^'^^ °^ l^^iry^Zt^. ^^.^ will make their 
the minutest details of village affairs I il"'?!*' ^* Y^^^^^^ '" a- flat ta the 
and the examiners are requested not Matheson building. 
to hesitate In the least to ask any em- 
ploye or officer of the village for any 
Information desired." 

Treasurer Gelselman made the fol- 
lowing statement: "My books were 
the first books the examiners asked 
for. I, at least, had no notice of any 
kind that they were coming and, while 
it was a surprise, yet I invite the 
closest scrutiny of all books and rec- 
ords covering the treasurei-'s accounts. 
I will assist the gentlemen in every 
conceivable manner so that they may 
scrutinize the minutest detail thereof. 
They will find the affaii-a of my office 
in perfect order. I am much pleased 
at the prospect of the fullest report In 
the premises." 



VIRGINIA SCHOOLS 
CONTINUE TO 6R0W 

Supt. Colgrove Reports 

3,011 Pupils, 157 Gain 

for Year. 

Virginia, Minn., Sept. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — There are now 3.011 
students in the local schools, accord- 
ing to the report of Supt. P. P. Col- 
grove, Last year. In September, there 
were 2,854 students, making the gain 
for this year 157. During this month 

137 new students were added to the 
enrollment. 

At the school board meeting last 
night the contract for furnishing coal 
for the winter months was awarded 
to four Virginia dealers. Their bids 



AlWA!fS MAKES 
A TEN STRIKE- 

At home ^-^^^^ 
At the club - or 
Wherever it is 
Served 




were alike. The firms which will 
supply th.e dUstrict with fuel are John- 
son & Peterson, Eddv's livery, the 
Virginia Transfer & Fuel Lines, and 
M. F. Marlon. 

For screening cnal the bidders 
asked $4.35 a ton; |5.35 for soft coal- 
$9 for hard coal. The contracts for 
the coal will amount to about $7 000 
it is believed. ' 

Arrangements will be made to have 
A. Hutchings of the East side high 
school of Cleveland, apeak here on 
Nov. 26. He is a trade school expert 



SCHMAHL STIRS 

UP OLD QUESTION 

Secretary of State Says 

Virginia Is Third Instead 

of Fourth Class City. 

Virginia, Minn.. Sept. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Virginia Is a city of 
the third class, according to Secretary 
of State Julius Schmahl, who replied 
to a letter from City Clerk Albert E. 
Bickford regarding Virginia's status 
and read at the city council meeting 
last night. Secretary Schmahr» ruling 
differs fi-om that of the supreme court 
and the attorney general, who, when 
the city desired to annex valuable 
mining properlty, now a portion of the 
village of Franklin, ruled that Vir- 
ginia was a city of the fourth class. 

Secretary Schmahl declares that ac- 
cording to the law, cities of more tiian 
10,000, according to the last state or 
national census, are cities of the third 
class. Virginia had 10.473 people in 
1910, according to the national cen- 
sus. City Attorney R. J. Montague 
said that possibly Secretary Schmahl 
had overlooked a special ruling on the 
case and the matter was referred to 
him. 

Mayor Michael Boylan suggested 
that a letter be written to the at- 
torney general regarding the matter. 
City Clerk Blckford recently wrote 
bids ! Secretary Schmahl regarding Virginia's 



status, so that the proper election 
blanks could be secured for the next 
city election In February. 

City Clerk Blckford reported that 
city employes who leave work or are 
discharged have difficulty in cashing 
their time checks and on his sugges- 
tion the city treasurer was empow- 
ered to cash time checks. '' 

Secretary A. B. Dahl of the Virginia 
Military band thanked the council for 
their co-operation during the summer ' 
and advised the councllmen that the 



and has illustrated slides of industrial I ^j^"** ^^^^^^^ f^l^f mid-winter concerts 
school work. Hia school was visited! '' » "*" could be secured. The mat- 
by the members of the school board ^'^^ '^'^^ referred to the music com- 



General Foreraata. 

Chicago, Sept. 29 — Forecasts for the 

twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 
Thursday: 

Minnesota — Partly cloudy tonight 
and Thursday with probably showers 
in northeast portion tonlg.ht; not much 
change in temperature. 

^'laconsin — Partly cloudy tonight 
and Thursday, probably showers In 
northwest portion tonight; not Tnuch 
change in. temperatures. 

Iowa — Partly cloudy tonight, prob- 
ably becoming unsettled, Thursday; 
not much change In teanperature. 

North and South Uakota — Fair to- 
night and Thur.sday, probably light 



afternoon as the time for examining 
the road and culverts. Monday after- 
noon the council will also meet with 
the water and light roTomiaslon to act 
on the request of the Troy laundry to 
make connections with the city wells. 

Attorney Montague was instructed to 
compel the Duluth, Winnipeg. <fe Pacific 
road to fence its tracks south of Poplar 
street. 

One thousand dollars was allowed 
for the entertainment of the League 
of Minnesota Municipalities' conven- 
tion delegations, who will meet here 
next month. 

Benjamin Mllaveti suggested that 
local coal dealers b^' licensed and all 
their deliveries weighed on the city 
scales. No action was taken on the 
suggestion. 

ADAIR ISURGED^ TO 
RETURN TO HIBBING 



.\]l>ena 48 34 

AmarlUa SI 

Battletor 1 52 42 

j Bismarck 4« 40 

I Bolsa 68 4ij 

ItiMtoQ 6i 48 

Buffalo 54 42 

I Cairo 60 

' CaJgarj- TO 34 

Charles City 43 

Cliarleiton 88 Ti 

Chicago .58 52 

Concordia K 

Daveijport 44 

Dfir.er 60 44 

Dm Moines SO 52 

PevlU Lakd «» *i 

Dodge 63 54 

Dubu<ju» 5^ 44 

OULUTH 46 40 

Eilmoncoit till 34. 

licanaba 52 34 

Kort Smith T9- 

Oaiveston 84 78 

Grand Ua,y«n M SB 

Gre^u Buy 54 38 

Havre m 3» 

Helena 56 36 

Houflhtoa 81 

Huroa SA 34. 

IndiaiLipolb 42 

JBcksorrvtliB Ufi 7'^ 

K ajn'.fKiiM 68 48 

Kan^afi City 02 59 

Kei.kuk 

KnowUl* 88 

L* Cronse ' 

Liuider 



48 
68 

...' 42 
42 

.62 48 



LoLa^tllla. . . 

STadlsori 38 4£ 

Marquette' 4fl 32 

^^ediclne Hat 64 

>ff nu>hl!r M 64 

Mile* City 4« SS 

Mil>vauk8« 5(i 4j 



High Low 

MlnnedOBs *2 

.M"den» 6$ 36 

Moiitviinery 90 74 

Muiitraal .5t 38 

.Moarliead 60 40' 

Nabli«<llle 

Sew Orleans 



,„. 82 
.88 78 
New York 64 46. 



North Platte ....02 
Oklaiioiua 90 



40 
S4 



Omalia B8 M 



Paiiy Sound 



M 



Phoenix 90 S6 

Plurr* 56 » 

Ptttsburgh 64 4a 

Port Arthur 46 38 

PorUajid. Or 70 W 



DIREGTOIIS SPUT 
ON TRADE SCHOOL 



Virginia Board Estimates 

Range From Nothing to 

$225,000. 



Prtin^ Albert 



.48 38 



<iu'.\BpelJfi 42 

Ralelgli 74 



36 
60 



1UU«L Cltr 36 40 : 

Rcwe&nrr 72 42. 

KosweU M ■ 

St. LoulT ...,'...70 58 1 

8t. Paul 54 4al 

9idt Lstoo City... 60 44.1 

iiaa Uieao 70 60 

San Ktnnrtsco 76 34 

Sault Sta. Marie.. 52 32 

Saattis ...04 iS 

WiBTldan. 51 86 

SlireveiKirt 90 72 

HMux City 58 48 

Spok.iJie Sa 

.Sprip.sfleld. Ill 48 

Sprlnjffleld. Mb 02 j 

Swia Currant 46 28, 

Tampa 8* .. i 

Toledo S4 3»' 

Valentljie 44 

W.umngtoa Si. 42 

Wichita 5fj 

WilUston 42 40 

Whineitmcra, 88 36 ' 

Winnipeg 4d t0\ 

YellowBtana 3ft 



on their trade school junket and the 
local directors were w^ell pleased with 
the Cleveland institution. 

The levy for the next school year 
was discussed, but action was de- 
ferred until neVit Monday night. The 
Ipvy for the present achool year Is 
ri75.00O. 






THEO. HAMM 
BREWING CO. 
SAINT PAUL 



Jay W. Anderson, 

(AGENT) 
610 VVFST MICHIG.W STREET, 
DLXLTH, 511NN, 
Phones— Zenith, Grand 1800 
Uuluth, ilelrose 1800 



JUDGE OF PROB,(\TE TO 
HEAR VIRGm iA CASES 

Virginia,. Minn., Sept. 29. — Judge S. 
W. Gilpin of the county probate cotirt 
will hold a special term of the court 
in Virginia Thursday of this week 
beginning at 8 o'clock a. m. The fol- 
lowing cases are on the calendar for 
consideration: 

Appointment of administrator-es- 
tates of Erick Seppala, Frank Suvl- 
vich, Erik Larson, Thomas Koaman, 
Morris Mltche-U; final account, estates 
of John Tscholl, Higgipus Wuori, Yrio 
Xara, Elizabeth^ Wuliams; appoint- 
ment of guardian, Maggie Dunlap; 
claims. Adam Samanka; petition to 
sell land. John Buhn; citations, David 
C. Pfeiffor et al, Francis Zidar et al, 
Matt Forsman. 

« 

Sues Eveleth for f3,000. 

Eveleth. Minn., Sept. 29. — Eveleth 
has another personal injury claim on 
its liands. It is for $3,000 for injuries 
alleged to have been sustained bv 
Frank, young son of Anton Rabetz of 
this city. The claim alleges that on 
Aug-. 31, the child fell against the 
tongue of a dump wagon which was 
standing in the alley between Hayes 
and Garfield avenue, breaking a bone 
In his right arm. Damages to the ex- 
tent of $3,000 are asked by the father 
of the youth. 



mlttee, 

L.. N. Osborn, owner of Rldgewood 
addition, reported that the Wolf road 
to the addition had been repaired and 
asked that the councilmen examine 
the culvert and highway. President 
Pro Tern A. D. Heritage set Monday 



Use Cocoanut Oil 

Far Washing Hair 



If you want to keep your hair in 
good condition, the less soap you use 
the better. 

Most soaps and prepared shampoos 
contain too much alkali. This dries 
the scalp, makes the hair brittle, and 
is very harmful. Just plain mulsified 
cocoanut oil (which is pure and 
entirely greaseless), is much better 
than soap or anything else you can 
use for shampooing, as this can't pos- 
sibly Injure the- hair. 

Simply moisten your hair with water 
and rub It in. One or two teaspoon- 
fuls will make an abundance of rich, 
creamy lather, and cleanses the hair 
and scalp thoroughly. The lather 
rinses out easily, and removes every 
particle of dust, dirt, dandruff and ex- 
cessive oil. The hair dries quickly 
and evenly, and it leaves it fine and 
silky, bright, fluffy and easy to man- 
age. 

You can get mulsified cocoanut ofl 
at most any drug store. It is ver>' 
cheap, and a few ounces is enough to 
last everyone in the family for months. 
— Advertisement. 



Pastor of Hibbing Metho- 
dist Ctiurch Commended 
By His Parish. 

Hibbing, Minn.. Sept. 29. — Rev. and 
Mrs. R. W. Adair left last night for 
Minneapolis, where they will attend the 
annual conference of the Methodist 
church. 

The official board of the local Meth- 
odist church has tendered Mr. Adair 
a vote of thanks and congratulation 
upon his work accomplished In Hib- 
blng during the past church j-ear and 
has invited him to remain in Hibbing 
for another year. The appointment Is 
made by the bishop at the conference 
but It Is expected here that the wishes 
of the church, as is custom.ary. will 
be regarded and Mr. Adair will be- re- 
turned. The board also expressed its 
high appreciation of the work done 
in and for the church by Mrs. Adair. 



dergone an operation for tonsilltls. She 
was accompanied to Duluth by Mr. Col- 
vtn. 

J. H. Ahlin, mayor of McKinley, was 
a bustne.ss visitor In Biwablk Monday. 

Mrs. Jacob MakI, who was called to 
Biwablk from her home at Crosby 
last week by the death of her father. 
John Tullne, will malce her hom« Ln 
this village. 

The Congregational Missionary so- 
ciety met wtth Mrs. William Carml- 
chael. 



EARLY CURFEW FOR 
EVELETH CHUDREH 

Wh»stle Will Be Blown at 

8 o'clock Beginning 

Oct. 1. 

Eveleth. Minn., Sept. 29.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — G. M. Dorway, superin- 
tendent of water works, annoiuices 
that In accordance with a elty ordi- 
nance curfew will be blown each night 
at 8 o'clock beginning Oct. 1. During 
the su-nrimer months 9 o'clock is the 
hour fixed for the curfew. The police 
win see that children do not loiter 
on the streets after 8 o'clock after the 
end of this month. 

Placing the blowing of the curfew 
whistle under the direction of the 
superintendent of water works Instead 
of with the chief of police or mayor, 
where it rightly belongs, Is a pe- 
culiarity of the Eveleth ordinances 
th«tt no one is able to explain. 



Virginia, Min 
to The Herald, 
school for Virg 

vision amxMig t 
on the levy for 
w^aa. submitted I 
tee, of w^hich. . 
chalmieui and - 
ward C. A. Johi 
night. 

William H. 1 
$J25,0O0 for the 
which w^ould i 
auditorium and 
instruction. Ci 
and Director H 
$150,000 would 
new building. 
Trwin opposed 
in school taxes. 

Director Holl 
trade school at 
an addition can 
school and an 
nasiiun provldec 

CNARTiER 
DATE 



n., Sept. 29. — (Special 
y — The proposed trade 
inla has caused a dl- 
ickool board members 
1916-17. N"o estimate 
ly the finance coramit- 
Vndrrew Hawklnaon is 
V. B. Holtey and Kd- 
son, ■ members, Monday 

:aton favors spending 
proposed trade school, 

nclude a gymnasium, 
class rooms for tradi- 

airman R. J. McGhee 

)lley were agreed that 

cover the cost of a 

Director William T. 

too large an increase 

ey does not favor a 
this time. He believes 

be made to the high 
auditorium and gym- 

in the new structure. 

ELECfJON 
iAY BE HXED 



To Drill Victoria Dflne. 

Virginia. Minn., Sept. 29.— DrilUnjr 
equipment Is being put in place at the 
Victoria mine, east of the Norman In 
the Virginia district. The property 1« 
owned by the Republic Iron & Steel 
company and no information was 
available today as to the purpose of 
drilling operations at this time. It la 
probably for the purpose of proving 
the ore body more fully and may fore- 
cast an Intention on the part of the 
company to further develop and possi- 
bly to operate the property. 
»_ 

li%'inn Funeral Held. 

Chlsholm. Minn.. Sept. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The funeral of E]arl 
^^ mn. who was killed while at work 
as brakeman at the Shenango mine on 
Saturday, was held TUesdav afternoon 
fiom the M. E. church, the Rev. E. F. 
Stidd officiating at the services. Mem- 
bers of the young men's club, the 
Bible class of the M. E. church and 
high school students attended the 
services In a body. The procession 
was one of the longest ever seen In 
the village. 



Virginia Commission Meets 
Tonight to Consider Im- 
portant Features. 



Virginia, Minn 
The Heral4i.) — ' 
charter commis 
divided on the \n 
ment, will meei 
night, and it is 
set for a chart 
vote was taken 
ment, which pr 
and light plant 
eral direct taxa 
to 6. 

The inability c 
agree on the ch 
ment has causf 
servers to predic 
be defeated. 

It Is possible 
plan will again 
according to ni» 
commission, the 
ter and light b 
fered by P. C. 
city, has not me 

Several citizen 
held to discuss 
Is a division of 
visions and the 



., Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The members of the 
!lon, who have been 
ater and light amend- 
in the city hall to- 
possible a date will be 
er election. When a 
on the Costin amcnd- 
)vide3 that the water 
bonds be paid by gen- 
tlon, the vote stood 6 

f the commissioners to 
arter and the amend- 
d local political ob- 
t that the charter will 

that the city manager 

be discussed tonight, 

■mbers of the charter 

solution of the wa- 

ond difficulty, els of- 

Wasserzieher of this 

t with much favor. 

s' meetings have been 

the charter and there 

sentiment on its pro- 

Costln amendment 



Elks Plan fay Winter. 

Hibbing, Minn., S.pt. 29. — \i the first 
October meeting Elks of Hibbing will 
make preparations for the lodge's so- 
cial activities for the coming winter. 
Committees will be appointed and ar- 
rangements gotten under way for en- 
tertainments and balls. John Murphy 
is exalted ruler. Elks" lodge meets on 
every Monday in thv> mo-nth. It has 
not been active during the summer 
months, only routine business having 
been disposed of. 

m 

?re»r PUstop I''«»r Biwablk. 

Blwabik, Minn., Sept. 29. — A succes- 
sor to Rev. H. R. Harris, who recent- 
ly resigned as pa.stor of the Congre- 
gational church of this village to take 
up a pastorate at Madison, Minn., 
will be n.Tined soon by the members of 
the congregat'on. Several applications 
have been received but definit.> action 
will not be taken for several days. 

TennI* Club to Reorcranixe. 

Buhl. Minn.. Seot. 29. — Pre.^Ident M. 
A. Morse if the Brhl tennis club has 
appointed as members of the commit- 
tee to draft a constitution and by- 
laws for the reorganiz.itlon of that 
club as an athtetic and social club, 
Lelghton Simons, John I. Anderson 
and Dr. Pfeflier. The committee will 
hold a mf=^ting thi.s week and the 
necessary by-laws will be prepared. 



ChUholm Teacber RrMlfrni*. 

Chisholm. Minn.. Sept. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— Mifs Isabella M. 
Black of St. Clair. Mich., teacher of 
languages in the local high school, 
has resigned her position to accept one 
in the junior high school In Detroit, 
Mich. She will begin her work there 
on Oct. 11. 



Bo7«' Clnb HVm M^et. 

Eveleth. Minn.. Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Boys' Study and 
Recreation club of the Presbyterian 
church will meet Saturday evening at 
the club rooms of the city auj'i^orium. 
Mrs. John Gnard will be the hostess. 
F. Evans, fl^ld secretary of the Min- 
ne.sota Christian Endeavor league, will 
address the boys. 



VIRGINIA ELECTRIC 

RATEVERY LOW 

Virginia, Minn., Sept. 29.— (Special 
to The H<*rald.) — Virginia has the 
lowest electric light rate In the state, 
according to figures of local water 
and light department ofElciala. Six 
cents per kilowatt is charged, with 
a 10 per cent discount ten days after 
the bill has been submitted. The local 
department has 2,600 electrical con- 
sumers. _ . 

Virginia has the distinction of hav- 
ing the fourth lowast gas rate In the 
state. Gas is offered cheaper In Du- 
luth and the Twin Cities than here. 
The local rate per thousand feet ts 
$1.25 net. In DuUith the rate is TO 
cents per thousand feet. 

This month has been the banner one 
since the gas service was established 
here Feb. 1 of this year. This month 
the conaumptlon passed 1,000.800 cubtc 
feet In February leas than 300,000 
cubic feet of gaa was used. 

BtVWBliT MOTES. 

-r^ 

Biwablk, Minn.. iSept' 29. — Gust An- 
derson of Coloraine and W. H. Jasper 
of Two Harbors were Biwablk visitors 
on Sunday. 

Mrs. .Tohn W. Dorse-y of Two Har- 
bors spent Sunday with Mr. Dorsey, her 
husband, who Is employed here. 

M. Glassner, Jr., and C. H. Schuster 
were Virginia visitors on Sunday. 

Miss Dorothy Colvln, daughter of 
Mayor F. S. Colvln, has returned home 
from Duluth, having Bucceasfully un- 



TWO HARBORS TEAM 

FEE LS LIK E WINI\IER 

Two Harbors, Minn., Sept. 29. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — The local city 
football team will clash with Duluth 
Central high school on Saturday, and 
has been hard at work since its or- 
ganization, about two weeks ago, un- 
der the supervision of Coach Brig- 
ham, practicing at every available op- 
portunity. 

Capt. Harry Johnson, also a member 
of last year's squad, has all confltienca 
in ills men, and is sure of victory with 
the excellent material with which he 
has to work. 

Richard Erickson. left half, has re- 
cently had two years' coaching under 
Dr. Williams at the state university, 
where he made the freshmen team at 
the state university. Beryl McLaugh- 
lin, left end, was a member of the fast 
Adams team of Duluth. last season. 
The remaining men of the team have 
all starred at different times on the 
local high school teams. 

Manager Russell Rose has secured a 
game with the Superior city team, to 
be played at Superior Sunday, Oct. 10. 
He Is also arranging dates with num- 
erous teams of the iron range and near- 
by towns. The present plana call for 
a home game Thanksgiving day, prob- 



EVELETH A 
GETS 

Eveleth, Minn., 
the part of local 
torney J. J. til 
the releasing ol 
ranks of the Ai 
to that effect 
by Mike Papich 
and announcemt 
has also been r 
partment. Pave 
wife, will return 
letb, just as so 
the country, bu 
that they will 
transportation f 



USTRIAN 
OUT OF ARMY 

Sept. 29.— Efforts on 

men, among them At- 

jlln, have resulted In 

Palo Pavel from the 

strlan army. A letter 

ivas received recently 

uncle of Palo Pavel. 

nt to local authorities 

lade by the state de- 

l together with his 

to their home in Eve- 

on as they can leave 

t conditions are such 

lot be able to obtain 

)r some time. 



NEW SOCIAL CLUB 

FOR VIRGINIA 



What Is the Best Remedy Fior 

' ' Constipation? < 

This is a Questioa asked ua many tim«f 
each day. The aamn is 

We guarantee them to be satisfactoiy 
%o you. Sold only by us, 10 cents. 

B. M. Tredway. 



Virginia, Minn 
thusla.stic meetii 
and Mrs. A. Ke 
the Killkalre 
M'ss Dorothy Bi 
Arthur Hutchinj 
rectors; M. K. E 
Boyle, secretar; 
Demsror. Hayes, 
Harriet Shaned 
Hazel Boylea, e 
tee. The new c 
dance of the S 
Moose hall. Tw( 
long to the new 
to become one 
organi^Mktions of 



., Sept. 29.— At an en- 
ig at the home of Mr. 
Ller, 328 Cedar street, 
?lub was organized, 
dwell, A. B. Dahl and 
ra were named as dl- 
aer, treasurer; Joseph 
'; Dr. A. Raymond, 
P rank Cummings, 
ting, Gladys Shields, 
ntertainment commlt- 
Lub will give its first 
eason Oct. 8 at the 
^Tity-flve members be- 

club, which p-romlses 
of the leading social 

the city. 



CHISHOLM HIGH 

SCHOOL INCREASING 



dred and fifty 
rolled In the loc 
are classified as 
juniors, 29; soph 
6-4; post-graduat 
post-graduate cc 
unclassified stud 
Two literary ; 
organized, one f< 
Clark and one fc 
Sweet. The mei 



rtudents are now en- 
al high school. They 
follows: Seniors, 14; 
omores, 3J; freshmen, 
a normal students. 6; 
mmercial students. 2; 
ents, 2. 

locleties w^lll soon be 
T the boys under Mis 
r the girls under Miss 
abership will be hoa- 



VlewK Hibbing Mlnrn. 

Hibblng. Minn.. Sept. 29. — Mr. and 
Mrs. Benton McCoy of Washington, 
D. C, w^ere visitors here yesterday. 
They were shown through the mines 
in this district. Mr. McCoy Is con- 
nected with the United States for- 
estry service. This is his first visit 
to the range. 

» 

Safety Flmt IWrellng. 

Eveleth. Minn.. Sept. 29. — Tlie second 
illustrated lecture to be held here In 
the Interests of safety first and wel- 
fare work oji the D. & I. R. railroad 
w^s largely attended in the city audi- 
torium when Glen S. Locker of the 
railroad spoke to a large audience. 



rhiMholm Couple MTed. 

Hibbing. Minn., Sept. 29.— Miss Anna 
Savari of Chisholm was marrlod Satur- 
day night at the village hall to Jerry 
Cllek. also of Chisholm. Judge Brady 
of this village read the vows, which 
were f«iken in the presence of Miss 
Ceirlo Savari and Mars Cilek. 



Pastor Off to Hinekl^^y- 

Gilbert, Minn. Sept. 29. — Rev. 
George Turner, pastor of the Pres- 
byterian church of Gilbert. left yes- 
terday for Hinckley where he will at- 
tend the annual meeting of the Du- 
luth presbytery. 



Aid Society Meet*. 

Biwablk, Minn., Sept. 29. — Th« 
Ladies' Aid Society of the Mfthodiat 
church will meet this week with Mrs. 
H. E. Green on Thursday afternoon. 



NO CATHOLICS ON THE 
JURY I N ROG ERS CASE 

Houston, Tex.. S«»pt. 29.— Knights of 
Columbus and Roman Catholics have 
been excluded from jury service at 
Marshall, Tex., In the suit on trial 
there today of Mrs. John Rogers 
against an Insurance company for 
$4,200 on an accident policy her hus- 
band held. 

Rogers, a Marshall contractor, lost 
his life Feb. 3, in a pistol battle. In 
which William Black. anti-CathoHo 
lecturer, was shot to death In a hotel. 
Mrs. Rogers claims her husband was 
accidentally killed. 

The trial of George Tier, Georgs 
Ryan, John Copeland and Harry Winn. 
charged with the murder of Black, has 
been set for Dec. 14. 



Many Complaints Heard. 

This summer seems to have produced 
an unusxial amount of sickness. Many 
complain of headaches, lame hacks, 
rheumatism, biliousness and of being 
"always tired." Aches, pains and Ills 
caused by the kidneys failing to do 
their work and throw the poisonous 
waste from the system yield qulckljr 
to Foley Kidney Pills. They help 
elimination, give sound sleeo and make 
you feel well and strong. They ar^ 
tonic In action. Sold everywhers. 



f 





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14 




Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALu 



September 29, 1915. 



Rowing 



News and VI 



I 




f the Sport World 



BILLIARDS 



GOLF 



B O W L I I>J G 



Wrestling 
Boxing 



PARAGRAPH COMMENT 
OF THE SPORTING ZIG 



Vn[RAN MANAGER 

HAS LEfT BASEBALL 



fOOTBAlL COACH OE 

EAST LOCAL TEAM 



BY BRUCE. 

Pat Moran, manager of the Phila- 
delphia Nationals, is an Irishman. If 
Jim Corbett is loyal to the members 
of his own race he will refuse to pre- 
dict that the Phillies are going to win. 

* « « 

George Was There— Take It From 
Us. 

G. Washington crossed the Delaware, 
his eyes were all ablaze, 

For through the drifting twilight the 
Hessians caught his gaze. 

George fell upon them hip and thigh 
and put theni all to rout. 

For histi>ry tells that George pos- 
sessed an awful clout. 

If George were battling in the ranks 

of present heavyweights. 
I'll bet he'd chase the whole darned 

tribe through seven different 

states — 
For George was big and fast and 

strong and could hit witli cither 

hand. 
And when he got his dander up he'd 

fight to beat the band. 

• « * 

Mike Gibbons recently declared 
that it would not require much effort 
upon his part to lick Soldier Bartfield, 
which only goes to show that Mike 

needs a manager. 

• • * 

A professional tennis player be- 
came a nervous wreck from over- 
work. It doesn't seem possible. 

* * • 

Frank Hinkey. Yale football coach, 
is called "Silent" Frank Hinkey. 
Still, when you think of it, he hasn't 
much to talk of. 



BASEBALL STANDINGS 



National League. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Philadelphia 86 60 .689 

BoPton 78 66 .642 

Brooklyn 78 69 .631 

Pittsburgh 71 79 .473 

Chicago 70 78 .473 

et. Louis 70 79 .470 

Cincinnati 69 80 .463 

New York 67 78 .462 

Games Today. 

Brooklyn at New York; clear. 
Cincinnati at Chicago; clear. 
Philadelphia at Boston; clear. 

Yesterday'M Rmolts. 

Chicago, 7, 5; Cincinnati, 3, 0. 
Philadelphia, 6; Brooklyn, 4. 

» 

American League. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Boston 99 "IS .683 

Di.troit 97 53 .647 

Ciiicago 88 61 .691 

V.'ai-hlngton 81 65 .668 

New York 67 81 .453 

St. LouLs 62 86 .419 

Cleveland 57 92 .383 

Philadelphia 40 10« .274 

names Today* 

Philadelphia at Washington (two 
ganit.*); clear. 

St. Loiiis at Detroit; clear. 
Chicago at Cleveland; clear. 

Yesterday** Resnlts. 

Washington. 3; Detroit, 0. 

Federal League. 

Won. Lost. Pet. 

Pittsburgh 84 63 .671 

6t. I^ouis 85 65 .568 

Chicago 82 64 .662 

Kansas City 78 69 .531 

Newark 75 71 .514 

Euffal.i 72 78 .480 

Brooklyn 70 80 .467 

Baltimore 45 101 .308 

Games Today. 

Buffalo at Brooklyn; clear. 
Chi'-ago at Pittsburgh; clear. 
Kansas City at St. Louis; cloudy. 

Yesterday's Resalts. 

Pittsburgh. 7; Newark, 2. 
Kansas City, 3; Baltimore, 2. 



The manager, a funny cuss, in colors 

all ablaze, 
He runs a string of boxers and talks 

in funny ways. 
"I'll fight that bloke for fifty thou," 

you'll hear him loudly cry — 

But should he see that goodly sum 

the chances are he'd die. 
« • « 

Should the telegraph companies of 
the United States refuse to send col- 
lect message the fighting game would 

be killed. 

• « « 

The Yale football team is being 

touted to defeat Harvard this season. 

Between early fall and the day of the 

Harvard game is the only time the 

Yale followers can indulge in this line 

of dope. 

« • * 

Dancing promises to be popular 
again this winter, as the Vernon Cast- 
les, Maurice and Freddy Welsh are 

busily booking engagements. 

« « * 

While there are some who will dis- 
pute as to whether a prize-fighter can 
be a gentleman, Packey McFarland 
and Mike Gibbons have shown that 

they can be perfect ladies. 

« • « 

Mike Gibbons declares he will fight 
Packej' McFarland for nothing. Evi- 
dently the little incident of the cherry 
tree has made no impression upon the 

mind of Michael. 

• • * 

Oftimes men find themselves in a 
rut. Now there is the case of Lang- 
ford and Sam McVey. 

• • * 

Eddie Kane declares he would 
whistle even if he was starving to 
death. He was whistling today. 



' the second g^ame for arguing a deci- 
sion by Umpire Orth. Scores: 

First game — R. H. E. 

Cincinnati 01200000 — 3 7 3 

Chicago 3 1 1 2 X— 7 10 4 

I Batteries — Dale and Wingo; Doug- 

I lass. Pierce and Archer. 

Second game — R. H. E. 

I Cincinnati 00000000 — 7 1 ■ 

I Chicago 4 0001000X— 5 7 O! 

I Batteries — Schneider and Wingo; i 
Hogg and Bresnahan. I 




m GYMNASIUM 

TO BE THROWN OPEN 

Prof. Kane's Place to Pre- 
sent an Athletic House- 
warming Program. 



Phillies Beat Dodgers. 

Brooklyn N. Y., Sept. 29. — The 
Brooklyn Nationals rung down the 
curtain on their home grounds yes- 
terday with a poorly played game, 
losing to the Philllt-s by 6 to 4. Er- 
rors helped the coming champions to 
all except one of their runs, while 
the Superbas earned all four of theirs. 
Getz was the batting star, getting a 
home run, a triple and a single in 
four times at bat. Cravath made 
three hits In as many times up. Bus- 
ter Mails, from the Northwestern 
league, made his debut for the Brook- 
lyns in the last two innings and made 
a good impression. He is a south- 
paw. Score: R. H. E. 
Philadelphia ...20201010 0—6 8 1 
Brooklyn 20000010 1—4 8 4 

Batteries — Chalmers and Burns; 
Cheney, Dell, Mails and MUier. 




Grand Opening 

TONIGHT 

ZENITH 

ATHLETIC 

CLUB 

109 West Superior St. 

(Over Sunbeam Theater.) 

Business Men Especially Invited. 

Splendidly equipped Gynuiasiam, 

Sbo^ver Bntlui, Handball Cuurt. 

Competent Instruction. 

NO ADMISSION CHARGED 





/ 















Pal Brown, Steve Gardner, Kid Bil- 
lings. "Steamboat" Bill Scott and oth- 
er less widely known boxers, as well 
as some local wrestlers, are down for 
participation in the opening program 
of the Zenith Athletic club, which has 
a house-warming on this evening for 
its members and the general pub!ic. 

Those interested in the new gym- 
nasium state, through Prof. Edward 
Kane, that classes will be conducted 
in physical culture and that certain 
days during each week will be set 
aside for classes of business men, 
boys and women. 

It is planned to keep the gymnasium 
clean, respectable and free from ob- 
jectionable characters, according to 
the announcement of Manager Kane. 
Business men, their sons and those in- 
terested in clean athletics in general I 
are invited to give the place the once 
over at the opening. 

An athletic program will be given 
this evening, several of the best known 
local mitt men and grapplers having 
volunteered their services. Manager 
Kane declares that he has lined up an 
attractive card. 



3-year-olds trotting futurity, worth 
$10,000; the Arch City, 2:10 pace, stake 
«3,000 and the i :13 pace for a purse of 
$1,200. 

Directum I, Peter Volo, Margaret 
Druien and Etawah are all expected 
to make speed trials during the after- 
noon. 



J. W. MUNCH LEASES 
THI: AUDITORIUM 



Former Champion Roller 

Skater Will Return to 

Duluth. 



.- ( 



RALPH CAULKINS. 



around the Odanah redskins last Sun- 
day can defeat the stalwart Kents in 
the game of this coming Sunday. It 
will begin to look as if the local 
eleven stands a very strong chance 

I for the state Independent title, some- 
thing that Duluth teams have been 

{ chasing for five or six weary and 

I fruitless years. 

WEBER'S HODGE TAKES 
LOUISVILLE CUP 



I 




clalr, with Gerou and Tenhoff doing 
the alternate work. 

Interest centered yesterday in the 
meeting of the eligibility board at 
noon. After the session was over, it 
was announced that no information 
would be given out at present. 



flMEBicAN league"! KENTS LOOK 



Shuts Detroit Out. 

Washington, Sept. 29. — Walter John- 
son won the second and final game of 
the scries from Detroit yesterday 3 to 0. 
Johnson struck out ten In the first five 
Innings, fanning the entire side, includ- 
ing Cobb In the initial round. In the 
last half of the fifth, a sijigle, a pass 
and Foster's double, netted Washing- 
ton two runs. In the eighth, Milan's 
hit bounded over Cobb's head for a 
home run. Score: R. H. B. 

Detroit 0000000 — 8 

Washington ...000 02001X — S 8 4 

Batteries — Oldham, Dubuc and Stan- 
agr; Johnson and Ainsmith. 



FEDERAL LEAGUE 




Cubs Perking Up. 



Chicago, Stpt. 29. — Chicago made It 
four straight from Cincinnati yester- 
day. The locals took both games of 
resteruay's double-heaiter, 7 to 3 and 
to 0. Four home runs, all by Chi- 
cago players, were made during the 
afternoon, two in each game. The 
locals won the first game by bunch- 

tng hits behind erratic fielding. Doug- 
ass was forced to retire, but Pierce 
had little trouble holding his oppon- 
ents safe. 

In the second game Chicago went 
to the front in the first Inning when 
two homers, a base on balls and a 
•Ingle gave them four runs, a lead 
which the visitors could not over- 
come. 

Manager Herzog was banished from 



Pittfeds Win From Newark. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Sept. 29.— Pittsburgh 
defeated Newark yesterday 7 to 2. 
Knetzer for the locals allowed only 
two hits while his team mates ham- 
mered Moseley and Billiard for a total 
often. Score: R. H. E. 

Newark 00000200 0—2 2 4 

Pittsburgh 30000400 x — 7 10 1 

Batteries — Moseley, Billiard and 
Rariden, Huhn; Knetzer and O'Connor. 



Gordon 



hats ^3 



00 



— are you? 
Hardly. 
You would 
be if you 
paid $5.00 
for it. 



Kawfeds Win Anoiher. 

Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 29. — With the 
score tied and Rawllngs on second in 
the ninth inning, Goodwin hit a single, 
scoring Rawllngs and Kansas City won 
the last game of the season on the 
home grounds from Baltimore yester- 
day 3 to 2. Cullop, who opposed Le 
Clair, settled down after the second in- 
ning and had the game well In hand 
until the finish. Only five hits were 
registered from his delivery. 
Score: R. H. E. 

Baltimore 11000000 — 2 5 3 

Kansas City 00100 100 1 — 8 8 2 

Batteries — Le Clalr and Owens; Cul- 
lop and Fasterly. 



GOPHER MAY LOSE 
BACKFIELD STAR 



Mauser's Injury May Keep 

Him Out of Saturday's 

Game. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Sept. 29. — The 
University of Minnesota football team 
may be short one of its stars when 
North Dakota plays here next Satur- 
day. Hauser, the big backfteld candi- 
date, is suffering from an injury to 
his shoulder that perhaps will not be 

well in ume to let him into the first 
game. 

Coach Williams has switched his 
lineup several times in practice of 
late, so it is not known who will work 
Saturday. 

Yesterday Turnqulst was moved from 
center to end and Hanson, a, sturdy 
member of last year's freshmen, took 
center. The tackles w^ere Oray, Hart- 
wig and Mayer, who is not yet eligible. 
Solon and Quist. with Turnqulst. 
worked the ends and Baston was 
shifted to the backfleld, where he was 
•tried at half. Wyman was moved to 
fullback and Bierman took the other 
half. Kleffman worked at quarter most 
of the time and probably will start 
! the game there Saturday. The guards 
were the veterans Dunnig and Sin- 



VERYJTRONG 

St. Paul Football Team Has 

College Stars in Its 

Lineup. 



Coach Caulklns of the Duluth In- 
dependent football team has called 
for an extra session of practice of 
the team candidates for every eve- 
ning of the present week in extraord- 
inary preparation for the big grid- 
iron battle of next Sunday afternoon 
with the husky and much-feared Kent 
football team of St. Paul, 

Carl Hedges, a former Minnesota 
university end, and Ralph Blodgett, a 
Brown football star, have enlisted 
with the Kents. This year, determined 
to wrest the state title from Minne- 
apolis and also put Duluth out of the 
running at an early date, the Kents 
have recruited a heavy team from 
some of the best college and univer- 
sity football material to be found In 
the Northwest. 

Hedges and Blodgett — gridiron stars 
of the varsity world — are not the only 
college players that the Duluth boys 
will run into. Dougherty, Boyle, both 
famous stars on the crack state cham- 
pionship St. Thomas college team, and 
LaBlssonere, another St. Thomas prod- 
uct, are playing with the Kents this 
season. 

More Grief <o TeU. 

That sounds bad enough to the fol- 
lowers of what looks like the best 
local team in years — but It isn't quite 
all. 

"Stubbs" Balfour, the best Independ- 
ent back ever turned out in St. Paul, 
will be with the Invading gridiron 
hosts. 

Jones, a former St. Paul high school 
star, and the very pick of the crack 
players of St. Paul will be pitted 
against the best that Duluth can trot 
out onto the field to respond to the 
referee's whistle. 

If the crack team that rp.n circles 



Schorr's Lindenthal Is Sec- 
ond and Weir's Ringling 
Follows Close Up. 

Louisville,. Ky., Sept. 29.— Hodge, W. 
J. Weber's 4-year-old gelding, under 
a well-judged ride by Jockey Roscoe 
Goose, easily won the third annual run- 
ning of the Louisville cup at two miles 
at Douglas park here yesterday over 
a muddy course. 

J. W. Schorr's Lindenthal was second, 
three lengths back of Hodge, with F. 
D. Weir's Ringling, a close up third. 
Hodge carried 125 pounds, and conced- 
ed from 16 to 30 pounds weight to all 
the other starters. The time, 8:33 3-6, 
was considered good owing to the con- 
dition of the track. 

Ten horses had been named over 
night to go to the post, but as a re- 
sult of heavy rains early yesterday, 
five were scratched, leaving, besides 
Hodge, Lindenthal and Ringling, only 
Former Senator Johnson N. Camden's 
One Step and C. Straus' Raincoat to 
face the issue. 

With the small field the start was 
perfect. Goose got Hodge away fully 
in his stride, and the little gelding 
showed the way throughout. In addi- 
tion to his share of the purse, $2,410, 
Weber was presented with a handsome 
solid silver loving cup from which the 
race takes its name. Hodge was the 
favorite in the Parl-mutuel betting, but 
winning t2-tickets paid only $6. 

YOLGA~tROTSTO 

. EASY VICTORY 



Gienoxs AivD soi.dikr *. 

BARTFIF.I.n ARE WAXTKD .5!. 
OX LOCAL, MITT CARD. * 

^ 

Promoter Kd Whalen of <he Dn- * 
lu<h Boxing: einb Is workliijc on a ^ 
^ propoHcA match betwern Mike Gib- *. 
^ boHM and Soldier Bartfield of Neiv i^< 

* York, •* 
^ (^bbonif wants a jreneronw nUce ■* 
^ of <he dear olfl maasuma ami Han ^ 
^. MeKetrick also Isn't any too mod- *. 
^ est wUen It comes to making; de- ,>*> 
% mands for his boy. Bar-fflolil. * 
^ Whalen says It will require quite ^ 
^ a larKTe amount of money to float ^ 
^ thlM match — not quite as much as * 
•jjt the banker* of th,e United States ,>!> 
^ are loaning the allies — but quite -* 
^ a tidy sum, nevertheless. ^ 
^ The club wonid like to stage the * 
% bout, however, and this may be * 
$ one of the cards offered local fans ,^> 

* later. * 

BIG dayTorTorsemen. 

Large Purses Put Up for Winners in 
Grand Circuit Races. 

Columbus, Ohio, Sept. 29. — Today is 
counted on by horsemen here to be 
one of the big days of the Columbus 
Grand Circuit session. In addition to 
four races, one of which is worth 
$10,000, It is planned to hold several 
speed trials at the track this after- 
noon which have aroused great inter- 
est. The racing card for the day In- 
cludes a 2:18 trot for a purse of $1,200; 
the Horseman and Spirit of the "Times, 



Joseph W. Ml 
former resident 
rlor has leased 
Hanimel compa: 
and will soon 

men at work r< 
Mr. Munch hi 
ence in the ami 
been manager ( 
ing Palace in 1 
seven years and 
cess of the $50, C 
The Auditor!! 
mnnagement, w 
tions, banquets, 
shows and all 1 
Mr. Munch is 
skating and Is 
known rink ma 
ters in America 
New York last 1 
mously elected 
formed Nations 
elation, which 
tlonal and wor 
plonship races 1 



inch of Milwaukee and 
of Duluth and Supe- 
the Auditorium from L. 
ly for a term of years 
have a large force of 
•modeling the building, 
is many years' experi- 
sement world. He has 
if the Rivcrview Skat- 
ililwaukee for the last 
has made a great suc- 

00 enterprise. 

im, under Mr. Munch's 
ill be used for conven- 

dancing, skating, auto 
irge gatherings. 

an authority on roller 
one of the most widely 
nagers and race promo- 
In a meeting held ii^ 
December he was unani- 
presldent of the newly- 

1 Roller Skating asso- 
controllcd all the na- 

Id's professional chani- 
leld last season. 



CURLING CLUB 

MAY DROP HOCKEY 

Directors Waiting to Hear 

From Officers of City 

Leaguers. 



on the Pennsylvania schedule. Benfer^ 
the Albright star, was unable to play. 
Berry, who played fullback in th» 
opening game, started at Quarterbacii 
for the Red and Blue. 

ASSOCIAflOirCLUB 
OWNERS TO RETRENCH 



Arrange 154-Game Limit 

and Player Limit of 

Sixteen. 

Chicago, Sept. 29. — American asso- 
ciation club owners laid plans for radi- 
cal retrenchments for next season at 
their meeting here yesterday. Th» 

magnates decided on a 154-game sched» 
ule and a player limit of sixteen. Th« 
sixteen will be carried from May 15 to 
Aug. 15, and before and after the two 
dates, twenty men to a club will b« 
permitted. 

The salary limit was also discussed^ 
but no decision was reached, the propo- 
sition ranging from $4,000 to 16.000 % 
month. 

According to the members present, 
no one suggested a new president for 
the .association, despite rumors that 
the post held by Thomas Chlvington 
was in the balance. 



GOPHER CHAMPION 
OUTPLAYS OUIMET 



There may bi 
ter — and there 

A meeting ol 
of the Duluth 
uled for tomoi 
time it is expt 
deci.«lon In reg 
reached, or i\ 
game will be 

At least this 
mated by a cu 
oughly In touc 

As yet the d 
the m.anagers < 
the city league 
understanding, 
ment Is reache< 
ing of tomori 
some grounds 
may not be pla 
ing the cominj 



; hockey here this win- 
may not be. 
the board of directors 
Curling club is sched- 
Tow evening. At that 
cted that some definite 

ard to hockey will be 
at the dear old puck 
abandoned. 

Is what has been inti- 
"llng club director thor- 
h with the situation, 
rectors of the club and 
)f the various teams ot 

have failed to reach an 
Unless some agree- 
1 at or before the meet- 
ow evening, there is 
for belief that hockey 
yed in the big rink dur- 
wlnter. 



"Pennsy" Faces Albright. 

Philadelphia, Sept. 29. — The Univer- 
sity of Penn;?ylvanla football team 
met Albright < ollege today on Frank- 
lin field in the only mid-week game 



Dudley Mudge of St. Paul 

Springs Surprise at 

Greenwich Links. 

Greenwich, Conn., Sept. 29. — One of 
the surprises in the golf tournament 
of the Greenwich Country club yester- 
day was the defeat of Francis Ouimet, 
former national amateur champion bjr 
Dudley H. Mudge of Yale, Minnesota 
champion, by 4 up and 3 to play. The 
first and second match rounds were 
run off. The survivors for the semi- 
final rounds today are Philip W. G. 
Carter of Nassau, L. I.; Reginald M. 
Lewis of Ridgefield, Conn.; Maxwell 
R. Marston of Baltusrol, N. J.; and D. 
H. Mudge of St. Paul. They will meet 
In the order named. 

The chief reason for Ouimet's defeat 
was his failure to get his approach 
putts dead to the pin, a trick which 
Mudge turned nicely. Ouimet out- 
drove his opponent consistently by 
twenty yards. 



TENNIS TITLE HOLDER 

AGAIN A WINNER 

Boston, Mass., Sept. 29. — Miss Moll* 
Bjurstedt of Norway, the national 
woman tennis champion, yesterday won 
her matches in both singles and doubles 
divisions of the annual woman's tour- 
nament on the court of the Longwood 
Cricket club. In each case her victor- 
ies were In straight sets. 

An upset developed in the mixed 
doubles when R. Norrls Williams II., 
former national champion, and Miss 




Steps Last Halves of Two 

One-Mile Heats in 1:03 

and 1 :04. 

Columbus. Ohio, Sept. 29.— Volga, 
champion 2-ycar-old trotter of this 
racing season, aVepped the last halves 
of two one-mile heats in 1:03 and 1:04, 
while winning the Chicago Horsemen 
and Spirit of Tithes futurity, one of the 
principal events on yesterday's Grand 
Circuit card at the driving park here. 

In thirteen other heats by aged trot- 
ters and pacers, no last half was as 
good as 1:0.3. 

Over a cuppy track, Volga finished 
each heat alone, Blngen Silk in turn 
placing in rushes past SUdlne and 
Walnut Tree. The winner is owned by 
the Pastime stablea of Cleveland and 
last week won the Horse Review race 
for trotters of her age. 

Lizzie Brown, counted on to have the 
Chamber of Commerce trotting stak(» 
at her mercy, did win, but five heats 
were required. On behalf of the Co- 
lumbus Chamber of Commerce, Mayor 
Karb presented a silver cup to Driver 
Charles Valentine. 

Bessie R.. beaten last week by Cam- 
elia in a five-heat race, was first choice 
In the 2:15 pace, but raced second to 
Mary Coastman, the latter taking the 
last three of five heats. In this race, 
Fred Eagan was taken from behind 
'Dexter Direct. 

Judges relieved Driver Marsh, who 
had Durin in the 2:18 trot, after the 
second heat. The horse, the original 
favorite, got away well in the third, 
but broke before the first quarter was 
reached. Onward Forbes won the race 
in straight heats. 

CORNEL L WIN S FIRST. 

Takes Opening Football Game of 
Season FrOini Gettysburg. 

Ithaca, N. T., !5ept. 29. — Cornell de- 
feated Gettysburg, 13 to 0, In the open- 
ing game of the season here yester- 
day. The Pennsylvanians startled the 
Red and White by holding them score- 
less until the second period. 

Cornell played mediocre football and 
twice lost chances to score by fumbling 
within the shadow of the goalposts. In 
the second period, Collins and Barrett 
brought the ball to within striking 
distance and Barrett went over the 
line for a score.' 

Gettysburg fou-ght Cornell viciously 
In the third period and It was not un- 
til the fourth that the Ithacans, rein- 
forced by Mike IClelnert, managed to 
work the balj over for another touch- 
down from tRe ftve-yard line. Barrett 
again did the sqArlng after three plays 
had failed to gain. Barrett attempted 
two field goals, but failed. 




"When Good Fellows Get Together" 

You will find fresh-rolled cigarettes of deliciously mellow "Bull" 
Durham in evidence at banquets, club smokers and other social 
gatherings of men of wealth, prominence and experienced tastes. 
In the fragrant smoke of this mild, delightful tobacco formality gives 
way to congenial good-fellowship. If you w^ould be fashionable, 
expert in the company of cor noisseurs, you "roll your own" — and 
your tobacco is "Bull" Durham. 



genuine: 



Bull Durham 

SMOKINO TOBACCO 

To millions of experienced smokers there is no other tobacco 
fragrance comparable to the wonderful, unique, mellow-sweet flavor 
of "Bull" Durham— no other cigarettes so fresh, tasty and satisfying 
as those they roll for themselves with this 
golden-brown, bright Virginia- North Carolina 
tobacco. 

Roll a "Bull" Durham cigarette today — 
you will experience a distinctive form of 
bacco enjoyment. 



Ask for FREE package of 



FREE 



An IllustratecJ Booklet, show- 
ing correct way lo "Roll Your 
Own " Cigarette 3, and a pack- 
age of cigarette papers, will both b<i mailed, free, 
to any address in U. S. on request. / address "Bull'* 
Durham, Durham, N. C. 

THE AMERICAN TOBACCO COKIPANY 




I 

I 
) 



J 



■is^ 



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c" ' — ■ ■ ■. ^ - ■ 










■ 

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MiX^ 



- f*" 



/ 



\ 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH^ HERALD 



September 29, 1915. 



15 



Elf-anor Sears, were defeated by MLss 
Alice Thorndike and A. N. Reggio of 
this city. 



ATHLETIC 
PLANS^MADE 

Y. M. C. A. Physical Culture 

Committee Prepares for 

Busy Season. 



j team league If pospible. rommerclal 
bowling kagrues have been very suc- 
cessful In other cities and it is be- 
lieved that one would prove equally 
successful in Duluth. 



Lewis Again Bests Britton. 

Boston, Mass., Sept. 23. — Ted Lewis, 
the British boxer, last night won an- 
other decision over Jack Briiton of 
I Chicago, In twelve rounds. In the 
' eleventh, he floored the Chicago boxer. 



At a meeting last evening of the 
menibors of the Y. M. C. A. physical 
dcpartmeut commiilt-e, held at the 
home of Chairman E. C. Congdon, 
plans were outlined for the work of 
the present season. 

L<ouis Ardou:n, instructor In wrest- 
ling ai.d swimming, asked that a team 
be orgu,nized to enter the Northwest- 
ern swimming meet, which Is sched- 
uled to be held in St. Paul some time 
during March. A suggestion was also 
offered that a local team be entered 
In thy national swimming contest. 

A water polo team will be organ- 
ized, according to present plans, and 
monthly swimming meets will b^^ a 
feature of the winter sport program. 
The "teach another to swim" move- 
ment, given Impetus during the fast 
aiimmor. Is to be carried forward dur- 
ing thf winter months. 

Plans wore suggested for handball. 
From present indications there will be 
more handball played at the associa- 
tion this iieason than ever before. 
Some new rules may be offered to 
govern play on the three association 
courts. 

James Nelson outlined his plans for 
the conducting o( boxing clas.se.s. II 
was announced that a team would be 
entered from the as.'^oelation in thf> 
national hexathlou competition. P-asket 
ball 's to be taken up alnio.«!t Im- 
mediittely and general plans were 
made for conducting classes in gym- 
nastics. 

Work in all the departments 
of the local a.ssociation will be 
resumed on Monday. 

The following members of the physical 
department committee attended the 
the m-eting: 

Ph:,pical department committee — E. 
C. Congdon, chairman, C. A. Brewer, 
W. H. Schilling, VViniam F. Jamar. I, 
K. Lewlfi, C A. Andrews, H. Zins- 
ma.ster; phy.'slcal departnjent ouncil — 
volley ball. M. F. Jamar, chairman. A. 
C. McDonald. Dr. F. A. Brown; base- 
ball, Carl Lingwell and E. Smith; ac- 
quatics, W. Patton. cha'rman, W. Mar- 
tin. H. Bailey; leaders corps. S. Duby; 
wistling. L. Ardouin; boxing. Jame.s 
Kelson; hand ball I. K. Lewis, J. Hay- 
d^n, L. Whithead, C. Olson; basket ball, 
Ray Fenton. chairman, Dave Larson 
and Joe Moore; health promotion. Dr. 
A. G. Schiulze, chairman. \V. L. 
Smithies, R. Johnson; social. H. 
Jungch. chairman, W. Brown, A. 
Launie and N. EacobaccI: camp, .Jo- 
seph Llnd, chairman, C. Llnwall and S. 
Severson. 



I Connie's Son Married. 

Asheville, X. C, Sept. 29. — Earle C. 
McGillicuddy, manager of the Raleigh 
baseball team, and son of Connie Mack 
of Philadelphia, was married last 
' night to Miss Mary Cain of Morgan- 
town, at the bride's home. 

wm oiscuss ~ 

CHARTER GHfiNOES 



COMMERCIAL LEAGUE 
PLANNE D BY BOWLERS 

Plans for the organization of a com- 
mercial bowling league will be con- 
sidered this evening at a meeting to 
k^ held at the Grand bowling alleys, 
'he F. A. Patric?k company as well as 
teams from the other wholesale firms 
of Dulijth are wanted to join the move- 
ment. It la planned to make an eight- 



Special Committee Will Be 

Called to Meet Next 

Week. 

Some time next week the special 
committee of the charter commission 
will meet to consider the four pro- 
posed amendments to the city 
charter. 

Henry F. Greene, city attorney and 
member of the special committee ap- 
pointed by T. T. Hudson, chairman of 
the charter commission, received word 
yesterday that the latter will return 
I to the city next Monday and that he 
will Immediately arrange for a com- 
mittee meeting during the week. He 
is now in the West on business. 

At that time a plan of procedure 
will be decided on and arrangements 
made to hold conferences with the 
v.Hrif>u3 city officials. After the nec- 
es.-ary data is obtained, Mr. Hudson 
plans to prepare the amendments for 
presentation to the general charter 
b<idy. 

A week ago Monday six amend- 
ments w^ere presented to the charter 
commi.vsion for consideration. but 
since then the two relating to the es- 
tablishment of a storm sewer fund by 
means of an additional 1 mill tax 
levy and the granting of the city 
council power to order sewers hAvc 
been dropped by Mr Hudson. It i.-i ex- 
plRinfd that the council has decided 
to divert the u mill tax levy from 
the water and light d*»partment to the 
creation of p special sform sewer fund 
and that the two amendments are no 
longer de.aired. 

The other four amendment.=i now 
before the specLil charter committee, 
consisting of Mr. Hudson. Chrst'^r A. 
Conerdon, H. H. Phelps and John O. 
WMIIiams, follow: 

Raising of the non-advertised pur- 
chn.«»o limit from $100 to $BOQ. 

Changltirr of the m.«mbersh!o of th«» 
board of tax review to include the 
mayor, a.<»se.«!.qor and commissioner of 
finance In place of the former two and 
the city clt^rk. 

Granting the city council .nTithorlty 
to call special elections for municipal 
judares. 

Adoption of a new voting system In 
place of the preferential ballot de- 
clared illegal by the supreme court. 

BoHt<»ii LilgrhtHhip Tlammed. 

Boston, Mass., Sept. 20. — The Boston 
Ught.ship wag rammed bv the coastwise 
steamer Quantlco last night and a hole 
was smashed In her side two feet 
above the water line. The Quantico, 
outward bound for Philadelphia, with 
a few pa.^sengers and a general car-« 
go. sustnlntd only slight damage, ac- 
cording to radio me.s9age8 which she 
sent to her agents here. The cause of 
the accident was not given In the ra- 
diograms. 



§^ 



'■^'Jf~&i 









m^m 



the real 
economy car 

The 1916 Detroit Electric offers 
the relief you seek from operation 
overtax. Current for battery 
charging is furnished at low rates 
(averaging $S to $7 per month) 
and is growing lower constantly. 

Repair, replacement and ad}u«tment charget— 
conta which swell the monthly bills of manycnotor- 
i»t« — seldom concern the Detroit Electric owner 
because the mechanism of the Detroit Electric is 
to simple and so strongly built that there's really 
nothing to get out of order. You are never bothered 
by ignition, carburetor, cylinder and engine ailments. 
You have no gasoiin« bills to pay. And the mod- 
em Detroit Electric is an ideal car for winter driving 
«> well as sunvner motoring — without the expense 
of ao additional body the ga.i car owner must 
Incur. In many other ways the Detjoit Electric is 
the preferable and practical car for your use. When 
will yoa take your demonstration drive? 

1916 Detroit EUctric Price* 

Model 61 4-pa8S. Brougham, $1975 

Model 60 S-pasa. Duplex Drive Brougham, f 2273 
Model 59 5-pass. Rear Drive Brougham, 12223 
Model 58 S-pass. Front Drive Brougham, $2250 
Model 57 4-p;8a. Rear Drive Brougham, $2173 
Model 56 3-pass. Cabriolet. $2075 

Anderson Electric Car Company 

Manufacturers of the Dettrolt Electric Car 

Detroit, Mich. (if) 




"Rush Orders a Pleasure" 



The kind you want. Every grade and 
size. We have the stock. 

MERRITT « HECTOR 

Frlritets and Binders 
112 WEST FIRST ST. 



REX ISN'T LIKE ORDINARY BEERS — 
KTNOLY IN WFIOLKSOMENESS, SPARKLK AND FLAVOR. 





ALWAYS SATISFIES MEN WHO KNOW GOOD BEER. 

Jg^^Have a Case Sent Home'^fl^ 

BREWED AND BOTTLED BY BREWERS OF A BETTER BEER 

DULUTH BREWING & MALTING CO. 

DULUTH, MINN, 




TT P=i 




^^^^ 



ar^iLDC 



Bf WILLIAM BRADY. HD 





A Good Utile Lie 1} I 

V ORDER to succeed in practice I appearance — his ^i^rt will warm to 
a doctor has to be a fairly you. and It will really stimulate his 
proficient liar. Of course , metabolism and lnrpj-r>ve his digestion 
everybody has to lie more or | and tone up his di»pUfagm wonderful- 
less, but In medicine, as she ; ly. Doctors dispense this good little 
is practiced, a good liar Is lie with the secoiid, bottle of tonic as 

a regular custom. It will work just 
as well, if not better, in lay hands. Try 
It over on your mouth organ for a few 



bound to win the good will of the peo- 
ple. 

From time to time we have en- n over on ytjur moutn organ ror a rev 
deavored. in this interlude of Interro- ! times and see for yourself Its remark 



gallon to throw the light of truth 1 able vitalizing power. 

upon the more hackneyed, shopworn [ If a group of friends should con- 

f \ f/ /"*'^'"*^'e»sion, because we , spire together to do away with one 

reel that when a diagnostic lie bo- of their number, no better way could 

comes threadbare enough to be seized ' be devised than to continually and un- 

upon by the Junkmen of the no.strum ; tlringly comment upon his failing 

world and worked over and marketed j health, his bad color, the strange look 

as genuine goods. It is high time to I in his eyes, and to inquire solicitously 

call a halt. That !.<» why we have no ! If he isn't «lck. 

room In this column to discuss "stom- Just as surely can psychological in- 



ach complaint," "biliousness" and 
rheumatism" unless in a spirit of lev- 
ity. These lies, we beMeve. are now 



fluence improve health 

So don't be a kill-icy. Be a. good 
lictle liar and make yourself popular. 
QUKSTIONS AJTD AXSX^'ERS. 
Younx: Cilrl Mr'ould Bee«nie A'ursie. 
Kindly tell me how a "young" girl 

a 



Old and decrepit enough to be pen- 
sioned off, and It is a shame to think 

the "eminent specialist" whose name, .....v., 

*h ^^^^'"^^^ *8 l^ept sacredly secret ' eighteen years old may become 
should keep such venerable old serv- ! trained nurse? .isks M. M. E. 
ants in harness all these years. But { Answer. — First, why do you young 
the people like to be deceived, no mat- girls waste words? Every young girl 
ter who does the lyin^r. Take the who writes us gives her age and in 

uric acid" Joke, for instance. It Is still the same sentence mentions that she 
gof»d in mo.9t communities. There are Is a young girl. In order to become 



lots of poor souls who deny themselves 
this or that choice morsel of diet mere- 
ly because they have been led to Im- 



a nurse you must decide which hos 

pital you wish to enter, then write 

the superintendent and state your 



-„ ----; — •- v"tj navo ueen lea lo im- me supennienaent ana state youi 
agine it will produce acid in the blood ! desire. You must be in good health 

and ^0-frrav-^i CL *v.^\^ <<«i *.. .. » _ *.:_. i: t^ .. 



and aggravate their "rheumatiz. 

Lying does as much good as harm 
however. That is. In reference to 
health it does. One good little He 
we can unqualifiedly recommend for 
universal u.se is the habit of lying to 



have a fair preliminary education, and 
be prepared to furnish certificates from 
your family doctor and other persons 
of standing. 

Everybody's Ailment. 
Please tell a great sufferer what to 



people about their looks. We cannot I take for constipation, 
repeat this too often. Say How do | Answer.— Take your pen and send 

you do? then follow It right up with ! us the oft-mentioned stamped, ad- 
a hearty compliment upon your friend's 1 dressed envelop© for a letter of advice. 

r>i. Tlrafl> Hill aii'iwe- all questions penalnlng to ncaltli. If your (j?ie»tlon la (if B«iieral IiitweM ft will 
n« snavrered tliroijgn tliese coiiiiufn; IT not U will Ije aa-^nered pcrsr.nally If Htamped. «<j.lrfs.se,l envelope Is 
vT I'l ' . .■ ''"'^^ '^" ""t prescribe f,.r Individual cimm or niako diagnose*. .\.Jdrcw. a'.l letters to Dr 
. I'liV. • ''^'^ "' '^'^ Herald. All question* will be answered, whether lUey com* from peo.ae wstld- 

Ing iJi Duluth or outdlde, provided they comply with the rules here staled. 

ON ROADS IN THIS' VICINITY 



Deputy State Engineer 
Mullen and County Road 
Engineer Coe Take Three- 
Hundred-MileTrip of High- 
way Inspection; State 
Official Well Pleased. 



Work on state highways within St. 
Louis county during the last season 
has been very satisfactorj', according 
to John H. Mullen of St. Paul, deputy 
state engineer of highways, H'ho has 
recently returned from a 311-raile trip 

throughout the county with B. K. Coe, 
county road engineer. Mr. Mullen has 
returned to St. Paul. 

"Mr; Mullen expressed himself as be- 
ing well pleased with the work that 
St. Louis county has put In on the state 
highways this year," said Mr. Coe yes- 



CHARLES A. PERKINS 
GETS NOMINATION 



New York District Attorney 

Receives Two-to-One 

Vote. 

New York, Sept. 29. — District At- 
torney Charles A. Perkins of New 
York county received the Republican 
nomination for re-election by a two- 
to-one vote over Frank Mose. a former 
assistant district attorney, in the pri- 
maries here yesterday on the face of 
Incomplete returns received late last 
night. Mr. Perkins, who was ap- 
pointed by Governor Whitman, his 
former chief, was regarded ai the 
choice of the organizatfon. 

There was no Important contest 
among the Democrats. With few ex- 
ceptions the regular organization can- 
didates were successful. 

Judge Edward Swann and Assembly- 
man Alfred E. Smith, candidates for 
the Democratic nominations for dis- 
trict attorney and sheriff, were unop- 
posed. The same was true of the 
party's candidates for Justices of the 
supreme court, on whom it fused with 
the Republicans. Opponents of Pat- 
rick H. Sullivan, brother of the late 
"Big Tim" Sullivan, and his successor 
as leader of the Third district, failed 
In their attempt to defeat him for the 
Tammany nomination for alderman in 
that district. Frank L. DowUng, 
Tammany leader of the board, also 
had no difficulty in obtaining the 
nomination. 

One Content of Repabltcans. 

The only contest among Republicans 
for a congressional nomination was in 
the Twenty-third district, where Will- 
iam S. Bennett had a walkover. His 
opponent was William Q. Webster. 
Ellsworth J. Healy a nephew of the 



terday afternoon. "We spent three 
days inspecting the work." 

The two engineers first Inspected the 
new Duluth-St. Vincent road, which Is 
otherwise designated as State Rural 
Highway No. 4, and which extends 
from a point about twenty miles out of 
Duluth on the MUler trunk road, duo 
west to Floodwood and thence In a 
northwesterly direction to the county 
line. The portion of. the road to Flood- 
wood has been graveled and is In the 
best of condition. A larg'e crow of men 
Is now engaged In completing the work 
on the portion from Floodwood to the 
county line. 

In.<«|»r«t Other RoadM. 

Returning from Floodwood to the 
Miller Trunk road, the engineers made 
a trip to the I.sland farm, tlience back 
to the Miller Trunk and on to Eve- 
leth, Virginia, Sand I.«ke, Angora, 
Cook and Tower. The trip from Tower 
to Biwabik was made over the new 
cut-off which was built recently. From 
Biwabik to Duluth, the Vermilion road, 
otherwise designated as State Highway- 
No. 4, -was traveled. 

Prior to the Inspection of the St. 
Louis county state highways. Mr. Mul- 
len made a trip by automobile over the 
N'orth Shore road from Duluth to Two 
Harbors and thence to the Pigeon 
river boundary. The road la passable for 
the entire distance, but only portions of 
It have been graveled. 



leader of Tammany hall, was success- 
ful In securing the Democratic nomina- 
tion for the same office, easily de- 
feating independent candidates. 

The principal primary struggles In 
the state outside New York city were 
concerned with nAminations for as- 



ROAD OPENS 
IIUPRING 

Highway Will Lead From 

Twin Cities to Port 

Arthur. 



Deputy State Engineer Re- 
ports Rapid Progress in 
Nearby Counties. 



One of the most picturesque high- 
ways In America will be ready for the 
motorists of the country next spring, 
when the new road from the Twin 
Cities to Port Arthur Is officially 
opened. 

J. H. Mullen, deputy engineer of the 
state highway commission, has just re- 
turned to St. Paul from an inspection 
trip of state aid roads in St. Louis. 
Lake and Cook counties, and the high- 
way now being completed on the Cana- 
dian side. He reports great progress 
in the work, and announced on his re- 
turn to St. Paul that the highway 
will be ready for motorists when the 
touring season begins next spring. 

A statement issued today by the 
state highway commission follows: 
Ciood Prugress Made. 

"In the last two years Lake and Cook 
countita have spent most of their 
money available on the North Shore 
road, running from Duluth to Port 
Arthur. The engineer found it pos- 
sible to rldo In an automobile to with- 
in three miles of the international 
boundary, and the last few lap.q of the 
road are being completed rapidly. 

"Meanwhile the Canadian road-build- 
ers are within the same distance of 
Pigeon river, where the two highways 
will meet, being due to be joined .some 
time in November. Then only a bridge 
will be necessary over the Pigeon river 
to mtiik the completion nf the last lap 
of gravel road from the Twin Cities to 
Port Arthur, a di.stance of 400 miles. 

"The highway traverses some of tht- 
most beautiful country In Northern 
Minnesota, famous for itsj scenery. High 
and rocky hills abound, and the road 
affords a clear view of Lake Supe- 
rior a larpe part of the way. 

"Mr. Mullen also went 230 miles over 
state roads in St. Louis county, tlirough 
Evelelh, Cook, Tower and Biwabik, and 
found them in fine condition." 



CONSUL GENERAL 
ASKED TO RESIGN 



Statements of Thomas 
Gaffney at Municii Criti- 
cized By the President. 

Washington, Sept. 29. — Thomas St. 
John Gaffney. American consul gen- 
eral at Munich, Germany, has been 
aisked to resign his post because of 

piirtisan utterances on the European 
war. Officials would make no an- 
nouncement concerning the case, pend- 
ing receipt of word from Mr. (Jaffney. 
The ron.^ul general is understood to 





CHARLES A. PERKINS. 



sembly members. In the majority of 
cases the regular organization candi- 
dates were succesMTul. No other state 
officers were nominated and the vote 
therefore was comparatively light. 

Norman J. Gould of Seneca Falls ap- 
peared to be successful in the contest 
for the Republican nomination for 
mernber of congress in the Twenty- 
sixth district. 

George R. Lunn. former mayor of 
Schenectady and one of the few So- 
cialists In the country to become 
mayor of a large city, wa» renominated 
for that office by an overwhelming 
vote. • 




THOMAS ST. JOHN GAFFNEY. 

have made statements reflecting on 
the president's policy in the European 
war. He was once before the subject 
of controversy over expressions con- 
cerning the war, and as a consequence 
was transferred from one post to an- 
other. 

Should Gaffney decline to resign. It 
was Intimated by officials that he 
would be di.smlssed from the service. 



nVE THOUSAND 

ARE EXPECTED 



X ^.l:. T*a.\i\. Minn., Sept. 29.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Five thousand dele- 
gates and visitors are expected to at- 
tend the national convention of the 
Danish Brotherhood of America here 
Oct. 11 to 16, according to an an- 
nouncement today by the local com- 
mittee which Is completing arrange- 
ments for the big gathering. 

Few matters of an Important na- 
ture will come up at the convention 
and most of the time will be devoted 
to social affairs and di.scu8.«»Ion8 In- 
tended to promote greater interest In 
the organization, which now comprises 
800 lodges throughout the country. 

The Danish Sisterhood, an auxiliary 
body. Is expected to take up the wom- 
an suffrage question and also discuss 
matter.9 pertaining to the welfare of 
the child. ,j 4(^ 



NAVAL OmCER 

WILL CO-OPERATE 

Peter Coyle Helps Uncle 

Sam in Effort to Secure 

Recruits. 

Navy Recruiting Officer Peter Coyle 
w^lll co-operate with the postofftce 
department as much as possible In 
the campaign to secure more recruit* 
to the United States navy. The 800 
names of Duluth men eligible for the 
navy as secured by the noail carriers 
of thl» city, will come In very handy. 
Officer Coyle believes, in procuring 
recruits. 

Postnvaster McEwen forwarded the 
lists to Washington. D. C, and from 
there they w^ill be sent to Indianapolis 
where a publicity branch of the navy 



GOTHIC THE NEW 

ARROW 

2 for 2ffc COLLAR 

IT FITS THE CRAVAT 



liHany People Require 

SearGJiing Blood Remedy 

BODY WASTES ClOil SYSTEM MB CAUSE NEARLY All F8RMS V SICKNESS 

TAKE 

s. s. s 

FOR YOUR BLOOD 




S. S. S. Go<-s Into AM the Dark 

The hum^n bodj- is such a highly 
specialized digesti\e system that it is 
practically more or less out of order 
jCrom infancy. 

On this account J». S. S. has a mark- 
ed influence In overcoming blood pov- 
erty since it circuities with the blood 
all over the body. 

Digestion is not merely a stomach 
function. The word nowadays is used 
in the broad meaning of bodily and 
psychic energy. 

There is a constant change going on 
every Instant all C'ver the body, and 
to preserve health every atom of our 
material existence should be replaced 
with renewed energy in the form of 
food and air. 

But there is uuually much more 
material in the blood than can be 
oxidized or taken up by the tissues, 
hence all sorts of conditions of blood 
poverty arise in tlie form and name 
of Rheumatism, Citarrh, Abscesses 
and so on. 

It thus requires a searching anti- 
dote such as S. S.. S. that will cir- 
culate with the blood and not lotie its 
own characteristic Identity. 

When you jump at the explosion of 
a toy pistol don't rush for a "nerv- 
ine." Get a bottle of S. S. S. at any 
drug store and fill y^our blood with its 
wonderful tonic influence. 

If you feel stale iind run down don't 
waste effort with I'ood medicine. You 
can get all the fcod you require in 
an egg or a pound of beef. Just con- 
sider S. S. S. as entirely a medicine, 
but at the same time understand that 
it contains no st:-ychnine, caffeine, 
or "dope" of any kind. And yet Its 
Influence in the blood is more health 
ful, more penetrating, more stimu- 
lating and more productive of notice- 
able results than anything else ever 
discovered for the promotion of pure 
blood. 

S. S. S. Is absolutely purely a vege- 
table product; it (contains one Ingre- 
dient, the active principle of which 
stimulates each cellular pari of the 
tissues to the healthy and Judicious 
selection of Its o'vn essential nutri- 
ment. 

Thus, when the tissues break down 
and cause pimples, boils, carbuncles 
and abscesses, wh;n the muscles be- 
come charged witli acids that cause 
twinges of rheumatism; when the kid- 
neys are weak, the liver sluggish and 
the stomach sour, the blood streams 
become Loaded with all sorts of poi- 
sons. 

S. S. S., by its stimulating Influence 
in the cells, drivei out all these poi- 



Corners Searching Out Impurities 
sons, and this is what is meant by 
the word tonic. S. S. S. cleans the 
stomach and thus paves the way for 
healthy pabulum to enter the circu- 
lation. 

The relative medicinal values of the 
components of S. S. S. are just aa es- 
sential to well-balanced health as the 
elements of meat, grains, fats and su- 
gars of our daily food. 

And when a condition of disease has 
invaded the blood the action of S. S. S. 
in the tissue cells enables them to 
resist their accumulation, each cell 
thereby helping its neighbor to throw 
off what would otherwise be a con- 
gestion to produce a boil, carbuncle 
or abscess. 

That condition known as ennui or 
"all in," often precedes an attack of 
rheumatism, but the timely use of S. 
S. S. will so tone the blood that the 
attack may be entirely prevented. 

And if you feel old, if the good old 
.jokes seem flat, if the activities of the 
youngsters seem foolish to you, and 
if you are less inclined to participate 
in the activities of life, a bottle of 
S. S. S. will so reinvigorate your blood, 
so react upon your jangled nei-ves, 
that In eye, mind, step and appetite 
you will (luicldy get: back into that 
keen, sharp, active condition where 
you will fairly hum with energy. Try 
S. S. S. It won't fail you. Get a bot- 
tle of this famous blood purifier, toniq 
and antidote of any druggist. Get it 
today. For special books on overcom- 
ing blood and skin humours write to 
The Swift Specific Co., 461 Swift Lab- 
oratory, Atlanta. Ga. 




Swift Specific Co. 

Medical Dept. 

461 Swift Bidg., 

Atlanta, Ga. 

I enclose a brlf^f 

description of my 

case. Please spiid 

me, absolutely free. 

your Advice, Dlag 

Georgia's FibhnU nosls and all Infor- 

i»i ., u • 1 Bi J mat Ion for Private 

DiagiK)sticinl>Uo«4 Home Treatment I 

ind SkJB Disease. have boj;nn the use 

of 8. S. S. 

Name 

ADDRESS 

CITY 

STATE 

^^- ^ • ^. ••••••»•••••■•••••••«•••. . 



i.s stationed. The 
forwarded to recru 
,)ubllcity matter tc 
lie a& to the excel 
be derived from ser 

Officer Coyle ha.' 
hand in the work, a 
lecrultlngr officers t 
I..a Cro3se and otl 
The whole United S 
system, will be sco 
looth comb In th( 
1 llglble men for th 

"I think this i 
work out verj' sue 
Coyle today, "and 
raise the standard 
materially. The le 
^pt^ured list.s of d( 
wiah to better th 
rrwike naval service 
jiatlon. The condl 
nre being Improved 
Secretary Daniels 
in making: the sei 
young- men." 



lists will later be 
iting- officers with 
educate the pub- 
lent advantages to 
vice In the navy. 

already taken a 
nd. sent data to th^e 
t Virginia. Austin, 
ler branch offices, 
tates, throuRh this 
•ed as If by a fine 
attempts to get 
> navy. 

►Ian is going to 

;e9sfuly," said Mr. 

will help us to 

of the navy ver>' 
tter cJirrlers have 
islrable men, who 
eir condition and 

their future occu- 
:ions in the navy 

all the time, and 
'las done wondnrs 
vice attractive to 



B«saea»«ii lieaves Dakota. 

Harvey, N. D., Sept. 29.— (Special to 
Tlie Herald.) — Forrier State Senator 



I Henry ,). i;essessen <.f HarAi'y, v.iio 
I wa.s a candidate for coiigreasman from 
the Second di.strict two yc'ar.<« ajjo. 
Staking the Uopublican nomination, 
will remove to Mlnne.ipolis about (>ot. 
15. to en^jage in the practice of law 
with hi.s bi'uther. Mr. l>essed.sen was 
a promlnem inembiT of the .state as- 
sembly durLng his period of service, 
and he is the sponsor of the stare's 
present initiative, referendum and re- 
call laws. In the congressional fight, 
Mr. Be.sstssen w.is beaten by tjeorg© 
M. Young of Valley City. 

MANN WOULD'ENXCT 

PRO TECTI VE TARIFF 

St. Louis, Mo., Sppt. 29. — Congrc.<?8- 
man James R. Mann of Chicago, 
speaking at a banquet of Mis: o'.iri 
Republicans here last night, f.avor^d 
a non-partisan tariff commission, a 
protective tariff, security for the 
rights of the worklngman and like- 
wise for capital, expansion of Amer- 
ican trade abroad and protection of 
the flag for the pioneers who enter 
the foreign commercial field. 



/■ 




Marie Antoinette 



Broadway, etth & 67th Sts. 
New Yark City. 



SITUATED in the 
most convenient loca- 
tion in town. Modem 
in every detail, abso- 
lutely fi^proof , with- 
in ten minutes of the 
leading department 
stores, shop? and 
theatres. Convenient 
to Pennsylvania and 
Grand Central 
Depots. 

Rooms, witliHunning Water, $1.50 Per Day Upward. 

Rooms, with Bath, $2.00 Per Day Upward. 

Suites, $4.00 Per Day Upward. 

RESTAURANT OF UNUSUAL EXCELLENCE. 

fl. STANLEY GREEN, Manager. 




ALUMINUM PLATE $12 



UNTIL 

OCTOBER Isl 

ONLY 




GUARANTEED 
20 YEARS 



Seldom indeed do you see such a bargain offered. Have your 
impression taken now for one of these beautiful plates that last 
a lifetime. 



I 



BRIDGi:W0RK$3 



RUBBER PLATES $4 UP 
FILLINGS 50c 



NEW YORK PAINLESS DENTISTS 

123 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



« II- 





H- 



m I I nij w jt^- ^ -t^ t L ' jr r -"P- 




!« »- — . 



■■■ »4" I I 



I ■■■ — 



i 



1 




I 



i 

I 



18 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 29, 19i5. 



SCOOP 



THE CUB 
REPORTER 



Gosh ! But the Boss Is Stubborn 



By "HOP" 



JS»m 





MAKE WHISKY 
THRESHERS 

Fargo Believed to Be Home 
of Small Dis- 
tillery. 




Alcohol, Rainwater and 
Snuff Formula of Bever- 
age Confiscated. 



Fargo, N. D., Sept. 29. — Since the 
closing of the Moorhead paloons It Is 
the belief of local offictrs that the 
manufacturing of poor grade of whisky 
has started here. 

A man by the name of Joe Courtenay 
was arre.sted by Policeman Milligan, 
late yesterday, as he was attempting 
to dispose of a bottle of liquor to a 
transient on Lo\\'er Front street. The 
llriuur in question Is pronounced the 
worst stuff that has come into the 
hands of the police In years. 

The rainy weather has brought in 
a large number of threshers and the 
police court has witnessed, within the 
last couple of days, the trial of more 
drunks than at any time since the 
drouth struck Moorhead. Where the 
threshers get their booze is uncertain 
as most of thorn could not have gone 
to BarnesvlUe for it. 

It is understood that Courtenay will 

filead guilty to the charge of selling 
nloxicating liquors. 

LIGNITE MENlEEK 
LOWER RAIL RATE 

Complaint to Be Lodged 

With State Commission By 

Burlington Operators. 

Minot, N. D., Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The lignite coal rates, 
recently promulgated by the state 
rallw^ay commission, are duo for an- 
other reopening, if the coal operators 
of lUirllngton, N. D., prevail. 

Complaint will be lodged with the 
commis.>*ion, claiming that the short 
hour rates are such that they work 
an extreme handicap, and the oper- 
ators ask for a further modification of 
the ratfS. 

t'nd<-r the recently promulgated 
state rate, it costs 80 cents to trans- 
port a ton of coal from Burlington 
to Surrey, a distance of sixteen miles, 
whil • It costs the same sum to trans- 
port a ton of coal from Noonan to 
Burrey. a distance of 105 miles. 

The former rate from Burlington to 
Minot was 30 cents a ton, while un- 
der tlie new rate it is 40 cents. 

Threats Land Man in Jail. 

Brainerd. Minn.. Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — John Dubles of Cuyuna, 
who threatened to kill Henry Dehnlng, 
a farmer residing near that town, was 



fined $20 or twenty days in jail, and 
having not the wherewithal to pay the 
fine, is now sitting In the county jail 
thinking it over. 

RAIN MAY CAUSE 

UBQR SHORTAGE 

Farmhands Deserting Grain 

Country With Only Half 

Crop Threshed. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Sept. 29. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Farmers of the 
Northwest may find themselves con- 
fronted with the most serious labor 
problem that they yet have had to 
deal with as a result of the rain that 
has continued during the last six 
days. 

Hundreds of threshers have arrived 
In Grand Forks during the last few 
days and more than half of these are 
going east. When the threshers are 
able to resume operations, they find 
themselves with short crews. 

In some few sections of the state 
threshing has advanced to tho point 
where the labor shortage will not 
cause any worry. But on the whole 
the situation Is one that has serious 
possibilities. 

Rain has interfered with threshing 
In the east end of the state since last 
Thursday. In all reports available only 
I about half the threshing has been 
completed. The slow threshing proc- 
ess has resulted from the fac that 
the straw this year is exceptionally 

h G 3. W 

Only In a few sections of the state 
has much grain been threshed. Farm- 
ers of the North Dakota, despite the 
almost constant appeals made to thern 
to stack grain, have failed to heed 
the call, and they have most of their 

■ grain in shock where it Is becoming 

' thoroughly soaked.^ 

EAU CLAIRE GUARDS 

WAN T NEW ARMORY 

Eau Claire, Wis., Sept. 29.— Ten 
thousand dollars for an armory this 
week. That is the goal the soldier 
boys of Company E. Wisconsin Na- 
tional Guard, have set for themselves. 
They want to start work on their 
armory this fall and will scour the 
city for subscriptions to the stock 
company that Is to be organized to 
erect the company armory. 

The men of the company have de- 
cided that if they were to have a 
prop'-r place to drill It was up to them 
to go out after it. Four skirmishing 
squad-s were organized to solicit sub- 
sc-iptions this week, every militiaman 
to report each evening at the armory 
as to progress made during the day. 

MURDERCERTAIN" 

IN MUELLER CASE 

Milwaukee, Wis.. Sept. 29. — That Col. 
and Mrs. Robert W. Mueller, were mur- 
dered on the grounds surrounding their 
cottage at Puckaway lake and then ; 
dragged Into the house where their 
bodies were soaked in oil and set fire 
to hide evidence of the crime, was the 
opinion of Dr. Daniel Hopklnson, who 
announced that an examination of a 
clot of blood found on the grass dis- 
closed that It was that of a human 
being. 

Col. R. B. Pixley, private secretary 
to Governor Phlllpp, is on the scene, 
having been commissioned by the gov- 
ernor to make a searching investiga- 
tion. 

The funeral of the victims was held 
yesterday afternoon from Scottish Rit j 



cathedral Members of Troop A, W. 
X. G.. uf which Col. Mueller served as 
captain for many years, acted as escort. 
"Nigger," a big black horse that Col. 
Mueller rode at the head of his com- 
mand for eight years, followed the 
hearse. It was saddled and riderless 
and was led by a trooper. 

After the Masonic rites at the grave 
a platoon of the militia escort fired 
three volleys over the graves and 
trumpeters sounded "taps." 



NORTH DAKOTA TEAM 
MAY BE SHY CAPTAIN 



but this was of metal, and could not 
be C)pened. 



Game Witti Minnesota U 

May Be Played Saturday 

Without Lynch. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Sept. 29.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — It Is barely pos- 
sible that Capt. Lynch of the Univer- 
sity of North Dakota team, will not 
be In the game Saturday against the 
University of Minnesota. Lynch is 

suffering from an early season Injury 
that may keep him on the sidelines. 

Bad weather has Interfered with! 
the university's work of training for \ 
the Gophers. Coach Gill has practical- , 
ly determined upon the llnevip for the 
Minnesota game, and probably will 
send his team onto the field with Mann 
at center; Taylor and Boyce, guards; 
Lynch. Flynn and Fingarson, tackles; 
James and Johnson, ends; Rush, quar- 
ter; Lowe and McKay, halves, and 
Helmkay, full. His subs probably will 
be Mann at guard. Murphy at center, 
Talbot at end. McKay at quarter, 
James at half, and Clark at full. 

The North Dakota team will leave 
Grand Forks on Thursday night, ar- 
riving in Minneapolis Friday morning. 
This leaves the North Dakota team 
with only three days for real work. 
Most of the time now is given over to 
scrimmage, with Thursday being 
used for light practice. The team will 
also be out for a light workout on a 
Minneapolis field Friday afternoon. 



STREET CARNIVAL 

OP ENS A T BARRON 

Barron, Wis., Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Barron's three-day 
street fair opened today. The exhibits 
of farm produce are all very good ex- 
cept that of corn, which, on account of 
the cool summer, Is still soft. There Is 
a fine display of home-grown fruit and 
canned goods. The free attractions are 
cleaner and better than ever before 
and there are more of them. 



Sir Lackaivatina, gallant Knight^ 
Doth tie his lady 'j slipper tight. 
It sets as ivell an J fits as fair 
As iMckaivanna Undernjoear. 

Tn selecting undergarments for their chiWren, 
A mothers who discriminate finely, consider the 
quality of the garments. 

LACKAWANNA TWINS 
UNDERWEAR 

is very decisive in quality. Being made from 
wool yarns, it conserves health. Be- 
ing scientifically sized, it is not easily 
strained or worn out. It is absolutely 
non-shrinkable. 

Boys' and Girli* 
Vests, Pants and Drawert 

50c to $1.00 

Union Suits 

?1.00 to $1.50 

*rhe iMckaivanna Tivins $1.00 Union 
Suit ranks as the best value in America. 

Wyfuau, Partridge & Co. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Wholesale Distributers for the 
Northwest. 



DULUTH PASTOR AT 

BR AINER D CHURCH 

Brainerd, Minn.. Sept. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Special meetings at 
the Swedish Baptist church this week 
will be addressed by visiting speakers, 
Rev. Swaney Nelson, Duluth; Rev. A. O. 
Lundeen, Alexandria, and Rev. Fred 
Palmborg, Long Prairie. 

LA CROSSE MAY GO 
BACK TO BLUE LAWS 




Row Between Minister and 

Theater May Close Up 

Town. 

La Crosse, Wis.. Sept. 29. — As a re- 
sult of a controversy betw^een Rev. J. 
E. "Watson, pastor of the West Avenue 
Methodist church, and W. J. McWill- 
lams, a theater manager, residents of 
La Crosse must soon face squarely 
the question of whether every place 
of business In the city shall be closed 
.ind the street cars cease running on 
Sunday. 

I Mr. McWilliams is having a theater 
i erected near Rev. Watson's churcn. 
j The latter insisted that the theater 
i should not show its pictures on Sun- 
! day and threatened to Invoke the old 
Iblue law of tho state, prohibiting all 
I manner of work on Sunday. Mr. Mc- 
i Williams came back with the declara- 
tion that If this law was Invoked to 
close his theater, he would close every 
business institution In the city and 
make all public conveyances cease 
running on the Sabbath day. 

The City Union of the Young Peo- 
ple's Societies of Christian Endeavor 
Indorses the suggestion that the city 
be closed tightly on Sunday by pass- 
ing strong resolutions favoring both 
Mr. Watson's campaign to close the 
theater and McWilllam.s' proposed en- 
forcement of the blue law all around. 
To show the sentiment of the com- 
munity surrounding the West Avenue 
church and new picture house, Mr. 
McWilliams had a vote taken in near- 
by drug stores. As a result 609 voted 
for a Sunday theater and nine 
against It. 

CHURCH ROBBED 

AT FERGUS FALLS 

Fergus Falls. Minn., Sept. 29. — The 

Church of Our Lady of Victoria in this 

I city was entered by thieves and a 

1 beautiful chalice, valued at between 

I $50 and $60 was stolen. The chalice. 

; or sacred cup used in the sacrament of 

' the Lord's supper, was kept in a sort of 

cupboard in the sacristy. Two other 

older chalices alongside of it were not 

taken, and one or two other chalices 

of lesser value were also left. 

After robbing the sacristy, thieves 
endeavored to open the tabernacle, 
where other £acred vessels aro kept. 



RECORD PRICE FOR 
GOLDEN VALLEY LAND 



Gilbertson Farm Near 

Beach Brings $75 an 

Acre Casti. 

Beach, N. D., Sept. 29. — The sale here 
this week of the 258-acre Gilbertson 
ranch at a price of $75 per acre, bare 
of crops, implements, and stock, es- 
tablishes a record price for this great 
section of the state. The beat of Im- 
proved grain lands have heretofore 
sold in Western North Dakota for a 
price approximating $35 to $50 per 
acre, and the sjv^e of the Gilbertson 
place at this ftgurie, though known to 
be one of the best ranches in the 
Golden Valley, is thought by dealers to 
presage a new and higher standard of 
prices for lands hereabouts. Average 
sales previous to this of improved 
ranches have gtnerally been made at 
prices rangingf from $35 to $50 per 
acre, records of $60 being the highest 
sought, and the $75 sale of this week 
is regarded as an extraordinary event. 

William Andreas, a wealthy farmer 
with large holdings In Frankfort, 111., 
was the purchaser, paying $19,450 cash 
for the farm. The Gilbertson ranch 
was purchased from the government 
by Levi Gilbertson ten years ago and 
has been In continuous cultivation 
ever since, yields generally being enor- 
mous. 



CANCER PROBLEM 
TO BE DISCUSSED 



Campaigns to Be Started 

in Large Cities of 

the State. 

St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Anti-cancer campaigns 
are to be conducted in the large cities 
of the state according to Dr. I. J. 

Murphy of the Minnesota Public Health 
association. 

Tho first of these popular discus- 
sions of the cancer problem will be 
held at the Pence auditorium, Minne- 
apolis, Oct. 4. 

Dr. W. L. Rodman of Philadelphia, 
president of the American Medical as- 
sociation, will be the principal speaker. 
The meeting will be held under the 
auspices of a committee of the Hen- 
nepin County Medical association. 

Commenting upon the situation In 
this state Dr. Murphy said: "Deaths 
from tuberculosis, pneumonia and ac- 
cidents were the only ones In the pre- 
ventable group surpassing cancer. 
Cancer held fourth place In the pre- 
ventable field last year, causing 1,703 
deaths. This field of course differs 
from the communicable disease field 




THOUGHT SHE 
COULD NOT LIVE 

Restored to Health by Lydia 

El. Pinkham's Vegetable 

Compound. 

Unionville, Mo.— "I suffered from a 
female trouble and I got so weak that I 
could hardly walk 
across the floor with- 
out holding on to 
something. I had 
nervous spells and 
my fingers would 
cramp and my face 
would draw, and I 
could not speak, nor 
sleep to do any good, 
had no appetite, and 
everyone thought I 
would not live. 
Some one advised me to take Lydia E. 
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound. I had 
taken so much medicine and my doctor 
said he could do me no good so I told my 
husband he might get me a bottle and I 
would try it. By the time I had taken 
it I felt better. I continued its use,and 
now I am well and strong. 

"I have always recommended your 
medicine ever since I was so wonder- 
fully benefitted by it and I hope this 
letter will be the means of saving some 
other poor woman from suffering."— 
Mrs. Martha Seavey, Box 1144, 
Unionville, Missouri. 

The makers of Lydia E. Pinkham's 
Vegetable Compound have thousands of 
such letters as that above — they tell 
the truth, else they could not have been 
obtained for love or money. This med- 
icine is no stranger — it has stood the 
test for years. 

If there are any comp^Iications you 
do not nnderstard write to Lvdia E. 
rinkham Medicine Co. (conlidential) 
Lynn,Ma88. Your-lett«r will be opened, 
read and answefcd by a woman and 
held in strict cofifldencd. 



In which the causes are known and 
should be controlled. Authorities as- 
sert, however, that with our present 
knowledge of cancer Its death rate 
sl)ould be reduced at least one-half. 

"State and county medical societies, 
hospitals, dispensaries, women's clubs, 
boards of health, and practicing physi- 
cians In every community should co- 
operate In an anti-cancer propagan- 
dum. In the larger cities campaigns 
similar to those of early antl-tuber- 
culosls societies might be instituted. 

"The Minnesota Public Health as- 
sociation will furnish literature for 
public distribution at such meetings. 
Our cancer committee will also furnish 
speakers where local speakers are not 
available. Besides the literature for 
public distribution, the association has 
purchased cancer circulars of special 
Interest to nurses and physicians, all 
of which will be furnished free upon 
request." 



NOTABLE VISITORS 
TO ADDRESS TEACHERS 



North Dakota Educational 

Association at Grand 

Forks Nov. 3-5. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Sept. 29. — (.Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Featuring P. P. 
Claxton of Washington, United States 
commissioner of education; Booker T. 
Washington, the colored educator; 
Irving Bacheller of New York city, and 
Prof. Lotus D. Coffman of the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, as the principal' 
visiting speakers from outside the 
state, the annual meeting of the North 
Dakota Educational association will 
be held in Grand Forks Nov. 3, 4 and 6. 

Provision Is made for half-day ses- 
sions of the general association on 
each of the three days of the con- 
vention. The balance of the time is 
given over to the several departments. 
The departments Include science and 
mathematics; history, civics and social 
science; Industrial education, musical 
education, teachers of English, school 
peace league, principals of gr.aded, con- 
solidated and third-class high schools; 
agricultural education, higher and 
professional education, secondary edu- 
cation, superintendents, elementary, 
school administration, rural education, 
school administration, higher and pro- 
fessional education. 

To have an attendance of 2,000 
teachers Is the aim of the officers of 
the general association, and both A. G. 
Crane of Minot, the general president, 
and W. B. Parsons of Bismarck, the 
secretary, are very hopeful of being 
able to accomplish this object. They 
have letters from all sections of the 
state. Indicating that hundreds of 
teachers are coming, and Grand Forks 
has been advised to be in readiness to 
care for them. 

President Crane has announced the 
appointment of the committee on reso- 
lutions, the number Including W. E. 
Hoover of Fargo, Anna M. Peterson, 
Wllllston; E. J. Taylor, Bismarck; E. 
V. P. Squires, Grand Forks, and Martha 
Fulton of Wahpeton. 

Several Important problems will be 
presented t^ the resolutions committee 
and one probably will be the proposed 
Indorsement of the establishment of 
another normal school at Dickinson. 
Several years ago the association In- 
dorsed the Minot normal school plan, 
and Indorsement of the Dickinson plan 
Is now sought. 



Barnesvllle Man Ilnrt. 

Cooperstown, N. D.. Sept. 29. — Hal- 
vor Stensgaard of Barnesville, Minn., 

was run down by A. J. Smith of this 
city, driving an automobile and sus- 
tained a fractured collar bone, disloca- 
tion of the shoulder and Internal in- 
juries which may prove serious. 
Stensgaard Is today In fairly good con- 
dition, showing signs of recovery. He 
was standing on a street crossing 
when he was hit and dragged several 
feet by the car. 



SiTCdlsh "Sankey" at Brainerd 

Brainerd, Minn., Sept. 29. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— Rev. J. A. Hultman of 
Worcester, Mass., who has been called 
the "Swedish Sankey," will speak and 
sing at the Bethlehem Lutheran church 
under the auspices of the Swedish Mis- 
sion church Sunday evening, Oct. 8. 
Rev. Hultman Is the best known gos- 
pel singer among the Scandinavian 
people on the two continents. Swedish 
and English songs will be sung on his 
present concert tour. 



WISCONSIN BRIEFS 



Bayfield — Because of defective wir- 
ing Bayfield was visited by a $5,000 
fire Monday, when the fine Lambert 
residence on the Dalrymple boulevard, 
was completely destroyed. Fanned by 
a gale It was a matter of a compara- 
tively short time before the residence 
was burned to the ground. The build- 
ing was covered by insurance. 

Ashland — A meeting of the state 
board of medical examiners will be 
held In this city Oct. 1. The meeting 
will be strictly a business session, for 
the purpose of acting on application. 

Washburn — It is understood that 
Long lake and Twin lakes, seven and 
nine miles west of Washburn, will be 
cleaned of carp and put In nice shape 
and later stocked with bass and pick- 
erel. 

Berlin — The Fair store of A. Ep- 
stein & Son, having done business In 
this city for the past twenty years, 
passed into the hands of M. C. Rass- 
mussen, trustee of the adjustment as- 
sociation of credit men of Chicago. 

Milwaukee — Anthony Taugher, 82 
years old, died at his home, 294 Four- 
teenth street, at 9 o'clock Sunday 
night. Mr. Taugher was one of the 
pioneer residents of Manitowoc coun- 
ty, and lived there until nine years 
ago, when he removed to Milwaukee. 

Racine — Ralph Alvls, 25 years old. 
Is dead and Leslie Trout. 27 years old, 
were fatally Injured as a result of a 
fiaii Xroia & Btacluc ttoxxx wblch they 



were repairing a 
Peter Rausch ne 
this county. 

Oshkosh — Fullj 
the local par 
churches, togeth 
adults of the s 
and sixteen Cath 
tend a warm grt 
Peter Rhode on 
Wednesday. 

Stevens Point- 
too homesick to 
from home. Est 
and Sadie Pfanq\ 
county, have r 
girls were undt 
came here to att 
normal. 



silo on the farm of 
ar Caldwell's Prairie, 

5,000 children from 
ochlal schools and 
er with about 3,000 
IX Catholic churches 
)lic societies, will ex- 
eting to Bishop Paul 
his arrival here on 

—Because they were 
stay in school away 
her Whitt and Alice 
le, all of Arena, Iowa 
eturned home. The 
r 17 years old and 
e-nd the Stevens Point 



ceased was 40 years old and Is sur- 
vived by her husband and ten children, 
the eldest a girl of 20 and the young- 
est a boy 3 years old. 



DAKOTA briefs] 



MINNESOTA BRIEFS 



Red Wing — The marriage of Ben- 
jamin S. Gayloid, formerly of Rich 
Valley, now of Red Wing, and Miss 
Lillian R. King, a daughter of Mrs. 
Nellie King of this city, took place 
this morning al the Church of the 
Guardian Angels In Hastings. 

St. Cloud— Aft( r Oct. 1 St. Cloud will 
have automobile mall passenger serv- 
ice. Contract for transporting mail 
between the po!:toffice and the rail- 
way stations h£s been let to E. P. 
Lound for $1.80C. 

Bemidji — The city of Bemidjl will 
redeem ?25,000 bonds Oct. 1. The 
bonds to be taki>n up are $10,000 wa- 
ter bonds, $7.00( hall and jail bonds 
and $8,000 permanent improvement 
bonds. 

Brainerd — Miss Marie Anna P. Deck- 
er and Richard F. J. Martell. both of 
Stewartsdale, w< re married by Judge 
H. C. Bradley. Oscar E. Anderson and 
Miss Esther Anderson witnessed the 
ceremony. 

St. Cloud — At the home of the bride's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Grignon, 
Riverview aven le Sartell occurred 
the marriage of Miss Grace Grignon 
to Carl Dewayne Forshey. The ring 
service was used. Rev. E. V. Campbell 
of St. Cloud off elating. 

Brainerd — Herman Tischman, aged 
38, and single, a homesteader near 
Atkin, died of Iropsy In a Brainerd 
hospital and the body was sent to the 
home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
TlPfhmnn of Me lominee. Wis, 

Bemidjl — Accoiding to a report Is- 
sued by officials of the Birchmont 
Beach summer hotel, there were 780 
guests at the hotel during the summer 
from points outside of Bemidjl. 

Ellsworth — Tie city council has 
posted a reward of $500 for Informa- 
tion which will lead to the arrest and 
conviction of the murderers of Charles 
DiUehay. 



Jamestown, N. D| — Although a storm 
of protest was raised by various 
automobile livery men, the ordinance 
regulating the operation of jitneys 
was passed unanimously. This ordi- 
nance calls for a license of $16 from 
each livery driver and in addition the 
filing of a bond for $500 with the 
city auditor. 

Carrington. N. D. — The marriage of 
Miss Lora Claire Holiday and Harold 
E. Stinchfleld took place at the liome 
of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
C. S. Holiday, in Carrington. The 
ceremony was performed by Rev. A. 
W. Brown, pastor of the M. E. chur'^h, 

Devils Lake, N. D. — The marriage of 
Miss Hattie Marsh of Starkweather 
and Vincent Keogh, son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Keogh. pioneer settlers 
In Cleveland township, occurred at the 
Catholic parsonages at Devils Lake, 
Rev. Father Mauriss officiating 

Wishek — Miss Pauline Swerdlow, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph, 
Swerdlow, of Wishek, was married 
Sept. 19 to Dave Silver, a rising young 
business man. 

Goodrich, N. D. — Sundav occurred 
the marriage of Mrs. Barbara PfafC 
and Gootlob Strobel. The ceremony- 
was performed by the Rev. F. Mind- 
rup of McClusky, at the home of 
Conrad Fichtner In Goodricli. 

Wahpeton, N. D. — A very pretty 
wedding was solemnized at St. John's 
church, Wahpeton, when Miss Mar- 
garet Ruddy of Wahpeton became the 
wife of Dr. W. J. Mulroony of Havana. 

McClusky, N. D. — A pretty wedding 
occurred in Christ's Chapel at Mc- 
Clusky, N. D., Monday evening, when 
Charlie Colling of Jamestown and 
Miss Amy Wasson of McClusky were 
united in marriage. Rev. \ijr. Bray- 
field of Jamestown officiating. 

Fargo. N. D. — The wedding of Miss 
Wllma Margaret George of this city 
land Alfred Willis Jennison of Rugby, 
N. D., which was announced here by 
I the bride's mother, Mrs. Charlotte 
George, of 109 Ninth street north, 
took place Sept. 21 at St. Peter's 
church. Williston, N. D. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^f^^n 



PENINSULA BRIEFS 



Marquette — Mr 
West Michigan 5 
St. Luke's hosplt 
Illness. She wj 
leaves her husba 
a 3-week-old inl 
two brothers. 

Escanaba — Mer 
County Medical 
ernoon, held thei 
fall season at tl 
Miller at Gladst( 

AVallace — Regl 
Llndsey, A.ssemb 
County Clerk E 
inette and F. J. 
salesman, were 1 
bile accident ne 

Laurium — The 
initial agricultur 
the Houghton-I^ 
passes into histo 
hlhlt on record ii 

Marquette^ — Mr 
formerly Miss 
Monday at the 
Marquette, the 
illness of onlv a 

Calumet — The 
Robert Williams 
noon from the r 
Stephen Williami 
Burial was In 1 
of the Foresters 
in a body. 

Ishpeming — Ap 
$105,250 were r 
meeting of the 
ning. The approj 
for the construe 
p^ant. 

Tshpemlng — Mr 
wife of Henry E 
ily home at th< 
Saturday afternt 
with a cancer fo 



i. E. T. Marshall, 222 
treet, died Monday in 
al after several days' 
s 84 years old and 
nd, two children, one 
ant; four sisters ana 

ibers of the Delta 
society, Saturday aft- 
r first meeting of the 
le office of Dr. A. H. 
• ne. 

3ter of Deeds Alex 
lyman C. A. Budlong, 
. N. Wazek of Mar- 

Kurzell, a traveling 
njured in an automo- 
ar Wallace. 
Twin County fair, the 
al show conducted by 
eweenaw association, 
r>' as the biggest ex- 
I the Upper Peninsula. 
'. Thomas Marshall, 
Mildred Holmes, died 

family residence In 
end coming after an 

few weeks. 

funeral of the late 

was held this after- 
esldence of a brother, 
5, on Boundary street. 
.^ke View. Members 

of America attended 

propriations totaling 
lade at the special 
c^ouncil Saturday eve- 
rlatlons Include $8,000 
tlon of an Incinerator 

8. Helma M. Berg, 
erer, died at the fam- 
! Deer Lake location 
on. She had been 111 
r some time. The de- 



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With this liquid bathe the eyes tw6 
to four times daily. Just note how 
quickly your eyes clear up and how 
soon the inflammation will disappear. 
Don't be afraid to use It; It Is Hb.<^o- 
lutely harmless. Many who are no-sr 
blind might have saved their eyes had 
the>- started to care for them in timew 
This is a simple treatment, but mar- 
velously effective In multitudes of 
cases. Now that you have been warned 
don't delay a day. but do what yoi. can 
to save your eyes and you are likely to 
thank us as long as you live for pub- 
lishinsr this prescription. 



^ictect 



Against Slubstitutes 

Gettfae WcU-Known 
Round Package 




Ask For 




HORLICKS 

THE ORIGINAL 

MALTED MILK 

Made in the largest, best equipped and 
sanitary JMalted Milk plant In the worid 

We do not make "milk products*'-^ 
Skim Milk, Condensed Milk, etc. 

Ask For HORLICK'S 
THE ORIGINAL MALTED MILK 

Made from clean* full-cream milk 

and the extract of eelect malted ^rain* 

reduced to powder form, soluble ia 

water. Best Food-Drink for All Ages* 

Used for over a Quarter Century 

Unless you &ay"HORUOICS" 
ycMf may get a Substitutem 



VaJke a Paekatie Homo 



m— 



i! 



•I 



— ^f 

' -■< ~ m -T , r ?"»* 







1 












[ 


' 




1 


















•> 


♦ 




1 






^ 






» 






i 






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I 




Wednesday, 



THE DUL-tfTH HERALD 



September 29, 1915. 



17 



MARKET HAS 
SHARP BREAK 



Mont, wheat, 1 car. No. 3 hard 
winter 91 

Mont, wheat, 1 car. No. i bard 
winter 90 

No. 1 durum. 20,000 bu, to arrive .90 



Wheat Turns Weak With 

Good Selling on Day's 

War News. 



Flaxseed Slumps on Free 

Offerings and Light 

Crushers' Inquiry. 



I 



Sept. 29. — Wheat wan 
trading after ltd Khov-v 



De. 



Duiuth. .>lin!i. 
Srm in the lute 
•f iTeakne^it. 

Septemlver wkent cloweil 9(ic off; 
Cembvr 1 '■xO olT, uiid May Ic off. 

September durum elo»ed -A'/ieC otf} 
tober 4V4C off; f>eeea»lier -4Hc off, 
May 4VHe off. 

Oats rlOMed ~He off at 32%@:t:t%e 
on the traek. Ilye eloaed ic off at 
for on the track. Barley closed 
«haiiaetl at 
traek. 

>liniieai>oli!« ittitx and ea 
ber. puts. 9Uc &tked; eai 



frook 47e to 55c (or on 



U: I>eeem- 
llN. Vic asked 



After advancing Ic around the open- 
Injf today. In spile of liberal receipts. 
tha wheat marltet turned weak after 
the first three hours' trading on. re- 
Borta of a victory of the allies in the 
I>ardanelle3. .. . .„ 

Armour and some of the other big 
operators at Chiiago turned sellers and 
considerable liquidation developed on 
tho part of over-an.xious longs. A good 
millers' inquiry for cash whtat and 
nearby futures was reported around 
the opening. That was duo In great 
measure to th'* continued lleht receipts 
of winter wheat, thus bringing about 
« ready absorption of all the spring 
wheat offerliig.s. 

At Kansas City there were only 234.- 
©00 bu a«ainst 356,000 bu last year, bnt 
locally 1,011 cars came to hand, com- 
pared with 518 cars a year ago. At 
Minneapolis there were 847 cars against 
493 a ye.ir ago and at Winnipeg 
1630 cars against 1.016 a year ago. 

Prtmiums on cash wheat at Duiuth 
were unchanged at 3»^c over De<-ember 
♦nd durum was traded In at V-jC over 
October. A good tonnage of Canadian 
wheat was received here In bond to- 
day 76 cars coming from Manitoba 
points over the Great Northern. At 
Omaha demand from millers led to an 
advance of 2c. The cash markets were 
unchanged at Kansas City and bt. 
Louis. The Winnipeg cash premium 
waLS off Ic in consequence of the lib- 
eral receipts to flU export require- 
ments. , ,, . 

September wheat opened 'iC up at 
P7c, adv:tnced -♦c more and thi-n eased 
off to 96 'hc at the noon hour. Decem- 
ber opened He up at 93 'tic, sold up 
%e more and weakened 2c. May wheat 
opened ""nc up at 98 'ic, gained Vic more 
and broke to 97 ^c. 

September durum opened unchanged 
at fl.Ol, gained Ic and broke SVaC., 
CJctober opened y»c up at $1.00V* and 
broke 4V*c later on liquidation. I>ecem- i 
ber opened MsC up at 98=^*0 and broke 
3*4.c May opened ^c up at 11.02 Vs and 
broke to 99 -\c. 

Slump In FInx.ieed. 

Business in fla.K.sood was compara- 
tively light wnfl the market turned 
weak. That was due to small crush- 
ers' Inquiry and a weakening of the 
cash premium at Minneapolis. 

September flax opened unchanged at 
$1841. and closed 2 Vic off at $1.8^ 
nominal. October opened ^Vac up at 
83 and closed 2^20 off at ?1 81 



Xo. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

.No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

N«>. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 
I No. 
i No. 
i No. 
' No. 

Mixed 

Mixed 

Barley, 

Harley, 
03e I r^^rley. 

Barley, 
Karley, 
' liirley. 
Barley. 
. Barley, 
' Barley, 
Oats, 1 
Oats, 
( )ats. 
Oats. 
(Jats, 
; Oats, 
Oats. 
Oats, 
Oats, 
Out>>, 
<Jats, 
! -No. a 
I No. 2 
No. 2 
No. 2 



Oc- 
and 

for 



un- 
the 



durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum^ 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum," 
dura m, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 
durum, 1 
durum, 
durum. 1 
durtini. 1 
durum, 1 
durum, 1 
durum, 1 
durum, 1 
\'i cars 
4 cars. 

cH rs . 
cars 

car. . 

car. . 

cars, 
car. 
car. 

car. . 



17 cars 1 01»i 

17 cars 1.00*4 

11 cars 1.00V4 

3 cars 1.01»/4 

9 cars 1.01^ 

1 car 99^ 

1 car 96 

10 cars 96 >4 

5 cars- . . , " 

3 cars. . . 

1 car. . . , 

2 cars . . , 
8 cars. . . 

1 car .... 
1 car 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, SEPTEMBER 29, 1915. 



Sept. — Open. 

Duiuth 97b 

Minneapolis 98 ^ 

Chicago 1.05** 

Winnipeg (Oct.) .91 5^ 

December — 



•1.06 



High. 

.971i 
.»?b 
l.OS 
.91 >« 



Low. 
.96\a 

.96 5s 
1.03 
.89 ^ 



Close. 

.96b 

.96iia 
1.03*, 

.89-^ b 






28 

^ea^b 

05a 



1.05 



Y'r ago. 
1.07 V* 
1.07^ 
1.04 
91b 1.07% 



% 



■ •••«•< 



cars. 

cars. 

car. . 

cars. 

car. . 

cars. 

car. . 

car. . 

cars. 

car. . 
7 cars. 
1 car. . 
1 car. . 
1 car., 
car In 

1 car 

1 car 

1 car 

1 car 

1 car 

1 car No. 
1 car No. 



2 

2 

r 
1 

5 

1 

1 
1 
car sample 



car.g No. -4 white, 
car No. 4 white... 
car No. 4 white. . . 
car sample grade. . 
car No. 4 white. . . 
cars No. 2 white., 
car sample grade, 
car sample white., 
car No. 4 white. . . 



l.OOS 
.99- 
.99^1 
.99 '4 
.99% 
.96 
.97% 
.981,^ 
.9 4 '.t 
.96 Va 
.97 ',i 
.98 r* 
.92 Va 
.93 %k 
.96>4t 
.92 'i 
.95 
.97*4. 
.93% 
.SOJ^ 
.1*4 Vi 
.92 V. 
.89 J4 
.96 Vi 
.89 34, 

.94'* 

.93^* 

.95 

.98-'* 

.52 

.61 

.50 Ml 

.52Vi 

.63 

.&4 

.S« 

.49 

.53 

.51 li 

wheat 35 Vi 

.33 
.33% 
.32M« 
.33 

.3314 
.34^ 



j-^iurn . . . , 
Minneapolis 
Chicago . . , 
Wlnni^'g . . 
May— 

Dulath 

Minneapolis 
Chicago . . . 


93^b 

»3^- 

96 '4- 

&»?*- 

**.'>*> 

• • • • .& 1 'i* - 

9g ** - 


.94'i 
3i .93 ?i 
Vj .96% 
.90 .90 

.98% 
.98 .98 
% .98% 
% .96% 

rLUTH 

High. 
1.02 
l.t»«>% 
.991* 

LUTH I 

High. 

l.S44a 
1.83b 
1.82% 
1.81 Ml 


.91Tia 

.91% 

.94% 

.as 

.96 %a- 
.96% 
.97 
.»3%a 


.92% a . .J3'4b 
.91%--,li^/A2% 
.94%-%a ..96%-V4 

.8»%i> yv#^--9o 

.96 %a ^.9#%b 
.96%-%b .97% 
.97%-%a .98%- %b 
•W -^.^%b 

MARKET 

Closi?. :5ept. 28. 
.9«%h 1.01b 
.95%b .99%b 
.93% .98 'ib 
.98 1.02 %b 

MARKET. 

Close. Sept. tt. 
1.82n 1.84% 
1.51b 1.83%b 
1.80a 1.80%b 
1.77 %a t.79a 
1.8511 1.86 %n 


1.08 
1.08% 
1.08% 
1.10% 

1.14% 

1.14% 
1 IS 


■Winnipeg 

September . 
October . . . 
Decemb«r 
May 


9fi%- 

DL 

Opi:X\., 

1.01b 

l.»OV»b 

985^ 

l.ftiMra 

DUl 

Oi>e«. 

1.84^4 

1.83b 

l.SOVib 

... .1.80b 




DURUM 

Low. 
.96a 
.96 
.93% 


Y'r ago. 

1.00% 

1.00% 

1.02% 

1.09% 


September . 
October ... 
November . 
Dfeccmber 
May 


-INSEED 

Low. 
1.8Ja 
1.80% 
l.«« 
1.79^ 


T*r ag©. 

1.43%n 

1.43% 

1.45% 

1.47% 



DECLINES IN 
SPECIALTIES 

React Sharply and Severe 

Net Losses Shown 

By Some. 



2%'S~2% per cenl. 90 dayss. 2»i; six 
months, 3. Call money easier; high, 2 
per cent; low, 1%; ruling rate. 1%; 
last loan, 2; closing bid, 1%; offered 
at 2. 



store. 



2. 

2. 



Duiuth close: Wheat— 
No. 2 northern. 93 'nc; No. 
arrive. 97c; Montana. No. 5 
asked: May, 96 %e asked. 



-On track: No. 1 hard. 96 %c: No. 1 northern. 95 '/ic; 
1 northern to arrive, ^%c: Montana. No. 2 bard, to 
, on track. 97c; Septe-mber. 9«c l>td; December, 92 'aC 
E>unim — On track: No. 1. 96 %c: No. 2. 92is-93%c; 



.35% 
.33% 



car No. 3 white 34V» 

rye, 2-5 car sample grade 

rye, I ear 

rye, 9 cars 

rye, 4,600 bu to arrive,.. 



.88 
.94 
.93 
.91 



MARKET GOSSIP. 



Duiuth bonded grain receipts: Wheat, 
76 cars; oats, 3 cars; barley, 10 oars; 
flax, 1 cai-. Total 90 cars. 

Cars of wheat received: Year 

Ye.s.terday. Ago. 



Duiuth 




. 1.011 


518 


Mlniirapolis 




847 


493 


Winnipeg 




. 1,630 


1,016 


Chicago 




226 


307 


Kansas City, bu . . . 




.234.000 


356.000 


St. Louis, bu 




.135,000. 


lOl.OOQ 



Year 
-Vgo. 
31 
23 
32 



$1. 



bid. 
November opened unchanged at 
$180%, and clo-^cd %c off at %\.m 
asked. December opened Ic upat 
$1.80, and closed l%c off at 91.i7^s 

asked. .^ .. . 

At Winnipeg October 
2%c oif at .$1.57%. and 
off at $1.56%. ^ , - 

At Buenos Aires flax closed 
at %\ 26%. and London %c 
11.04%. 



flax closed 
December l%c 



in*- 

oft 



off 
at 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
to 



Cn-^h Sale* WedneHday. 

hard wheat, 6 cars \ 

northern wheat, 31 cars... 

northern wheat. 7 cars 

northern wheat. 11 cars. . . 
northern wheat, 2.000 bu. 
arrive 



No. 1 northern wheat. 1 
No. 1 northern wheat. 1 
No. 1 northern wheat, 3 cars. 
No. 1 northern wheat. 1 car. 
choice 



.98 1^ 
.9-7% 
.96% 
.97% 

.97% 
97% 



car. . . . 

car 96% 

. .95% 



northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat. 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat, 

northern wheat. 

northern wh».-at, 

northern wheat, 

northeiii wheat, 

northern wheat. 
4 northern 

frosted 

Nu. 2 mixed wheat, 1 car 

M<mt. wheat, 1 car. No. 3 hard 

winter '*^ 



No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 



19 cars. . . 
4 cars. . . • 
4 cars. . . . 

1 car 

10 cars.. . 
3 cars. . . . 

car 

cars. . . . 

car 

cars. . . . 

cars. . . . 

cars. . . . 

cars. . . . 

cars. . . . 
1 car. . . . 
1 car. . . . 

2 cars. . . . 
2 cars. . . . 
2 cars. . . . 

1 car. . . . 

1 2-5 cars 

1 car 



.98 
.95% 



wheat, 1 car. 



.97% 

.96 

.96% 

.96% 

.97% 

.»«% 

.97% 

.95% 

.94% 

.95% 

.93% 

.94 

.93% 

.95% 

.92 »^ 

.93% 

.91% 

.92% 

.90% 

.91% 

.90% 

.88 
.94% 



• • • 
Unseed received: 

Yesterday 

Duiuth 

Minneapolis 10 

Winnipeg 2 

• * # 
Duiuth grain stocks, givinor changes 

In three days: 

Wheat^Western. .and winter, 234,000 
bu. increase, 52.000 bu: spring. 2.401,000 
bu, increase, 632,000 bu; durum, 1,398,- 
000 bu. increase. 535,000 bu; bonded, 
231,000 bu. increase, 115,000 bu; total 
wheat, 4,264,0^0 bu. net increase. 1.33 4.- 
000 bu. 

Coarse grains — Oat.s. 278.000 bn. de- 
crease, 102.000 bu; rye. 131.000 bu. in- 
crease, 14.000 bu; barley. 1,275,000 bu, 
decrease, 5,000 bu; flax, domestic. 159,- 
000 bu; bonded,, 3,000 bu; total flax, 
162,000 bu, decrease, net. 9,000 bu. 

Total of all grains. 6,110,000 bu; net 
increase. L232.000 bu. 

i . • ♦ 

; Clearance reported: Wheat, 960.000 
bu; flour, ll.ODO bbl; together equal to 

11,010,000 bu; com, 2.000 bu; oats, 

1 92,000 bu. 

« * « 

I Primary markets report the follow- 

Infi- receipts and shipments todar: 
I Wheat — Receipts, 3.145,000 bu.' last 

year, 2,893,000 bu: shipments, 1,805.000 
j bu, last y-ar, 1,095,000 bu. 
I Corn — Receipts. 1,336,000 bu, last 
I year, 546,000 bu; shipments, 458,000 bu. 
I last year, 185.000 bu. 

Oats — Receipts, 1,206.000 bu. last 

year. 1.755,000 bu; -hipments, 979,000 

bu. last year. 1,311,000 bu. 
« * « 

Cash No. 1 northern wheat was in 
firm demand at 3%c over December, 
and cash, durum at Ic over October. 
« * • 

Liberal receipts of wheat material- 
ized at Duiuth. there being 1.011 cars 
against 518 last year, and there ^tere 
706 cars on the track for the day. 

• • * 

Price Current says.: "Wet weather 
In the West and Northwest has furth- 
er delayed threshing, but the move- 
ment in the Northwest has assumed 
the largest proportions of the season. 

"Cool and wet weather was against 
the maturing of corp, although in the 
southern part of the belt the gn'eater 
part Is safe from killing- frost and 
some new grain is moving; to market. 
Quality is exceptionally high for this 
early in the season. Some sections of 
the northern part of the belt have 
up hopes of securing a 



to arrtve. No. 1. 95t,c; September, 96 %c bid; October, 95% e bid: November. 
»J%c; May, 9&c. Linstn^d — On track, $1.82: to arrive. |l.t2; September, $1.82 
Domtnal; ♦October. $1.81 bid; November. $1.80 asked; Dect»nber. SI. 77% asked. 
Oats — On track, J2%-33%c; to arrive, 32%-33%c. Rye — On track, 93c; to ar- 
rive. 9«c. Barley — On track. 47c-55c. 

Elevator receipts of domestic grain — "Wheat. 1,037.191 bu. last year. 792.150 
bu; oats, 6^940 bu. last year. 33.093 bu; barley, 268.311 bu, last year, 58.951 bu; 
rye. 9(9.376 bu. last year. 44,300 bu; flax. none, last year. L1.725 bu. 

.Shipments of domestic grain — Wheat. 782.994^ bu. last year. 193.T36 bu; oats. 
127,400 bu. last y<^r. none; barley. 226.809 bu. last year, 1?9,71J bu; rye, 144,450 
bu, last year. 105, 00« bu; flax, 5,587 hu, Inst year. none. 

Elevator receipts of bonded grain — Wheat, 26,227 bu. last year, 13, ITT bu. 

Shipments of bonded grain — Wheat, none, last year, 8,767 bu. 



northern, 131; No. 3, 44, 

No. 4, 26; rejected, 7; no grade. 20; 
sample grade, 8: durum, 401; winter, 
9; mixed. 30; total wheat. 1,011; last 
year, 518; Uax. last year, 31; oats, 29, 
last year, 61; rye, 60, last year, 37; 
barley 116, last year. 13; total of all 

r rains, 1.216, last year, 660; on track, 
33. 



w^hlte. 32%©J3%c; flax, $1.82® 

Unchanged; shipments, 84,- 

ry*; 92®9Jc; bran. 



No. 3 
L86. 

Flour— 
400 bbls. 

Barie}-; 47(§55c; 
J19. 



Corn and Wheat Bulletin. 



For ttui tireiit.v 



r>ur hours endUnc at 8 

lal.j; 



a. ai. , We<lue»- 



•TATIONS— 



mat« of 
wMUhor. 



Temperiktura i 'Pm- 
Mai- 1 Uin- i cipl- 
ImiunI imum{ '(tioa 



Liverpool Grata. 

Liverpool, Sept. 1'9. — Wheat — Spot. 
No. 1 Manitoba, lis lid; No 2. lis 9d; 
No. 3, lis 8%d; No, 1 northern Du- 
iuth, lis 4%d; No, 3 red western win- 
ter, Us 10%d. ^ 

Com — Spot American mixed, new, 
8s 8d. \ 



Extensive Profit-Taking tn 
War Shares and Clos- 
ing Irregular. 



Uinnm(M>U3 R;>luliiai 

.\Iex !!idiU Cloudy i 

Catiipbell Cloii.iy j 

('n'.kston Pt. Cloutiy ! 

1 >etioit Clt'uUy' 

.Vloiitevldeo riBBrl 



New rim . . 
Park I'.apiUs 
ttbciu»itnr 
Wliiiiehaifo 
WorUiiinnon 
Al't«.(leon ... 

Mtltmiit 

Mixihell . . . . 
Rodfltld . . . , 
Sioux rail* 



...Pt Clombi 

Baining! 

tnoiKly! 

Kalulngi 

Clwirl 

Cloudyl 

, ...Pt Clo««l.T| 

Clear; 

Cloufiy! 

Cleaxl 



Watertowu Cloudyl 

Yanktou Clearl 

Ainenia Cloudy | 

Bottineau Raining! 

It!cUct>.iiL Cloudyi 

r.raf lull Pt. CkMUty I 

Grand For** Cloady I 

Jame.>town Cloudy; 

LaoMilou Foggr! 

L:irlinorB nondyl 

Llslmo ClouUyi 

Mima RaliiiuKi 

N'.ipoleoH Cloudy) 

Pemblua Cl<mdyj 

Wahiirton Ocarl 

BUUngi Clear! 

r..e« h<o^»n Clewj 

Wll>aiil ClniKtri 

DulutK RiUiiitUCi 

MoorhesMt Clotiiiy. 

.•*t. Paul HalJiin»i 

Ui rroM* Pt. Cloudy I 

Hiirrjtt Pt. (loudyl 

Pierre Cloudyi 

Baplt Citr Cloudji 

Bi»Di4f(I« Ctondy! 

n»vll.i Lak» Raining! 

WllUiton Ctoudyi 

H.'Lira Clearl 

Miles Cltj- Clomlyl 

tUiiuieilC'sa Rainlngi 

tWliinipeg RaliiinKJ 

tKattkford Ctoudy; 

tPiince. Albert Pt Cloitdyi 

tQir A' pelle Cloudyl 

t.swlft Current Cle.iri 

tiiliiiuulon Clearl 



51 


44 


68 


42 


64 


40 


46 


U 


sa 


40 


58 


3» 


52 


48 


48 


42 


54 


44 


52 


44 


50 


42 


54 


as 


59 


38 


36 


39 


«<) 


38 


5» 


4;» 


5« 


40 


6» 


42 


58 


.14 


44 i 


40 


64 


36 


54 


40 


54 


40 


50 ' 


38 


48 1 


44 


32 1 


38 


3a 


34 


44 


38 


48 1 


38 


58 [ 


40 


62 1 


38 


«0 1 


32 


34- 1 


30 


42: 1 


»4 


4.S i 


40 


fiO 1 


40 


54 1 


4ft 


■■ 1 


42 


5S 1 


S4 


56 1 


38 


r.9 1 


40 


4« 1 


40 


48 1 


42 


42 


43 


e» 


30 


4« 1 


38 


•• 1 


43 


4» 1 


40 


r,z 1 


48 


48 ! 


38 


42 


38 


40 


28 


80 


Si 



.08 
.60 
.2t 


.46 
.30 

.26 

.32 



.20 

.08 



.14 

.08 



.08 

.08 

.04 



.26 

.08 

.02 

.02 

.08 

.08 





.10 

.06 

.42 

.OS 







.14 

.»« 

.12 



.02 

« 



.06 

.24 

.01 







.14 





.04 



• 



St 

St. Louis, 
wheat closed 



l,o«ia l^Vheat. 

Mo.. .Sept. 29. 

Sic 



at 95*4C. 



■December 



KanMaH City Wheat. 

Kansas ClLy, Mo., Sept. 29. — Decem- 
ber wheat closed at 92c. 

■fr 



New York 

New York, Sept. 29. 



Wheat. 

W heat — Septem- 



ber. ?l.lii%; December, Jl.01%. 

BUTTE ftSUPERIOR 
ACTIVE FEATURE 



•—Indies smj hundredtlia. 

I— Highest ypstprday. lowest last nlglit. 

X — Jtnt Indudejl In tha aTer;k^ea. 

NOTE— Weekly siiramartei or '•ointttiiMi In tlJe »r«!» 
region will be tel^graphM from Washlnston. April 13. 
and each Tie-stlay thereafter during the growing sea- 
eon, except that this summary will !« telegraphed 
and publUhed o\\ WeaueBd-iy whenever tUa oiecedlng 
Uunday i» k boUdaj. 



Stock Advances on Strong 

Metal Situation— Other 

Issues Firm. 

Mining stocks were strong at the 
start at Boston today, on the firm mar- 
ket in copper metal. Quotations eased 
oft In the late trading and price changes 
were slight at the close. 

Butte 4^ Superior was an active fea- 
ture, selling up J1.75 to 'i^61.50, and 
then easing off on realizing to $60.50. 

American Zl-nc clo«ed a5c up at 155.12; 
Calumet & Arizona, 75c off at ?62; 
Copper Range, 25c up at $55.75; tJreeue 
Cananea, 75c off at f37.75; North Butte 
nnchanged a-t if 30; Tamarack un- 
cha,nged at |56. a^d Shattuck 25c up 

at $27.25. 

• * • 

quotations of Boston curb 
reporteji to Paine, Webber 



Now York. .Sept. 29— Aside from a 
resu.mption of, the upward movement 
in specialties, publication of the 
terms of the Anglo-French loan failed 
to exercise a stimulating Influence at 
the outset of today's trading, invest- 
ment shares again receiying; scant at- 
tention. There were numerous "wide" 
openings- In the war grroup, Baldwin 
Locomotive overabadowinjr all others 
with a sale of 8.000 shares at 135 to 
140, a irtximrm gain of 12. American 
Locomotive opened with 1.500 shar. s 
at 69% to 70, a i-polnt advance. Rail- 
way Steel Springs roae 3 to 48 Vi. 
Pressed Stel Car 2% to 75% and Ten- 
nessee Copper 4% to 65. Colorado Fuel 
also became actlvtt at an advance of 
2% to 66%. The list showed signs of 
heavy proJit-taking after the initial 
outburst and reactions of 3 to 10 
points followed. 

Reactions resulting largely from 
heavy realizing, temporarily unsettled 
the stock list today, but had no ef- 
fect on the large outpourings of stocks, 
the first hour's business being esti- 
mated at 450,000 shares. Later prices 
showed more regularity. United States 
Steel's rlae of % to 79% being a help- 
factor. In the main, however, the 



THE PRODUCE MARKETS. 



Saluth. 

FRLIT3- - 
b<w. 83c crata $1.1» 

*■•••••••■■•■•• 1. 5v 



DECIDVOrs 

Prunes. Italian, 

I>anisou Plums, crate 

Peaches, bu., $1; box 

Pears, California Clarlgeai, box 

Pears, Washlogtoii BarU< U, box 

Varieties — Bartlett. Uixoln Coreless. 
Pears. Washington, boi 

Varieties— Flemish. Beaity. Fall Butter. 

c;nAPra_ 

Black Prince. 4 bskt.. crite 

Malagas, 4 inkt., crate - 

Tokay 4 basket, crate 

Concords, S lb. ba^kols. Iskt 

CoiKMnda. 8 lb. baskets, liiblcd, bskt 

Mi;U)N8— 

Osage Melons, cwt 

Water Melona. cwt 

Ca.saba .Melons, crate 

Cantcloupes. Fsncy 3td. • 5s, crate 

Pink MeaU, Flats, crate. 

BKHRIE8— 

Cranberries, btl 

Cranberrltt. KTaporated, IS pkgs., carton 
BluelH'rries. 16 qls.. crat* 

MI.siT.U.ANBOlS FIUITS— . 

V^xtltf Pears, bbl 

I>i)('hPs!: Pear!>, hamper 

ITmvell Pears, bu 

()U.A_NOES— 
F.xtra 

Fey. 96-112 126 

Val ...$4.50 $4.40 

Ge< rge Washington. 
Ex. Ch. 
Val ... 4.00 4.25 

Martha WaslUngton. 



150 

$i;.oo $6.50 

Mother Colony. 



178-200 216-250 
$6.00 



!;.7S 
Balboa. 



G.23 
.Sumelaas. 



.rr 



.TO 
3.00 
3.00 

2.T5 



1.39 

1.50 

1.7S 

.3« 

.ar 

4.09- 
2.15 
2.25 
•3.00 
1.50 

8.0O 

2.r» 

2.T5 

8.75 
1.75 
2.23 



298 
$5.75 



5. SO 



ful 



morning session clearly reflected an 
increasing degree of nervousness, in- 
duced by a mixture of professional 
liquidation and h ss aggressive public 
buying. Crucible Steel, which rose « to 
the new high record of 107% and 
Lackawanna Steel 9% to 91%, also a 
record, together with a few other spe- 
claltie.9, took the places of some of the 
early leaders at midday, when the 
trading became more normal. 

Bonds were firm. 

Continental Can came to the front 
in the early afternoon, rising 17% to 
111 after new records had been estab- 
lished by Crucible Steel and a few 
other specialties. Railroads, particu- 
larly Harrimans, Anthracites and St. 
Paul were 1 to 2 polnt.s higher. 

Today's market opened with a con- 
tinuance of the movement in war 
shares. Tho.se issues became heavy 
later on extensive profit-taking. 

Specialties reacted more sharply 
later, some showing severe net losses. 
Steel fell to 78 V* and railroads also 
receded. The closing was Irregular. 

NEW YORiTSTOCKS. 



Bsported tu Ctaafln & Lewis & Co. 



H. W. RICHAUnsON. LtfCftt F>recastar. 



CHICAGO MARKET. 



about 
crop.' 



given 



Broomhall 
'Firmness In 



EstablUhed 1888. 



Gtias.E.Lewis&Co 



DULUTH 



Write for Our Speoial Letter on 
ERIE: 



* * * 

cabled frf)m Liverpool: 
Winnipeg and American 
strength caused light offers, and the 
undertone was firm. Spot market was 
very firm, unchainged X.o Id hiRrher. 
with a good demand for Mantiobas, 
with near Manitobas very scarce. Car- 
go market was firm. Winters and 
Mnnltobns were 3d higher. Plates 
were unchanged and Indians 6d high- 
er. Millers' demand continues. Native 
offers were light, and foreign arrivals 
were very disappointing. Advance In 
freights checked business," 

• « « 

At Minneapolis, there was only fair 
demand for cash wheat and premiums, 
were steady. No. 1 northern blue 
stem sold at 2c to 7c over December, 
and No. 1 northern velvet chaff sold 
at 2c to 3c over December. Cash No. 
1 northern sold there at from 9tc to 
99c, and No. 2 northern at from 90c 
to 96c. 

♦ • * 

Duiuth car Inspection: "Wheat — No. 
1 hard, 26: No. 1 northern, 301; No. 2 



Unfavorable Weather and Bullish 
Foreign Advices Give Wheat Strength 

Chicago. Sept, 



• * 
Closing 
stocks as 
&. Co.: 

Butt© & London % 

Bohemia . . . , ^ . 

Braden 

Bix Ledge 

Calumet &. Montana 

Alex Scott 

Coppermines 

Chief 

Carneg-ie Lead & Zinc... 

Cliff 

Davis Daly 

Denn 

Interstate Callahan 16.50 

First N.ational 2.60 

Jumbo Extension 1.25 

Keating 1.75 

New Baltic 2.87 

1.60 



Bid. 

.30 
2.00 
9.00 
2.87 

.60 
8.38 
1.75 

.8a 



1.44 



New Cornelia 

Onondaga . . . 

Rainbow 

San Antonio 2.25 

c,» Ti'i- . J 1 1 Stewart .^"S 

29. — Wheat developed i (.•......p.ao s" 

fresh strength today, influenced by un- j Tonopah ^. 5.63 

favorable weather and by bullish for- ' lon^P*?* Belmont:^ 3.63 



eign advices. Rains in the Northwest 
continued to threaten that the move- 
ment of the spring crop would be de- 
layed and Liverpool reported that 
prices there were advancing on account 
of difficulty la obtaining supplies. The 
opening here, which ranged from a 
shade to Ic higher, was followed by 
some additional gain, and then a re- 
action all around. 

December started at 96 %c to 96 %c, 
and May at 98 %c to 98 %c. Despite 
early strength the bulk of later trad- 
ing, however, was at much lower lev- 
els as a result of big receipts in the 
Northwest, and because of Anglo- 
French reports of progre.'»s» which 
suggested enlarged chances of opening: 



Tonopah Extension. 
j Verde Kxteneion . . . . 



2.50 
6.75 



Asked. 
$ .31 

2.25 

9.25 

3.00 

.62 

"2! 6 6 

.90 
2.62 

.40 

1.50 

10.12 

2.75 
1.38 
2.00 
3.25 
9.00 
1.75 
8.75 

'".68 
.88 
6-87 
3.75 
2.64) 
6.85 



STOCKS — 



|High.:Low.!Clos8. 



AIII3 Chalmers 

Am. Tel. & Tel 

Am. (^an, com 

Am. Can, pfd 

Am, Beet Sugar...... 

Am. Hide & Leather. . 
Am. Hide & Lea., pfd. 

Am. Car Foundry 

Am. Cotton Oil Co 

Am. Ice Sec. Co 

Am. Locomotive i 72% 

do, pfd (lOO 

Am. Smelting .......: 86% 

Alaska Gold Min<;a Co| 32>'. 

Am. Sugar |109% 

Am. Tobacco Co. ...1 

Am. Woolen, common' 52 



1 47% 


45 


126 


125% 


65 


63 


168% 


107% 


«s% 


64 


12% 


12% 


53% 


60% 


86 


81 


63 V2 


52 



Copper 



Anaconda 
Atchison 
.\tchlson p<d . . . 
B. & O. com . . . 

B. R. T 

Bethlehem Steel 



73% 

!104% 



45>, 
125% 

ft3% 
108% 

66% 

50% 
81% 
52 
23 

69% 

99% 

85% 

32% 

109 

227 

60% I 50% 

72 V2' 72% 

103 % 1164 Vs 



fi«% 
99 i 

32.% I 

108 y2. \ 



89 I 



com. .'365 



Cal. Petroleum ( 20% 



Canadian Pacific 

Ches. He. Ohio 

Chino Copper <Zo. . . . 
Chi. Grt. West. com. 

do pfd 

Chicago, Mil. ^ St. P. 
Colo. Fuel & Iron 



Gas 1131 Vi 1130 



BOSTON C OPPER STOCKS. 

Beportad by Pniua^ Webbtr A Ca. 



STOCKS 



Bid 



I 



to l%c net 
94%®94%. 

only tem- 



M K .>IBER S 

New York Stock EStchange. 
N. T. Cotton Esch. Chicago .Stock Excli. 

N. Y. Produce Kxch. St I>oul» Mercii't.-i Ex. 
Boston CUain. of t om. Uuluth Bil. of Trade. 
Chicago Bd. of Trade. WIruilpeg Grain Kxch. 
Mixuiea;,aUs (. hamber of Commerce. 

The only Reaident Members of the 

N. Y. Sto«4c lixeh. and N. Y'. Cotton 

Kxeh. >ur«h¥»e«t of Chleago. 



A Good Firm to Ship 
Your Grain To 

ATWOGD-LARSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 



Special attention 
grains. We give all 
personal attention. 

DULUTU MIXXKAPOIilS 



given to cash 
shipments our 



"EXPERIENCE IS THE BEST TEACHERS 

CajUN COMMISSION SINCE XbKS 



C. C. WYMAN & CO. ^ 



DULUTH 



MINNEAPOLIS 






^iiSiNEAPOLlS 



DULUTH 



ITGHELL CO, 
ERCHANTS 

WINNiPEa 



the Dardanelles 

The close wns unsettled 1 
lower, with December at 
and May at 97%'S97%c. 

Cool temperatures gave 
porary fimine»s to com. Signs of ac- 
tive Argentine competition discouraged 
the bulls. After opening %c off to % (3> 
%c trp the market tended to sag. 

Afterward tb« weaUnes» of whea;t 
hud a depressing effect. The ck>3e 
was nervous, Vi to 3c under last night. 

Oats held steady owing ta absence 
of any decided pressure to sell. About 
the only offers were from scattered 
longs. 

Provisions gave way with hogs. Buy- 
ing power appeared to have diminished 
to a notable extent. 

Wheat: No. 2 red. $1.03'g:l.05 V'2 ; No. 

3 red. 97cli;$l.o:-: No. 4 red. 80 (^i 90c: 
No. 2 nard. $1.03 -a 1.05%. 

Corn — No. 2 yellow, 65%@67%c; Noi. 

4 white, 64c. 

Oata^— No. 3 white, 34Vi@35c; stand- 
ard, 38V2@39c. 

Rvo — No. 2, 99c; barley. 51*5 600; 
timothy, $5.50@7.25. Clover, 112.50'^ 
19.00. 

lard. 98.30; riba, $8.62 ^^ 



Alaska . . 

Adventure 

Ahraeek . 

Allouea '. . 

American Zinc 

Arcadian ,^ 

ArL2.Mia Ccmnt«rc^l .^. 

Butte & Ballakla\t. .. 

Butte & Superior 

Calumet &. Arizona ... 

Calumet A Hecla^ 

Centennial 

Chief Consolidated.... 

Chlno . 

Copper Rang'e 

Daly West ^ 

East Butte 

Franklin 

GoJdfleld; Conaolidacted. 
<5ranby 



32 

1% 
»8% 
55 
55 
9% 
»% 
2% 
60% 
62 
650 
18 
SSc 
45'^ 
55% 
2^ 
12 
8% 
1% 
55 



Asked 



32% 
o 



(Jreene-Cananea .| 37 Vi ( 



Hancock Consolidated. 

Inspiration 

Indiana 

Isle Royaie 

Keweenaw ;.... 

Lake Copper 

Mass. Consolidated . . . 

Mayflower 

Miami Copper ....'..... 

Michigan 

Mohawk , 

Nevada Consolidated... 



.J.. 



$13.50; 



Pork 

9.26. 

Wlieat— Open. FTliih 

.Sevt ....$1.0S\ %l.<\&. 

neo »G'4 .06% 

M.iy W% -9*1 

Coist — 

nee 55% .55% 

.May WH .^*k. 

Oats — 

[)«r 38% .3** 

May 38^4 .SS"** 

Porfc— 

Oet W-05 13. 4« 

Jan 15.30 1<J'J<^ 

LAcd— 

Oct 8.22 8.27 

.Ian 8.77 8-77 

Rlb»— 

(^>rt &.68 8.75 

.Tan 8.92 8.92 



Low. 

$1.')3 

.9T 

.54* 
.58% 

.37^ 

U.05 
13.75 

%.xr 

8.65 

».B5 
8.80 



CJosft 

$1,034^ 

.94% 

.54% 
.56% 

.37% 

13.40 
16.00 

8. 28 

3.75 



8.75 

8.92 



MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 



Minneapolis, Sept. 29. 
i-r early. Receipts, 847 
with 493 a year ago. 

Wheat: September opened 
high, 99c; low, JT6%c: closed. 
December opened. 93 %c; high, 
'ow, 91 %c: closed, 91 ^ic 

Cash: No. 1 hard 99 %c; 
rn, 93%(?T98%c; to arrive. 
No. 2 northern. 87 %c and 
wheat, 84%'fi'92%c. 



-W heat — Low - 
cars compared 



North Lake 
Nipissing . . 

North Butte 

Ojibway 

Old Colony 

Old Dominion 

Os^-eola 

Quincy 

Ray C^onsotidated 

Santa Fe 

Shannon 

Shattuck 

Shoe Machinery 

Superior Boston 

Superior Cop^per 

Tamarack 

Trinity 

Tuolumne 

United Fruit 

tr. S. Mining 

U. S. Mining, pfd...;.-;, 
Utah Consolidated -ii.. . 

Victoria r-* '. • ' 

Winona ;'.;;• 

Wolverine , 



16 
37% 

5% 
26% 

2% 
1S% 
10-% 

4 
27% 

2% 
73 
14% 

1% 
7 5.-16 
29% 

1% 

3% 
52% 
83 

23 

«?i 

27 
49% 
2% 
27 
56 
4 
45c 
131 
40% 
47 
12% 

3 

67 



99 

55% 
55% 
10 
8% 
3% 
60% 
63 
563 
18% 
90« 
46% 

12% 

9 

1% 
55% 
38 
16% 

a7% 
s% 

27 Vi 
3 

14% 
11 

-.'*^* 

28 V4 

2% 
73% 
14% 

1% 
7% 
30 
2 

3% 
63 

8f% 
82 

23% 
3% 

27% 
49% 

2% 
27% 
»«% 

4% 
49c 



Con. 

Com Pro. Co. 

Distillers Sec 

.Eirid ■■■•• ••>••••■• 

Erte. lat pfd 

B. F. Goodrich Co.. 
General Electric ... 
(Jeneral Motors, pfd. 
Great Northern, pfd . 
Great Northern Or« . 
Gug. Explor. Co. . . . 
Inter Barough, con*. . 
Inter Borough, pfd . 

Illinois Central 

Insptr. Cop. Co. . . . . 
K. C. Southern . . . . 
Central I.,eather . . . . 

Lehigh Valley 

Missouri Pacific . . . . 

M. K ft T., com 

Northern Pacific . . . . 
National Biscuit .... 

National Lead 

Nev. Copper Co 

.Norfolk & Western.. 
North American . . . . 

Northwestern 

N. Y. Central 

N. Y.. N. H. & N. H . . 
Ontario & Western.. 
Pennsylvania R. R.. 
Pnssed S. C:. pf<i. 



ll62Ti 
51% 
45% 

38" 
S8 

6&%! 



88 

83% 
360 

20 
161 

60 V4 

45V4. 

32% 
86% 

61 v; 



20% 
33 %i 
33% 
63% 

74 
176 
365 

121% 
50% 
66% 
20% 



19% 

33 

32% 

52 

71 
174 
tS,3 



101 

88% 

84 
360 

20 
161 

60% 

45% 

13 

32% 

86 Vi 

61% 
130 

19% 

33 

32% 

52% 

T3 
174 
»3 



Lesd .10 In 5 and 10 bu lots. 

GoMen Bowl Brand. 270s 3008 360* 

Kx. Fry. CallforuU, box $4.50 $4.50 $4. 29 

Bratul— Prtde. 
Ex. niolce California, bo?: 4.25 4.25 4.00 

liraiiils — Sliver Cord, Biauty. 
LlmeK. Kancy, box 1.25 

B.\.\.\X.\S— 
Banaiiaa, Faryy LJmon, Vy M 

RAKUKT, APPI,B8 — 
Extra y^tcr Clrtda F. BriAd. bbt. 

Varieties — .Mrx.inden. 
F.itra Faivci Cbcle K Brand. bW 

\ arletlen- -Jon.ithan. 
Extra Fancy Circle F Bn nd, bbl 

Vurletlea — Wealtliles, Ct ^t Bed. Hass. Snow. 
Fancy Aitplaa, Fautry Mar (, bbl 

Varlettes—Whealihy. Alexander, Bltiali, Bell- 
fleur, WoU Ulvcr. 
Fancy Apples, Plain Mark, bbl 

Varletle?< — Duchess. 
Fancy -Copies, PUlii Mart, bbl 

\ ariellea — Junathao. 

Craljapples. Hysloje, bu 

Cral>apiiie8, Tran:«cen(lents, box 

GRiii-iN vbim:tabi.ks — 

BcaiiA, VCaai. Hoiue Uruwji . bu. 

Beaus Green, ba 

Carriita. Home Uixiwr, doii 

("auUflower, Home Grown, bskt, 

CucuiulMrs, Homo GrowD. bu 

Com. H'/me Grown, wlill!, doz., 15c; yellow, 

(lor 18 

Ebb Plant, bu 2 30 

Green Unions, doz.. 14c. 14 doz.. doa. 12% 

Green Unioiw, lame, doz 16 

Ix-ttuco Leaf, bu 50 

HcaU Lettuce, Honie Grn»n, hamper 2.00 

-Miin. dozen *0 

Parslt-y. Hot iluuse. dot *0 

Peppers, Climax, l>sk« 50 

Pojiperj, bu LOl* 

Radishes, Home Grown, d«. 25 

Radishes. Home Grown, bt' bakt.. doe 20 

Squash. Summer, bu l-OO 

Pit lvLl-\<J GOOD3 — 

Citron, doz 

I'ickllng Cucumber*. FHll. bu 



4.00 
4.5« 

s.as 



4.0O 

2.00 

8.50 

2.30 
S.50 

1.J5 
1.00 
.25 
1.25 
2.00 



bu. 



$1.75: bu 
ti; bu.... 



bu 

medium, bu. 



1.20 
2.50 

3.00 
3.50 
2.25 
4.00 
1.00 
2.75 
3.00 
2.50 
.40 
3.75 

2.rs 

t.»0 
1.35 



Pickling Cucumbers, metiiim. % bu. 
Pickling Cucuoihers, taoall % 
Gerkina, Extra Small, H !)U. ..., 
Pickling Cucumhem, M3dg< ts, % 

Yellow- Cucuinbersi bu 

Pickling Onions, large, b'l., $2.23 

Pickling Onions, Small. b» 

Ground Cherries, % bu., !I1.50; bu. . 

mil, bu 

Finger Peppers, red, btt. . 

Finger Peppers, Uroen. bu 

Flngf r Pci.i)er», Red. bu 

Fins^r Peppers, Giaeu, bu 

TOMATO l';S— 
Kancy Home Grown, H Iri., TSc: ba 
Home Grown Climax. Basket, tokt. .. 

Home Grown, crates, era e 

Faiicj- Yellow, bu 

Fancy Green, bu 

C!:i.KU\'— 

MIclilgan Calery. doa 

Milwaukee, orata-. $2.75.; (loa 

Vi;Gl'7rABI.*iS— 

Cnrrota. Minn., cwt 

Beet a. Minn., cnt 

Bagaa, Mlun., cwt 

Lima Beans, Calltonria, U' 

Pumpkin, Large, lb 

pumpkin. Pie, do/. 

Hin.seradlsli. lb., I-jc; bbl 

Niivy Beans, Faucj-, H. P.. Michigan, 

Parsnlis, cwt 

.Sfiua-Mli 01% 

ONIONS— 
Onloni. Minn.. Tellowa, Fancy, cwt. 

Oiilons, Minn., Red, Fane:-, cwt 

S.'iani h Onions, crt 

CABBAGE— 

Miiui. Cabbage, Large, cr(t« 

Cabbage, It€d, crate 

Cabbage. Red, doz 

POTATO R8 

PolatocH, Minn., Ohio, farcy, bu 

IVlatoes, Mliui.. Burpank, Fa-icy.... 



bu.. 



1.38 

.50 

.80 
1.50 

.TO 

.40 
.25 

l.SS 

1.50 
1.00 

.074 
.Ol'i 
.90 

9.00 

8.60 

1..35 



1. 00 

2.2a 

1.15 
3.00 
1.00 



BONDS ON MARKET 
WiTHiN TWO WEEKS 

Half Billion Loan Will 

Be Offered in Score 

of Cities. 

New York. Sept. 29.— The $500.000.Q»t 
five-year 5 per cent .iolnt Anglo-French 
bond issue, securing the credit loan to 
be established here to Great Britain 

tlflwL'"^"''^^ ""'l^ *>^ P'aced upon the 
market in New York city and approxi- 
mately twenty other cities throughout 
the country .simultaneously within the 
next two weeks. It was decided today 
B«tween forty-five and fifty banks, 
intst companivs and bond houses will 
participate jointly in this city. 

This decision- was reached today at a 
meeting- In the office of J. P. Morgan 
& Co. of represenlatlve.s of ten of tha 
Chief ftnancial institutions In New 
York city. The banking house of 
Kuhn, Loeb & Co. was not represent- 
ed at this meeting, but It Is under- 
stood that members of the flrn^wlll 
subscribe to the loan as individuals. 

As officially announced last night, 
the issue will be offered at 98 to th« 
investor and bonds will be issued In 
denominations as low as |100, pavablo 
in Installments. " 

The chief cities in which the vssue 
win be marketed are Philadelphia. 
Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, San Fran- 
cisco, Pittsburgh. Baltimore, Atlanta. 
St. Paul. Minneapolis, Denver and 
Louisville. 

It was announced that any bank tn 
any section of the country might Join 
the syndicate. 



SUIT AGAINST ROCK 

ISL AND D IRECTORS 

New York. Sept. 29. — .Jacob M. Dlck- 
in^^n. receiver of the Chicago, Rock 
Island & Pacific Railroad company, 
today brought suit in the supreme 
court here to recover S7, 500, 000 from 
the directors of th» Chicago, Rock Is- 
land & Pacific Railway company. 



JIM AND^BOB 

The Young Man Who Went to Town 
Owes Money and Has a Taste for 
Beer— The Farmer Rides in a 
Motor Car. 



u. 



120% 120% 

48V4i 48 Vb 



65% 


1 20 

j 


107 


37% 


27 


51 


145V« 


3% 



65% 
2Q 

73 Vs 
107 107 lOT 
38 7s 37% 38 

27% 27 I 27% 

63% 51 I 62% 

147% 143 V« 1146 

4 3%i 3% 

4% 

lll%|110yaillO% 

L2« 122 il25 

6& I 66 "^i 66^4 

14%' 14%i 14 Vi 

llS%ill3%jll4% 

i I 73% 

128% 
97 
69 
28% 
113% 
78 



{98 I 97 
{ 70%! 68% 
I 28.741 2«% 
1114 1113% 

T5.V4I 73% 



Heading |154% !152% |153 V« 

Republic Steel ! 55 %[ 53%! 54 7^ 

Republic Ste**!, pfd. . .'l(»3%a03 |103% 
Rock Ul&nd | 22% I 20 %| 22% 



154 %il54% 1164% 
93%1 93% 



94% I 
19% I 



18%! 



122 



1121% 

.1. 



.Sears-Roebuck Co. 
.Southern Pacific . 
Southern Railway 

do, pfd 

Soo, common 

StudebaktrT. pfd . - , 

Studebaker Cor 143%ri38^i 

Tenn. Conner Co (68 | 62 

Texas Oil Co rl70 iir.6 

Union Pacific J134%il32% 

U. a Rubher t 64%! 52% 

U. S. steel T9%| 78 



Sweet Potatoe-r bbl., $1.5( ; hamper,. 

CHKlCsF, — 

Bloi k Swlas, lb 

Brick, half case, lb 

Twins. Wteconsln, lb 

Twina. New Tork Stat*, 

BLTPBB — 

J«r9, lb 

Print*, lb 

Taj*-, lb' «, 

Flat crmmefT. lb ..... 
Imitation cfeameqF, Vtt- . 

n.'^lry. lb 

Procaan. lb 

MKATS— 
Beef. naUW steers, lb .. 
Beef. Western stoewi lb 
Beef. Terns steers, 16 . . 

C^vn, butchers, lb 

Muiuni. p«r lb 

Pork I.oliia, vmr lb 

Veal, per lb 

Pork .Shoulder, lb 

Lamb, per lb 

list: pocltbt— 

Springs, lb 



.45 

.45 

1.50 



.10 



,.20 
..20 



..18 

..11 

'.»% 
.10 
..14 
..It 



..U 



Hens, 
Hens. 
Cotlffs 
IXK-ks, 

Geese, 



llflit. 
h«wy. 

11> .. 

lb .. 

lb .. 



lb .. 
lb . 



do pfd 

U. S. Steel. 5s 

Utah Cop4>er 

Western Union 

West. H's<? El. Mfg. Co 
Western Maryland! . . 

Woolwc rth 

Wisconsin Central ... 

Baldwin 

Buttd Superior 
Crucible 



18% 

67% 
122 
108% 
139% 

63% 
166% 
133 

63% 

78 



|114%jll4%!114% 
102 ■»& 



6S% 
77V4 

125% 

I 50% 

1221 

I 34 

|14« 

I «1 



I 67% 
I 77% 
124% 
1 29% 
1218 
2l 34 I 
127% 
»&% 



. 110^9 % itOl 



67% 

771^. 

124% 

31» 

34% 
131% 

60% 
104% 




98%c: 
96 %e. 
93%c; 



No. 1 north- 
93%®96%c: 
95 %c; No. 3 



Corn, No. 3 yellow, 65%:g'66%c; oata. 



South St. Paul Llvewtook. 

South St. Paul, MtVin.. Sept. 29. — 
Hogs — Rect»ipt3, 3s400; 10c lower; 
range, $6.75f§i7.»0: bulk. $7.10®7.90. 

Cattle — Receipts, 3,700; steady, 
ateers. 14.00 '5; 9.25: coirs aiwi heifers, 
14.25 rot 6.50: calves, steady, $^75 Tj?' 9.50; 
stockera and feeders, steady, $4.00® 
7.26. .^,. . 

Sh*-ep — Recelplfc , ^ 9.800 
lambs. ?4.50i^8.25r Others, 
5.75; ewes. $3.00#8.»S.' 



Chi<>flso Livestock. 

Chicago. Sept^ 29. — mi« prlpas toilay ralllBd from 
an early 'lecllne. the tactfcw of tlia pocfctirs In boidi- 
Ing off not being ar entire snovw. 

1*8 caltla mirket felt tb» eflfect of a broader d»- 
majid n* fMBh m«at. 

Stipples o( sbsep and la-nb* pwved man than 

Hogs_R«eaiets. 3i.no*; easy. UBcliamteid to Be un- 
der yoswtdw's average; tniUs, >:.25«at8.25; llgiit. 
$7.iW(2».40: ittliced, $u.:)()ffiS.10: heavy, $G.G5«S.25; 
ro»igh. $fl.r.X*C.30; pigs. JC. 00^)18.00. 

Cattle— KeceljK*, ItJ.Oflrt; fttro; miU»e beof steers, 
$filOv(*10.40; wwtom steers. W.r0(*«.:3, cowa and 
heifers, »2.»0(?t8.3i; enlv?». $T.301*U.25. 

.<«hee!>— Becetote. 15.fl»»; staajy; wetlwrs, $j,70@ 
•.55; lamta», jr.0<Xt».2J. 



Ttirkeja, lb 

KRKSH DRlSSriKD POU ..TRY— 

Surlnga, lb 

i'owla, be»vy, lb 

io^U. U«ht, U> 

EtJGS— 

Fresh eggs, dot 

Green Valler 

Checta. doe 

H.\Y— 

Choice rlmottiy. per ton ,.. 

No. t timothy, per ion , 

No. 2 tlraotUi', per ton 

No. 3 tliBothy . pw toa 

Na. 1 mixed tlnu)«hy, per ton 

Xo. 2 mixert tlmotUy, per on 

Na. 3 mlxtd timiithy, per 
Xo. 1 pratrle, per ton .... 
No. 2 pralrte, per Don ... 
No. 3 pram*, per toa ... 
No. I midlajid. per toa. . . 
No. ! mMloud. per ton... 

Parking hajr, per *ca 

Rye straw, per ton 



.25 
.21 



.IT 
.15 
.15 
.1» 

.211 
.27 
.U 

.25 
.22 

.22 

.2314 

.13'^ 

.12 

.10 

.08 

.lOH 

.17 

.13% 

.11 

.14 

.18 
.13 
.10 
.00 

.IJ 

.13 
.10 

.20 
.16 

.14 

.25 
.2» 

.IB 



$14.50 
■»1.^08<ai4.00i 
11.50« 12.50 
. 9.00<a£ie.00 I 
. 12.<iO® 12.50 
. S.CB^ilO.OO I 

toa B.on® 9.00 

lo.oo^gn.oo 

8.oo<a tf.oo 

7.0l»<v* 8.00 

T.OOtS 8.00 

..- 0.00® 7 00 

5.0(H^ 5.50 

•.5tia 7.00 



Owts straw, per loA G.OO® 6.50 

<> — ■ - — 

ChtcaflTA. 

ClUcago. S«vt. 29 —Butt T— Higher; receipts. r.SlS 
till*; creanrery exti-a», 26i'i2t'4c: e«ini JltBls, 25(a- 
23 ',T,fi : "flrsti*. 'i?,yi(ati'rac; tocuiuU, 21>»(a22Va«. 

Chaeso— Hlglior; daisies. l4»4(alH4c; twins. 13^ 
@l.T\r; Ajuericas, H\i(i HVac; long horus. 14>» 
®ll'.ic. 

Egg.s — Receipts, 7.250 casw; unclwnged. 

PMatooi — Receipts, 4? csm; HnchMiged. 

Potilfry — Alive, miatttled; fcwls, li^^'lSc; 
wrings, i4c. 



Dallas News; A reader at Pari*, 
Tex., writes In as follows: "Several 
years ago I read in a Clarksville pa- 
per a «tor>- concerning two young men 
of the same age and equal ability who 
started out from the same neighbor- 
hood to make their way in life. Jim 
sought the country, hired himself to a 
farmer at |20 a month and at the end 
of the year he took an Inventory of 
his effects, to-wit: On© large floppy 
straw hat, two suits of overalls, a 
ru(?ged con.stitution and $200 in ca.sh. 
Bob, the other youth, went to a small 
city and connected with a job paving 
(65 a month, and at the years end he 
also took an Inventory, finding these 
accumulations, to-wit: One suit of ice 
cream clothes, on* Imitation PananMi 
hat, four pairs of near silk socks, an 
appetite for beer and $90 in unpaid 
bilia. 

Jim Wan No (Quitter. 

"Have you," asks the Paris reader, 
"any later Information concerning 
these young men?" To which Inquiry 
State Press begs to say that he has 
kept In clo.«e touch with each of them 
and today he will make an exhibit of 
their present standing. Jim duplicated 
tho secoftd year the first year's per- 
formancvi, coming out with $200 cash, 
making a total of $400. He bought a 
pair of feminine plow horses, a second 
hand wagon, a cultivator and a weed- 
ing hoe for half his capital, rented 
forty acres of land, raised 600 busholr 
of corn, nine bales of cotton, a mus- 
tache and a mule colt. Next year he 
did about as well and at the etui of 
four years he found himself possrpseii 
of $800 in real money, throe milch 
cows, two mule colts, a sow with 
seven pigs, a set of chin whiskers a'td 
500 bushels uf corn. 

Feeling plenty able to support a 
family in comfort he got niarri.?d, 
bought thirty acres of land for $1,600. 
paying $600 cash. He had a couple of 
light craps and a set of twins during 
the next two years and had to hustl« 
to pay interest and extra expenses. 
But he was bo quitter; he knew he 
was o« the right track; he raised 
plenty of good foodstuffs for his home 
consumption and bought no feed for 
his livestock. Seven more years have 
passed and at this writing .Tim has 
three children, one wife, ten head of 
valuable work animals, a small herd 
of good cows, a dozen fat shoats, a 
barn full of com and hay, 150 acres of 
land, a white farmhouse with vines 
prowing over the porch, a motor car, a 
phonograph, $400 in hank and a gor- 
geous, sunburned complexion. Jim, 
In short, is rich and happy and a con- 
scious .success. 

Bob'H Son ^m ''Swell Ciny.'* 

Bob, who chose the tf)wn for his 
operations, also makes an interesting 
showing at this date. Bob has a wife 
and a 12-year-old son, the latter be- 
ing a swell guy who knows the rec- 
ords of all the pugilists and billiard 
experts and la so smart he calls coun- 
try folks "rubes." He lives with h's 
parents in a hot little "apartment" 
close to the business center, thus sav- 
fcn.i: carfare at the expense of eating 
dust. His father, Bob, Is also a won- 
de,-fully bright man, who works when 
he can get a jobs He mostly earns 
about $80 a month, keeps the Icebox at 
home full of beer, when he has the 
price, and hates his landlord. He Is 
now S5 years old, owea alt he can, 
is a conscious failure and envious of 
all those who have acquired com- 
petencies by saving their wages and 
not trving to deadhent their wav 
through the world. This, reader. Is 
how Jim and Bob stand today. 

The longest ."ttralght piece of rail- 
w^av line In the world is from Nynrau 
to Bourke, In New South Wale.q. This 
railway runs 136 mlle.s on a level In 
a perfectly straight line. 



-Steady ; rec«ipta. 

2Hac; creauiery, 

aEt^27c; seconds. 



BTew lock. 

New York, Sept. 2'J--Hutter- 
14.851* cLCamcry extras, 12 score, 
kisfacc seuring ZBia.'iH'^tp: flrsts^ 

V.igi — Firm; receipts, 15.>r>4: fresh gathered extraa, 
::i(sXW: extra firsts, 3(V©c!l^; ftr»t.s, 2GV2@28»<ic; 
becoiicU, 23'>iC«2,"iV»c; near >y lieunery whites, fine to 
fatttT 44<J*4€c; nearby h'-iiiery hri'Wna, 3*ta3«c. 

Oheesc— Steady ; receipts, 5,378; stal* whole milk, 
fresh flul.i, special*, 14% (s 15c; ditto. MMage fancy, 
14 He. 



— SHIP TO— 



H. POEHLER CO. 

(ICatabtlalied 18BS) 

GRAIN COMMISSIOM 

MINNEAPOIilS DUlvUTH 



HIDES, PELTS, ETC. 



steady: 

$4.76'^ 



N»w Ytt^a^ Cotton. 

York, Sept.^ ay. — Cotton: 



New York, Sept. 3". — Cotton: Fu- 
tnres closed easy. ^- October, 11.60; De- 
cember. 11.97: January. 12.15; March, 
12.35; May, 12.6». 



I<ond«n Stocka. 

London. Sept. 29. — American secur- 
ities were quieter and prices dropped 
■with the improving; ejichan.<e rates, 
but the market hardened near the 
close and finished steady. 



N 
per, 
*ay 

$4.7 



Ne*T York Money. 

ew York, Sept. 29. — Mercantile pa- 

3Vt@3% per cent. Sterling, 60- 

bills. $4.68%; demand. $4.72; cables, 

'3t^,. Francs, demand, 5.80: cables. 



5,.79. Marks, demand, 83%; cables, 84. 
Llre.i, demand. 6.26; cables. 6.26. Rubles, 
demand. 34%; cables. 34%. Bar silver, 
49%c; Mexican dollars, 38V2C. Govern- 
ment bonds steady: railroad bonds Ir- 
regular. Time loans steady; 60 daya^ 



No. 1 creen salted cows ind steers. 

»ll weights 

No. 1 grteii sailed bulla. 

Green salteJ aiid branded Udea. flat. 
.\n So. 2 and buti braiidetl bldw Ic 
B per povuid. 

1 green salted »eal calf 

1 green salted long- li lire* kip, 

to 23 Ui» 

1 green aaltAd xaal lio. 15 ta 
lbs 



la 
No. 

yt,. 
» 

No. 

25 



.16H 

.14 

.14 



.16% 
.15 



Groen salted deacoiw, each 

Oreen sclted horse hides, eiictl 

Green hUes. 2c per lb. less. 

Dry Hides- 
Territory butc*or». over 15 Iha 

Murrain and faUeu. over 15 lbs 

Cikif, under lbs 

Dry aalteil hWes. all welgWi. 

Horse and mule hides. 

TaliuM and Grease — 

No. 1 tallow 05ti 

Xo. 2 Ullow , 04 





.18 




.78 


.50 


4.00 


.2i 


.2f 


.16 


.19 


.24 


.21 


.17 


.20 


.75 


1.50 



The Situation in 

SUCCESS MINING 

Write for Special Letter 

EDWARD E. EPPS&CO. 

EttabiUhad 1803. 

25 Broad Street New York 



.03H 
■ 04^ 



THE ODD LOT REVIEl*', pub- 
lished by John Muir & Co., 
tells each week of New York 
Stock Exchange investment 
opportunities available to 
small as well as large Invest- 
ors. $1.00 a year. Send for 
sample copies. 61 Broadway, 
New York City. 



',-^ 



► ♦*-"» H MJ*lk I M_JI) J 




r— " 



' ■ ■ I ■ ■ ■ ' 1 ' 



I 

1 

■ 

— ^ ■ >% 

I 



■ 



- f 



I 







18 



Wednesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 29, 1915. 



m 



1 



D. H., 9-29-15. 



Fall Exhibition, Window No. 8 

' ' Warmth and comfort stream forth from the necessary 
MACKINAW and the useful SWEATER seen as you 
walk northward on Third avenue and dream of the 
coming wintry days. ' ' 




n NEW HATCHERY 
BEING TALKED 



Sportsmen of Duluth Will 

Hold Rousing Meeting 

Friday Evening. 

State Game and Fish Offi- 
cials Will Come Here 
to Attend. 



On the one hand here's the useful sweater — on the other 
hand the necessary mackinaw. 

You can't go wrong if you have one of each. 

^[ackinaws are The Cohimbia's forte, for we pride our- 
selves with being the originator of "Mackinaws for City 
Folks." We have grown to be the best known retailers 
of this garment in all these United States, and were first 
to trumpet into the ears of the world that — 

"It's Warm In a Duluth Mackinaw" 

Every store in the country now carries mackinaws, and 
Duluth' has become one of the im,portant points for its man- 
ufacture. It's here at this store where you find the grand 
selection, the new ideas, the varied styles and all sizes for 
men, women and children. Let us describe a few. 



Mackinaws made of Oreg:on 
cloth in Jacquard patterns, 30 
oz. to yard, 34 and 36 inches 
long. $5.00 and ?6.00. 

Oregon cloth in plain colors 
and plaids, plain or Norfolk 
styles, 30 oz. to yard, 34 and 36 
Inches long, at $7.00, $7.50. $8.00 
and $S.50. 

Cedarburg Cloth, 36 oz. to 
yard, heather mixtures and 
f)laln colors, Chrlstensen, Men- 
denhall & Graham's special 
make, 36 inches long, $8.50 and 
$9.00. 

Patrick - Duluth B!gger-than- 
weather Coats, all colors, in 
plain, mixtures and plaid-s. Nor- 
folk or plain styles, for boys or 

Webber's Celebrated Sweaters are shou-n in this win- 
dow in the heather mixtures and plain colors. 

Light weight with V neck to wear under your coat or 
the extra heavv weights for hunting and outdoor sports. 
Trices range from $3.50, $5.00, $6.00, $6.50, $7.00, $7.50 to 
$10.00. 

CORDUROY VESTS — Chamois lined and chamois sleeves — for 
railroading or hunting. 



men, $7.50. $8.00, $9.00, $9.50 
and $11.00. 

Mackinaw Hunting Coats and 
Trousers, reinforced all through, 
blood proof game pockets. 

Coats, $10.00 and $11.00. 

Trousers, $6.00. 

The "King Bee" — our own 
special coat for the winter of 
1915. Weighs 7 lbs., 50 oz. to 
yard. Made like an overcoat, 
absolutely cold and storm proof; 
navy blue only — one-half belt 
back — 

38 inches long, $10.00. 

42 inches long, $12.00. 

Specially good for railroad 
men and drivers of autos. 



X* 



ii\i^^ 



Y 




MAKE READY TO 
PUBLISH PAPER THIS YEAR 



Sportsmen of Duluth who are inter- 
ested in the building of the pro- 
posed new fiah hatchery in this coun- 
ty, talk of which has been rife for 
some lime, will be given an oportun- 
ity to express their views next Fri- 
day evening at the Commercial club 
rooms when the Northeastern Minne- 
sota Game and Fish association will 
welcome to the city Carlos Avery, 
state game and fish commissioner, and 
E. Cobb, state superintendent of fish- 
eries. Both of these men will ad- 
dress the meeting. 

While it is not yet decided just 
wh^re the proposed new hatchery will 
be located, many of the local sports- 
j men have a strong leaning toward a 
spot in the Split Rock river, along the 
i line of the Alger-Smith logging rall- 
i road. Tomorrow Secretary James A. 
j Lawrle of the local association and 
Mr. Cobb will make a trip to the 
Split Rock, inspect the proposed site 
I and report their findings to the sports- 
men at the Friday meeting. 
I "Our club has about 200 members 
; and we should have a rousing gather- 
I Ing," said Mr. Lawrie. "An appro- 
! priation for the nrelimlnary work for 
I a new hatchery for this section of 
I Minnesota has already been nnade by 

the state." 
I I'rotection for all kinds of game and 
I fish will also be discussed at this 
meeting. 

Lots of Bi^ Game. 
That big game is plentiful In the 
north wood.s this fall. Is vouched for 
by I..eon Eberhardt, who has been 
conducting a summer hotel on the 
shores of Vermilion lake and who has 
Just returned to the city. He says 
that both deer and moose are plenti- 
ful and that the slaughter this fall 
will probably be the largest in his- 
tory. 

"The woods are simply filled with 
big game." said he. "Many of the 
animals are so tame that hunters can 
get real close. There are few ducks 
at Lake Vermilion this fall, and moat 
of the hunters of Tower and Ely who 
enjoy this kind of shooting have gone 
up Into the Bow String country, to 
Pelican or Nett lakes. 

It is expected that next year there 
will be good duck shooting at Ver- 
milion for the reason that the Duluth 
& Iron Range railway people have 
just completed planting 800 pounds of 
wild rice in that body of water which 
will furni.«h food for the wild fowl. 
This rice was gathered by Indians and 
will be planted by them, working un- 
der an expert employed by the com- 
pany." 

Mr. Eberhardt says most of the 
summer resorts in the Vermilion 
c<»untrv are closed for the season. 
While 'he is not certain, he believes 
he will spend the winter in Southern 
Wisconsin. 




ADDITIONAL WANTS 

From Pages 19 and 20. 



REALKTATEJLOANS. 

IF YOU AA'ANT MONEY 



ON REAL ESTATE MORTGAGES, 

WITHO IT DELAY, 

AT 6 lER CENT. 

CALL ON US. 



W. M. PRINDLE & CO. 



WE LOAN MONEY 

In amounts of from $100 lo $50,000 on 

improved city property and improved 

farm.*?. Prompt service; low rates. 

KREIDLER-DOYLE CO., 

405 Central Av^enue. 

MONEY TO LO.AN— ANY AMOUNT— 
Any time. Qui 2k service. Building 
loans a specialty, 5. 5 >/fe and 6 per 
cent. Cooley & Underbill, 209-210- 
211 Exchange b uilding . 

CASH ON HAND TO LOAN ON CITY ^ 
and farm property; any amount, low- Uj. 



MOIOJOLOAN^ 

ii- WE HAVE # 

4 $100,000 TO LOAN ON IMPROVED * 



REAL ESTATE AT 1 % PER 
CENT COMMISSION. 



ST. LOUIS COUNTY STATE 
BANK, 

1901 W^EST SUPERIOR ST. 



I 



•^ $10-.n5-$20-$25-?30-$40-f50 * 

LOANED TO ANYONE * 



vaCiOk 1'. EVA. 

Work for the coming year was out- 
lined last night at a meeting of three 
committees from the boys' department 



RALPH BROWN. 

unique and attractive features for the 
paper this year. His assistants and 
bi*.<jiness managers will be appointed 
Friday evening. The opening number 



est rates, no delay. Northern Title ^ On furniture, pianos, etc.. or hold- -;» 
Co., 612 First National Bank b\iilding. j .-i i^g a steady position, at rates ^ 

LOWEST '^ honest people are willing to pay. ■^ 
-A^ See us first and get a square deal, i^ 
•jY Money in your hands in fe>^' hours' ^ 
# time. Low rates. Easy payments, y^ 
vt DULUTH LOAN COMPANY, ^ 

7& 307 Columbia Bldg.. 303 W. Sup. St. ^ 
if- Hours: 8 a. m. to 6 p. m.; Wednes- -A* 
^ day and Saturday to 8 p. m. #► 

■^ Melrose 2355; (Jrand 1224. * 

•,V # 



of the Y. M. C. A. The plans will be j of the paper will come out about 



Duluth, 
Minn. 




At Third 
Ave. W. 




FOOT NOTE: Hunting Boots, Rubbers and Heavy Socks. 



FOUR MEN HELD 

FOR WHEAT THEFT 



reported Friday night at the annual 
dinner of the committeemen. 

Duluth Boys, the "Y" publication 
of la;.-t year, will be continued this 
year. Ralph Brown, a gr.aduate of 
Central high school last year and 
chairman of the clubs' committee, will 
bj editor-ln-cbltf. He has in mind 



DULUTH WELL 
REPRESENTED 



Health Advocates on Pro- 
gram at Rochester 
Conference. 



Oct. 15 

The camp and outing committee 
will meet this afternoon at 4:30; the 
Bible study committee at 3:30; social 
comniittee at 4:45; athletic committee, 
Thursdey evening at 7:30. 

This completes all the committee 
meetings preparatory to the big rally 
of committeemen Friday evening. 



in district court. This suit is the last 
on record, as a result of the floods in 
1912 and 1913, when considerable prop- 
erty was damaged in the western end 
of the city. 

CANADA BUSINESS 
ON THE INCREASE 



MONEY TO LOAN — AT 

rates; no delay; see us If you want 
quick seivice. C. L. Rakowsky & 
Co., 200-201 Exc hange building. 

" Money at Lowest Rates. 

Anv Amount; No Delay. 
Little & Nolte Co., Exchange Bldg. 

MONEY TO LoXN— LOANS MADE ON 
timber and faim lands. .Tohn Q. A. 
Crosby, 305 Palladio building. 



Dr. Murphy Will Preside and 

Dr. A. T. Laird Will 

Speak. 



ATTACK WELL 
WORKED OUT 



Preparations for Offensive 
of Allies of Most Elabo- 
rate Nature. 



Dispatches From Corre- 
spondents at Front Printed 
in London Papers. 



London, Sept. 29. — Re.'jpondlnp to 
the demand of the British press for 



Mail correspondent, "that the i.^sue of 
the whole war turns on the questio;i 
whether the Germans will be strong 
enough to withstand the sledge ham- 
mer blows wh'ch the allies are deal- 
ing at three breaks in the German 
line, in Artols. Champagne and Lens." 
Word of CaatJon. 

The Times correspondent has a word 
of caution, however, for those who 
look for too speedy results. "A great 
strategic plan," he says, "takes time 
for its working out. A great move- 
ment has begun, but at its best It must 
have its slow hours and it is necessary 
to view it in a sane perspective. Again, 
we must not only win victories but 
follow them up, and this will need a 
tremendous and sustained effort. 
Large numbers of men will be re- 
quired to replace wastage and a steady 
stream of munitions must be furnished. 
The whole nation is the shaft of which 
the army is the spearhead. Unless the 
shaft is stout, the tempered point will 
fail of effect." 

li^'^ork of Airmen. 

The work of airmen contributed 
largely to the effec«tiveness of the 
Briti.«h attack, according to today's ac- 
counts. Their duty was not only to 
direct the artillery, but also to keep 
enemy air craft inside their own lines, 
and prevent them from detecting Brit- 
ish oper.itions. Last iveek there were 



Two of Them May Be 

Charged Wit-h Receiving 

Stolen Property. 

Wheat "harvested" from Northern 
Pacific freight cars, sixty bushels of 
it, are stacked on the corridor floor at 
police headquarters and four men are 
being held in connection with the theft 
today. No formal charges have been 
placed against any of the four. 

Gabriel Angelo, aged 28, and Martin 
George, aged 28, admit they swept the 
grain from the freight cars, according 
to police, and they probably will be 
charged with trespass. Both men live 
at 922 Garfield avenue. 

Thomas H. Johnson, agr-d 35, a dairy- 
man living at 1030 West Seventh street, 
and Charles K. Worth, aged 35, fore- 
man for the Park Point Traction com- 
pany, living at 1818 Minnesota ave- 
nue, are the other two who were ar- 
rested and probably will be charged 
with receiving stolen property. 
i Worth and Johnson were released 
yesterday 
took then 

cer made the arr ' when he saw i 
Johnson's dray halted on Garfield ave- 
nue because of a broken wheel and 
began examining the bags of wheat. 

Angelo and George were taken into 
custody later by Sersreant John 
Hunter. 

Wortli and Johnson admit buying the 
wheat from the other two for $24, they 
say, but claim they did not know that 
the grain had been stolen. 



Several Duluthlans are on the pro- 
gram of the Minnesota Public Health 
association art€ Minnesota State Sanl- | 
tary conference, which opened at Ro- 
chester, Minn, this morning. Dr. I. J. | 
Murphy, formerly of this city, is | 
president of the conference as well as ! 
secretary of the state health associa- 
tion. Dr. A. T. Laird, superintendent 
of Nopeming sanatorium, is to speak 
on "Community Control of Tuber- 
culosis." 

The Indifference of people in gen- 
eral In regard to preventing disease 
is forcibly emphasized by Governor 
Winfield Scott Hammond, in nis pro- 
clamation announcing the meeting, 
which follows: 

Take Heavy Toll. 

"Minnesota lost in 1914, 11,078 of its 
population through the ravages of pre- 
ventable di.^eases. Notwithstanding 
this large number of deaths, no out- 
cry or protest was raised — probably 
for the reason that "it is given yo all 
men once to die." Had 11,000 cattle 
or hogs died from preventable dis- 
eases, the newspapers would have been 
filled with the calamity, and the na- 
tional and state governments would 
have sent out their agents to do all 
in their power to stay the evil, simply 
because cattle and hogs have a mone- 
tary value. Should we not consider 
human life as valuable as animal life, 
and put forth as much effort to pro- 
tect our people from preventable dis- 
eases as we do to protect our live- 
stock ? 

"1 most earnestly urge physlcIaniS, 
nurses, health officers, and all those 
in authority, to attend the Minne- 
sota State Sanitary conference and 
Minnesota Public Health association, 
at Rochester, Minn., Sept. 29, 1915, in 
order that plans may be laid to re 



Chicago Capitalist Says 
Conditions Are Much Bet- 
ter Than Last Year. 

W. L. Brown of Chicago, director of 
the Zenith Furnace company of Du- 
luth, and well known capitalist and 
investor, is registered at the Spalding 
today. Mrs. Brown and a maid are 

also at the hotel. 

Mr. Brown is on route to Chicago 
from Port Arthur, where he has been 
for more than a month. 

"They are feeling somewhat better 
over in the Dominion," said he. "The 
shadow of war is still there, but the 
feeling of business depression has been 
somewhat dispelled by the really won- 
derful grain crop. The remakable crop 
cannot fail to exercise a beneficial ef- 
fect on business. I should say that 
there is a more confident feeling in 
Canada today over the business out- 
I look than has been the case for the 
past year. 

"Business in the United States? Get- 
ting better all the time. Our grain 
crop is going to help a lot, and be- 
sides there is a better feeling, brought 
about by a gradually increasing busi- 
ness In most lines of trade." 



—FOR CHEAF MONEY QUICK— 
— See L A. larsen company — 
— 214 ProvHence building — 

For Farm Loans and Farm Lands, see 
Ebert-Walkcr Co.. 316-16 Torrey 
building. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON IMPROVED 
farm lands. C Francis Colman, 421 
Manhattan building. 

MON3Y FOR ■F'lRST MORTGAGES. 
Wheler agency, 619 Providence bldg. 

CITY AND FARM LOANS. WILLIAM 
C. Sargent. Providence building. 



THREE NEW ESTATES 
OPENED FOR PROBATE 



terday after Patrolman ^""dberg »^°«'- ^"^J^ ^^ j^i^^^ ^he annual toll 
»^J„h^"^.V«„^!e5^"''^';l^v,'-" ^>r." ""L; of'vlcUmslnourstate.". _ .^ ^_ 



Every city of importance In the 
state is represented at the meeting, 
and some of the most noted physicians 
and surgeons in the profession are on 



Two Come From Ely and 

Another From Biwabik; 

All Small. 

Three new estates were opened In 
probate court today. 

Auguft K. Johnson, who died at Ely, 

Sept. 20, 1915. aged 69, left an estate 

valued at $2,900 and a will bequeathing 
it all to his wife, Carolina Johnson. She 
filed papers today asking that the will 
be admitted to probate and that she be 
appointed executrix In accordance with 
its provisions. 

Arthur J. Week of Ely petitioned the 
court for letters of administration for 
the estate of his father, Mathew Week, 
who died June 26, 1914, at Ely, aged 
61. The estate consists of real and 
personal property worth $300 and the 
heirs, besides the petitioner^ are a 
widow and one son, both of whom re- 
side in Finland. 

John Tullnlemi, also known as John 



the program, including the Drs. Mayo Tullne, left property valued at $1,625 



more complete details of British sue- { tw5'?*r *^^'^'? ^^'^^It '" -^^^ air on the 

' Bnti.sh front and the airm.en kept up 



c-?ises on the western front, the press 
burt-aa today permitted the morning 
papers to pul lish long but carefully 
censored dispatches from correspond- 
ents at British headquarters, describ- 
ing the first three days of the battle, 
which began Saturday. These dis- 
patches add little essential news to 
the brief official communications 
ready publishtd 



a continual patrol in watches of two 
hours each over the entire front for a 
week previous to the beginning of the 
battle. As the fighting opened the air- 
men's operations, in many cases had 
an offensive side. They hampered the 
enemy communications, performing 
some of the functions of long range 
artillery". 

The prisoners taken by the British, 

al- I according to the Times, ■were largely 

from Eastern Germany. "The major- 



FLOOD OF TEARS 

PALLIATE JUDGE 



and 'many of the medical instructors 
of the state university and officers 
of the state health association. 

One of the chief alms of the con- 
ference will be to emphasize the im- 
ortance of stamping out and check- 



pc 
in 



g preventable diseases 



Harry Dahl Promises "Never 

Never" to Drink 

Again. 



When a prisoner faces a judge In 

municipal court, tears seldom do any 

good, but this morning Harry Dahl, 

.. ,,T,, I. J 1 * ..1. I M I aged 42. a well-known character, ac- 

wntes. "They had almost the air of ^ ' , , ,, , ' , 

Russian troops. These men came from I compllshed the near-impossible with a 



the fringes of Germany's empire. Her 
old stalwarts of the first line for the 
most part. have found graves in 
Flanders, Champagne and on the far- 
off Polish plains." 



SAYS UW DOES NOT 
APPLY TO COUNTIES 



The chief bag of prisoners was at j ity had light eyes, and the high cheek 
Loos where a German force was sur- | bones of the Slav." the correspondent 
rounded and compelled to surrender 
when its ammunition was exhausted 
owing to the seveiance of lines of 
communication with supply bases. 

Correspondents unite in stating 
emphatically that preparations for the 
attack were of a most elaborate na- 
ture and scarcely could have been 
kept secret from the Germans. 
dirmy Awalte«l Attack. 

"We know from German prisoners' 
states the Telegraph's representative, 
"that the enemy awaited an attack, 
but wa.«5 ignorant of our strength and 
pl.ins, and blindly confident of victory. 
It 1." betraying no secret to say that 
the British officers and men all had 
been tuned to a high pitch of anticl- 
p.ition by various signs and portents 
that nivibt impcrtant operations were 
at ha id.' 

The fighting continues with a high 
degr*^e of intensity, and the cor- 
rtsp.jjidents voice the hope of the 
British commanders that the begin- 
ning .'oade Saturday may be the open- 
ing wedge for operations of a decisive 
charpcter. "It is scarcely an exagger 
ation to say, 



Half-Mile Dry Provision for 

Cities and Villages 

Only. 

St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 29. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Attorney General 
Smith ruled today that the half-mile 
comiiients" the""i)aiiy ' P'"*^*"'''*'^" provision of the local op- 
tion law does not apply to counties 
voting dry under the county option 
act. The opinion was given In an- 
swer to a question from a Northern 
county. 

Under the local option law, when a 
village or city covered by the act votes 
dry, the dry territory extends to a 
half mile beyond the corporate limits 
of such city or village. It was thought 
by some that the half-mile provision 
might be made to apply to counties, 
but Mr. Smith holds to the negative. 



o^xait 




"93"HairTonic 

Stops the hair fron falling oat 

K. AL Tredwai. 



TO CLOSE AERIAL 
BRIDGE TWO WEEKS 

Annual Repairs Will Be 

Made Beginning on 

Oct. 11. 

The aerial bridge will be shut down 
on Oct. 11 for a period of two weeks, 
during which time the annual repairs 
will be made to the structure. 

Flotd M. Fuller, manager of the Park 
Point Traction company, announced 
this morning that during the time the 
bridge Is shut down, four freight cars 
will be operated every day. leaving the 
car barns at 10 a. m., 11 a. m., 4 p. m. 
and 5 p m. The fire car will also be 
In readiness at all time to answer 
alarms, as the fire department will be 
unable to reach the point with equip- 
ment. , ^, , J, , it. 

At the present time and during the 
winter the company will operate a 
freight car every day, leaving the 
barns at 8 o'clock in the afternoon. 
There will be no freight service on 
xi^aii «o « ^Kyb wv^..v.. v" ,'"""",^'' I SundavB or holidays and packages 
no traces of the previous day's cele- ^^g" "be left at the car barn for de- 



at the time of his death at Biwabik on 
Sept. 20, last. A daughter, Ida Makl, 
who resides at Biwabik and who is the 
only heir, today petitioned for appoint- 
ment as adminlstratrljc. Tullnlemi was 
56 years old. 



Forty-five towns in Great Britain 
have a population exceeding 100,000. 



European liussia has the highest 
birth rate in the world; France the 
lowest. 



lie utilities unt 1 3 o'clock. Oct. 8, 
1915, for supplj Ing ferry service In 
accordance with specifications on file 
In the office of the commissioner of 
public utilities. 

A certified check for 10 per cent Of 
the amount bid, made payable to the 
treasurer of the city of Duluth, must 
accompany each proposal. 

Proposals must be addressed to the 
commissioner of public utilities, water 
and light depari ment, city of Duluth, 
and indorsed "B'd for Ferry Service." 

The city reserves the right to reject 
any and ell bids. 

CITY OF DULUTH. 

By W. H. BORGEN, 

Clerk. 
LEONIDAS MEFRITT, 

Commissicr:er. 
D. H., Sept. 28 aid 29, 1915. D 1674. 

LEIUA):. NOTICES. 

SIMMONS — 

State of Minnesota, County of St. 
Louis — ss. 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 

George W. Buck, 

Plaintiff. 

IS. 

Hannah Parry; the unknown 
heirs of Hanrah Parry, de- 
ceased; Evan Phillips, John 
Parry; John Parry, wid- 
ower; John ACcKinley; Dun- 
can McKinley, Jr.; Mesaba 
Liand Company, a cor- 
poration; Eu;?ene A. AVood- 
ward; Robert Osborn; George 
Burnette; Samuel Muncie and 
John Orser, pj.rtners as Mun- 
cie & Orser, aid individually; 
also all othor persons un- 
known claiming any right, 
title, estate, Interest, or lien 
in the real estate described 
in the complai it herein, 

Defendants. 
The State of Minnesota, to the above 
named defendiints: 

You and eaci of you are hereby 
gtimmoned and required to answer the 
complaint of the plaintiff in the above 
entitled action, which complaint is 
filed in the offioe of the Clerk of the 
District Court of the Eleventh Judicial 
District, In and lor the County of Saint 
Louis, and State of Minnesota, In the 
County Court Htuse in the City of Du- 
luth in said County, and to serve a 
copy of your answer to the said com- 
plaint on the St bscribers at their of- 
fice. 1000 Aworth Building, in the City 
of Duluth, Saint Louis County, Minne- 
sota, within twenty (20) days after the 
service of this Simmons upon you. ex- 
clusive of the day of such service; and 
if you fail to ansv.'er the said com- 
plaint within tie time aforesaid, the 
plaintiff in this action will apply to 
the Court for tlie relief demanded in 
the said complaint. 

Dated at Duluth, Minnesota, this 14th 
day of Sept., 1915. 

ABBOTT. MacPHERRAN, LEWIS & 
GILBERT, 

Attorneys for Plaintiff. 
1000 Alworth Bldg., Duluth, Minn. 



SPECIAL LOW RATES. 

Loans on Salaries. Furniture or Hor.<=es. 

Low rates. Small payments. 

Borrow $10.00. you pay back $11.00. 

Borrow $20.00. you pay back $21.75. 

Borrow $30.00, you pay back $32.50. 

Other amounts In proportion. 

Liberal rebate if paid before due. 

DULUTH FINANCE COMPANY, 

301 Palladio building. 

Office hours: 8 a. m. to 6:30 p. m.; Wed. 

and Sat. eve'gs to 9 o'clock. Both phonesw 

DULUTH REMEDIAL LOAN AS.S'N. 
401 First National Bank Building. 
LICENSED by the city of Duluth to 
make loans on furniture at rates hon- 
est people CAN AFFORD TO PAY. 

WE LOAN ON ALL KINDS OF PER- 
sonal security at lowest rates. Call 
on us. Duluth Mortgage Loan Co., W. 
Horkan. New 1598-D.; Melrose 3733. 

Loans on watches, diamonds, guns. etc. 
Keystone Loan Co.. 22 W. Superior St. 



__FOR^AILECOWS^ 

# ON ACCOUNT OF SHORTAGE OF ■» 

# FEED, # 
ii- I must sell the following: One -f^ 
■?<■ pair work horses and harness, one •^ 

# registered Jersey bull, two grade :» 
■5^ Jersey cows, one registered Jersey ^ 
^ bull calf out of a 1,000-lb. cow. ^ 
a- WILLIAM H. SARGENT, >& 

# R. R. No. 3, Box 71, Duluth. Minn. )^ 
7{' Melrose 3020— ring 2. . ^ 



FOR SALE — A CARLOAD OF FINE 
selected, fresh milch cows, som© 
Holsteins, Guernseys and Jerseys 
among them, will arrive for Le-vino 
Bros., Thursday, Sept. 30. 821 Fotn th 
aveww* east; Grand 1268, Melrose 
4702. 



FOR SALE— S. GOLDFINE WILL Alt- 
rive with a carload of fresh milch 
cows arud close springers, Sunday, 
Sept. 26. Holsteins and Guernseys 



am.ong them. Both phones. 
North Fifth avenue west. 



1016 



FOR SALE— FRESH MILCH COW9. 
217 North Fifty-fourth avenue west. 
Call after 6 p. m. 

FOR SALE— YOUNG JERSEY C(7w. 
3725 West Eighth street. Call Cole 
2 13-13. 



_JlVANTEDJOJRENL__ 

WA.NTED TO RENT — BY SMALL 
family, seven-room furnished houtte 
or flat for winter; modern conveni- 
ences and good locution necessary. 
Write L 420, Herald. 



FOR SALE — OR WILL TRADE FOR 
automobile, 120 acres good farm 
land near Duquette, Minnesota. P. 
T. Persinger, Cloquet, Minn. 



briny flood which Impressed even the 
court officers. 

Dahl was arrested last night after 
he had made one too many visits to 
the flowing bowl, and despite his en- 
treaties, was locked up by Jailer Root 

"Never, never again will I touch the 
stuff," he shotitcd today before the 
judge, and finally the court, after a 
severe lecture on the evils of intoxica- 
tion, suspended sent*^nce. 

Harry's tears subsided and he dis- 
appeared, nursing a bumped head. 

Five minutes afterwards he reap- 
peared at headquarters, smiling and 
fresh as a spring flower. He showed 




bratlon, and had donned a clean collar 
and an immaculate white vest. 

"Just wait till you see me in a sa- 
loon again," he said. 

It was a cloudy day for the police 
"grist" this morning, for twelve men 
divided an aggregate sentence of 300 
days. Ten of the twelve were old 
offindcrs and four of them drew sixty 
days eacn. 

The two newcomers were given 
seven days .at the work farm duringr 
which to repent, while the older men 
stood up and took their medicine with- 
out comment. 



Storm Not Felt. 

Galve.?ton, Tex., Sept. 29. — This city 
today felt no effects of the tropical 
storm which has gone Inland over 
Louisiana. All wires out of the city 
are working. The Western Union re- 
ported that Its wires near New Orleans 
were down, but no wire trouble In 
Texas. 



livery, he said. 



TO FIGHT DAMA GE CLAIM. 

Council Will Not Settle With J. H. 
Brigham. 

Through an error it was reported at 
the council meeting Monday that the 
commissioners had adopted a resolu- 
tion authorizing the city attorney to 
settle with John H. Brigham for $435. 
covering damages caused to his prop- 
erty at Fond du Lac by an overflow 
of Mission creek in 1913. 

An examination of the figures this 
morning by Comipissloner Sllbersteln 
disclosed the fact that the final vote 
was 3 to 2 against the resolution. 
Instead of the other way. 

By opposing the measure, the council 
went on record as favoring a continu- 
ance of the damage suit now pending 



No. 1107 Flfty-flr»t avenue east, 5-ro»m heu»*, 
water nearby, $14. 

Modern 6-room flat* in Ashtabula terrace, $35. 

Three 4-room flat* at 14 FIret avenue west, 
$27.50, $31 and $39. 

Four-room flat, WIelnnd flats, heated. $18. 

1416 East Superior street, modern, l2-n)«m 
house, $50. _ ^ J i. _. 

Modern 4-room heated flat In East end, hard- 
wood finish throughout, $27. 

Modern furnished house In East end, $90. 

Modern 5-room heated flat, centrally located, <30. 

Store at 28 West First street, newly deco.-ated, 
135 

Store at 105 Seeofld avenue west, $33. 

Store and rooms at 1610 West Superior street, $60. 

HOOPES-KOHAGAN COMPANY 



NOTICE OF LIS PENDENS — 

State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis — ss. 
District Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 
George W. Buck, 

Plaintiff, 
vs. 
Hannah Parry; the unknown 
heirs of Hannah Parry, de- 
ceased; Evan Phillips; John 
Parry; John Parry, wid- 
ower; John ?IcKinley; Dun- 
can McKinley, Jr.; Mesaba 
Land Company, a cor- 

poration; Eu;;:ene A. Wood- 
ward; Robert Osborn; George 
Burnette; San tiel Munclf and 
John Orser, pf rtners as Mun- 
cie & Orser, and individually; 
also all other persons un- 
known claiming any right, 
title, estate, interest, or lien 
in the real estate described in 
the complaint herein. 

Defendants. 
Notice Ts Htreby Given, That a 
complaint has bfen filed in the above 
! entitled action. In the a^ove entitled 
i court, and that »n action has been com- 
menced In said court by the above 
named plaintlfi' against the above 
ramed defendanL«!. the object of which 
action is to ob ain a Judgment that 
said plaintiff is the owner in fee sim- 
ple of the following described real 
property and thit said defendants and 
each of them huve no estate or inter- 
est therein or li?n thereon. 

The said real estate affected by this 
action is situated In the County of St. 
Louis, State of Minnesota, and is de- 
sci'ibed as follo\.-s, to-wit: 

The East K alf of the Northwest 
Quarter (EH of NW14). except the in- 
terests and rights acquired by, and the 
right of way gr? nt^d to, Duluth & Iron 
Range Railroad Company by Wayland 
W. Sanford by deed dated August 26th, 
1887, conveying railway right of way 
one hundred f e ;t In width over the 
Southeast Quarter of the Northwest 
Quarter (SE»4 ct NWH) of the above 



^WANTED TO BORROW. 

WANTED TO BORROW^ITfOr'saLE^ 
$600 contract for deed paying $20 
per month and interest; will di.acount 
8 per cent for cash. Write 428 Herald, 

FOR SALE — 500 SHARES IRON MOUN- 
lain stock at $1.25 per share. C. H, 
Gordon & Co., 406 Providence Bldg.| 
Melrose 1578. 



__JJPHOLSTIERING^ 

Furniture, Automobiles — Reasonable 
price. E. Ott. 112 1st Ave. W. Phont-s. 



1902, at 9:15 o'clock A. M., in Book 163 
of Mortgages, on page 417, coveringr 
upon lots numbered Ten and Twelve 
(10 and 12) West Fourth (4th) street, 
in Duluth Proper. First Division, ac- 
cording to the recorded plat thereof, on 
file in the office of the Register of 
Deeds, in and for said County of St. 
Louifc-; and given to secure the pay- 
ment of a note of two thous.ind 
($2,000.00) dollar.", dated April 25th, 
lt*02, payable on the first day of May, 
1905, with six per cent (6'/,) inter-st, 
which said mortgage was assignrd by 
said August Siebcr to The Midland 
Company, a corporation, by written In- 
strument, bearing date the eleventh 
(11th) day of December. 1909, recorded 
in said Iteglster of Deed's office on the 
Thirtieth (30th) day of December. 1909, 
at eight o'clock A. M., in Book 188 of 
Mortgages on page 369. 

Said default consisting in non-pay- 
ment of the principal of said note when 
due and in the non-payment of lnter«.-st 
and failure to pay the taxes and assess- 
ments levied upon said premises am 
therein provided, previous to the day 
appointed by law for the sale of land* 
for taxes, for v.hlch tax certificates 
were Issued bv the County Auditor of 
St. Louis County to various parties and 
by them assigned to the said Midland 
company, and the amount of which 
taxes so paid by the assignee of the 
mortgagee, at the date of this notice. 
Is One Thousand Seven Hundred 
Eighty-six and 88-100 ($1,786.88) dol- 
lars; and whereas, exclusive of said 
taxes, the amount claimed to be due 
upon said mortgage for principal and 
interest at the date of this notice is the 
.sum of Two Thousand Thlrtj' and 
20-100 ($2,030.20) dollars; and no ac- 
tion or proceeding at law having been 
instituted for the collection of the said 
debt; and whereas, said mortgage con- 
tains a power of sale for such defaults; 

Sale of the said premises pursuant to 
statute at public auction will be made 

in 



the g 

Dated this 14th Jay of Sent., A. D., 191B. 
ABBOTT. Mad HERRAN. LEWIS ' & 
GILBERT, 

Atto-neys for Plaintiff. 
1000 Alworth Bllg., Duluth, Minn. 
D. H., Sept. 15, 22. 29, 1915. 

FORECLOSURE OF MORTGAGE. 
Default havi ig been made In that 
certain mortgage, bearing date April 
25th, 1902, executed by Ella R. Menden- 

^^,„„_„,-.^..^ hall, a single voman, mortgagor, to 

OFFICE OF THE COMMISSIONER OF August Sleber. mortgagee, both of Du- 
PUBLIC UTILITIES— imj,, Minnesota which said mortRage 

City of Duluth, Minn., Sept. 28, 1916. ^as recorded in the office of the Reg- 
Sealed proposals will be received at jgter of Deeds of St. Louis County, 
the office of the commlaeioner of pub- ' Minnesota, on he third day of May, 



description, of Section Nine (9). in , , ^. , . , , ., -, . tt 

Township Fifty-one (51), North of '»<• the front door of the Court Housf 
Range Twelve C 2). West of the Fourth | ^^^ City of Duluth, Minnesota, on the 
(4th) principal Meridian, according to sixth (6th) day of November. 1915, at 
the government survey thereof. 10 o'clock A. M. to the highest bidder 




for cash In order to pay the said debt, 
principal and Interest and llenable 
taxes, and including Seventy-five 
($75.00) dollars as attorney's foes, stip- 
ulated in .=ald mortgage to be paid In 
the case of foreclosure; subject to re- 
demption within one year after said 
sale as provided by law. 

Dated September 21st. A. D.. 1915. 
THE MIDLAND COMPANY. 
Assignee of said Mortgage. 
JOHN B RICHARDS, 

Suite 309, First National bank build- 
ing, Duluth, Minnesota. 

Attorney for the Assignee of sal4 
Mortgage. 
D. H., Sept. 22, 29; Oct. 6. II. 20, 27, 1911, 



■N 



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I 



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. 




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i 






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T 



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— 




Wednesday, 



THE DULI|TH HERALD 



September 29, 1915. 



If 



FOR SALE— HOUSES. FARM AND FRUIT LANDS. FOR RENT— HOUSES. 



9i- * 

* FOR SALE. ^ 

if- Very attractive eight-room house * 

f^ at 1617 East Fourth street; hot*; 

if- water heat. hardwood floors ^ 

^ throughout; full depth cement ^, 

-ft- basement: newly decorated ana * ; 

«?. patntPd Inside and out; splendid # , 

* view of lake; large lot. 50 by 140. *, 

* This property is well worth $8,000, * 

* but was secured under foreclosuro * 

* proceedings, and owner being a 7f ' 

* non-resident and anxious to sell, *; 

* we are authorized to offer same #| 
7* at J6,500. on term'». *, 

* * ' 

<» —FOR SALE OR RENT— *i 

^ *■ 

-ff- One of the choicest residence * i 
^ pronerties in the city, located at if • 

* 2302 East Fifth street, in the -^ , 
i^ midst of beautiful surroundings, if 

* Three-story brick house of colonial A- 

* type; grounds large, set out in yf 
if- many varieties of trees and shrub- ii 
if bery effectively placed. The treat- * 
if ment of the interior displays per- ir 
if feet taste. Five fireplaces. 2 baths, * 
if billiard and amusement rooms. * 
if Modern In all its appointments. H- 
^ This property can be purchased or -^ 
a- rented ac remarkably low figures. # 

if. * 

if JOHN' A. STEPHEXSOX & CO., H- 
if Wolvln BIdg. * 

* # 



if- a 

if. MINTSTESOTA FARMERS ARE •* 
if PROFITING BY THE EUROPEAN ^f 



WAR. ARE YOU 



a- 



# FOR RENT. * 

# 
* 



if'y&ff>^^if^i('-^i£-ie^ii-it<if-^'^y?i^:i-i<-}i^-^if-»if 
* if 

if- EASY TERMS if 

if- if 

if 
# 

if- 
* 

if- 

if- 

if 
if 
if- (875) 



(913) — Central Hillside — 5-room -Jf- 
house, water and gas, sewer in if- 
lot: nice location. Price $1,675. if 
only $300 ca.sh rcQuired, balance if 
at $15 per month. if 

(914)_Central Hillside — 4-room iC- 
house, gas water, sewer and if 
electric lights: improved street: H- 
nice corner lot. Price $1,700, if 
$200 cash, balance on easy -^ j 
monthly payments. •* 



80-acr© Improved farm near if- 
if Drim.«<on, Minn.; log house, 4 ^ 
•X- rooms, woodhouse, granary, log ^ 
if barn, 20 by 30, room for 6 head * 
if of stock and 6 or 8 tons of hay; if- 
a. good henhouse; 15 acres under -;^ 
# plow, 20 acres more nearly all if 
if cleared: well and new pump; H 
if about 4 acres seeded to clover; soil if 
if is heavy sand loam with clay sub- ^ 
if soil, and is in good community. * 
if only IVs miles from town, with if 
a^ several large improved farms ad- * 
•X- joining. Price $1,400, half cash, if- 
0- This farm is all ready for occu- *• 
if- pancy, as the buildings are in good if 
if condition and are now occupied. ^ 

if * 

if Fine 40 acres, excellent farm if 
*■ land; 20 acres In tame hay that cut ^ 
if 30 tons last year; all fenced; good if 
if- location, only two blocks from if- 
if Burnett station; frame house, if 
if chicken house and barn; stock -if 
if tank and piping to pasture. This if 
ii- farm is offered 5500 below value, if 
if- on ea.sy terms; only $500 cash re- if- 
if- quired to handle. Price $1,750. if- 
if *^ 

if- 160 acres good level land on -^ 
if main road adjoining city limits; if 
if- 100 per cent profit can be made O- 
if on this by sub-dividing. if 

if if 

if. 320 acres of good land In Lake if 
it- county at $2.50 per acre. 
^- 

if 

if- 
if 
if 
if 
if- 

a- 



Two centrally located houses, if- 

# etone foundation, furnace heat, if^ 

if- fireplace, hardwood floors down- ^ 

if stairs; all modern throughout, in ■Sr 

■^ fine condition; large cozy rooms; 7^ 

■* walking distance to all banks. -iV 

*- depots, hotels and theaters: excel- -if- 

fc- lent view, and as near as you can if- 

1 •* possibly get to th« downtown * 

! *. turmoil and be where there are no * 

1 if. noise, smoke or any unhealthful -* 

I if elements whatsoever. Rent $22.50 re 

1 if per month. * 

I ^ if 

'if Detached 6-room house, Hun- if- 
\if ter's Park; absolutely modern and if 
1^ almost new; excellent neighbors, if 
; if Rent $23. * 

if * 

!^ Plx-room house on. Tenth ave- *■ 
I -^ nue east near Ninth street car if- 
\i(- line; modern; furnace heat. Rent if 
\if $27.50. H' 

j* * 

lif- West end upstairs flat — may '^:- 
\if- have a good one soon on Fortieth if- 

if- avenue west above Sixth street. * 
\'» Rent $20. * 

if If in the mavket. telephone, call # 
I if or write. H- 

I* * 

L. A. LARSEN CO.. * 

Providence Building. 0- 

Grand or Melrose 1920. * 




ADDITWIAL WANTS 
18 A?!D 20 

~?ORlpfIlHOUSES. 

(Continued) 

FOR REN^T — SIX-ROOM HOUSE, 310 
West Fift*^.««treet; modern except' 
heat; newly decorated. Inquire Iten- 
tal department, Bridgeman-Russell 
Co. 



FOR RENTto-NlCELY FURNISHED 
five-n-oom inMse with all conven- 
iences; rent •f25. C. H. Gordon & 
Co.. 406 Providence building. 

FOR RENT— mCE SIX-ROOM HOUSE. 
Apply 119% East Fourth street. 



PERSONAL 



EBERT-WALKER COMPANY, 

Farm Land Dealers. 

315-16 Torrey Building, 

Duluth. Minnesota. 



a- 

ii-k-ifif-X'ifif'if^if'if^.if-Jf^if^f^^f'if^if^i^i^-^ 
fl'^f^ififififif'if'if'ifififii^t-'ifif'ifrif^ifif^ri-^ii- 
* HOUSES AND FLATS 



if 414 Second avenue west. 7- 
if 



I 



. .., -Here Is a grt-at bargain in ^- 
an Incomplete house; two rooms if 
now ttiiiahed; hardwood floors if 
and flnlph. gH.e, water and elec- if 
trie lights: corner lot. 36 by 90; if 
location. East end hill.side, 1 Va ^ 
blocks from car line. Price if 

$1,050. only $100 cash required, if 
balance monthly. -^ 

ir 

* 



if 
if 

if 

if 

if 
if 

if 

■^ WHITNEY WALL COMPANY 

■5^ Real Estate. Loans and Insurance, if 

if 301 Torrey Bldg. if 

if * 



ifififiC-ififif^ifiS'ii^TfiiifiC'if^ififififififii^ 

if 

EXCELLENT BARGAINS if 

IN FARMS. * 

* 



if 



room modern house; this '^ 

house is in good condition if 

and has a new furnace; if 

rent $34.00 •* 



if 
if 
if 
if 
* 

if 



ifHifif^fifififif-ifif^if'if^fififii^fiC-i^if'if^Je-if 

if $200 CASH if 

if With balance oft easy monthly if 

if payments like rent, will buy good if 

•jf. Investment— !J-room house, cen- if 

■if trally located; exceptionally fine if 

•^ rooming-house proposition. In a if 

if few years the lot will be worth if 

if more than is now asked for en- if 

if tire property. if 

if See W. M. PRTNDLE & CO.. if 
^ Main floor Lonsdale Building. 



A few fine 40-acre tracts west if 
^ of Alborn; level, fine soil, easily ^ 
if cleared; no stone; on Spider creek; -^ 
■^ worth from $12 to $15 per acre, if 
if are going for $7 per acre, half if 
if cash. if 

if if 

ii if 

if IMPROVED CARLTON COUNTY if 
if FARM. if 

•^' 80 acr*»s. 30 acres cleared, if 
•^ fenced and cross fenced; on good if 
■^ road; telephone, school and rural if 
if- delivery; located in fine farming if 
if community; good house, barns and if 
if outbuildings. First-class property, if 



if $40 per acre. 
if 



if->fif-.:fifi:'i<'if-:->^-:y^irif>fifif^^t^ii^X^^^^ 

(3-30) H.\NDSOME NEW BRICK AND 
stucco home, built by owner as per- 
manent dwelling; being a railroad 
man he has been transferred from 
Duluth and he prefers to sell this 
beautiful place rather than rent; liv- 
ing room 13x27 feet with Colonial 
fireplace and built-in book cases. 
Here's a magnificent home at very 
moderate price. 

LITTLE & NOLTE CO.. 
Exchange Bldg. 

(22 11) OWNER WILL SACRIFICE A 
fine modern home near normal 
school, lot has 130 foot frontage; 
house is modern in every way; price 
hns been reduced to make a quick 
sale. 

LITTLE & NOLTE CO.. 
Exchange Bldg 



FOR SALE — DANDY FIVE-ROOM 
cottage, stone foundation, hardwood 
floors, gas. water, electric lights; 
fine 50x140 cor.ter lot; one block to 
car; near Twentieth avenue west; 
price $1,350; nteds $750 cash. Little 
& Nolte Co., Exchange building. Our 
auto at your service. (17-13) 

FOR SALE — VERY FINE EIGHT 
room house; hot water heat; fine 
loc:ition; East end; large modern 
garage; here's an elegant home; 
price $10,000. Little & Nolte Co.. 
Exchange building. Our auto at 
your service. (20-8) 

FOR SALE— CHEAP. BY OWNER, 
flve-room cottage; modern except 
heat: newly painted and decorated 
Inside and outside; walking di.stance; 
nice lawn and garden; must sell, 
quickly, leaving city. Grand 1318-X. 

FOR SALE— $25 PER MONTH, NEW 
five-room house with bath and 
basement and good garden plot; ten 
minutes' walk to courthouse. This 
Is a bargain. Inquire 505 Alworth 
building, phone Melrose 1082. 

ST. PAUL, MINN— FOR IMMEDIATE 
sale, by the ow^ner, at a bargain, 
this week only. 649 Summit avenue, 
a beautif\;lly located. .<?outh-faclng, 
twelve-room, brick house, 120 feet 
frontage. 



FOFl SALE— WE HAVE A TEN-ROOM 
house on East Tliird street which 
we can a^ll at a big discount: fur- 
nace, bath, etc. For particulars sea 
Field-Frey Co.. 204 Exchange Bldg. 



FOR SALE — SIX-ROOM HOUSE. NEW. 
attractive Inside and out, hardwood 
finish, hot water heat; .?400 ca.sh 
and balance monthly; very cheap. 

F. I. Salter Co.. 303 Lonsdale Bldg. 

FOR SALE — WILL SACRIFICE FOR 
quick sale new modern six-room 
house In Kenilworth Park. Stewart 

G. Collins. 710 Torrey building. Mel- 
rose 7079. (107) 

FOR S alp:— CHEAP. BY OWNER, 
five-room house; modern, hot water 
heat; 620 Eleventh ave>iue east. In- 
quire 10 Lake avenue north. 

FOR SALE — TWO-FLAT BUILDING, 
five rooms each; all modern except 
heat; garage In rear of lot; a snap. 
W. M. Prindle company. 

HOW TO GET THE BEST HOMH 
built for tho least money. See L. A. 
Lar.«en Co.. 214 Providence building. 

FOR SALE — BI;NG.\L0W O.N BOLT^E- 
vard; Ave rooms, bath; modern; $200 
cash. 1920 East Elghth'st. Owner. 



CANT & McLEAN, 

Farm Lands — Farm Loans, 

First National Bank Building, 

Duluth, Minn. 



if 

il- 
if 
if 



*. 129^2 West Fourth street, 

if 6-room house; rent $31.00 

* *■ 

if 815 East First street, 7f 

# elegant 6-room heated it- 
i^ flat with new hardwood O- 
"^ floors; janitor service; if 

if rent $42.50 if 

^ .jt 

if 1116 West First .street— five- # 

if room modern flat $16.00 if 

j^ .fA 

if W. M. PRINDLE & CO. if 

* * 
if Lonsdale Bldg. * 
if * 
if Melrose 2400. Grand 239. if 

# * 
if'if^if^f-?fif^ififififififif-:fififififii^ii'ii-^'iir 

—FOR RENT- 



PERSONAL — YOUR OPPORTUNITY 
to buy a piano at a real sacrifice 
price. Choice of a number of well- 
known makescan be seen at Christie 
Lithography. & Printing company's i 
store, 118 Fourth avenue west. Phone, 
trustee's agent for appointment. 
Melrose 6469 . Calumet 211. or Cole 65. ! 

PERSONAL— jTOUN(i PEOPLE OR { 
anyone desiring household goods 
will find oUr three to five-room out- 
fit from $(5 to $225 and up. very j 
6atlsfacto»jrrf<jr the money; easy 
terms of payment. R. R. Forward & ' 
Co., 124 Efst Superior street. Look | 
for the electri c sign. Forward's. 

PERSONAL—AN EXPERIENCED AND ' 
reliable paper-hanger will furnish i 
new and up-to-date patterns and 
paper an ordinary sized room for 

J 4. 60. Painting and tinting neatly 
one; pronvpt and satisfactory work 
guaranteed. Call Decorator, Mel. 4303. 

PERSONAL— ELIMINATE THE BLUE ' 
Mondays, send the family wash to I 
us; the charge is small; . only 5H I 
cents per pound. All flat goods. 
Ironed, no additional charge. Phone I 
us and our wagons will call. Either I 
phone 2442. Yale Laundry. 

FOR RENT — FIVE PLEASANT, COM- | 
fortably furnished rooms; desire to ! 
rent them to young buslnesa men or 
women who want a home as well as 
a place to stay. 1609 East Superior 
street. 

PERSONAL — LadleTi Ask your drug- 
glst for Clik heater Pills, the Diamond 
Brand, f(<r 96 years known as best, 
safest, always reliable. Take no 
other. Chichesttr Diamond Brand Pills 
are sold by driiggists everywhere. 



Five-room house, rear of 809-11 East 
First street; rent $12 per month. 



Eight-room house, 811 East First 
street; modern in every respect; in 
good condition; rent $35 per month. 



ifr;^ififififi:.iiii.ififi£-if^ififif^^if ifif'ififif-}f 

ififiy:yk-ifi:--^ ifif^-ifififififiiif^ii^ ^f-ifr-^-H * 
if * 

if FOR SALE. i^ 

if if 

if Fine improved 90-acre farm at -if 
if Meadowland.s, one mile from sta- -^ 
^ tion, good building.'^, black loam if 
if soil, clay subsoil, no stone. Price if 
^ $17 per acre; terms. This farm is if 
^ a money-maker and easily worth if 
if $60 per acre. ^ 

if •>*, 

if We have a large list of partly if 
if Improved farms for sale on easy -if 
if terms. Unimproved lands, vicinity if 
■k of Meadowlands, Alborn and if 
if Flood wood; among these many if 
if choice river frontages. Terms $2.50 if 
if per acre down, balance to suit. if 

if ERNEST LE DUC, ^ 

if 310 Sellwood Bldg. if 

if # 

ifi fifii-if''<ifififii'if^^fi(-^ f ifif-X-ififififi:-l-ifif 

FOR EXCHANGE— 120 ACRES OF 
level, stonefree, fertile, all tillable 
farming land In Carlton county; good 
mixed timber; price $11.50 per acre; 
will take good flve-paasenger Ford 
or other light car as first payment, 
balance on long time at 4 per cent; 
might consider city property. If you 
mean business, state what you have 
to offer, and price. W. D. R., Box 212, 
West Duluth. 

FOR SALE — FORTY ACRES OF GOOD, 
high, level land, half mile from 
Adolph; $850, easy terms. E. E. Hel. 
land. 103 Thirty-ninth avenue west. 
Duluth. 



Seven-room house. 1813 East Second 
street; two bath rooms, brick fire 
place, gas stove. In fact modern In 
every respect; rent $42.50 per month. 





WHITNEY-WALL CO., 






Torrey Bldg. 




Crand 810. Melrose 


1368. 


ififif 


i:^i(-ifififrcif^ififififif'ifififififififif^ 


if- 




a- 


if 


FOR RENT. 


if 


a- 




if 


if 


EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE AT 


if 


if 


1612 EAST SIXTH STREET. 


if 


if 




a- 



if Modern except heat. Owner now if 
if living In house, but will leave city if 
if soon. Low rent if taken at once, if 

if'if^fi-fi:ififififififififififif'?fii^ifififif-)fififif 
if^?fifiy:iifif^ififii^ifi(-^ififif^ifififif-?fifif 



it' 



if FOR RENT FOR THE WINTER, 

if Six-room finest house, nearly new 
if all modern; Twenty-first avenue if 
if east. Call Melrose 4811. if 

if if 

if if 

icifififii-^if-ii->f:fifii-if-^ififif^!fifif^^f^ifif 

WEST END HOUSES. 



FOR SALE— FORTY ACRES, 8 MILES 
from covirthouse; lots of timber. F. 
Reclctenwalt. 655 Sherman street, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 

Farms, garden and vacation lands at 
Meadowlands, on easy terms. Uno 
Lludstrom, 31 E. Mich. St.. Duluth. 

FOR SALE OR TRADE — FOR IM^ 
proved city property, a few lO-acre 
tracts. J 402, Herald. 

I BUY AND SELL LANDS AND TIM- 
ber. George Rupley. 612 Lyceum bldg. 

Farm lands at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larsen Co.. 214 Providence building. 



SITUATION WANTED 

FEMALE. 



SlTU.\TION WANTED — MARRIED 
woman would like day work, laun- 
dry or cleaning; will also care for 
children evenings. Write W 423, 
Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — MIDDLE- 
aged lady and girl friend of 18 are 
wishing for position out of town. 
S 401, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BUNDLE 
washing called for and delivered: 
price.'' reasonable. Call Grand 

1351-A. 

WANTED— BY Y'OUNG WOMAN WITH 
two children, position as housekeeper 
In city. 17 Fifty-second avenue 
west. 

SITUATION WANTED — HARDWORK- 
Ing woman desires any kind of 
work by the day. Call Melrose 7392. 

SIT U AT ION WANT ED — SMALL WAS H • 
Ifigs and ironings to take home. Call 
Melrose 6986 after 2 p. m. 



FOR SALE — HOUSE WITH TWO 
apartments In best section of West 
Duluth. Call Grand 1220-X. 

FOR SALE— 13 -ROOM HOUSE; ALL 
modern. 2803 Wellingston street. 



SITUATION WANTED — WASHING 

and Ironing at home or out. Mel- 
rose 5233. 



SITUATION WANTED— AS CHAMBER- 
mald or dishwasher. Phone Grand 
1112-X. 



_JjOSJ^N2FOim__ 

LOST— GOLD BROOCH. BETWEEN 
Fourth avenue east and Fifth street 
and Fifth avenue east and Fourth 
street, or on East Fourth car or at 
Third avenue west on Superior street 
or on Duluth-Superior car. Return to 
152 1 Banks avenue. Superior. "Wis. 

LOST — SMALL GOLD-ENAMELED 
badge, pendant to watch chain. Name 
of engineering society on face, name 
of owner on back. Reward for re- 
turn. John H. Darling; phone Mel- 
rose 318, Grand 1465-D. 

LOST— BETWEEN FIFTY-FIFTH AND 
Twenty-fourth avenue west on Grand 
avenue. 35x4 Goodyear tire on rim 
F. D. Knight. 2320 West Fourth 
street; reward. 

LOST— DARK JERSEY COW, ONE 
short horn. Return to Mrs. Hanson, 
Sixty-third and Highland. Reward. 

LOST— SATT'RDAY EVENING. PEND- 
ant from watch chaim, initials J. L. 
D. Reward. Return Herald office. 

LOST— BROWN BOSTON BULL TER- 
rler, Dewey, about 1 year old. Call 
Melrose 5399 or 1144. | 

LO.ST— BAT EAR BRINDLE TERRIER. ' 
with white markings. Call C. W. El- 
fiton. Melroae 2627. 



SITUATION WANTED — TO TAKE 
home ladles' washing. Grand 2240-A. 



SITUATION 
housework. 



WANTED 
212 West 



— GENERAL 
Third street. 



PRIVATE HOSPIT.ALS. 



PRIVATE HOME FOR WOMEN BE- 
fore and during confinement; expc"! 
care; Infants cared for. Ida Pearson, 
M. D., 284 Harrison avenue, St. Paul. 

PRIVATE HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN 
before and during confinement. 1602 
Twenty-eighth street, Superior, Wis. 
Ogden 851-X. 

Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwife; pri- 
vate hospital and home, 329 N. 68th 
Ave. W. Phones, Cole 173; Cal. 270. 

[Mrs. Thoresen, midwife: private home 
for ladies during confinement. 3108 
17th Ave. South, Minneapolis. Minn. 

j MRS. HANSON. GRADUATE MID^ 
1 wife; female complaints. 413 Seventh 
avenue east. Zenith 1225. 

Mrs A. Ferguson, graduate midwife, 
917 East Tenth street-. Grand 1976- Y. 



No. 3908 West Eighth St. — Five rooms, 
basement; modern except heat. $17.50. 



No. 2101 West Sixth St. — Five rooms, 
modern except heat. $18.00. 



BE.NJAMIV F, SCHWEIGER CO. 
1932 West Superior St. 



__STOyE REPAIRS. 

; WE CARRY InTsTHDCiTrERaTrSFO^ 

10.000 different stoves and ranges. C. 

I F. Wisseru &, Sous. 410 East Sup. SL 



FOR RENT— AT WOODLAND, SEVEN. 
room house; hardwood finish; water, 
gas, sewer, electric light, sun porch, 
attic, excellent heating plant, nice 
large grounds, house warmly built 
ana easily heated; only $27.60 per 
month, including water. C. Francis 
Colman, 421 Manhattan building. 

FOR RENT — 1309 EAST SECOND 
street, walking distance from busi- 
ness center; all modern; warm 
house; aeven rooms and large attic 
room; rent $42 per month. Melrose 
7361. Zenota Realty company. 110 
Oak Hall building. 

FOR RENT— SEVEN- ROOM HOUSE, 
barn and outbuildings, and five 
acres of ground, on the Jean Du- 
luth road; two miles from car line; 
greatly reduced rent for the winter. 
See William C. Sargent. Providence 
building. 

FOR RENT — FOUR ROOMS; FIRST 
floor; centrally located; hardwood 
floors throughout, toilet, gas. water 
and electric light; $12.60 per month. 
See Chas. P. Meyers. 611 Alworth 
bldg. 

FOR RENT — EIGHT ROOM AND AL- 
cove, brick house modern, new; hot 
water heating plant; three blocks 
from postofflce. $36. 00 per month. 
Inquire J. E. Roos. 608 W est Third. 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM BUNGALOW; 
all latest Improvements; modern 
throtighout; Forty-seventh avenue 
east and Gladstone street. Inquire 
Bridgeman-Russell company. 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE, 813 
Fourth avenue east; $11 per month; 
water, gas and electric light. Apply 
Henry Halenbeck, 429 East Sixth 
street; Grand 1970-Y. 

FOR RENT — EEAUTIFT'^L SIX-ROOM 
house; hot water heat; large corner 
lot; rent $35; will reduce If no chil- 
dren. Little & Nolte Co.. Exchange 
building. 

FOR RENT — SIX- ROOM HOUSE, 310 
West Fifth street; newly decorated. 
Apply rental department, Bridgeman 
& Russell company. 16 West First 
street. 

FOR RF:nt — EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE, 
all modern; cheap for winter; 330 
North Fifty-second avenue west. In- 
quire Gallagher Grocery company. 

FOR RENT — DESIRABLE NINE- 
room East end residence. Stewart G. 
Collins, 710 Torrey building. Melrose 
7079. (106 ) 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM, ALL CON- 

veniences except heat, 2009 West 

Third street. Inquire 1906 West 
Superior street. 

FOR RENT— DESIRABLE SIX-ROOM 
house. 1130 East Third street. Call 
either phone 298. 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM HOUSE, 
water, light, gas. bath. 19 East 
Eighth street. 

FOR RENT — SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE^ 
modern except heat. 609 Second ave- 
nue east. 

FOR RENT — SEAMEN-ROOM HOUSE, 
all conveniences; walking distance. 
Melrose 3038; Grand 1787. 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM FURNISHED 
house. 2709 Minnesota avenue. Call 
Melrose 1266. 

For Rent — Houses, stores and flats. L. 
A. Larsen Co., Providence building. 

FOR RENT — OCT. 1; 6-ROOM HOUSE. 
25 South Sixty-fourth avenue west. 

FOR RENT— NOS. 1718 AND 1720 EAST 
Superior street. B. P. Alex&ndsr. 



I Hit 

IRT 



PERSONAL^CHftONICS AND INCUR- 
ables. there is hope for you; costs 
nothing to investigate. The von de 
Schoeppe W»y to Health. 1509-1511 
East Superior street. Call Melrose 
415; Grand ^a?2-X. 

THE COMFOHT BEAUTY PARLORS 
now located In large pleasant quar- 
ters, 109 Oak Hall Bldg. Hairdress- 
Ing. manicuring and chiropody work. 

PERSONAL — THE DEGRADING EF- 
fect of the r^e bt narcotics portrayed 
in six reels,, "The Spirit of the Pop- 
py." at SuuMeam. Sept. 80. 10 cents. 



Cancer tumors (lupus) treated without 
knife or paib, jAU work guaranteed. 
Free book. Dr. Williams, specialist 
on cancer, 2900 University av. Se, Mis. 

PERSONAL — Get away from washday 
troubles by sending your family 
wash to us. 6 Vic per pound. Lutes* 
laundry. 808 E. 2nd St. Both phonos. 

PERSONAL — ELECTRIC VACUUM 
cleaners for rent. $1.60 a day. Bur- 
gess Electric company. 310 West 
First street; Grand or Melrose 466. 

MADE-TO-MEASURE SHIRTS, UN- 
derwear. raincoats. Suit or overcoat. 
$18. Clark N. Hamilton. 316 East 
Superior street. Melrose 4319. 

PERSONAL — Newly wed outfits at 
easy prices; easy payments too. An- 
derson Furniture company. Twenty- 
first avenue west. 

PERSONAL— MOUNTAIN ASH TREES 
furnished and planted; you can see 
the trees at 325 Bast First street; 
Melrose 6730. 

ELECTRIC VACUUM CLEANERS FOR 
rent. $1.60 a day. The Moore Co.. 319 
W. First St. Mel. 6860; Grand 2064-X. 



PERSONAL— EXPERT PIANO TUN- 
ing done by F. C. Ross. Call Mel. 
1777; residence 1016 Twelfth ave. E. 

The only exclusive piano mover In city ; 
refei ences. leading piano stores. John 
Asbuch. Meliose 6176; Grand 1222. 

MASSAGE— MARGARET NELSON. 21S 
W. Superior St., room 8, third floor. 
Also appointments at your home. 

PERSONAL — MADAME ROSCOE, 
clairvoyant reader. 32 West Second 
street, Grand 828. 

WANTED— LACE CURTAINS AT 26c 
pair. Ladle* laundry. Call Mel. 7061. 



PERSONAL — M. WOLSON, 414% LAKE 
avenue north, clairvoyant. Mel. 4138. 

Hair, molss. warta removed; children's 
hair cut. Mlas Kelly, 131 W. Sup. St. 

Personal — Combings and cut hair made 
Into beautiful switches. Knauf Sisters. 

PERSONAL — Ladles, have your suits 
made at Miller Bros.. 405 E. Sup. St. 



BARKER'S REMEDY for coughs, colds 
& rheumatism guaranteed at Boyce's. 

Beautiful switches from combings and 
cut hair. Marinello, Fidelity Bldg. 

"personal— FOR SICK PEOPLE— 
flowers. Duluth Floral company. 



SITUATION WANTED 

MALE. 



SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG MAN, 
24 years of age, with several years' 
office experience, desires position In 
the evenings. Not afraia of work 
and quick to learn. D 430. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG MAN 
desires position as bookkeeper or 
general office work; can furnish 
references; willing to work. Write 
G 413. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— BY EXPERI- 
enced retail and wholesale dry goods 
clerk; willing to make small invest- 
ment for Interest in business. Write 
U 411. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— WANTED PO- 
sltion as engineer; have chief engi- 
neer's license; can do pipe fitting. 
631 South Sixtieth avenue. West Du- 
luth. 

SITUATION WANTED— BY COMPE- 
tent stationary engineer; married; 
experienced also in electrical work; 
accept anything along these lines. 
J. J. S.^ Melrose 278. 

SITUATION W»ANTED— AFTERNOONS, 
by young man attending school In 
morning; knowledge of bookkeeping 
and stenography. Write M 374, Her. 
aid. 

SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG MAN 
desta-es drafting at home after work; 
can draw anything, architectural or 
mechanical. L 400. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — EXPERI- 
enced timber scaler, bookkeeper, 
timekeeper wants position. W. J. 
Guthrie. La Salle hotel. 

SITUATION WANTED— BY EXPERI- 
enced stock salesman; position with 
live propositkm. Address R 399, Her- 
ald. 



-^U-i _ 

SITUATION \<'ANTED — BY EXPERI- 

enced hotel clerk. Write, B 418, 

Herald. / 

SITUATION WANTED— BY A PRI- 
vate detective. Write Y 408. Herald. 

TIMBER LANDS^__ 

TIMBER AN0^"^^CuT-OVER LANDS 
bought; morifrage loans made John 
Q. A. Crosby, ,3()6 Palladlo building. 



BOARD & ROOM OFFERED. 

FOR RENT —I TWO NICELY FUR- 
nlshed modWn>-^ooms; private fam- 
ily. Kast •ad^ Melrojie 14«8. 



* * 

* FOR SALE. if 
if ^ 
if 1 style 27 White rotary, used, if 

* only $29.60 if 

if 1 fltyle 45 White rotary, used, if 

* only $32.50 if 

if 1 etyle 60 White rotary, used, if 

* only $35.00 if 

if 1 style 27, White vibrator, if 

if used, only $27.60*. 

* Easy Terms. -?& 

* * 
if WHITE SEWING MACHINE CO., if 
if 9 East Superior St. if 

* -S" 
■^^a^ifif-^'ifififif'if^Ti-ififif'if^-ifififif'ifififif 

f^a-a^ififif'if^if'if^ififififieit'ifr^ifieifififif 

f « 

* ATTENTION I if 
^ Headquarters for stoves and base- if 

* burners. We have some especially if 
•* good bargains In used heaters, }f 

* ranges and gas atovea. Prices $5 if 

* to $45, on easy terms. if 

* ENGER & OLSON. * 

* 1828-32 West Superior St. if 

* if 

■^i^-'ifii^fififififrlfrifififififit'^f'if^^^f'i^ 

f ^ •* 

* POTATOES RIGHT FROM THE if 

* FARM. * 

* ^ 

* Delivered In 1%-bushel sacks, if 
if anywhere In the East end. if 
if WILLIAM H. SARGENT, if 
if R. R. No. 3, Box 71, Duluth, Minn, if 
if Melrose 3020 — ring 2. if 

i^^f-ii'i^'if^if'if^'ifit^fif'if'if^^if^ififif^ie^ififif 

fifitifii^f^if^^i^fif'ifiiifif^f'if'if^-ifif'if'ifif-^f^ 
if if 

^ FOR SALE. if\ 

if i 

if A fine used mahogany piano, $100 -^ 
if for quick sale; easy terms to if 
if responsible party. Please do not if 
if answer this unless you mean busi- if 
if ness. Address "Piano Bargain," * 
if care Herald. -v. 

i^'^i'^f^^f^ifif^if^-'ifififififif^-^fififififif^^^^^^ 

FOR SALE— SECOND-HAND HEAT- 
ers. Here is a chance to get a good 
heating stove cheap. We have a few 
i5iewart and other makes of heaters 
that have been taken in trade; every 
one In good shape and guaranteed. 
Terms as low as $1 per week. F. S. 
Kelly Fu rniture company. 

FOR SALE— A MISCELLANEOUS As- 
sortment of good used furniture, 
suitable for furnishing a 60 or 70- 
room hotel; will sell single pieces or 
the entire lot cheap. Apply Zenith 
Realty, 4 South F irst avenue east. 

FOR SALE — INTERNATIONAL DE- 
livery truck. Good condition. Cost 
$900. Must be sold to close estate. 
Make us an offer. Duluth Jobbers 
Credit Bureau, Inc., 631 Manhattan 
building. 

FOR SALE— PEDIGREED REGISTER- 
able Airedale pups; excellent speci- 
mens; sire from imported cham- 
pions; also grown females. 109 
Fifty-fourth avenue east. Lakeside 
105-L. 

FOR SALE— BRAND NEW PIANO; 
bargain for a quick sale; heating 
atove in good condition. Call Calu- 
met 525-L. 6801 Grand avenue. West 
Duluth. 

FOR SALE— WILL SACRIFICE NEW 
rotary White sewing machine, used 
three months; cost $70; for imme- 
diate sale $20. Call 1118 East Third 
street. 

FOR SALE — Second-hand woodworking 
machinery, portable sawmill, trans- 
mission appliances, pipes for steam, 
water and furnac ea. Duluth Mach. Co, 

FOR SALE— FOUR-FOOT YELLOW 
birch wood, $6 per cord; 24-inch, $7; 
16-lnch, $8. Drop card to Peter 
Matthlesen, bo x 150, route 4, city. 

FOR SALE — FIXTURES, COMPLETE 
for ice cream parlor and confec- 
tionery store. Inquire Bridgeman- 
Russell Co.. 16 West Fir st street. 

FOR SALE— SECOND HAND GAS AND 
coal ranges. In good repair at little 
prices. Anderson Furniture Com- 
pany, Twen ty-first avenue west. 

FOR SALE— FURNITURE; new parlor 
and bedroom set. A nice lot and in 
good condition. Will sell for half 
price. Call Melrose 37 33. 

FOR SALE— $90 ^RGAN FOR $25; 
also some good used pianos at big 
bargains. Korby Piano Co., 26 Lake 
avenue north. 

FOR SALE— A $350 PIANO FOR $140- 
less than 2 years old; easy terms to 
responsible party. Address A 948 
care He rald. 

FOR SALE— TWO TOLEDO COMPUT- 
Ing scales and one Stimpson com- 
puting scale at a bargain. Call Mel- 
rose 6970. 

FOR SALE — TWO CASH REGI.STERS. 
onj 7-foot floor showcase, one but- 
ter scale. Inquire Bridgeman-Rus- 
sell Co. 

FOR SALE— LARGEST SIZE JEWELL 
heater, flrst-class condition. Call 
923 Vi East Fifth street, or Grand 
1962-D. 

FOR SALE— OR RENT AT BARGAINS 
new and slightly used shot guns and 
rlfiea. J. W. Nelson, 5 East Superior 
atreet. 

FOR SALE— PLAYER PIANO, WITH 
music, at a bargain; easy payments. 
Edmo nt. 18 Third avenuc; west. 

FOR SALE— ONE STEWART HEAT- 
er. one Universal kitchen range, 
cheap. 301 P:;ast Fifth st reet. 

FOR SALE — GARLAND HEATER; 
good condition; $6. 322 North 

Sixtieth avenue. West Duluth. 

FOR SALE— LIBRARY TABLE, DIN- 
Ing chairs and rockers, two ranges. 
etc. 6 21 Ea£t Second street. 

FOR SALE— NEW HEATER, JUST 
used last winter. Inquire 407 North 
Forty-aecond avenue west. 

FOR SALE— LARGE ROUND OAK 
heater. $6.00. Zenith Park 11. L. A. 
Gunderaon, Lester park. 

FOR SALE— CHEST OF COMMUNITY 
Silver, consisting of 32 pieces; never 
been used. Melrose 6093. 

FOR SALE— FINE UPRIGHT PIANO 
In good condition, $60. 221 West Su- 
perior street; room 210. 

FOR SALE — SECOND-HAND $65 
heater, sell for half, good as new. 
1901 West First atreet. ■ * 

FOR SALE — TEN SECOND-HAND 
safes, cheap, and on easy terms. 
Write J 422, Herald. 

FOR SALE. CHEAP — SET OF MARA- 
bou, also several yards of bear fur. 
Call Melrose 6093. 

FOR SALE — CANARY BIRDS FROM 
$2 up. Barber Shop. 107 East Su- 
perior street. 

FOR SALE— FEW PIECES OP FUR- 
nlture. 1611 East Fourth street; 
Melrose 109«. 

FOR SALE — "$75.00 PRACTICALLY 
new Colonial heater. Call 231 East 
Fifth street. 

FOR SALE — FINE COAL RANGE, 
bench w^rlnger. reasonable. 516 Lake 
avenue north. 

FOR SALE— PRACTICALLY NEW $80 
Jewel base-burner; will sell cheap. 
Melrose 6418. 

FOR SALE— POLAND CHINA PIGsTl 
months old. $4 each. Call Lincoln 
516-A. 

FOR SALE— KITCHEN TABLE AND 
leather couch. 1128 East Third 
street. 

FOR SALE— FURNITURE. ODDS AND 
ends at half price, Boston Music Co. 

FOR SALE — SECOND-HAND SAF^ 
and desk. 406 West Superior street. 

FOR SALE— AUTOMATIC BASEBALL 
machine. Address P" 388. Herald. 



PROFESSIONAL AND 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY 

A buyers' : nformation department open to representative firms and 
professional men. If your business is not represented below, phono 
324 and file application. Herald readers who do not find the line of 
business they are seeking will confer a favor by requesting of us the 
information desired. 



AWNINGS, "ENTS, PACKSACKS. 

POIRIER TE?fT^''&"AWNING"^ar'4r3 
East Superlc r street. Both phones. 

Get our prices. Duluth Tent & Awn- 
Ing Co.. 160): W. Sup. St. Lin. 347-X. 



ACCOUNTANTS. 



JAAli-.,5 S. iAA V Li^t^OS, 
Certified Public Accountant, 
700-701 Alworth Building. 

— JOHN E. MACGREGOR — 

Public Aocauntant and Auditor. 

601 Sellwood Building. Melrose 670. 

DAVID QUAIL & COMPANY^ 

Chartered Accountants, 

Certified Public Accountants. 

401 Torrey building, Duluth. 

Highest references. Inquiries invited. 

ASHES, CINDERS, ETCrREMOVED 

Ashes, clndei-s and manure removed. 
Merrill. Mel. 1390; Grand 1488-X. 



EDUCATIONAL. 



CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE. !• 
East Superior street, Duluth. The 
largest commercial school in the 
Northwest, invites your patronage. 
Catalogue free. Barber & McPherson. 

PARSONS BUSINESS UnTvERSITY', 
Glencoe bldg.. 3rd ave. w. and 1st at. 



CAMERAS AND KODAKS. 



—A RCA Die CAMERA SHOP- 

110 West Superior street. Amateur fln- 

ishlng, k odaks and camera supplies. 

KODAK FINISHING AND AMATEUR 
supplies; all work guaranteed. THE 
OWL STUDiO, 6 East Superior street. 



CARPENTER REPAIR WORK. 



WORK NEATLY DONE— O. PEARSON 
& Son, 209-11 Lake Ave. N.; Zenith 
1336-X: residence Park 97; Mel. 1753. 



CARPET CLEANING WORKS. 

1908 West ].lichigan St. Both phonc.^. 



COLLECTION AGENCIES. 



Duluth ».'ollec.ion .\genev (bomied)- 
222 Manhattan Bldg. Grand 1221-A. 



FLORIST AND NURSERYMAN. 



Duluth Floral Co.. wholesale, retail cut 
flowt-rs; funeral designs. 124 W. Sup. 



FURNITURE RE-COVERED. 

Let Forsell do your UPHOLSTERING. 
334 E. Superior street. Both phones. 

GRADINGT^ODDING AND SEEDIN^ 

GRADING. SODDING AND SEEDING. 
Also black dirt, sandy loam and ma- 
nure for sale. Keedy. Both phones. 



HARNESS SHOP. 



ir— ^ 



HARNESS OILED AND REPAIRED IN 
first-«tesrs condition 31 East First st. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 



A. Haakonsen, dealer 
.ind expert repairing, 
at J. W. Nel.son's, 6 
East Superior street. 

Pianos, violins, vlctrolas, shett music, 
etc. Boston Music company. 




PATENTS. 

All about patents; con.^ultation free. 
S. Geo. Stevens, 716 Fidelity. Mel. 3125. 



CHIMNEYSWEEP. 



ED Mccarty, chimney sweep and 

furnace cle aning. Call Lakeside 46-L. 

Knudson. chimney sweep, and furnace 
cleaner. Fite headquarters. Mel. 46. 



CIVIL ENGINEER AND SURVEYORS 



ALEXANDER & FARRELL, Engineers 
and surveyors, 418 Manhattan Bldg. 



DEALF.RS IN SACKS. 

We sell sacks of all kinds. Write for 
quotations. L. Karon Iron & Metal 
company. Eighteenth avenue west 
and Railroal street. 



PAWNBROKERS. 



Loans $1 to $1,000 on watches, dia- 
monds, shotguns, rifles, furs, etc.; 
firearms held till hunting season. 
Keystone Loan Co., 22 West Sup. St. 



PLUMBING. 



THE SANITARY PLUMBING CO.. 34 
W. Fir.-;t St., plumbing arfi heatic*;. 



REAL ESTATE. 

L. A. LARSEN CO., 213 Provldenc" Bldg.' 
City property, lands, loans, ftre ins. 



DIAMONDS. 



DIAMONDS, 1.1 KARAT, $20; H KAR- 
at, $40. Dia nonds sold on easy pay- 
ment plan. Keystone Jewelry com- 
pany, 22 West Superior street. 



UPHOLSTERING. 



Theo. Thompson, upholstering & furnl- 
ture finishing. 411 E. Sup. St. Mel. 2828. 



DANCING ACADEMY. 

COFFIN'S ACADE.MY — Classes Monday 
Tuesday and Thursday. Either phone. 



TYPEWRITERS. 

TYPEWRITERS^— ALL MAKES OF 
used machines at bargain pricea. Some 
used only few months and as good 
as new; rented $2 per month; $5 per 
three months; three months rental 
applied on purchase. Send for list. 
DULUTH TYPEWRITER CO., 
819 West First Street. 



SUBSCRIBE FOR THE HERALD 



HORSES, VEHICLES, ETC. 



HORSES— G 
Take a look a 
class and qual 
and look ov? 
want sound, > 
free from expc 
city markets, 
with every ho 

We give yoi 

Our cheap h 

trade, we sell 

declare their I 

TWIN POR 

W. 

18 F 



JARANTEED HORSES, 
t our horses. Note the 
ty, then take a atreet car 
r other horses. If you 
oung, acclimated horses, 
sure to the disease of the 
and a written guarantee 
rse sold. COME BACK. 
1 a little time if desired, 
orses, which we take in 

at their true value and 
ilemishes. 
TS HORSE MARKET, 

E. BARKER, 
rst Avenue West. 



ififififif^-'if^'-^'. fifififif^ifif^^fif^ififififif 

if DRAFT AND DELIVERY HORSES, if] 

if FARM MARES, GENERAL if] 

if PURPOSE HORSES. if \ 

if All our horses are Minnesota if ' 

if raised. Sales made on time if de- j^ i 

# sired. Buy from an established ^ 

if dealer. Also, we guarantee every if 

if horse to be as represented. ic 

if ZENITH SALE STABLE 

if Moses Goldberg, Prop., 

if 524 ^A'est First street, 

if Two blocks from union depot. 



ACRE^TRACTS^ 

7fi:-:rfififrfififififififif'ifififit'ififii^f^ificifif 
if ■H- 

if FOR AN ACRE HOMESITE AT if 
if ENGLEWOOD FARMS, if 

* ^ if 
if OR A5I acre cottage SITE AT * 

* PIKE LAKE, -^ 

if SEE W. VAN BRUNT, ^ 

if 105 PROVIDENCE BLDG. if 

it if 

if^if^:yil^fif^if-if'^^if'ififif-ifH^Mf^ifif^if-^ 

FOR SALE — ABOUT AN ACRE 
fronting on Pike lake; location the 
best; will make terms. M 396. Her- 
ald. 

FOR SALE — HALF ACRE AND 
rtoored tent, one mile from Wood- 
land car line. D 410, Herald. 



a- 
a- 
a- 

if 
■^^ifif'ififif'ifif: f'ififififif-^'ii'ififif^if'ififif^ 

FOR SALE— r 'RAFT, GENERAL PUR- 
pose and dr vlng horses. We have a 
select buncli to choose from, and 
guarantee tiem to be just as repre- 
sented In (.very respect. Western 
Sales Stable?, 26-28 East First street. 

FOR SALE- 5-YEAR-OLD MARE AND 
horse 8 yea -a old, city broke, single 
or double, ^iccllmated; weight 1,300 
pounds each. 6131 Tioga street. 
Park 17-X. 



RENT— STORES. OFFICES 

— FOR RENT- 



Large store room, 108 East Superior 
street; will rent very reasonable to 
May 1, 1916; suitable for any line of 
mercantile business. 



ZENITH REALTY CO., 
4 South First avenue east. 

FOR RENT— TWO NICE LARGE 
light offices, second floor. Providence 
building. Call at 218 Providence Bldg. 



FOR SALE— L 
young mare 
w^agon and 
Credit bure* 
Ing. 



IGHT DELIVERY TEAM, 
s; also double delivery 
larnesa. Duluth Jobbers' 
,u, 631 Manhattan build- 



RAILROADJ^^ 

Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road. 

"VermlUon Rontr." 



FOR SALE— r 
harness, wa 
Cole 50-A; 
ond avenue 



'EAM HEAVY HORSES, 
gon. sleighs. Telephone 
1015 South Seventy-sec- 
west. 



niLTTH- 



I Leave. 



I Arrive. 



FOR SALE— BAY HORSE, WEIGHT 
about 1,400 pounds. Inquire Bellnet 
Installment company, 202 East Su- 
perior stree' . 

FOR SALE — 5-YEAR-OLD BAY 
horse; weight 1,700; sound. S. M. 
Kaner, 1217 East Seventh street. 

FOR SALE — I WANT TWENTY 
boarders. Horses for sale. Inquire 18 
First avenue east. ^ 

FOR SALE— FINE BAY HORSE, VERY 
cheap. Inquire 1731 East Fifth 
street. ^^ 

FOR SALE— I'raft and general purpose 
horses. 820 Ith Ave, east. J. Gallop. 

FOR SALE— DOUBLE SET HAliNESS, 
good as ne\/. 417 Fifth avenue east. 

FOR REMT— COTTAGES. 



ADIEBTISE II THE HERALD 



FOR RENT 
winter coti 
place, electr 
etc.; very c< 
rled couple, 
nue south. 

FOR RENT— 
ern seven-i 
on Park Po 
rose 3999. 



— FURNISHED SMALL 
age. Park Point; Are 
ic light, hardwood floor.s, 
zy home for newly mar- 
Inquire 3405 Lake ave- 



A WARM. MOST MOD- 
oom furnished cottage 
int, only $20. Call Mel- 



FOR RENT — MODERN COTTAGE. 
Lake avenue south. Park Point. 



:i6 



wi^rk^g^rarteed; prices low; quick 
service. 123 10th Av e, east. Mel. 7392. 

DRESSMAKI>G BY THE DAY. PHONE 
Melrose 362 5 a fter 6. 

WANTED— D^SSMAKINQ BY THB 
day. M«lroi« 617S. 



Knife lUver, Two Harljors. 
Tower. Ely, Wlnt«n, Au- 
nr», Dlwablk, McKiiiloy. 
Sparta. Lveletli, Gilbert, 
Vlniinia. 



• 7:30a.m. i tll:30a.ni 

t 3:l5|i.in. i • 5:I5;.«. 

tU 30p.m. j SI0:l5p.m. 

I xlO :45p.m. 



•—Dally. tDally ciLoept Sunday. t— Mixed 
train loaves dally from Fifie<'nth Avenue Ea.«t Station. 
i — Mixed train arrives daily except Sunday at Fif- 
tesnUi Avenue Bast Station, i— Arrives Union Depot 
Sunday only. 



DULUTH, MISSABE & NORTHERN 
RAILWAY. 

Orilce: 426 Wext Superior St., 
Phone*, 969. 



Le.ire. 



Arrive. 



( Hibbiug, Clilsljulm, Virginia. Kve- 1 
*7 :40am ; leth. Coteralne. Shan/ii. tMoun- }■• 3 2lpi 

I. tain Iron, Sparta, liiwabik. 

f Hibbing. Cliishoim. Sharou, 
•3;50pm'( Virginia, Evelctli, h*IO:3l«H 

1 Coleraine. 

r Virginia. 
*7 :58pm i CiiUUolm. }*t6 :46pn 

I Hibbing. 



'-Dally, 
liin-iibili. 



t — Dally except Sunday. J— Kxcept 



— » 



Cafe Observation Car. Missabe Range 
Points. Solid Vestibuled Train. 



DULUTH A. NORTHERN MINNESOTA RAILWAY. 
Offlee. SIO Lontdalt B!dg., Dulutli. 

Trains connect at Knife Hlvfr daily (except Sun- 
diy) with D. & I. R. trains leaving Dulutli at 7;3» 
a. ni., arriving at Dijluth at .'i:35 p. m, Coonect at 
Cramer with Grand Marais stage when running. 



3 



Duluth, South Shore ^ Atlantic. 



I>eave. 



STATIONS. 



.\rrlT». 



t8:IOaro S6 



18 :40am 
Arrive. 
t7:33pBi 
i8:45ptn 
i«:30pni 
t7 :10pm 



l.ea»« 



§7 

5 

« 

§4 

§5 

iio 

f 9 
i 8 

I 8 
I 8 



30pm. 

(Soo 
lOpm. 



. . . DuluUi 
Line I'ni'tn 



.S 9:S0mi $5:40pa 



.Stati 'n.i 



. . Sui)enor . . . 

( L'nion Depot. ) 
:40am... Houghton .. 
:30am . . . (aluniet . . . 
:20am . . . Ishremlng 
:00am... Mara'iette 
:25am. Sault Ste. Marie 
.-03am.... Montreal ... 
:50>« Boaton . . . 



30am . 
OOpm. 



Montreal 
Nev« York 



.§ 9:10am 

.tl0:45pm 
.% 9::>0pm 
.SI2:08afn 
§11 :20pni 
S 5:30pm 
.{ 8:45pm 
.i 9 30am 

.f 7:45pm 



t5:IOpa 
Leave. 



M :20aia 
t6:lS 



t l>iJiT mMtx SuuUa). i— luiif. 



J 



^ ■ <i4 



-^r- ; I I ■ ' > - J ' 



" w 



,^-^.4 .. . . m 





Wednesday, 



THE UUIiUTH HERAIilJ 



September 29, 1915. 



".> 



J 




Dress 



Up 




One Cent a Word Eat-h Insertion. 
So Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

helFwante^femall 

WANTED — $150 SALARY FOR SIXTY 
days work paid lady In each town to 
distribute free circulars, and tako 
orders for White Ribbon Concen- 
trated Flavoring. J. S. Zlegrler Co., 
Chicagro. 



IT MAKES 
THE WORLD 
CHEERFUL! 



The best dressed women are the leaders of 
their social sels. The best dressed men 
are the ones who get ahead in the world, 
DRESS UP, and be ready to participate in 

Dress-Up Week! 



Watch The Herald for 
News of *DresS'Up' Week 




One Cent a Word Eaeh Insertion. 
Ho Ad venire JBient Lot. Than 13 Cents. 

TELEPHON O fRECt rT 

OF 

BUSINESS 

HOUSES. 

Rf-low you will find a 
condensed list of reliable 
business firms. This Is de- 
signed for the convenience 
of busy people. A telephone 
order to any one of them 
will receive the same care- 
ful attention as would be 
given an order placed in 
per.son. You can safely de- 
pend upon the reliability 
uf any one of these firms. 
Old New 

LAODRIES — 'Phone 'Phone. 

Peerless Laundry .... 4L'8 428 

Yale Laundry 479 479 

Lutes Laundry 447 447 




One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
Xo Advcrtisienient Less Than 15 Cents. 

autosXmotorcycles^ 




REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

INSURANXE AND 
RENTAL AGENCIES. 



•U'illiam C. Sargent, 102 Prov. Bldg. 
Duluth Realty Co., 608 1st Nat. Bldg. 
L. A. Larsen Co.. 214 Providence Bldg. 
Field-Frey Co., 203 Exchange Bldg. 



WANTED — REFINED ELDERLY 
woman looking for a good home 
rather than a big salary to look after 
house and baby 15 months old; three 
in family. Addres s C 426, Herald. 

WANTED — COMPETEnI" HOUSE- 
keeper, one who can cook; family 
of three; |20 per month; good home 
for right party. Write to Mrs. M. 
Soloskl, Cohasset, Minn. 

WOMKN WANTKD AS GOVERNMENT 
clerks. $70 month. Duluth examina- 
tions coming. Sample questions free. 
Franklin Institute. Dept. 646 Q, 
Rochester. N. Y. 

WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; good homo and 
good wages. Mrs. E. G. St. Clair, 
4327 Lombard street; Lakeside 344. 



WANTED AT ONCE — SWEDISH GIRL 
to help with housework and care of 
children; no objection to newcomer. 
Call 617 Thirteenth avenue east. 



WANTED — ^LADY STENOGRAPHER, 
experienced In law work; apply In 
own handwriting, stating salary ex- 
pected. F 427. Herald. 



WANTED— AT ONCE. AN EXPERI- 
enced cook and hall girl for Chil- 
dren's home. Fifteenth avenue eaat 
and Fifth street. 



WANTED— COMPETENT MAID FOR 
general housework; must know how 
to cook; small family. 1928 East 

First street. 



WANTED— GOOD GIRL FOR OENER- 
al housework, wages |25.00: no wa.sh- 
ing. Apply at once, 1018 East Third 
street. 

WANTED— COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housewoik; family of two. 
1829 East Seventh street. Grand 
890-D. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; good wages. Mrs. W. 
C. Gilbert, Grand Rapids, Minn. 

W^ ANTED — T^VO YOUNG LADIES TO 
work on com:ni.<slo:i In flower bu.-:l- 
nesB. 110 West Superior street. 

WANTED — EXPERIENCED GIRL 
for general housework. 2220 East 
Superior street. Melrose 910. 



WANTED— WAITJ^ESSES, OR GIRLS 
to learn; out-of-town; good salar>'. 
Apply at once, Yale laundry. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
house-work. Mrs. Frank Church, 
Hiinter's Park. Melrose 3205. 



"WANTED— $200 INVESTMENT AND 
services will give reliable young 
man working interest in good, 
steady paying business; pay any 
amount down, balance out of busi- 
ness; will pay liberal weekly salary 1 
and divide proflt.s; trial prlven for 
satisfaction; experience unnecessary; 
Investment fully secured. Call 210 
West Superior street, room 3, up- 
stairs. 

Y. M. C. A. EMPLOYMENT DEPT. 
Guarantees members will secure em- 
ployment or refund of membership 
fee; gives two months full, ten 
months limited privileges. Young 
men seeking employment in commer- 
cial, clerical or techHical lines, espe- 
clrtlly strangers, are invited to "con- 
sult with Employment Secretary. 

WANTED — YOUNG M.\N, BE A BAR- 
bor. We teach you cheaply and 
thoroughly and furnish tools free. 
Write or call for free catalogue. 
Modern Barber college, 20 Vi East 
Superior street, Duluth. 

WANTED— MAN FOR BUTTER AND 
e?g department; one with good ox- 
peilence candling' egrgs and hand- 
ling butter; steady job for right 
party. Apply after 2 o'clock. Knui- 
sen Fruit Co. 

WANTED— THOUSANDS OF GOVERN- 
ment jobs open to men and women, 
|70 month; rapid promotion. Write 
fmmf^diatelv for list. Franklin insti- 
tute. Dept. 186-G, Rochester, N. Y. 



WANTED — ANY INTELLIGENT PER- 
son may earn steady income corre- 
sponding for newspapers; experience 
unnecessary. Address Press Corre- 
spondence bureiM, Wa.'inlnj^tvin. D. C 

"WANTED — FIRST CLASS WATCH- 
maker; permanent position to com- 
petent man: must have good equip- 
ment for doing work. Call or write 
Bagloy & Co., Duluth. 

WANTED — YOUNG MAN WANTS 
partner at once to camp for winter; 
good hunting, best of fishing; lodg- 
ing ;ind board free; no boozer wanted. 
Call Cole 144-Y. 

WANTED— MEN TO SEE OUR UNRE- 
deericd shotguns, rifles, fur coata, 
overcoats, etc., all on sale. Keystone 
Loar. Co., 22 West Superior street. 

G O VE R N M E N T POSITIONS, ARE 
ea.'^y to get. My free booklet, B. Y. 
302. tells how. Write today — now. 
Earl Hopkins, Washington, D. C. 

WANTED— SALESMEN, AGENTS OR 
canvassers to solicit business from 
•amp!>s. Call Northwestern Manu- 
facturing company, 110 Oak Hall 
buililing. 



98 PEK «,r.NT OF AUTO BUYERS 
READ THE DULUTH HERALD. 

The names in which automobile li- 
censes are Issued have been checked 
with The Duluth Herald's subscription 
lists, and it was found that 98 out of 
every 100 people who buy cars read 
The Duluth Herald. , 

If you have a car for sale or trade, 
offer It In this automobile column and 
you will reach practically every one 
who will buy. 

i^ ^ 

tB- BEST USED CAR SNAPS OF * 

* THE YEAR. ^ 

* * 

7^ Biggest bargains in used cars # 
a- In the city. All just recently over- -J^ 
■?ir hauled. Prices reduced for quick •jj 
it- sale. Come in and look them over, vfr 
^ * 

^ E. M. F., 36-H. P., 5-passen- * 

*. ger $300 i^ 

a^ COLE, 35-H. P., 5-passenger.. 300 -^ 
^ INTERSTATE. 36-H. P., 5-pas- -A* 

* scnger 300 *j 

ii- RAMBLER, 40-H. P., 6-pas- *l 

;¥• senger 276 i^\ 

-^ * 

^ '»\ 

* ^ 
i(. KLEYN AUTO COMPANY. * 

* 627-29 East Superior Street. #1 

* *! 

^ FOR SALE. #1 

^ ^ 

■^ 1914 Cadillac, overhauled and t^- > 
7g> In A-1 shape: new tlre.s. Price •>¥' 
*• $900. * 

* * 

•?& One 1912 Cole. In flrst-class * 
•^ condition; new tires, electric •^ 
■ji^ lights and starter. Price $650. -^ 

■ft, 

^ JOHNSON MOTOR CAR CO., 

i^ 412 East Superior Street. *i 



WANTED — EXPERIENCED GIRL FOR 
housework; family of two. Call after 
6 o'clock. Melrose 31 92. 

WANTED — EXPERIENCED COOK, 
private boarding house; good wages. 
329 West Second street. 



WANTED— GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework. Mrs. F. G. Kleyn, 
316 Ninth avenue east. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 2714 East Seventh 
street. Melrose 4542. 



"WANTED — GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework. 619 Woodland ave- 
nue. Melrose 705. 

WANTED — EXPERIENCED WAIST 
draper. 1219 East Eighth street. 
Call Melrose 6422. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; no washing. 1727 Ea.3t 
Superior street. 

WANTED— GOOD GIRL FOR GENER- 
al housework; no washing. Call 
Melrose 2935. 



WANTED— YOUNG LADY COLLECTOR 
and solicitor. Call Room 24. La 
Salle hotel. 



WANTED— TWO MAIDS; THREE IN 
family, good wages. 1832 East Sec- 
ond street. 



WANTED^GOOD GIRL FOR GENEH- 
al housework. 2017 Jefferson street. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 223 East Third street. 



WANTED — GIRL TO ASSIST WITH 
hovisework. 1418 Jefferson street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 119 East Fifth street. 



W^ ANTED— COMPETENT COOK, 1401 
East First street. Melrose 1043. 



V^'ANTED — GIRLS FOR SEWING. 
Room 25 Phoenix building. 



WANTED— KITCHEN GIRL. APPLY 
23 West Second street. 



FOR SALE— FIVE-PASSENGER, 1916 
Studebaker touring car, lu perfect 
condition. 



ONE FIVE-PASSENGER HUPMOBILE, 
1913 model; just overhauled at the 
factory. 



See both of these cars for big bar- 
gains. 



JOHN M. FORD, 
210-212 East Superior Street. 

OXY-ACETVLENE WELDING CUT- 
tlng and carbon burning; all work 
guaranteed satisfactory or no charge. 
991/5 per cent pure oxygen for sale. 
Duluth Gas Welding Co., 2110-2112 
West Michigan St. Mel. 7064; Lin. 6 13. 

FIREPROOF GARAGE FOR STOR- 
age; low rates and the best of care 
in a steam heated building: cars 
washed and polished day or night. 
John M. Ford, garage, 210 and 212 
East Superior street; both phones. 



^^USINESS^HANCK^ 

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE — FLOUR^ 
ishing livery; complete funeral out- 
fit, in tiptop condition; established 
for twenty years; no competitor west 
of ore docks; this means all West 
Duluth, New Duluth and Gary with 
their wonderful growth due to the 
new steel plant; going at the first 
legitimate offer. Roach Bros., Fifty- 
fourth avenue and Ramsey street. 



WANTED— YOUNG MAN WITH SOME 
experience on web pres.ses or flat bed 
presses. Apply to foreman, Herald 
pressroom. 

$1 REPAIRS YOUR WATCH. WORK 
positively guaranteed. S. B. Wiseman, 
110 Oak Hall bldg.. Duluth, Minn. 



WANTED — ONE FIRST - CLASS 
plumber and one steamfltter. Spon- 
heim & Schrimhout, Proctor, Minn. 



WANTED— FI.VISH CLERK, ALSO ONE 
clerk with experience and references. 
Apply M. Weiss, Ca lumet. Mich. 

WANTED — TWO YOUNG MEN TO 
learn the barber trade. 20 '^ East 
Superior street. 



FOR SALE — FIVE-PASSENGER 30 
horsepower Regal, just overhauled, 
four new tires, good running order, 
will sell cheap. Call Zenith Auto 
Co., 123 First avenue wost; Melrose 
1366. 

—TRY • DASCO" SERVICE-^ 
High-class tlre-repairlng and auto- 
washing, accessories and all makes of 
tires. Prices reasonable. Duluth Auto 
Service Co., 329 East Superior street. 

Duluth Auto Tire Repair Co., 313 East 
Superior St.; all kinds of tires for 
sale; lowest prices; guaranteed re- 
pair work. Melrose 776. Grand 939. 

FOR SALE — FEDERAL TIRES AT 
wholesale prices to the users. Earl 
W. Bradley Motor Mart, Duluth, 
Minn. Phone Grand 907 ; Mel. 6196. 

I HAVE WEST END LOTS TO TRADE 
fo» good second hand automobile; 
give make, model and condition in 
first letter. Addre ss E 416, Herald. 

DO YOU WANT To CUT YOUR RE~ 
pair bills in two See Miscampbell. he 
will tell you how. 306 South First 
avenue east. Grand 254; Melrose 6357. 

WANTED TO BUY— SMALL, SECOND- 
hand automobile; will pay about 
$150. Inquire 330 North Central ave- 
nue, or call Calumet 558-M. 

The Eastern Radiator and Lamp Re- 
pair works, 336 E. Superior St. Grand 
2323-X. Night work by appointment. 

CHARLES J. DAHU GARAGE AND 
machine works. Fifty-sixth and 
Grand, W>st Duluth: Cole 16-A. 



One Cent a Word Bach Insertion. 
No Advertlijement Lea* Tliau 15 Cents. 

jn»AGmijiMpj9^ 

—THE MARYLA>ErilOTEL^^^^^ 
— 310 E. Superior St. Gran^ 467 — 
Neatly furnished, steam-heated, out- 
side room.s; very pleasant and comfor- 
table; hot and cold running water. 
Rates 60c day and up:47 m'thly and up. 



WANTED — FIRST-CLASS LADIES 
tailor. Frank Justyn. 205 Fidelity 
building. 



WANTED— MAN TO SOLICIT STEADY 
employment. Call A. Sherman, Hall 
hotel. 

GOT YOUR COPY OF THAT FM.VE Y. 
M. C. A. night school booklet? Ask 
for it . 

WANTED — CASH PAID FOFt diamonds! 
Watches repaired $1. B S. 5th Av. W. 

WANTED — A FORM SETTER FOR 
concrete curb work. Melrose 3092. 

Tou set most for your time and money 
At the Y. M. C. A. night school. 



FOR SALE^^^I^^^HEAP^ 3o3^00T 
launch; three-quarter cabin; fully 
equipped, with 3-cylinder Campbell 
engine. E. H. Falgren, care East 
End Ice company, 309 Sellwood 
building. 

FOR SALE— FIFTY h! R MOTOR 
boat. 25 feet long; worth $650, will 
sell for $400. Address K 424. Herald. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — WE HAVE A 
proposition that will clear $1,000 
and up per month for several 
months; exclusive sales right In this 
city and Superior; an Investment of 
at least $125 and services required. 
Call and investigate. Mr. Clark, 
room 708, Hotel Holland, 10 to 3 to- 
day and tomorrow^. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — WANTED — 
Painter to take over business of H. 
L. Searle at Deerwood. Minn.; some 
good contracts on hand; small stock; 
good tools; easy terms to good man; 
must act at once. 

BUSINESS CHANCE. WANTED — 

Salesman for well advertised office 
appliance; want a reliable man who 
is willing to do some hard work and 
get paid accordingly. Write Z 417, 
Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCE — FOR SALE OR 
rent, very reasonable small fur- 
nished new hotel; must sell account 
111 health. Write Main hotel, Crosby. 
Minn. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE OR 
Rent — Good hotel, fourteen rooms, at 
reasonable price. In Northern Min- 
nesota. Address box 123. JLittlefork, 
Minn. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — WILL INVEST 
$700 in legitimate business with 
services; state nature of business in 
first letter. Write T 414, Herald. 

NOTICE— DON'T FAIL TO SEE US IF 
you want to buy or sell a place of 
business. Duluth Business Exchange, 
509 Torrey building, Duluth 

BUSINESS CHANCE, FOR SALE — 
First-class rooming^ and boarding 
house; must leave city. Call day time 
only at 14 Chester Terrace. 

BUSINESS CHANCE— FOR SALE — 
Poor hall and bowling alleys In town 
of 3,000: would take car as part pay- 
ment. Write H 4 09. Heralcf. 

BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE — 
Light grocery store, centrally lo- 
cated: cheap if taken at once. Write 
L 412, Herald. 

FOR SALE— SALOON, BEST LOCA- 
tlon In city; good reason for selling; 
very reasonable price. Address K 
379, Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCE — FOR SALE. 17- 
room rooming house; all outside 
room.s; centrally located. Write Y 
177 . Herald. 

FOR SALE — SMALL GROCERY 
store, centrally located; doing good 
business. Write U 170 Herald. 



_SC^HGqL^FEI\IGUSIl_ 

TANIS SC'HOOlT^OF^'ENGLisii FOR 
foreigners, Winthrop block. Fourth 
Ave. W. and First St. Grand 1080-Y. 



FLORIST. 



Duluth FloralCo.. wholesale, retail cut 
flowers, funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. 



—THE NEW ALEXANDRIA— 

Furnished apartments and single 

rooms, with bath or without; private 

telephone in all rooms; dining room 

In connection. 322 West Second street. 



—ZENITH HOTEL — 
12 First Ave. east. Furnished rooms; 
steam-heated; $1.60 per week and up. 



HALL HOTEL — Fireproof— 613 W. Sup. 
St, Neatly furnished rooms, $2 per 
week. Hot and cold running water. 



WHELAN HOTEL— LOW RATES FOR 
the winter; steam heated, modern. 
Cor. Lake Ave.. Ist St. Grand 1723-Y. 



FOR RENT — Rather than pay rent on 
furniture In furnished rooms save 
money by getting a "Kelly" three- 
room outfit, price $69; payments of 
$1.50 per week. This includes fur- 
niture for bed room, dining room and 
kitchen, (choice of coal or gas 
range). Kelly Furniture company, 
17-19 West Superior street 



FOR RENT— GOOD ACCOMMODA- 
tlon for six or eight young men In 
East end home; all conveniences; 
breakfast If desired; walking dis- 
tance; references required. Write 
H 429, Herald. 



FOR RENT — LARGE. FURNISHED 
room suitable for two gentlemen or 
man and wife; rent reasonable and 
board in block. 822 East Fifth street, 
upper flat. Melrose 7442. 



FOR RENT REASONABLE — HEATED 
rooms, unfurnished, suitable for office 
or living rooms; also rooms for stor- 
age. 313 West Superior st. Mel. 6154. 



FOR RENT — CHOICE OF TWO OR 
three single or double steam heated 
furnished rooms; every modern con- 
venience. 205 vv est Third street. 



FOR RENT — MODERN. LARGE ROOM 
and kitchenette, furnished complete- 
ly for light housekeeping; furnace 
heat. 518 West Third street. 



FOR RENT— UNFURNISHED ROOMS, 
steam heated, suite of two; lake view; 
$16 and $18. Inquire Erd's Jewelry 
store, 29 East Superior street. 



FOR RENT— KITCHEN AND DINING 
room, for light housekeeping: steam 
heat; hot water, gas and light. 16 
West Second street. Flat A. 



FOR RENT — FRONT ROOM AND AL- 
cove furnished complete for light 
housekeeping; all conveniences. 119 
West Second street. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS 
for two; board If desired- private 
family, walking distance. East end. 
Call Melrose 4. 



FOR RENT — TWO FURNISHED 
rooms, cheap to right party; suitable 
for two. 406 Temple building. Mel- 
rose 4537. 



FOR RENT— FURNI.?HED, STEAM- 
heated rooms for light housekeeping; 
all conveniences. 16 East Superior 
etreet. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED R(^OM IN 
private family with privilege of 
bath and telephone. 1216 East First 
street. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED STEAM- 
heated single rooms; also light 
housekeeping rooms. ^^20 West Third 
street. 



FOR RENT — THREE FURNISHED 
rooms for housek.eepingr also two 
adjoining rooms. 228 East First 
street. 



FOR RENT— WARM FRONT ROOM; 
all modem convenience; $2 per week. 
Melrose 7045; 705 West Third street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS 
for light housekeeping; also fur- 
nished rooms. Roo m 418. 31 E. Sup. St. 

FOR RENT— TO GENTLEMAN. FUR- 
nlshed room In private home, East 
end; use of bath. Call Melrose 3542. 

FOR RENT — VERY REASONABLE, 
cozy, warm, furnished room; private 
faniily; cent ral. Melrose 4843. 

FOR RENT— VERY PLEASANT FUR- 
nlshed room for lady. Call Melrose 
7413. 1028 East Fourth street. 



FOR RENT— LARGE MODERN NEW- 
ly furnished room at 1431 East Su- 
perior street. Melrose 4529. 



FOR RENT— THREE ROOMS WITH 
water and light. Call at 816 Fourth 
avenue east, or Melrose 7426. 

FOR RENT— W^ELL-FURNISHED AND 
steam-heated rooms; reasonable for 
winter. 310 West Third street. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED FRONT 
room with alcove for housekeeping. 
2609 West Huron street. 



FOR RENT— ONE OR TWO UNFUR- 
nlshed rooms, $5 and $8 per month. 
621 East Second street. 



FOR RENT— TWO ROOMS FUR- 
nlshed for housekeeping. .524 Vi 
Fourth avenue east. 

FOR RENT— THREE ROOMS: MOD- 
ern except heat. 1025 West Second 
street; Melro se 5292. 

FOR RENT — SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE, 
$?0. 19 Mesaba avenue. Call 32 East 
Superior street 

FOR RENT — STEAM HEATED FUR- 
nlshed room, hot water. 429 East 
Fourth street. 



FOR RENT — FUR.NISHED ROOMS; 
light housekeeping allowed. 1 West 
Superior street. ^ 

FOR RENT — FOUR ROOMS. ALL CON- 
vcnlences, $14 a month. 2759 Well- 
ington street. 



FOR RENT — ROOM FOR TWO LA- 
dies or man and wife. Old phone. 
Lakeside 74-L. 



FOR RENT — FOUR ROOMS, ALL MOD- 
ern conveniences. 128 V-j West Fourth 
street. 



FOR RENT — FRONT ROOM. 115 EAST 
Third street; gentleman preferred. 



FOR RENT^ONE IJLGHT HOUSE - 
keeping room. 118 Third avenue west. 



FOR RENT— HEATED FURNISHED 
room. 321 Twenty-third avenue west. 



FOR RENT — THREE NEAT ROOMS. 
109 West Ninth street. Melrose 4896. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No AdTcrUsement Less Than 16 Cents. 

•^ it" 

-# NEW YORK APARTMENTS. * 

a- 319-321 East First Street. * 

-}{> Two six-room apartments at * 
-;¥. $40 each. These apartments are •* 
'^ very conveniently located with # 
•J^ respect to business section and H 
^ are modern in every respect '* 

* Steam heat and janitor eervlce # 
ffr included. * 

^ _ * 

■j& Seven-room house at 1426 East H' 
a^ First street; modern throughout, * 
■^ including new hot water heating * 

* plant— $42.50. "* 

* . •» 

* JOHN A. STEPHENSON & CO., * 

* Wolvin Building. * 

— FOR RENT — 
Five-room fiat at 1801 West Superior 
street; flat 7, heat, water and janitor 
service furnished; hardwood floors 
and gas stove; complete bath; rent, 
$25 per month. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement l>»s Than 16 Cents. 

nFOOIJ^-^^^FLATST" 

(Continued.) 



__JWANTEJIJO^UY^^ 

WANTED TO^BUY- SMALL ELEC- 
trlc motor, % h. p. up to 2, single 
face, alternate current, 110 volts; 
must be cheap. Write M 416, Her- 
ald. 

WANTED TO BUY — LAxSD ON CUY- 
una range; will buy or explore If lo- 
cation, price and terms are right; 
give full particulars. B 398. Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY— AM LOOKING 
for investment in Northern Minne- 
sota, land improved or unimproved. 
Address X 1915, Herald^^ 

WE PURCHASE REAL ESTATE COfT- 
tracts, mortgages and notes. Northern 
Equities Co., 612 1st Nat. Bank bldg. 

WANTED— CUT OVER LAND OR 
cheap property for Investments. W. 
H. Locker. 506 Lonsdale building. 

WANTED TO BUY — LARGE OR 
small tract of land foi- Investment 
A ddress I 69, Herold 

WANTED TO BUY— GOOD SECON'D^ 
hand covered delivery wagon. Write 
V 426. Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY — 1,000-POUND CA- 
paclty platform scale. Call Grand 
187. 



* FOR R3NT. * 

* Three-room flat 2732 West Third * 
•* street; rent ^10 per month. «■ 

« Steam-heated roc ms. 123 West * 

* Superior street, over Sorensen s * 

* shoe store; can rent single or •!*■ 

* double; (8 to $15 per month. * 

* * 

a. Nice, large, steam-heated front * 
^ room at 220 W. Superior street, * 
-» suitable for orfice or living * 

f-^ room; rent $12 per month. •»• 

ZENITH REALTY CO., * 

* 4 South First Avenue East. # 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 




PALESTINE LODGE NO. 7«, 
ir,«,= « '^• M— Rtgular meet* 
Ings first and third Monda* 
evenings of each month a% 
<:30 o'clock Next meetin», 
Oct 4, 1915. Work— Flrii 

degree. Philip M. Hanft W. M.; J. %, 

Matteson, acting secretary. 

IONIC LODGE NO. 186, A. P, 
& A. M. — Regular bu.'ilnenf 
second and fourth Monda^ 
evenings of each month at 
<:30. Next meeting, Sept. 2T- 
1^15. Work — Second degrcaC 

Chauncey C. Col ton. W. M.; Burr Porter. 

secretary. 




Six-room flat, heat, water and janitor 
service furnished, 1121,^ London road; 
two fireplaces, modern in every re- 
spect; rent $42.60 per month. 



WHITNEY WALL CO., 

801 Torrey Building. 

Grand 810. Melrose 1368. 

MODERN WEST END FLATs! 



No. 2004 West Second St. — Five room* 
and bath. 



No. 1727 West Superior St. — Five rooms 
and bath. 



No. 2821 West First St. — Five rooms, 
$20.00. 



BENJAMIN F; SCHWEIGER CO., 
1932 West Superior St. 



FOR RENT — IN THE KIMBALL 
apartments. We have two six-room 
flats which have Just been artistical- 
ly decorated throughout. These flats 
are thoroughly modern, steam heated 
and are situated In a very convenient 
location. If interested in an apart- 
ment of this size, we will be glad to 
show them at any time. F. I. Salter 
company, 303 Lonsdale building. 

FOR RENT- ON THE CORNER OF 
Tw^enty-thlrd avenue w^est and First 
street, a first floor flat which has 
five rooms and bath. This flat is In 
good condition and can be rented at 
a very reasonable price. F. I. Salter 
company, 303 Lonsdale building. 

FOR RENT — F1NI:ST SEVEN-ROOM 
modern flat In the city, centrally 
located; hot water all the year 
around; heat and Janitor service In- 
cluded; only $42.50 per month; upper 
flat. Minnesota I4ats, 120 E. Fourth st. 
See Chas. P. Meyers, 611 Alworth bldg. 

FOR RENT— FRONT FOUR- ROOM 
flat, 119 West First street; hardwood 
floors, bath, gas, electric lights, two 
large closets and large storeroom 
sixteen feet in length; only $20 a 
month. W'. C. Sherwood, 118 Man- 
hattan building. 345 



— FOR r ENT — 



5 rooms, 601 E. Firs; st. heated $40 

6 rooms. 114 Sixth A^e. E.. modern.. $32 
6 rooms, 118 Mesaba Ave., central. . .$^0 

WAHL & ]*IESSER, 
Lonsdale Bldg. 



-WAHLDORF- 



FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS IN A 
brkk building. No. 22 1^ West First 
street.- Electric lights, city water 
and toilet. This flat can be rented 
to colored people; $15 per month. F. 
I. Salter company, 803 Lonsdale 
building. 



FOR RENT— $15.00, A THREE-ROOM 
flat in brick building near Lake ave- 
nue and First street; water, sewer, 
gas, electric lights and toilet; stove 
heat; a bargain. F. I. Salter com- 
pany, 303 Lonsdale building. 



FOR RENT— ON THE SECOND FLOOR 
of 17 First avenue west, six light 
rooms, thoroughly modern except 
heat. This is a very central loca- 
tion; $22.50 per month. F. I. Salter 
company, 303 Lonsdale building. 

FOR RENT— UNTIL MAY OR JUNE 1 
exceptionally well furnished five- 
room flat, modem In every way; 
furniture all new, situated Eleventh 
avenue east; rent only $42. W. C. 
Shervvood & Co., 118 Manhattan 
building. Both phones. 

FOR RENT — FIVE -ROOM FLAT, 
bath. gas. electric light, hardwood 
floors. 227 West Fifth street, $18; 
also small four-room flat, 217 West 
Fifth street, $10. Call Broad 386-K. 



Five rooms, 220 Fi rst avenue west; 
corner; heated; Jinltor; 3 sleep- 
ing rooms; central; $45. 

WAHL & ]JESSER, 
Lonsdak Bldg. 

FOR RENT— PARTIALLY FI'RNISHED 
five-room flat, 624 Fourth avenue 
east; furnace heat $26 per month. 
Apply Henry Ha enbeck. 429 East 
Sixth street Gran d 1970-Y. 

FOR RENT — NICE, FIVE -ROOM 
flat, downstairs. Twenty-eighth ave- 
nue west and Wicklow street. Call 
2721 West Second street Mel. 1973. 

FOR RENT— FOUR- ROOM FLAT, UN- 

furnlshed; electric light and gas, 

sewer, water paid; downtown. 113 
First avenue west. 



FOR RENT — FIVE -ROOM MODERN 
flat. East Fifth street; hot water 
heat. Inquire 617 East Fifth street. 



FOR RENT— COMFORTABLE FOUR- 
room flat, also one two-room flat, 109 
East Fifth street Grand 829-A. 



FOR RENT — DESII 
house. 1130 East 
either phone 298. 



LABLE SIX-ROOM 
Third street Call 




meeting, 
master 
Stanley 
Richeux, 



KEISTONE CHAPTER Na 
«J0, R. A. M. — Stated convo- 
cations, second and fourth 
W ednesday evenings of each 
month at 7:30 o'clock. Next 
Oct 13, 1915. Wark— M.ark- 
degree, followed by lunch. 
L. Mack, H. P.; Alfred Lft 
secretary. 



- DULUTH COUNCIL NO. t, 

yV R. & S. M. — stated convoca- 

yi\ tions, third Friday of each 

Z.t \ month at 7:30 o'clock. Next 

■ meeting, Oct. 15, 1915. WorU 

— Royal and select master. Sigurd A» 

Rhode, Al fred Le Richeux, secretary. 

DULUTH C0MMA5JDER"J^ 

No. 18, K. T. — Stated con« 
tiave, first Tuesday of each 
month at 7:30 o'clock. Next 
conclave, Oct 5, 1916. Work 
— Regular business. Arch. D. Macin* 
tyre, com.; Alfred Le Richeux, recorder. 





Porter, 



SCOTTISH RITE— REGL'LAii 
meetings every Thursday eve- 
ning at 8 o'clock. Next meet* 
Ing, Sept. 30, 1916. Regular 
business and balloting. iiuiT 
secretary. 




n; 



FOR RENT— FIVE- 
water heat; first 
First street. 



ROOM FLAT; HOT 
floor. 1901 W'est 



FOR RENT— MODE 
flat, $9. Call 910 ^ 
third flat 



RN THREE-ROOM 
Vest Fourth street 



FOR RENT — FIVE 
flat, hot water he 
street. 



ROOM MODERN 
at 907 East Fifth 



FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE 



a- REGARDING LO 
# TATE AT HU: 
■» THAT "WE ARE 



rS IN THE ES- 
vITER'S PARK 
CLOSING UP. 



FOR RENT— A FIVE- ROOM FLAT, 
which Is thoroughly modern except 
heat at 501 East Fourth street. Wa- 
ter paid by owner. F. I. Salter com- 
pany, 303 Lonsdale building. 



FOR RENT — OCT. 1 — FIVE- ROOM 
brick flat; electric light, bath, hot 
water heating plant, hardwood floor.s, 
gas range; newly decorated. 407 
East Fifth street 



'^ Prices range fro 
*. at least 33 

■Sf. actual value 

•^ Location — The cl 
•SJ Hunter's Pa 

iff ated In a dis 

# building up; 

T^J and costly 

?¥• neighborhoo< 

iir School and chu 
i^ blocks; pav« 

■^ one side of 

ii^ Car service witl 
i^ beautiful ai 

-^ through this 

^ Terms — Notwtthsl 



m $635 to $750, 
per cent below 






FOR RENT — UPPER APARTMENT, 
925 East Second street; bath, gas 
range, laundry tubs, good furnace, 
$23.50; water paid. Melrose 1801. 



FOR RENT — SEVEN- ROOM FLAT AT 
716 West Second street; heat and 
water furnished; $30.00. William C. 
Sargent, Providence building. 

FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM STEAM- 
heated flat; hardwood finish; hot and 
cold water. 226 East First street 
Inquire Peerless laundry. 

FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM FLAT; 
central; all modern except heat; 
$12.50 per month. See Chas. P. Mey- 
ers, 611 Alworth bldg. 

FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM MODERN 
flat, $16 per month. 2815 West 
Third street. Cooley & Underbill, Ex- 
changc building. 

FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM FLAT; 
water, gas. toilet; $12 per month. 
225 Twenty-flrst avenue west, or 
phone Melrose 6559. 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM MODERN 
flat; heat furnished; central West 
end; $27. Field-Frey Co., 204 Ex- 
change bui lding. 

FOR RENT — MODERN, CENTRAL, 

newly decorated, seven -room ai^art- 

ment In San Marco, 224 West Third 

. street. 

FOR RENT— LARGE SIX-ROOM FLAT 
newly decorated; all conveniences; 
janitor service. 821 East First street. 

FOR RENT— 7-ROOM FLAT IN DACEY 
boar<l; hot water boat; private board- 
ing house. 2820 West Second street. 

FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT; ALL 
modern except heat; newly decorat- 
ed. Call 716 East Seventh street. 

FOR RENT — MODERN SIX-ROOM 
flat; steam heat. Inquire Rental de- 
partment, Bridgeman-Russell Co. 

FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM FLAT, 1112 
West Third street. Inquire 1326 Lon- 
don road. Melrose 2703. 

FOR RENT— FIVE LARGE LIGHT 
rooms, $10 per month, water included. 
20 West Seventh street 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FL A T, 
modern except heat. 632 West Third 
street; $23 per month. 

FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM MODERN 
flat, 7'^ East Fifth street Inquire 
6'/^ East Fifth. 

FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM FLAT, 
very central, 30 Fourth avenue east. 
Melros e 6643. 

FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM UPPER 
flat 1014% East Third street, $16.00. 
Melrose 664 3. 

FOR RE.NT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT; 1323 
Jefferson street; modern except heat. 
Melrose 6227. 

FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM FLAT; 
water and light 2401 West Fourth 
street. 

FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM MODERN 
flat. S. S. Williamson, 615 Torrey 
building. 

FOR RENT— FIVE- ROOM MODERN 
heated flat. 813 West First street. 

FOR RENT — NICE FIVE-ROOM 
flat Inquire 424 Ninth avenue ea«t. 



that this pr 
considerably 
easy terms 
given — $25 c 
Make appoin 



lolcest part of 
rk. Ideally sltu- 
trict that Is fast 
many beautiful 
homes in this 
1. 

■ch within two 
d street bounds 
property. 

lin two blocks; 

ito drives wind 

neighborhood. 

anding the fact 
aperty is offered 
below value, 
of payment are 
ish will handle, 
tments now. 



ZENITH CHAPTER NO. 
Order of Eastern Star — Reg» 
ular meetings second and 
fourth Friday evenings of 
each month at 7:30 o'clock. 
Next meeting, Sept. 24, 1916. Regular 
business and balloting. Ida Turneiv 
W. M.; Ella F. Gearhart, secretary. 

' EUCLID CHAPTER NO. bt. 

Order of the Eastern Star- 
Meets at West Duluth Ma- 
sonic temple the first and 
Tuesdays of each month 
Next meeting, Tuesday 
21, 1916. Regular busf- 
C. Melin, W. M., Pearl H. 



W third 
at 8 o'clock, 
evening, Sept. 
ness. Hannah 
Boerner, secretary. 




MIZPAH SHRINE, NO. 1. 
Order of the White Shrine ot 
lerusalem — Regular meeting* 
first Saturday evening of each 
month at 8 o'clock. Next 

meeting Oct. 2, 1915. Regu- 
lar business. Carrie Wilson, W. H. P.l 
Etta Trev iranus, W. S. 

EUCLID LODOE, NO. 138. /^ 
F. & A. M.— Meets at West 
Duluth, .second and f' urth 
Wednesdays of each month at 
7:30 p. m. Next meet, sep- 
cial, Oct 2, 1916. Work- 

degree. J. H. Medland, W. M.| 
A. Dunleavy, secretary. 

^DULUTH CHAPTER, NO. 5>» 
R. A. M. — Meets at We.-'t Du- 
luth first and third Wednes- 
days of each month at 7:30 
p. m. Next meeting, Oct. 6, 
Work — Entertainment. W. A, 
Pittinger, H. P.; A . Dunleavey, secretary, 

LAKESIDE LODGE, NO. 281, 




Third 




1915. 





W. M. PRIN 
Lonsdal 



DLE & CO., 
i Bldg. 



FOR SALE— ELEGANT LOT 45x100 
feet fine location, near East Fourth 
street; gas. sewei and \vater in the 
lot; price $1,400; easy terms. Little 
& Nolte Co., Exchange building. Our 
auto at yovir service. (207-3) 

FOR SALE-^PROPI IrTY, 213 AND 215 
West Third street; very cheap and 
very easy terms. Inquire E. F. Burg, 
224 "West First street. 

FOR SALE — CITY PROPERTY, 
houses and lots; farms and timber 
land. O. G. Olson, 314 Columbia Bldg. 

FOR SALE— HOUSES, FLATS, LOTS 
and lands by L. J^. Larsen company, 
213-214-215 Providence building. 



business. Jesse Norton, W. M.; Ruben 
Johnson, secretary. 

TRINITY L<3DGE. NO. 282, A, 
F. & A. M. — Meets first and 
third Mondays at 8 o'l lock, 
in Woodman hall. Twenty- 
first avenue west. Next meet- 
I ihg, Oct 4, 1915. Work— 

I First degree. Carl E. Lonegrcn, W. M.| 
I R. E. Wheeler, secretary. 

A. O. U. W. " 

FIDELITY LODGE, NO. 105 — 
Meets at Maccabee hall, 21 
Lake avenue north, every 
Thursday at 8 p. m. Visiting 
members welcome. F. C. Or- 
chard, W. M.; A. E. Piering. recorderi 
G. J. Murvold, financier, 217 East First 
street. 





east. O. 
building; 



First street. 



ZENITH COUNCIL, NO. 161, 
Royal league, meets the first 
and third Thursdays in th» 
month, at 8 o'clock, in the 
old Masonic temple, Superior 
street and Second avenuo 
S. Kempton, archon, Wolvin 
H. A. Hall, collector, 18 East 



JWMiyiES^^^EPAIREp^ 

Bring your watch to Garon Bros, to 
have it repaired light. 217 W. 1st St. 



SJCRET^OCIETIES^^ 

^ M O D E R V BROTHERHOOD 
OF AMERICA.- Duluth Cen- 
tral lodge No. 450, M. B. A., 
meets first and third Tues- 
days at '. 18 West Superior 
street. Claries V. Hanson, 
secretary, 507 West Fifth street. Ze- 
nith phone No. 221 L-Y Grand. 






MODER 
ALPHA C 

Take notit 
degree nr 
fourth Thi 
maritan d 
third Thursdays at 
Fourth avenue wes 
W. B. Henderson, 
Welbanka, scribe; 
201 First National ; 
W. N. Donaldson, L 



^ SAMARITANS. 
OUNCIL, NO. 1— 
e: That Beneficent 
eets second and 
irsdays and the Sa- 
^gree the first and 
U. O. F. hall, corner 
t and First street. 
G. S.; W^illace P. 
F. A. Noble, F. S., 
3ank building. Mrs. 
ady G. S. 




floor. Joseph 



East Fifth street. 



0RDI:R OF OWLS Du- 
luth Nest No. 1200— 
Meetings are held every 
Wednesday evening at 
Owls hall, 418 West Su- 
perior street, second 
J-Z. F< aks. secretary, 302 




LOYAL MYSTIC LEGION OF 
AMERICA.-North Star Coun- 
cil No. 6(, meets first and 
third Mondays, In the U. O 
F. hall, Fourth a>'enue west 

and First street. Dr. F. H 

Connor, W. C; C. J. Refuss, secretary' 
312 East Fifth stre et '' 

' M. W. A. 

IMPERIAL CAMP, 2206 

Meets ai Forester hall. 
Fourth avenue west and 
First street second and 
fourth Tuesdays of each 

Tn .. X J^^^n*^/*- ^- ^- Eagles, consul: 
Robert Rankin, c erk, care Rankin 
Printing company. 

kffl A CLAN STIJWART, NO. 50, O. 
S. C. — Mtets first and third 



DULUTH LODGE, NO. 28. L 
O. O. F. — Next meeting, Fri- 
day evening. Oct. 1, 1915. at 
8 o'clock. 221 West Superior street, 
third floor. Work — Regular business; 
all Odd Fellows welcome. E. Ander- 
son, N. G.; Helmer Johnson, Rec. Sec. 

MAJESTIC REBEKAH 
Lodge, No. 60, I. O. O. F. 
Regular meetings first and 
third Thursday of each 
ninnth, 8 p. m., 221 West Su- 
perior street, third floor. 
Next meeting, Oct. 7, 1916. 
Work — Regular business. 
Katherine McDonald, N. G.; Lil- 
Johnson, secretary. Grand 2113-Y. 

K. OF P. * 

NORTH STAR LODGE, NO. 
35, K. OF P. — Meets every 
Tuesday. 7:30 p. m. at Cas- 
tle hall, Temple building, 
Superior street, corner Sec- 
ond avenue east. Next meeting, Sept. 
7, 1915. Work — Regular business. 
Chailes V. McCoy, C. C. 810 Torrey 
building; R. A. Bishop. K. of R. and 
S., 505 Palladio building: Burt A. 
Rowe, M. of F., 206 First National 
Bank building. 

WOODMEN OF THE 
WORLD — Zenith Cam-p, 
No. 5, meets second and 
fourth Fridays at 8 o'clock 
sharp at Foresters' hall. 
Fourth avenue west and 
First street. J. H. Larkin, 
Sixtieth avenue east 





clerk. 
Phone, 



312 
Lakeside 23-K. 







Wednesdays each month, 8 p. 
m., U. O. F. hall, corner Fourth 
ave. west and First st. Next 
regular meeting, Srpt. 29, 1915. Angus 
G. Macauley, chiel ; John Gow, sec; 
John Burnett, fin. sec, 313 Torrey bldg! 

BENEVOJ IeNT ORDER OF 
Beavers— Duluth Lodge No. 

_ 166, B. O B., meets Monday! 

Sept. 20, and Oct. 4, 1916, at Moose hall, 

224 West First ctreet Charles D. 

Bowen, secretary, 922 East Second 

street Phone Grand 1383-D. 

~ "ai,^ WEST DU LUTH LODGE, NO 

\ffKf 1478, Loyul Order of Moose," 

B^^I^ meets every second and fourth 

^^■P Wednesda >rs at Moose hall, 

^^■^ Ramsey street and Central 

avenue. H. J. Wl ite, secretary. 201 

North Fifty-second avenue west 



WE-KE-MA-WUP TRIBE, 
17, I. O. R. M., meets the 
&6«cond and fourth Tuesday* 
of the month. Ht 8 p. m. 
sharp, at Owls' hall, 418 
West Superior street, sec- 
ond floor. L. A. Hector, 
sachem; S. J. Bennett, chief of rec- 
ord, 213 West First street^ 

DULUTH TEMPLE, NO. 186. 
Camels of the World, meeta 
every Wednesday evening at 
8 o'clock sharp, at Axa hall, 
221 West Superior street, 
over Stone's book store. 
Initiation, followed by card party, 
Wednesday evening. Sept. 29, 1915. W\ 
H. Konkler, ruler, phone Grand 909-Y: 
Martin Johnson, secretary, phone Grand 
1588. 

DULUTH HOMESTEAD, NO. 

3131, Brotherhood of Amer- 
ican Yeomen, meets every 
Wednesday evening at 8 
o'clock sharp, in Maccabee 
hall, 21 Lake avenue north. J. C 
Wesenberg, foreman; J. J. Palmer, cor- 
respondent, office in his drug store, 
2132 West Third street. Melrose 3769; 
Lincoln 611-Y. 

A. O. U. W.— DULUTH LODGE 
Xo. 10 — Meets every second 
and fourth Tuesday nights at 
Axa hall, 221 West Supe- 
lior street. Next meeting, 
Sept. 28. 1915. at 8 p. m. John 
Norgran, M. W.; R. G. Foote, recorder; 
George J. Sherman, financier, 213 First 
National Ba nk building. 

"-- DULUTH LODGE No! 506' 

mM|^ Loyal Order of Moose, nreeta 

HLfV^ every Tuesday at 8 o'clock, 

^KI Moo.<5e hall. 224 West First 

^^^ street. Carl Schau, secretary* 

14 Third avenue east 





i 




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» I 



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fom 



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0f^m^-y!mimmmm 



LIST EPmou 



THE DULUTH HERAL 



VOLUME XXXIII— NO. 150. 



THURSDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 30, 1915. 



HiSTOHiGAEYO cents. 




DVANCING WITH IRRESISTIBL 





KILLED AND 100 INJURED 
EW ORLEANS BY HURRICANE 
HIGH SWEEPS TO THE NORTH 



NOW CENTRAL MONEY SUBSCRIBED BY 

BANKS TO FOREIGN LOAN 
TO REMAIN ON DEPOSIT 



OVER INTERIOR 
OF MISSISSIPPI 

Wind Attains Velocity of 

Between 120 and 130 

Miles an Hour. 



Gale Is Advancing' Toward 
North With Greatly Di- 
minished Force. 



Communication Between 

Mobile and New Orleans 

Again Cut Off. 



New Orleans. La., Sept. 30. wireless 
by steamers Excelsior and Creole to 
Mobile. — Ten persons are known to 
have been killed. lEO injured and prop- 
erty loss exceeding $1,000,000 caused 
by the destructive West Indian hurri- 
cane which struck this city at 6 o'clock 
last night. 

At Intervals a terrific gale swept 
through the city at a velocity of 120 
to 130 miles an hour, according to the 
figures of the local weather bureau, 
and the average prevailing velocity 
between B:30 and 7 p. m.. was more 
than 80 miles an hour. Many schools 
and churches have been damaged. The 
famous French market was partly de- 
molished and the Masonic temple is a 
partial wreck, the roof of the tow^er 
having collapsed. More than 8,000 tele- 
phones are out of order. 

Owing to precautions taken on re- 
ceipt of weather warnings yesterday, 
damage to shipping Is alight, except to 
small craft. The downtown hotels and 
public buildings were filled with ref- 
ugees who were marooned there 

(Continued on page 10, fifth column.) 

STEAMER HELD BACK 



(ARRANZA mm. REPORTS 
CAPTURE Of CITY Of TORRfON 




To Be Held Until Needed 

and Then Withdrawn 

Proportionately. 



WHffif THE GERMANS AND 
• Tiff AUIES ARE fKliTING 




JOFFRE'S TROOP''^ GAIN FOOTING 

AT VARIOUS F JiNTS ON GERMAN 
SECOND.|{INE OF DEFENSES 



Syndicate Members to Pur- 
chase at 98 With Refund 
of 1 3/i Per Cent. 



One-Fourth of 1 Per Cent 

Will Be Used to Cover 

Expenses. 



GEN. OBREGON. 

Vera Cruz, Sept. 30. — The city of Tor- 
reon fell to Gen. Obregon late yester- 
day afternoon, according to a brief 
telegram from Gen. Obregon to Gen. 
Carranza received last night. Gen. Car- 
ranza on receiving the message, imme- 
diately gave orders for the ringing of 
all the church bells In the city. 



New^ York, Sept. 30. — The committee 
in charge of the sale of the $500,000.- 
000 Anglo-French bonds has cleared 
away a number of details concerning 
the method of marketing the issue and 
expected to announce tlie entire pro- 
gram late today. 

Chief of the details settled were 
that the life of the underwriting syn- 
dicate is to be sixty days, the sums 
subscribed by banks will be left on 
deposit with the subscribers until 
needed and then withdrawn propor- 
'. tionately and the profit of the syndi- 
cate members will be 1?4 per cent, the 
remaining M of 1 per cent being used 
for expenses. The syndicate members 
ro«y participate wltliout restriction as 
to the amount of their subscriptions. 

Undecided details concerned chiefly 
the date of the offering and the terms 
to installment Investors. 

Nine Points Asreed Upon. 

A memorandum containing nine 



ENGLISH PAPER SAYS 
LOAN IS A BLUNDER 



BY TERRiFiC GALES '^^"^^^^^^^ Guardian Says 

It Will Prove Costly, Polit- 
ically and Financially. 



Espagne Arrives at New 

York With Americans 

Two Days Late. 



(Continued on page 3, fifth column.) 

BRITISH GENERALS 
KILLEDjN BAHLE 

Lieut. Gen. Capper and 

Maj. Gen. Thesiger Victims 

of British Offensive. 



Capture of an Important Work of the 

Germans; South of Ripont Announced 

By the War Office. 

Berlin Admits Loss of Hill No. 191 to 
Allies as Result of Great Bat- 
tle Now Raging. 

Map Showing a Section of the Battle Line on Which New Offensive to ■ 

Break German^ West Front Is in Progress and Describing the Farthest | ,^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^,^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
Positions Attained By the Teutonic Forces in September and October i «-^ w^v-^^v.^ve-«^»^^ 



Last Year. 



TERRIFIC CONFLICT 
FOR CITY OF LENS 

Capture of This Place Would Give the 

Allies a Possibility of Once More 

Reoccupying Lille. 

^^— ■ ■ 

London, Sept. SO. — Th- great strug- i the prelude to what Is coming. At any 
gle on the western front has now re- Tate the public would be disappointed 



GERMANS ADMIT LOSS 

Berlin, Sept. 30, via London, 3:46 p. m. — Loss of another 
position in France to the allies as a result of the great battle 
now in progress is announced in the official statement from 
the war office today. The Germans lost Hill No. 191. 

Paris, Sept. 3C. — In continuation of the general offensive move- 
ment on the western front the French have captured an important 
defensive work oi the Germans south of Ripont, it was officially an- 
nounced by the var office today. 

In the Champc gne, French troops have gained a footing at vari- 
ous points on the German second line of defense, the official statc-^ 
ment adds. 

The text of the communication fol- 



solved itself clearly ijito a battle for 



If the movement were not sustained. 
There Is the usual speculation as to 



Lens in Pas de Calais, nine miles J the shifting of German forces from 

northeast of Arras. The capture of this: Jj^f east to the west, although any- 

,. ^, ,, thing like reliable information is lack- 

town with Its radiating railways, ! ^^g. As against the report that some 
would bring into the foreground the i Prussian guards have been hurried 

possibility of retaking Lille. \Y,^^^\ ^}^^^^ ^.\^ ^ rumors that Field 

Marshal von Hindenburg, .still bent on 
taking Dvinsk has been reinforced 



Both north and south of Lens the 
allies hold high ground dominating 
the town — the British on Hill No. 70, 
the French on Hill No. 140. the high ! fresli' "troops, 
crest between Souchez and Vimy. j victor>- in Mraopotamla. - 

The official report from Paris last 1 The victory of the British over the 

night said merely that this crest had ; T"/^^.,'." M«?sopotamla brings Gen. Sir 
, - »». » V, ' John Nixon s men within 150 miles of 

been reached, so that piesumably a Bagdad. The news came unheralded 
terriffic counter-attack la raging | to London, as the fighting in that 
there today, with final mastery of this] Quarter had been almost forgotten 



lows: 

"The only resistance of the enemy 
in the Artols district has been a very 



RUSS GAINING 
IN TERRITORY 



heavily. Moreover. the Austrlans, 

Judging from their new successes 1" ! AH\/onr>/i r\i T\»#on + \/ Cii/Q 

the south, apparentlty have received , AUVanCe OT IWeniy-rlVe 



the Importation of gold which brings 

no profit, the Manchester Guardian 

Espagne arrived today from Bordeaux | declares editorially "there is no rea- 



New York, Sept. 30. — The steamer 



London. Sept. 30. — The British oas- 
London, Sept. 30. — Asserting that ualties in the recent offensive action 
American bankers naturally prefef a j p^ tvie western front Included Lleut.- 
loan with some 110.000,000 profit to j Gen. Sir Thompson Capper and MaJ.- 

" G. H. Thesiger, both killed. 



Important position at stake. Rain, fog 
and soggy ground have l)een hamper- 
ing both the contenders and limiting 



Whether the British will try to push 
on to Bagdad Is problematical, but the 
concen.'sus of opinion here is that the 



Miles Reported on Svients- 
yanvo-Glubokoi Railway. 



two days late, having been held back 
by terrif'c gales during the last half 



son. however, why .the government 
should Indulge in what has every ap 



of the voyage. On Tuesday the steam- pearance of being a blunder as costly 
er was hove to for twenty-four hours politically as financially." 
during the height of a southwest gale. Insisting that the loan would oe in- 
which caused enormous seas to wash ; valid unless approved by parliament, 
over the vessel. i the (Juardlan adds: 

After leaving Bordeaux the E.«pagne ' "Seldom has a financial transaction 
■teamtd with all lights out at night been imposed upon the British people 
and used various precautions during which cried out so loud for justlflca- 
the day to disguise her movements as . tion. It may be that Mr. Morgan and 
German submarines had been reported his associates have done the allies a 
In the Bay of Biscay. A number of ; good service and earned a reward, but 
Americans who have been doing hospl- if so it would be cheaper to present 
tal work in France were among the i them with their £2,000.000 and forego 
arrivals. - | a loan so damaging to our credit." 



MOST 




GUNS 



USED BY THE FRENCH 

First Line of German Defenses Swept 
By Pitiless Fire From Artillery 

of Invaders. 



Gen. 



the activities of air craft. A few days | resistance of the Turks in this region 

of clear, dry weather might have a ; has been crushed. Some sections of the 

marked bearing on developments. \ British press seo in this victory the 

Ou Thirty-Mlle Ji^ont. ; addition of another British colony. 

The offensive 'it the allies thus far I "^Vhatever is done with the Turks 

has been confined to stretches of tlie elsewhere," S'uys the Pall Mall Ga- 

front amounting to less than thirty ' zette, "they can never bo allowed to 

miles in all. The general belief in resume their bloodstained way In the 

I England is that these attacks arc onlyi Euphrates valley." 



Germans Pushed Backward 
From the Terminal Sta- 
tion at Glubokoi. 



STILL, YOU CAN'T SAY HE'S LAZY. 



DONT'yOU THfNKlWORK HARD 
BN0U6H ALL PAV AT TH£ OFFICE 
WITHO(n" 5f€NDfMG HALF THE. 
NJQHT CiEfi^r^\i<Q UP THe CELLAR 
ANi) FiXINC- STORM WINDOWS 1 
HIRE. A MAN ! - 



Paris, Sept. 30. — A simultaneous 
movement of the French on a front of 
more than fifteen miles after a bom- 
bardment for three days of well pre- 
pared German positions, which were 
protected by dense networks of barbed | 
wire, and the use of the most recent 
creations of French artillery and the 
•helling with long range cannon of 
roads, railroad stations, while smaller I 
runs swept the entire first line of the'. 
Germans were among the elements | 
which brought success to the allied of- \ 
fensive movement in France, acccjrding I 
to the Havas agency, which has re- ! 
•ulted from a correspondent in an au- 
thorized account of the battle In Cham- 
pagne. 

"The first position, which formed the 
rrinclpal line of resistance," says the 
correspondent, "comprised from two to 
five trenches arranged in eclielons, 
with a complete accessory of defenses, 
including an impenetrable network of 
barbed wire, underground hollows as a 



protection against bombardment, and 
small forts garnished with Quick firers. 
Further there was a system of trenches 
which formed a veritable labyrinth. 
Position OrKanlxed With Carr. 
"The German general staff had the 
foresight to arrange their second line 
of resistance on the heights dominating 
to the south of the valley of the Py. 
The position^ had been organized with 
care. Between the two positions, sep- 
arated by a distance of from two to 
two and a half miles, all the cutting 
in the ground had been prepared witli 
a view to defense inch by inch. 

"Communicating trenches, uniting 
the two lines and protected by acces- 
sory defenses, permitted the dividing 
of the ground in each part of the 
line as it yielded. 

"For thrt-e days our batteries bom- 
barded the German positions. We made 
use of the most recent artillery and 
were able after an examination of the 
conquered trenches to witness its 
dreadful effect. At certain points the 
leveling of the trenches was complete. 

(Continued on page 10. fifth column.) 




He ♦CICKS LIKE 
THJ5 AT HOME 




Petrograd. Sept. 80, via London 

Territorial gains of considerable ex- 
tent by the Russians are indicated by 
the latest Information received at the 
war office. The Germans have been 
pushed backward "rom the terminal 
station at Glubokoi on the Svientsyan- 
vo-Glubokoi railway, to a point mid- 
way to the Vilna-Dvinsk railway. The 
position thus reach* d is the station of 
Poslawy, repreEen:ing a gain of 
twenty-five miles. 

In the district ■west and south of 

Molodechno the Germans have been 
forced back eight miles across the 
Lida-Molodechno railway, beyond the 
village of Krewo. 

At no part of tie northern lines 



violent bombardment of our new po- 
sitions to the east of Souchez. 
Pootin^ on Second Line. 

"In the Champagne district we hav« 
secured a footing at several po1?it8 ia 
the trenchf-s of the German second 
line of defense, to the west of Butt* 
de T.ihure, and to the west of tho 
Navarin farm. At this latter point 
certain detachments of cur troopa 
made their way through and resolutely 
advanced beyond the German llne% 
but It was impossible for them to 
maintain this advance because of a 
curtain of flre maintained by the Ger» 
man artillery ap well as a very violent 
flanking rifle fire. Our men, however, 
hold firmly the point.g conquered by 
them on the second line of the enemy. 
Complete Conquest of First Line. 

"To the south of Ripont we hav* 
enlarged and conipleted our conquest 
of the first line German positions by 
taking possession of a portion of th« 
Important supporting works known lo- 
cally as the Ouvrage de la Defalt* 
(the defeat earthworks). 

"The night pas.sed quiet along th« 
remainder of the front. 

"In spite of most unfavorable at- 
mospheric conditions our aircraft 
squadrons yesterday bombarded the 
lines of communication behind the 
German front. Shells were thrown 
down on the railway stations In th« 
valley of La Sulppe at Bazancourt, 
Warmeriville, Pont Faverger and St, 
Hilalre-le-Petlt, as well as u pon ft 

(Continued on page 3. fourth column.) 

AMERICAlTiHlP iS 
BLOWN UP BY MINE 



Crew of Vincent Saved 

Thougii Captain and 

Three Men Injured. 

T\'ashlngton, Sept. 30. — The Amer- 
ican sailing ship Vincent was bTown 
up Sept. 27 by a mine off Cape Orloff 



have Geritnan galmi "been announced' '" the White sea and is a total losa, 
although battles of great intensity are , The crew was saved, but Capt. Amber- 
being fought on the line from Kozlany i ^^n and three men were injured. They 
on the Disna river to Krlvo, a distance. " , . ^ ■, , v. w i » 

of sixty miles in a straight line. On : "e being treated in a hospital at 
account of a beni to Include the Archangel. Consular dispatches to th» 
Vlliy a line to Smornon, the actual ex- \ g^gte department today reported th# 
(Continued on page 3, fourth column.) disaster. 

wmmWWmmi 



the Entente allies 
nt is nanklng Im- 
!i the Champagne 
Paris claims a 
d Berlin concedes 
vc gained ground, 
1 \o. 191, north of 

lost to the Ger- 



he w/(ll h<k6 around a 
Swamp for houps trvinq 

TO GET A SHOT AT A DUCK 



it 



The prreat drive ol 
on the western fro 
portant headway 1 
region of France, 
notable advance an 
that the French ha 
announcing that HII 
Mnssiges, has been 
mans. 

It Is liltewlse admitted by German 
army headquarters hat French troops 
succeeded In penetiatliig the <iern»an 
lines in two sniiiil sections near 
Souchez, south of I ens, in tlie Artols 
reirlon. 

French attnclts south of Arras were 
I easily repulsed while a brigade that 
! pushed through the German outer line 
: at one point in the Champagne was 
broken up, 800 m« n being captured 
' and the others destroyed, Berlin de- 
clares. 

The Paris war office, in chronicling 
the advance in th<^ Champagne, an- 
nounces that n fo4»ting in the second 

j <:ernian line of defense was secured at 

I several points. 

The district wesi of the Butte de 
Taure and that to the west of the Na- 
varin farm are mentioned In connection 
with the Chanipagnr advance. 

In this district thr French arc push- 
ing for the stratci^etlc railway line 
Just behind the German front and ac- 
cording to their ell inui must noYV be 
▼cry close to it. 



Important .«npporting works to th» 
south of Ripunt in this section als4»- 
>%ere takcit. Paris asKcrts, eompletlns 
the conqucKt uf the fircit German de- 
fense line. 

Tlie only resistance of the German» 
in the Artols diKtrict wliere the Brit- 
ish and French are pushing their line* 
for«vard toward I-ens with the eventiutf 
taking of the important city of I. tile 
apparently in view, was an extremely 
violent bombardment of the new allied 
positions east of Sonehex, I'aris reports. 

Si.ii (ierman Zeppelins were slighted 
today northeast of Brussels hound i« 
a westerly direction. Their route 
would take them eventnally to tha 
Kngllsh channel, flanked by Dover and 
Calais. 

The Bussians are still holding off~ 
FlcI<I Marithal von Hindenburs's attacka 
nt Di'lnxk. hut are apparently having; 
more difTiculty In resisting the enerRetio- 
movement he Is making against thena 
near Osmiana, southeast of A Una. in 
the development of a sweep to south- 
eastward in an effort to head off tha 
Itussian Baronovlchi army. Petrograd 
admits tluit the RuKslans have been 
forced to retire somewhat in the Os- 
miana region. While the Ituswian forces 
are seemingly i" a retrttKrade move- 
ment again In Volh>nla. they are keep- 
ing the upper hand In (inllcla. accord- 
ing to the last reportw, drUine hack th» 
Teutons in combats along the Stripa. 

The Greek citamber has ratlfled th*- 
go^crnment's decree of niobilicatl«ai 
land authorised a «30,0OO.O00 loan. 








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Thursday, 



THE DUiLUTH HERALD 



September 30, 1915. 



MM*MM*MMMMMMMMM*«MMMMMMMMMMMM»MMM*MMMMMMM«MlfM^MHMMllMM 







Announce 



h 



D 

r 



OPENING 

With Styleplus Clothes $17 
a Big Feature 

We Should Say the ''Big Feature"— 

BECAUSE— STYLEPLUS Suits and Over- 
coats appeal to so many men — in quality and 
in price. 

BECAUSE — Without a single exception, 
every customer of ours who has made a Style- 
plus purchase in the past seasons has never had 
a cause for complaint. 






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n 

M 

m 
m 

m 

M 

m 
m 
m 

M 
M 
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M 

m 

M 
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^MMMMMMMMMMRggMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM 



TRIMMERS TO 
HAVEJSPLAY 

Duluth and Superior Win- 
dow Decorators Will Give 
Demonstration. 



N^Tvrk 



Stereopticon Vjews of the 

Prize-Winning Windows 

Will Be Shown. 



BECAUSE — Lastly, in our opinion, nothing in our 
entire stock of high-grade clothing givdB anyv^here 
near the value in fit, wear or style. ^ 11 

STYLEPLUS Clothes have stood the test, to the 
complete satisfaction of our patrons — they are a 
credit to a good store — hence we have installed an 
extra large stock to meet the demands of the fall 
season. 

Styles and sizes in Suits and Overcoats to fit all men, 
whether stout, short, slim, tall or of regular build — up 
to 50-inch chest measure. 



Window display men of Duluth and 
Superior will give an educatioiuil 
demonstration at the Commercial club 
this evening for the merchants and 
business m,en of the two cities. 

J. E. Hopkins, president of the Twin 
Ports Display Men's association, an- 
nounced this morning that a general 
invitation has been extended the mer- 
chants of Duluth and Superior to at- 
tend the demonstration, which starts 
at 8 o'clock. It will Include stereopti- 
con views of the prize-winning win- 
dow displays in New York city at the 
time of the annual convention of the 
International Display Men's associa- 
tion held at Gothana last spring. In 
addition, there will be talks by tho 
members of the local organization oh, I 
sign writing, shoe displays and iadie«' 
niodel draping. 

Plans for the demonstration this 
evening were made at the annual 
banquet of the association held last 
June, when committees were ap- 
pointed to arrange the program. 

"We want to show the merchants 
^ist what we are doing," Mr. Hopkins 
said this morning, "and to establish 
a cooperation between the display men 
and their 'bosses.' " 

The meeting tonight is the first 
since last June, when It was decided 
to postpone all sessions during the 
summer months. 



^f-* V.i*- 




HANCOCK NAMED 

AS COURT CLERK 



TRADE MARK REClSTEREfl* 



The same price the world over.'' 



Clothes with style and staying power for $171 There you have 
the Styleplus proposition in a nutshell. Style is easy to get — if 
you don't care how much you pay for it. Mere strength in clothes 
is easy to get — if you don't care how you look. But if you want 
to obtain style with long, faithful wear and save your money, too, 
Styleplus Clothes $17 are the COMPLETE answer. 

The vast scale of manufacturing, originality of methods, and 
scientific specialization on this one make of suits and overcoats 
enable- us to offer you : 

Style plus through-and-through quality (all wool fabrics) 

Style plus perfect fit (for every man of every age and physique) 

Style plus economy (you save $3 to $8 on each suit) 

Style plus guaranteed wear (a written guarantee with every 

Styleplus) 



Assumes Duties as Deputy 

in Municipal Court 

Office. 

M. S. Lloj-d, clerk of municipal court 
under Judge W. L. Windom, today an- 
nounced the appointment of William H. 
Hancock, Jr., as deputy. Mr. Hancock 
assumed his duties this morning, and 
will be In charge of the desk formerly 
occupied by Mr. Lloyd In Judge Win- 
dom's division of the court. 

This Is the second appointment made 
In the municipa.1 court since Judge 
Windom assumed charge recently, E. S. 
MacArthur having been selected as 
deputy in the criminal room, under 
Judge F. H. Cutting. 

There is still one vacancy on the 
court staff, that of deputy clerk of the 
West Duluth branch, under Judge 
Harry Lanners. Mr. Lloyd has not made 
an appointment to this position, and it 
Is believed that definite arrangements 
will not be completed until after the 
trial of Walter J. Rlcheson, deputy 
clerk, who was Indicted by the grand 
Jury recently In connection with al- 
leged shortages In the criminal court 
accounts. 

It Is believed that Mr. Rlcheson will 
be allowed to re.<^ume his work In the 
court clerk's office, after his case is 
disposed of. 

Mr. Hancock lives with his parents 
at 729 West Third street, and has 
resided In Duluth for a number of 
yeara. 




OA.K: HA.L.L. BUILDING. 



SUE ON B ILL 

Hardware Firm Demands Payment 
for Materials Furnished. 

Suit to recover |250 for building ma- 
terial furnished for the construction 
of a building for Barrett & Zimmer- 
man at 2S02-6 West Superior street 
last fall was brought to trial this 
morning before Judge Ensign and a 
district court Jury. The Kelley Hard- 
ware company is plaintiff, and seeks 
to recover from Smith & Yokes, con- 
tractors. 

The contractors allege In their an- 
swer that the architect ordered the 
material without authority to do so. 
The defendants admit the material was 
used and state In their answer that 
they are willing that judgment be en- 
tered against them for fl50, which is 
claimed by them to be true value. 



ANTITOXIN 
LITTLE USED 



Only Eleven Physicians Take 

Serum From Free 

Dispensaries. 

Eight Drug Stores Made 
Distributing Centers- 
Very Few Cases. 



Antitoxin donated by the state last 
August in its fight against diphtheria 
has been used but very little in Du- 
luth, according to Dr. E. W. Fahey, 
director of public health. 

At the time the consignment was re- 
ceived by the health department, nine 
packages of the serum were distributed 
to eight drug stores in various parts 



of the city, to be given physicians In 
handling diphtheria cases. An appro- 
priation of $5,000 was made by the 
state legislature latst January to sup- 
ply all the cities in Minnesota with 
free antitoxin, so that the poorer fam- 
ilies could have t^he benefit of the 
serum. 

Since the local distributions were 
made in August, the health department 
has received but eleven reports from 
physicians who made use of the serum. 
These reports are used as receipts and | 
returned to the state board of health] 
for additional units, making the sup- j 
ply a continuously revolving one. Ac- ! 
cording to the health records there 
were but five cases of diphtheria In 
August and only two during this I 
month. I 

The antitoxin, prepared in 1.000, 3,000 ' 
and 5,000 units, was distributed In 
lots of three to the following Duluth ; 
drug stores serving as free stations In j 
behalf of the state: 

E. M. Tredway, 108 West Superior! 
street; F. W. Palmer. 60O1 East Su- ! 
perior street; B. B. Byers, 1831 East 
Superior street; Smith & Smith, 101 
West Superior street; Lion Drug store, 
2030 West Superior street; A. E. 
Swanstrom, 301 Central avenue; W. A. 
Cable, 232 Commonwealth avenue, and 
the Le Richeux Drug store, 405 East 
Fourth street. 



Duluth by both the Northern 
and Great Northern railroads. 

The Cloquet Lumber company Is also 
opening up three camps on the Duluth 
& Northeastern railroad In St. Louis 
county. Branch lines of the railroad 
are now being built Into the timber 
and crews are at work cutting roads 
and' getting ready for actual logging 
at an early date. This Is early for 
woods activities to start In this sec- 
tion and Indicates a busy winter In the 
pineries. 



Pacific ! with negligence In falling to provide 
i a safe and suitably lighted pathway 
The jury returned its verdict short- 
ly before noon today. 



I 



Mother's Friend. 

The friend that the expectant mother 
ne«>ds, brings peace of mind, freedom 
from worry and added comfort. Expe- 
rienced women advise the use of Moth- 
er's Friend because it is so perfectly 
safe to use and has helped a host of 
expectant mothers to a happy, normal 
existence during this vary important 
period. Mother's Friend, to be had at 
any drug store, is an external treat- 
ment that relieves the tension upon tho 
cords and ligamenta that come from 
muscular expansion. It gently sooths 
the fine network of nerves and brings 
happy relief from abnormal pains, thua 
creatLnit coailort sad coateatmeaU 



INDICATIONS POINT 
TO HEAVY LOGGING 



TRUSTEE'S SALE! 

The stock of general merchan- 
dise, consisting principally of 
groceries, hardware, machinery, 
dry goods, furnishings, clothing, 
hats and caps, boots and shoes, 
ana Inventorylnii about $r;.090, also the store 
flxlurej Inveiitorjlng about $783.50. belonging 
to the estate of 

KBOSKY * CINKER, 

Cornacopla, Win. 
Will 1)6 sold at public auolion for cash to 
the lilcliest bidder at the store building at 
Cornucopia, on Wednesday. October Gtli. 1915, 
at 10 a. m. 

The trustee reserves the right to reject any 
and all bids. 

Inventory mny be Inspected at 631 Man- 
hattan Bldg., Duluth. Minn. 

W. O. Ul-aiBY. Trustew. 



Rubber Set Tooth Brushes 17c. 

Lyon's Tooth Powder, 17c; Mennen's 
Talc, 12c; 50c Pbmpeilan Cream, 35c. 
Gray's drug sale. 



I naitan 



Timber Operators Near Clo- 
quet Already Arranging 
for Camps. 

Cloquet. Minn., Sept. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The outlook for exten- 
sive logging operations In the pineries 
tributary to Cloquet this winter is very 
good. John Dinan, »uperlntendent of 
woods operations for Mullery-McDon- 
ald company, who are cutting the tliTi- 
ber of the allotted lands of the Fond 

du Lac Indians near here, was In town 

this week and is arranging for the 

opening of three camps there at an 

I early date. The logs will be taken to 



JURY GIVES INJURED 
WOMA N $300 VERDICT 

A verdict for $300 In favor of Har- 
riet M. Hoover and against the Con- 
necticut Mutual Life Insurance com- 
pany was returned by a Jury In Judge 
Dancer's division of the district court 
this morning after thirty minutes' de- 
liberation. 

The plaintiff sued for |3,000 for In- 
juries sustained when she tripped and 
fell over a chain which had been 
stretched across a path leading to her 
apartments In Munger terrace. The 
Insurance company Is the owner ot 
the premises in question. 

The accident occurred on the night 

of Nov. 9, last. 'I'ho i)laintiff Klleges 

that she was severely lacerated about 

the face and hands and that she bus- 

[ tained serious Injuries to hei Knee. 

' The insurance company was charged 



STRIKERS MAKE 

DEMONSTRATION 

Bricks Thrown and Win- 
dows of Chicago Estab- 
lishment Broken. 

Chicago, Sept. 30. — Two hundred or 
more striking garment workers and 
sympathizers made a demonstration In 
front of the cloak shop of P. Shapiro 
at Wood and Julian streets today. 

Bricks were thrown and windows 
broken, but no one was Injured. Po- 
1 lice responded to a riot call and one 
alleged striker was arrested. 

Shapiro told the police that the trou- 
ble started when union pickets failed 
In an effort to get Shapiro's employes 
to quit work. 

Sidney Hlllman, president of the 
garment workers, headed a delegation 
which complained to Mayor Thomson 
today against the alleged brutality of 
mounted police in breaking up demon- 
strations oi the etrlkers and their 
frlendSj ^i 

BUlSlNESS IS SLACK. 




CmoinnaH DuMh 



♦ 

g^rrect Dre^for Womm ^^ amd Girtt 

Superior Street at First Ave. West 





St 



unning 



Suits 



Clever styles — reproduced from the original models 
featured by our New York establishment— including 
adaptations and our own original ideas — a diversity 
of styles unequaled in any other Duluth establishment 
— of Velvet, Corduroy, Broadcloth, Gabardine, Callot 
checks and novelty fabrics — fur trimmed, braided or 
plain tailored effects. 

$25, $35, $45, $55 upwards 

Fashionable Coats 

Indivi.iual styles — for motoring, semi-dress and gen- 
eral utility wear — of fine imported Velour, Corduroy, 
Broadcloth, English Whipcord, Zibeline, Chinchilla, 
novelty mixtures, and water-proof Motor Coats. 

$15, $19, $25, $35 upwards 
Exclusive Millinery 

Womim who seek individuality in their hats can find 
at Giciding's wonderful selections in the latest ideas 
now being worn by the smartest dressed women of 
New York. Every day brings new shipments from 
our New York establishment, keeping us in touch 
with the newest styles as they are developed. 

$7.50, $10, $12, $15 upwards 
Fashionable Millinery 

Gidding Millinery is Fashionable to the 
Lgist Degree of Absolute Correctness! 

It gives the Duluth 
woman that same air of 
smart appearance as she 
who patronizes the 
smartest shops of Fifth 
Avenue, New York. 

Th(; rapid increase of 
our millinery business 
verifiiis the statement 
that Gidding Hats are 
constantly winning more 
and more friends. And 
why? Because Gidding 
millinery is planned and 
prepared with the broad- 
est possible knowledge of 
Fashion and of Wom- 
en's Tastes; and prep- 
arations are so complete 

that nothing better is obtainable. The price is the only 
commonplace thing about them. 

$7.50, $10, $12, $15 upwards 




TRIAL OF RICHESON 
TO ST ART NE XT WEEK 

Walter J. Rlcheson, deputy clerk of 
the municipal court, Indicted by tho 
September grand Jury on a charge of 
misappropriating public funds, will 
probably be brought to trial next 
week. The cast^ was to have been 
reached this week, but by mutual con- 
sent was continued. Mr. Rlcheson will 
be defended by Walter J. Dacey. 
Friends of the young man are confl- 
dent that he will be able to explain 
the apparent shortages. 

MAY PLiCE UEN ON 
SPEEDWAY PROPERTY 

Laborers Having Claims 

Against Company to 

Hold Meeting. 

St. Paul. Minn., Sept. 30. — (Special to j 
The Herald.) — Hugo V. Koch, deputy i 
state labor commissioner, has called a ' 
meeting of the laborers and unorgan- | 
ized workers who have claims against | 
the Speedway company for work. The : 
meeting will be held at the old capltol 
Oct 11. The plan for the meeting Is 
to have all the laborers Interested as- | 
sign claims to some responsible Indl- j 
vidua] and have a Hen filed on the 
Speedway property. The aggregate 
amount of the claims of the laborers 
Is difficult to estimate. Mr. Koch says 
it win probably amount to $5,000. 



BIDS FOR BUILDING 

SUBM ARINE S OPENED 

Washington, Sept. SO. — Bids for 
building sixteen submarines authorized 
by the last congress were opened to- 
day, the Union 'Iron Works. San Fran- 
cisco, and the Electric Torpedo Boat 
company, Quincy, Mass., submitting the 
lowest offers 'or the Pacific and At- 
lantic coasts, respectively. 

The San Fnmcisco concern bid for 
five or more a: $510,000 each, the. first 
to be completed in twelve months and 
two each month thereafter. The Mas- 
sachusetts company bid for eight or 
more at $528,0)0. the first to be com- 
pleted within seventeen months. 

WEDDING^NS." 

Uninvited Women Crowd to Fash- 
ionaWe New York Marriages. 

One of the modern institutions of 
the town wedding is the wedding fan. 
There are eoiiie people who attend 
weddings with just as much enthusi- 



asm as a baseball or tennis fan 



^ Our Advice Is: *j 

Wb«n yoti feel out of sort* from consti^^ 
pation, let ui say that if 



do cot reliere you, ie« % physician, 
because no other home rtmtuy wiil. 
Bold oidy by ue, 10 cents. 



C M. Tredway. 



t. 



V 



about the time that the wedding fans 
began to loom in evidence, and during 
the intervening years their ranks have 
steadily Increased. 

Just Shut Them Ont. 

The moment the bridal party start* 
up the aisle, at all of the Fifth avenue 
churches, the doors are closed and 
barred, and no one is allowed to enter 
until the ceremony Is over. The fans 
are thus left out in the cold, figura- 
tively speaking, but a wild scramble 
ensues to get a peek at the bridegroom 
as the couple leave the church. 

Not only are the fans a menace to 
order and form before the weddinr 
and during the ceremony, but their 
curiosity leads them to inspect the 




merely out of morbid curiosity. 
Crowd Cliarch and Street. 

Of course, i he wedding fans are 



caught in the act of picking the flow- 
ers massed in the chancel. 

The wedding fans are made up of 



most in eviden:e at the big town wed- women, who, as a rule, are stylishly 
dings which mark the alliance be- gowned. The ranks of what Is now 
tween two prominent and wealthy | known as the "regulars" are often 
families or thr marriage of an Ameri- i augmented by the casual passersby, 
can heiress to a penniless duke. They I who cannot resist the temptation of 
are mostly wsmen, and they attend I having a peep at the bride. There are 
regularly all >f the smart weddings. ! evidently many dressmakers amon» 
Tf thev cannot edge their way past the them, too, who are eager to take ad 



Passenger Official Still Keeps Hope 
ful for Fall, However. 



A. 5^. Cleland, general 



To Quickly Remove* 

Ugly Hairs From Face 



(Beauty Notes) 
Beautv-destroylng hairs are soon 
banished from the skin with the aid 
passenger I of a delatone paste, made by mixing 



some 



agent rtf the Northern Pacific railway. 

is in the city today. Routine business',"""";;, '.ipiatone 

brought, Mi;^ Cleland to the Head of ^^^^^ rV.l?,^l 

the Lakes, he declared. He also said 

that there i;s little news In the present 



condition of the railroad business. 

"Business Is not quite as good as we 
would like to see It.^ .-^ald Mr. Cleland 



"The travel to the West hag not been 
what vi-fts generally believed it would 
be. COndlUons may improve during 
the fall," 



water with a little plain pow- 
This Is spread upon 
the hairy surface for 2 or 3 minutes, 
then rubbed off and the skin washed 
to remove the remaining delatone. 
This simple treatment banishes every 
trace of hair and leaves the skin with- 
out a blemish. Caution should be 
used to be certain that it is dela- 
tone you buy. — Advertisement. 



sexton who tal:es the invitation cards, 
they congregate around the street 
awning, and J.re frequently of such 
number as to nteifere with the street 
pedestrians. The wedding fen. in fact, 
has become a highly objectionable 
feature at all of the large churches In 
the social zor e, especially on Fifth 
avenue, and extra precautions are 
strenuously observed In order to keep 
them out of t'le church. 

But they manage to slip In some- 
how, in many instances, a.s the result 
of a ruse, as, for instance, mingling j 
with a party of Arriving guests 

So it has bt'come necessary now to | 
have special patrolmen stationed at l 
the doors of he church, as has been j 
the case at se .'cral recent weddings of i 
note, who demand the invitation card. ' 
If the holder happens to be the least 
bit tardy In bringing it to light. Those' 
' Who fall to show the card are gently 
but firmly h\istled from the church, 
and many ariusing incidents have 
arisen at times when Invited guests 
have left theli cards at home, and have 
■ been forced to go to the trouble of 
showing their credentials. 
I It may be recalled how the wedding 
« fans at the marriage of Miss May Goe- 
let and the Dike of Roxburghe gained 
1 entrance Into the church by climbing j 
through th<i coal-hole. That waa 



vantage of the opportunity to study 
new styles. 

Rugby school was founded and en- 
dowed in 1667. 



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Thursday, 



THE DULUTHiHERALD 



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iMiiii'r^f' 



September 30, 1915. 



8 



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"Wise Chewers Think FIRST of STAR 



»$ 



Men Who Chew Are Men Who DO 



T Keokuk, Iowa, is the largest dam in the world, and the onl}; 

^ dam across the Mississippi River. To construct this dam it 
required^ some of the brightest minds and strongest bodies ever 
engaged in work of this kind. 

The majority of the men chewed tobacco while at wort and most of them chewed 
STAR. Thinking- men and doin^ men, m every phase of life, chew STAR tobacco. 

When you try a bite of this mellow, longf-chewing- Idaf, in the thick, tasty STAR plug 
you're bound to change from a "brand-switcher " to a STAR plugg-er. 



STAR plugrs are made clean and kept so and every STAR 
plug- weighs a full 16 ounce pound. 

The men who help to make America the leading nation 
of the worid chew 125,000,000 ten cent STAR cuts each 
year— enough tobacco to build a wall or dam 750 
feet long and 23 feet high. Take their tip and try 
STAR to-day. ^ ^ 



16 oz. 
Plugs 



W:^-^ 



CHEVfINO TOBACCO 

LEADINO BRANb OF THE VfORLP 



STAR was awarded the Grand Prixe at the San Francisco Exposition, and i» the 
only chewing tobacco that has ever received this highest possible award. 



f 



DULUTH "Y" IS 
eiGJUCCESS 

Officers and Department 

Heads Laud Work at 

First Banquet. 



Mew Membership Campaign 

Will Be Started Next 

Month. 



Good progrress and development were 
reportrd In every department of the 
Young Men's Christian association dur- 
ing the last year and prospects were 
declared to be bright for the coming 
year when the officers, directors and 
department heads of the association 
met last night and enjoyed the first 
banquet of its kind ever held here. 
While the institution is not self-sup- 
portine, the business-like manner of 
handling its affairs has resulted in re- 
markably successful work being done 
at a minimum of cost. 

"The Duluth Y. M. C A. Is positively 



Good-Night Corns, 
Good-Boy "Gets-It" 

New- Plan Corn Remedy That Never 

Fails. The Simple Common 

Sense Way. 

You poor corn-limpers, with com- 
•wrinkks and heart pains! Sit down 
t<»rhJKht and put a few drops of "Gets- 
It," thf simplest corn remedy in the 
world, on your corns. You can apply 




©B. Lawnse* 
ACo. 

**'GeC8*It* Ends Com Palni. It's 8ar« 

and Safe, too!" , 

It in just a few seconds, without fuss 
or trouble. What's the use applying 
salves that make toes raw and sore, 
that make corns swell, bandages that 
make it misery to walk, tape that 
sticks, greasy ointment, and other 
contraptions. Get rid of corns the 
«asy way, quick, simple, sure, new 
way. That's common sense. Try "Gets- 
It" also for warts and bunions. "Gets- 
It" can't hurt — the corn loosens, and 
comes right off — clean off. 

"Of-ts-It" Is sold at all druggists, 26c 
a bottle, or sent direct by E. Law- 
rence & Co., Chicago. 



one of the greatest institutions of Its 
kind in the United States." said F. E. 
House, who gave an address comment- 
ing upon the reports of the last year's 
work of the institution. "Never In my 
life have I seen such boundless con- 
fidence and untiring enthusiasm as was 
shown here tonight. 

After 500 New MemberN. 
Although the local association has 
grown rapidly during the last year, a 
new membership campaign will be 
launched Oct. 24. during which 500 new^ 
menil>ers are hoped to be procured. 
This was announced by George Wil- 
son, who gave a report on the member- 
ship work. The association is 'con- 
stantly looking for desirable young 
men, said r3r. Wilson, and while the 
membership at present is large and ac- 
tive, there should be at least 500 more 
young men In the city this year who 
could help and be helped by becoming 
members. 

The financial report showed that all 
of the nine departments were in ex- 
cellent condition. Some of the depart- 
ments are self-supporting while others 
are conducted with an idea of giving 
more than could be possibly expected, 
financially, in return. 

Bo>h' Departmrnt Great, 
The bright prospects of the boys' 
department were emphasized by W. J. 
McCabe, who gave an optimistic re- 
port for that department. The boys 
! have passed through a stormy year, he 
i said, not because of lack of finances 
: but because of the lack of a building 
during lart of that time. Within a 
I yoar. he said, the boys' will be pro- 
j vided with a handsome and adequate 
I building. The work that W'as" most 
highly praised by Mr. McCabe was the 
! conducting of camps and outings, 
j which give the boys much outdoor ex- 
I erci.'=e and social life under the best 
conditions. 

The educational department, accord- 
ing to J. J. Moe in his report, has had 
a remarkably successful year. The 
t'>tal enrollment during the year was 
966. he said, which was an Increase of 
50 per cent over that of the previous 
year. He said that large numbers of 
foreigners had been given instruction 
at very low cost and had been enabled 
to learn the Engli.sh language, thus 
increasing their earning capacity and 
opportunities for enjoyment of life 
in an English-speaking community. 

The religious department has not 
only conducted services for "Y" mem- 
bers but has done a great deal of mis- 
sionary work among the working 
classes of the city. Meetings have 
been held regularly said B. N. Wheel- 
er who gave the report, in twenty-six 
different centers. Including shops, fac- 
tories, etc. 

li%'ork For Many Men. 
R. A. Bartholdl told of the progress 
made in the employment department, 
which has done a great deal to im- 
prove the condition of young men In 
the city. He said this department had 
secured work for many young men 
who were strangers in the city and had 
also given council to many others who 
needed instructions as to the city, and 
other things. 

The physical departnnent has con 
ducted gymnasium classes for business 
and professional men, and work has 
been In progress both days and eve- 
nings. 

General Secretary B. C. Wade spoke 
of the development of the institution 
and said he hoped to see the West 
end. West Duluth and Morgan Park 
districts provided with buildings in a 
short time. 



flag carried by the company while the 
I organization was a part of the Four- 
toenth Minnesota volunteer infantry 
during the Spanish war. At a meeting 
held last evening the postponement 
was taken because of the absence of 
Capt. W. O. Flodin from the city. 

Capt. Flodin is expected to return 
home in about two weeks. The sub,- 
ject will then again be taken up by 
the members. Sentiment as to whether 
to keep or not to keep the flag appears 
to be divided among the membership. 
Veterans of the Spanish war wi*h to 
have the flag turned over to the cus- 
tody of the county and placed with the 
company flags of A and G as relics in 
Memorial hall. Only two members of 
the present Company C were enlisted 
in the company during the war with 
Spain, the two members being the cap- 
tain and Lieut. R. C. Nelson. 



ENDEAVOAERS 
TO M|EJ HERE 

Christian Worked From Two 

Harbors, CaHton and 

Cloquet Coming. 

Will Boost for Saloonless 

Nation and World 

By 1930. 



Christian Endeavorers of the Duluth 
district union, which Includes Two 
Harbors. Carlton and * Cloquet, will 
hold a conference in this city Monday 
and Tuesday of ntxt week. The first 
meeting will be held Monday after- 
noon at 5 o'clock at the Y. M. C. A. 
building and will te for pastors only. 
The district officers will meet at the 
Y. M. C. A. at 6:30 the same evening, 
where supper will be served. 

Secretary Evans will be the prin- 
cipal speaker at a conference which 
will be held Immediately after sup- 
per. The closing meeting will be held 
on Tuesday evening at the First Pres- 
byterian church at 7:30 o'clock. All 
committee chairmen are expected to be 
present at this conference. 

Among the local Endeavorers who 
will speak are Rev. J. A. Mc<Jaughey, 
pastor counsellor of the union, and A. 
E. Manthey, president. The names of 
other Duluthians who will take part 
In the program will be announced 
later. 

Among the matters of interest that 
will be taken up during these con- 
ferences will be the observance of 
Christian Citizenship day, Oct. 17, 
when a special service will be held to 
boost for a saloonless nation by 1920 
and a saloonless world by 1930. 

RUSS GAINING 

IN TERRITORY 

(Continued from page 1.) 



MENTIONED AS SUCCESSOR 

TO AMBASSADOR DUMBA 





BARON MERY DE KAPOS-MERE. 

It is reported from Vienna that Baron 
de Kapos-Mere, a distinguished Hun- 
garian statesman, will succeed Ambas- 
sador Dumba when the latter is re- 
lieved of office. 



Hodgson, representing the mayor of 
St. Paul, and the response will be by 
Dr. C. A. Upton of St. Paul, the retiring 
president of the American Osteopathic 
association. The president's address 
will be given by Dr. J. W. Hawkinson 
of Luverne. 



Smoke La Delia and Alvaro cigars. 



Be Wise. 

Advertise your wants in The Duluth 
Herald. It is the paper that will give 
you results. Over 30,000 circulation. 
There is no "just as good." 



BEGIN CUSSES 



IN ACCOUNTING 



tent of this front is eighty miles. 
StroHK Forces Alons JAn*. 

The Germans have concentrated, 
strong forces along this line. Includ- 
ing considerable bodies of troops 
drawn from the Pripet region. 

South of the Pripet the Germans 
have won a local success at Clar- 
torlsk, twenty miles west of the rail- 
way junction at Sarny. They appear 
to have gained control of the Styr to 
a point south of Lutsk, which lately 
has been the scene of heavy fighting 
and now appears to be In the hands 
of the Germans. 

A strong effort also is being made 
by the Germans In the region of Nowo 
Alexlnlec. fifteen miles north of Tarno- 
pol. Further south on the Strlpa, west 
of Tarnopol. the Russians have had 
the best of the fighting. 

RuMNlan Statement. 

The official communication from 
headquarters issued last night reads 
as follows: 

"In the region northwest of Frled- 
rlchstadt ineffectual German attacks 
were delivered at LIqger and Tehouksh. 
northwest of Birshalen. 

"The attacks were repulsed by ar- 
tillery fire. 

"At Dvinsk there has been a con- 
tinuous cannonade. The German at- 
tacks on th« front comprising Ghen- 
tenle, Swenton Lake and Modmoussl, 
were repulsed by our flr«. The fight- 
ing continues. 

"In the region north of Krewo and 
southeast of Omiana the enemy at- 
tacked energetically and drove back 
the Russians somewhat. South of the 
Pripet, the enemy attacked several 
times at Clartorlsk. At first all at- 
tacks were repulsed, bat with the aid 
of reinforcements the enemy contrived 
to repulse the Rus.sians to the right 
bank of the Styr. The village of Nowo 
Alexiniec v-as thrice attacked by the 
enemy on Tuesday under cover of a 
hurricane of artillery fire. The enemy 
was repulsed on every occasion by the 
Russian concentrated artillery and 
rifle fire. 

"In the region of Koupschlntse. on 
the Stripa. west of Tarnopol there was 
progressive artillery fire. In the course 
of terrible fighting the Russians oc- 
cupied the enemy's trenches and also 
one of his fortified pcsltions west of 
Chodaczkow. In .continuation of a 
further offensive, the Russians, after 
strong artillery preparations, rushed to 
the attack, and, clearijig the entangle- 
ments, captured the enemy's trenches 
east ot Koupschlntse." 



FRENCH ADVANCING 

(Continued from page 1.) 

German column marching near Somme- 

Py." 



Prof. Price, In Charge of 

University Extension, 

to Open Courses. 

University extension courses In ac- 
counting will be started tonight at the 
Y. M. C. A. and the Central high school. 
Prof. Richard Price, who has charge 
of the extension work for the state 
university, will be here and give an 
address at the dinner at the Y. M. C. A., 
which will precede an outlining of the 
work. 

The dinner will take place at 6:16 
o'clock and the meeting at the Central 
high school will begin at 8 o'clock. 
The advanced pupils will receive their 
instruction at the "Y" tonight and the 
beginners at the Central high school. 
C. E. Notzel will be the instructor. W. 
F. Haig. president of the Accounting 
Study club. Is expected to speak. 

A class of at least forty beginners 
is expected at the opening of the 
course. 




WILL WAIT FOR 

FLODIN'S OPINION 



Company C Postpones Ac- 
tion Regarding Flag's 
Disposal. 

Members of Company C. Third regi- 
ment, Minnesota National Guard, last 
evening decided to postpone any ac- 
tion regarding the disposition of the 




The Tonic for 
Coughs, Goliis 
aod Catarrh 

Prominent 
Physician's 

Prescription 

in use over 

thirty Years. 

Guaranteed to 

be Pure. 



Cirrman Statemtnt. 

Berlin. Sept. 30. via "London. — The 
German war office issued the following 
official statement: 

"Western theater nt \^ar: Yester- 
day the enemy continued his attempts 
to break through our lines only in the 
Champagne region. 

"South of the Me»ln-Ypres road a 
position occupied by'twD English com- 
panies was blown up.* 

"North of Loos our counter-attacks 
progressed slowly. 

"Southeast of Souchez the French 
succeeded In penetrating our lines in 
two small sections. Fighting con- 
tinues. 

"A French attack south of Arras 
easily was repulsed. 

"Battles between Reims and the Ar- 
gonne were very bitter. South of St. 
Marie-Py an enemy brigade broke 
through our outer lines of trenches 
and came in touch with our reserves 
who. during the counter-attack, cap- 
tured 800 prisoners and destroyed the 
others. 

"All French attacks between Somme- 
Py-Souain high road and the Challe- 
range-St. Menehold railroad were re- 
pulsed partly yesterday after bitter 
hand-to-hand fighting In which the 
enemy suffered heavy losses. 
Hill No. 191 Ijomi. 

"Early today a strong enemy attack 
on the front northeast of Massiges 
broke down. North of Maesiges. Hill 
No. 191. which was very much exposed 
to the enemy's flanking fire, was lost. 

"On the other front artillery duels 
and mining engagements of varying 
inten.slty took place. 

"Eastern theater of war: South of 
Dvinsk we forced the enemy back into 
the marshes and lakes to the east of 
Wessulowo. Cavalry engagements be- 
tween Lake Drisltlata and the region 
of Po.stawav were successful for us. 

"East of Smorgon we broke through 
the enemy position by storm. One 
thousand prisoners, including seven 
officers, were taken and six cannon 
and four machine guns were captured. 

"South of Smorgon the battle con- 
tinues. ' , , , , ^ 

"Army group of Prlnc* Leopold of 
Bavaria: Enemy attacks against 
many sections of the front were re- 
pulsed with sanguinary losses. 

"Army group of FUeld Marshal von 
Mack.nsen: The sltuatton Is un- 
changed. , ^ ^ Til 

"Army group of Gert. von Llnslngen: 
On the upper Kormln the Russians 
were driven back In ' an easterly di- 
rection. About 800 prisoners were 
taken. Two Russian aeroplanes were 

shot down." 

• — 

OsteapatlM to Meet. 

St. Paul. Minn.. Sept. 30.-^(Speclal to 
The Herald.) — The seventeenth annual 
convention of the Minnesota Osteo- 
pathic association will be held In St. 
Paul hotel roof garden Frloay and Sat- 
urday. About 200 osteopathic physi- 
cians and surgeons frdhi Minnesota and 
nearby states will atfend. The address 
of welcome will be fflven by L. C. 



-t 



.^< 




* IMI « 



MONEY SUBSCRIBED BY 
BANKS TO FOREIGN LOAN 
TO REMAIN ON DEPOSIT 

(Continued from page 1.) 

points agreed upon so far by the com- 
mittee in charge of the sale of the 
bonds was made public today by J. P. 
Morgan & Co. Following are the chief 
features on which an agreement has 
been reached: 

The syndicate is to have a life of 
sixty days. 

Syndicate members will purchase at 
nlnoty-elght — the price to the Inves- 
tor — and at the expiration of the sixty 
days will be refunded 1=^4 per cent. 
The difference between the price to the 
irfvestor and the price to the syndicate 
is 2 per cent. 

The remaining 14 of 1 per cent will 
be used to cover expenses. 
No Reattirtiona. 

Participation Is to be given to all 
classes of Institution.", Investors and 
dealers without restriction. 

The syndicate will have the right to 
repurchase up to 10 per cent of the 
total underwriting. 

Every incorporated bank participat- 
ing is to simply tran.= fer the amount 
of Its subscription on its books, the 
money remaining in the bank to the 
account of the syndicate managers un- 
til such times as it will be needed. 

It Is understood tliat when with- 
drawals of this money are made, they 
will be prorated among the various 
banks, so that In no case will the 
total amount be withdrawn at onco. 

The banks will pay Interest on this 
money at the usual rate of 2 per cent 
a year. 



Just Arrived f 

A new ship- 
ment 0/ those 
quaint 

"VOGUE 
HATS" 

A Word to tke Wise 

Concerningf the Coming Scarcity of 
Silks, Velvets and Dress Goods! 

Before the season will have advanced much farther there will 
be a scarcity, not only of certain materials, but of certain colors, 
in such shides as brown, blue, green and others, the dy.e situation 
is acute, ai d in consequence manufacturers are declining to take or- 
ders for Inmediate delivery. Our slogan is. "BUY NOW" — Chiffon 
Velvets. Slllj Velours for coats. Velvets for trimming purposes. Vel- 
veteens ani Corduroys In every imaginable new color, and prices 
reasonable. 

ks are very popular for waists, dresses, combinations and 
We are showing a splendid assortment of new color 
IS, 18 to 36 inches wide, from fl.OO to 92.50 the yard. 

5Uk« for waists and dresses In plain and novelty effects, 
:hes wide. fl.00 to 92.00 the yard. 

e Crepe, the most popular sheer fabric on the market. 
'or>' and 18 colors. This cloth will not slip or pull — an 
ilue at 91.60 the yard. 

for Taffetas has again become Insistent and In conse- 
have prepared to show you a world of ihem. True, we 
as In black and white and in a scope of plain shades, 
ned and fancy odd shades — 91.00 to 92.00 per yard. 
! Chine, Crepe Meteor, Fleur de Jennesa, Poplins, Crepe 
valine. Satin, Cii.anueu«e and Meanalinoa In black, white, 
full line of colors, 26 to 46 Inches wide. 



Plaid Si] 

trimming, 
combinatio 

Striped 

24 to 36 in^ 

Georg-eti 

In black, 1' 
excellent v. 
The call 

quence we 
have Taffe 
also two-tc 

Crepe d' 
Faille, Ben 

cream and 



Co:ne! Let Us Skow You Our New 
Fall Dress Goods ! 

Our assortment Is most complete. New weaves and colors. Our 
prices have not advanced owing to early buying. 

BroadrlC'th, Peau de Gaunt and Wool Satins for dress, skirt, suits 
and coats. In a wide range of colors. Beautiful deep black, staple 
and high colors, 50 to 54 inches wide — 91.50 to 9&.00 the yard. 

Nevr Serges, Henriettaa, Crepe Poplin, Rep«, Barrita, Poplina, 
Eplngrle, Ilivneyeomb, Santoy, etc., 60c to 93.0<i. the yard. 

Fancy checks, stripes, broken checks and plaids for dresses, 
waists and children's wear, 36 to 64 inches wide; excellent values 
at 60c to 92'..00 the yard. 

Importe<l and Domestic All-wool Challlea, 27 to 82 inches wide, 
at 49c, &9c and 69c the yard. 

^kVomen's Suits and Coats 

STYLES OT SURPASSING BEAUTY— COME LET US SHOW YOU. 











. 






1 






1 




, 








, 








PATRIOTIC DyiUTtllANS SUBSCRIBING 
TO SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' MONUMENT 



H.AITIEN REBELS AGREE 
TO LAY DO WM ARMS 

Cape Haltien. Sept. 30.— The Haitlen 
rebels who have been resisting the 
American troops, resulting in several 
fatal encounters recently, have agreed 
to lay down their arms. A confer- 
ence was held yesterday between the 
principal rebel leaders and American 
officers. The rebels accepted the condi- 
tions offered by the Americans and 
promised to cease armed resistance. 

Be"Wise^ 

Advertise your wants in The Duluth 
Herald. It is the paper that will give 
you results. Over 30.000 circulation. 
There is no "Just as good." 



Patriotic cltiz 
ganized themse 
and are now 
raise about $1 
scrlptlon among 
fesslonal men o 
pose of having 
dlcrs' and sail 
will serve as a 

Realizing tha 
a monument o 
which to comr 
who fought on 
fltlds and on th 
by a special lav 
to make a lev 
$7,000 for this 
budget for 1916 
last vi-eek In T 
the city Is not 
matter, levying 
teemen say tha 
ready been rai 
scrlptlon, leavli 
solicited. 

It Is believed 
that the propoi 
should be a lea 
the material to 
the best. For 
mated that ab( 
needed. 

This monume 
In any cemeter 
made, but will 
House square. ^ 
an historical fix 



ens of Duluth have or- 
Ives Into committees 
busy In an effort to 
1,600 by popular sub- 

the business and pro- 
f the city for the pur- 
erected here a sol- 
ars' monument which 
memorial. 

t Duluth should have 
f this kind, through 
lemorato the veterans 
many bloody battle- 
e high seas, the state. 
f, has allowed the city 
y to the amount of 
purpose. The city 
, which was published 
iie Herald, shows that 
going the limit in this 

only f5,500. Commit- 
t about 14.000 has al- 
scd by popular sub- 
>g $10,600 still to be 

by the committeemen 

icd Duluth monument 

work of art and that j 

be used should be of 

this reason It is estl- 

)ut $20,000 will be 

nt will not be placed 
y, according to plans 

be erected In Court 
vhere it will eerve as 

ure and will be a les- 



son In patriotism for all coming gen- 
erations. 

"Let the old soldiers have the sat- 
isfaction of seeing that one of their 
last actions has placed an enduring 
historical monument In their city," said 
a Civil war veteran today. 

It Is not expected by the members 
of the committee that they will have 
much trouble in collecting the neces- 
sary amount. When the fund Is com- 
plete plans for the proposed monu- 
ment will be asked for and i design 
suitable to the majority will be chosen. 



FORMER DULUTHIAN 
STAYS I N MIN NEAPOLIS 

William H. Jones, former manager 
of the Hotel Dykman, has decided to 
remain In Minneapolis, and Is to be 
associated with the managerial staff 

of the West hotel. Oct. 1. 

Mr. Jones has a wide acquaintance 
throughout the Northwest by reason 
of his long connection with the Kltchl 
tJamml club of Duluth. and has made 
many friends in Minneapolis during 
his past two years management of the 
Dykman. 

The Increasing business which, with 
the growth of Minneapolis, the West is 
enjoying, and the expansion of depart- 
ments now in progress, have demanded 
the acquisition of a capable man to the 
staff of the West; hence Mr. Jones' en- 
gagement. 



< 



Smoke La Delia and Alvaro cigars. 



Written By a Man For Men, But of Deep Interest to Women. 



\>. 





By Livi^ S. Richard 



Very wise was Shakespeare. You remember he wrote: 'The apparel oft 
proclaims the man." 

Jlidge for yourself if this isn't true. How do YOU "size up" a man the first 
time you see him? 

Not by his Brains. It takes time -for them to come to a show down. 

Not by his Character. Character c?n,'t be snap shotted. 

You judge him, you have to judge him, first off, by his Appearance— and that means 
more than the hang of his jaw or the cut of his hair; it also means whether his 
clothes fit and whether he dresses iri good taste. 

Rockefeller, Wilson, Edison, any man wlose money or reputation is made, can wear 
any old thing and folks will either not notice the slouchiness because thinking of 
what they know he has done or they will charge it up to the "whims of genius." 

Incidentally, Wilson and Rockefeller are both good dressers. 

But YOU, Mr. Average Man, haven't got the "genius" excuse. YOUR renown has yet 
to be accumulated. So it's very decidedly wise for you to put your best foot 
foremost. 

I was in a great department store the other day watching "the waiting line at the 
employment office. Dozens of eager youth longed to plant their feet on the first 
rungs of a career that would lade er them up among the Wanamakers, Marshall 
Fields, Filenes. 

Who do you suppose lost out? 

In every instance the fellow who looked s!iabby and dress-careless. 

The employrnent manager told me afterward he didn't judge applicants' clothing by 
its quality. 

"It may be cheap, because when a fellow's poor he, of course, can't buy broadcloth," he 
said. "But, it's got to be neat, clean and indicative of good taste. I can't take 
chances on a youngster who doesn't think enough of appearance to take pains not 
to look mussy.** 

So take a friendy tip, dear sir and brother. 



•^ 



'^. 



DRESS UP! 



fT 



-M>r^-* -^H f *'«> i»l ¥_»ll ..1 'Sat/i 



T - " " ■ ■■'■' 




Thursday, 



THE 



rl TV 

DULILTJI 



HERALD 



September 30, 1915. 



-^ 



"IS BEST IN 
THE WORLD" 

Duluth Milliner Has Most 

Enthusiastic Praise 

for Tanlac. 



WEST DULUTH 

HBRAJLD BRANCH OFFICES i 

J. J. Meran, SieV- North Central Arenae, AdrertUln* and ■S**?;?**'*"^ 
A. Jeaaen. Fifty-seTenth Avenue We«t and Grand Avenae, I>totrllmtl«fc 

Herald's West Duluth reporter may be reached after 
hour of ^olngr to press at Calumet 171-M and Cole B«7. 



Results Were Noticeable 

With Use of But One 

Bottle. 



•1 think 
the world. 



it l9 the beat medicine in 

_, ■ l.s the enthusiastic way 

that Mrs C. Washburn indorses Tanlac. 

Mrs. Washburn iaxa b«en in Duluth 
but two months. She is a milliner and 
resides at 11 Second avenue west, but 
during the hrief time she lias been In 
Duluth she says she has found a rem- 
edy that she has .nought for years. 

"I have lung been a victim of in- 
digestion." she told the Tanlac man. 
"I could not eat without gr<at suffer- 
ing, and I was afflicted with kidney 
trouble. I bought Tanlac because I 
saw it advertised an,l thought It might 
help me. It was wonderful what re- 
sults it had. These results were no- 
ticeable with the use of but one bottle. 
X am now on my third bottle and am 
feeling fine. I recommend it because 
It has helped mo and I think it is the 
best medicine in the world." 

Tanlac. the wonderful remedy which 
Mrs. Washburn rerommends .'o en- 
thuslastlcallv. may be purchased from 
the store of William A Abbett, "the 
careful druggist." at 219 West Supe- 
rior street, where Claude J. Meredith, 
"the Tanlac man." or one of his as- 
sistants, is constantly In charge. 

Tanlac mav also be procured at the 
Abbett branch stores: 101 West Fourth 
street and 932 East Second street. — Ad- 
vertisement. 



DENfElD SCHOOL 

TO HOLD ELEQION 



Oratory, such as would put in the 
shade the attempts of seasoned "stump- 
ers" and make the ordinary political 
campaigns seem of small slgniflcance, 
took place this morning at the as- 
sembly hall of the R. E. Denfeld high 
school. The cause of the activity of 
the spellbinders was the pleading of 
twenty candidates who wish the stu- 
dent vote at the school primary elec- 
tion to be held tomorrow morning. 

Twenty students, members from the 
four classes, told how if they were 
elected the destinies of the high 
school would be piloted through the 
storms of winter by their guiding 
hands. Some of the candidates also 
spoke in behalf of friends of theirs 
whom they recommended as wishing 
to be associated with in the capacity 
of "mayor" or "commissioner." 

There are three candidates for the 
office of mayor. In the prinwiry to bo ) 
held between 8 and 9:16 o'clock to- ; 



Grand avenue, which will carry the 
power wires for the extension. 

— ^^ — ^ 

Old Resident Summpned. 

John A. Mattson, aged 41, of «13 
North Flfty-sintth avenue west, a resi- 
dent of West Duluth for twenty-one 
years, died at 1 o'clock this morning 
at the Duluth hospital following an 
illness of a few days. He leaves a 
widow and three sons. The body was 
taken to Bell Brothers' undertaking 
rooms where funeral arrangements will 
be made this afternoon. 



GRAFONOLAS 



From 



$17.50 to $500. Records — 

65c to $7.50 

This Lb ona of the fifteen models 
to choose from. 





This Orafonola Favorite, with 14 
double-faced records, «5».10, and on 
easy payments. 

Lirgeat Stook of 

Maohine$ and R»e9rd$ 

in th' City. 




EDMONT 

18 Tbird Ave. W. 



Infant Son Dies. 

John Zanko, the 4-months-old son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Zanko, 329 South 
Fifty-seventh avenue west, died this 
morning. The funeral will be held from 
the family residence tomorrow morn- 
ing with interment in Calvary ceme- 
tery. . 

West Duluth Briefs. 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the West- 
minster Presbyterian church. Fifty- 
eighth avenue west and Ramsey street, 
will entertain at a social in the church 
parlors this evening. 

Oust Peterson of Virginia Is spend- 
ing a few days visiting friends In this 
end of the city. ^,, 

Al Hanson of Iron River. Wis., was 
a visitor yesterday at the home of his 
brother-in-law. George O. Cooper, 719 
North Fifty-fourth avenue west. He 
left this morning for Cussons. Minn. 

West Duluth lodge. No. 86. Degree 
of Honor, will n\eet tomorrow eve- 
ning at GlUey's hall, 822 North Cen- 
tral avenue. Mrs. Elizabeth Schroeder 
of St. Paul will speak. _ ^^ ^t t^ 

Rev. J. A. Bjerke of Grafton, N. D.. 
former pastor of Our Savior's Norwe- 
gian Lutheran church, who has been 
spending a week in the city, left for 
his home yesterday. _ 

Mrs. Herbert Calking of Raymond, 
Wis., left yesterday for her home aft- 
er spending a week visiting at the 
home of Mrs. S. B. Johnson, 127 ^orth 
Fifty-fourth avenue west. 

We offer for sale at $3,000, eight- 
room house, 919 North Fifty-sixth ave- 
nue west; stone foundation; all con- 
veniences except heat; fifty-foot lot; 
easy terms. L. A. Barnes. 304 Cen- 
tral avenue. „^ , ^ , x^' 

Watch 1 epalrlng. Hurst. West Duluth. 



its housing copdltlons and daily 
round-table liaachtefc discussions. 

Mayor Wallliel^. Nye of Minne- 
apolis win oMnlfh* convention at ' 
10:30 o'clock/ ^^#dnesday morning' 
with an address of welcome, which i 
will be reaponci^dtip by Robert W. de 
Forest, president jtt the association. 
Addresses will De'atllvered during the 
three days bjc J>rriW. a. Evans, for- 
mer health commissioner of Chicago; 
Prof. Arnold B.;Hall of Wisconsin uni- 
versity. "Houslnd;/; and the Police 
Power"; John Nolen, landscape archi- 
tect from Cfwb^dge. Mass., "Land 
S'lb-Division and Its Effect on Hous- 
ing"; Elmer Korb«s. chairman of the 
h')a8ing- connralttea at Boston, "Causes 
of Bad HousiaK":jr John J. Murphy. I 
commissioner 'Of the tenement house i 
department at New York. "Effects of 
Bad Housing"; Dr. J. F. Edwards. | 
health director at Pittsburgh, "Best j 
Mechanism For Administration": Dr. 
George Young, Norfolk, Va., of the | 
United States public health service, 
"The Place of Housing Work In ?i 
Health Department"; and Charles 
Hall, sanitary Inspector of Chicago, 
"The Alley Problem." 

The meetings will all be held at the 
Radlsson hotel, headquarters for the 
convention. The conference will close 
on Thursday evening with a banquet 
in honor of tJie delegates. 



$1.00 Listerine 67c. 

60c Pebecco, 37c; 25c Euthymol, 15c; 
Orave's 26c Tooth Pojrder, 14c. Gray's 
drug aale. 

f 



WISE CAT. 



Chloago Nows: "The wonderful cats 
and dogs I read about In stories make 
me elok!" said Jinks to TrlUer. "Cats 
'ever pull off any of that stuff I read" 

"I agree with you," replied Trlller, 

"that the stories about cata always 

sound improbable, but there are times 

when cats seem to understand every 
word you say. 

"Now, there is Tige. Tlge, mind you. 
ia not our cat. Ha came to us from 
next door when his folks got a puppy 
dog. He adopted us without consult- 
ing us about it. He came and whined 
around our kitchen door until he made 
us nervous and we howled to his peo- 
ple to call off their cat. We said we 
didn't want a cat, but the neighbors 
merely said that they guessed we'd 
have to have one, anyway. 

"So Tige stayed. "Then, one day I 
teased him and he has been a regular 
member of the family ever since. He 
sleeps in the cellar on some old sofa 
pillows. We call the basement 'Tige's 
bedroom.' 

"One night I went down Into the 
basement to get some things, and when 
I came out I left the light burning. 
Hanged if Tige didn't come whining 
around my sleeping porch till I got up 
to throw .something at him and saw the 
light burning in the basement. 

"Tige knew that light ought not to 
be there and he was telling me about It. 
"Then, the other day my .sister was 
eaying: 'Tige never used to let anyone 
hold him at all. but now he likes it:' 
Just then Tige gave a yowl and wig- 
gled and squirmed until he got away 
from my sister's embrace, and he 
bounded off with every symptom of his 
native wildness. He seemed suddenly 
ashamed of the meek and lovely tame- 
ness that he had acquired, just like al 
common house pussy cat. 

"And on another occasion, when my 
sister had Tige in her arms, I said: 
'That cat's paws are dirty and he'll soil 
your dress.' Just then Tige stiffened 
out his paws and stretched them out 
and held them carefully away from my 
Bister's clean white waist. 

"Xow, I don't say that Tige under- 
stands English. But these three inci- 
dents look very uncanny to me." 

"Did he look at you reproachfully for 
saying his feet were dirty?" 

^•No." 

"Nor offer to scratch you? Nor 
growl? No? Well, anyway, a cat like 
that la worth having. If anyone 
should ever throw a bombshell into 
yuur yard Tige will scratch out the 
fuse and save all your lives." 

• '» 

The canary bird Importation into 
this countrv from the Hartz mountains 
has amounted to 1,500.000 birds a 
year for several years. 

New York picture shows and thea- 
ters can seat over 1,000.000 persons at 
a time. 



CHESTER ROSBOROUGH, 
Candidate for Mayor. 

morrow morning one will be eliminat- 
ed from the race. The candidates are 
James Dormedy, Frank Martin and 
Chester Rosborough. 

Seventeen students seek to become 
commissioners. Only four are to be 
elected. Eight will be chosen In the 
primary tomorrow. The candidates are 
Stanley Allen, Walter Anderson, Mil- 
dred Ayotte, Rolland Clark, Clara Ben- 
nett, Richard Duffy. Chester Dunston, 
Halftan Eier, Anna Marie Extrom, An- 
na Gallagher. Rose Harris, May John- 
son. Myrtle Johnson, Marie Krantz, 
Reginald La Faivre, Eddie Moore and 
Bessie Merritt. 

While the girls are not represented 
for the office of mayor, nine of them 
seek to become commissioners. It Is 
intimated that the girls have banded 
together and propose to elect at least 
two of their number. 

The final election will bo held next 
Wednesday morning between and 8 aJid 
9:15 o'clock. 



ALPHA COINCIL NO. 1. 

Modern Samaritans. 

Will entertain at a 

LADIES' NIGHT 

a Social Dance this evening, 
in their Councjl Chamber, north- 
east corner of Fourth ave- 
nue west and First street. In- 
vitations may be had from any 
of the naembers and from the 
Financial Scribe's office, 201 
First National Bank Bldg. All 
members of the order and friends 
Invited by them are promised an 
enjoyable evening. Dancing at 
9 "b'clock. Blewett's orchestra. 
Punch will be served. 



MYSTERY MAN IS 

STILL AN ENIGMA 



Duluth's J. E. R. at Work 
Farm Fails to Find Him- 
self; Can't Grasp His 
"Handle." 



MODEL Gin BUILT 
ALONG MORAL LINES 



Saloon Not First Thing Pro- 
vided for Residents, Says 
St. Louis Man. 

The customary method of building a 
city has been abandoned wisely in the 
building of the suburb of Morgan Park, 
according to J. L. Baker of St. Louis, 
Mo., who is visiting friends in this end 
of the city. The lack of the entertain- 
ment features was what Mr. Baker said 
puzzled him. 

"Generally when new towns are 
built, whether on the prairie or else- 
where, the first thing put up is a | 
saloon," said Mr. Baker. "This being : 

a 'model city' I notice this feature ha.s j ^^^ ^^ prolonged indefinitely, especially 
been entirely eliminated. In the old ^g j^. ^.^^ known Bulgaria did not 



MOBIUZATION IS 
RATIFIED BY GREEKS 

Chamber Indorses Action of 
Government and Author- 
izes $30,000,000 Loan. 

Athens, Sept. 29, via Paris, SepL 30. — 
The Greek chamber In a special session 
today ratified the action of the govern- 
ment In decreeing a general mobiliza- 
tion of the army and authorizing a loan 
of 130,000,000. 

Premier Venlzelos was greeted en- 
thusiastically when ha entered the 
building. He said in an address to the 
chamber that mobilization of the 
Greek forces was Indispensable on ac- 
count of Bulgaria's military measures. 
He stated, however, that Bulgaria had 
explained to Greece that her object in 
mobilizing was to maintain armed neu- 
trality and that she had no Intention 
of adopting an aggressive attitude to- 
ward Greece or Serbia. 

Sltoatlon Grare. 

Notwithstanding these explanations, 
the premier continued, the situation 
was still grave. The state of affairs 
brought about by mobilization could 



Three days ar»^be work farm, work- 
ing In the open, have failed to clear 
up the n\in(^ of' James Brown, alias 
Harry G. Atkins, whose age, real 
name, address a^d relatives are un- 
known. 

Police call the "mystery man" a 
genuine case of Ipst Identity, and com- 
pare him to. J, EJ, R., the well-known 

Rochester, Minn., hospital patient who 
forgot who he was. 

Sunday morning Patrolman Lading 
arrested "Brown'/ as he was striding 
along Superior st.feet In the face of 
a bitter ^vind, bareheaded, barefooted 
and scantily clad. "Brown" Is a tall, 
slender man with fairly good clothes 
and an Intelligeut face, but so far he 
has been unable' to tell the officers 
anything abciut himself. 

The origlaal charge against him 
was drunkenness, and police have ad- 
vanced the theory that he was tem- 
porarily unbalanced by his over-in- 
dulgences. He was booked as "Brown" 
aX headquarters after Secretary Fred 
Johnson had quizzed him at length in 
the hope of striking a responsive chord. 
He brightened up when "Brown" was 
spoken, so that was the way he was 
booked. Later, on the way to the 
work farm, officers in charge of the 
wagon reached the conclusion that his 
real name was Atkins, and so that 
title has been u«ed by Supt Fred "Ward. 
Judge F. H. Cutting sentenced him to 
twenty days at the farm. 

"We have cases of this kind once 
in a while," faid Supt. Ward today, 
"but this fellow Is not recovering the 
way the others do as soon as they 
sober up. He has been outdoors a lot, 
and that usually brings them around, 
but he doesn't seem to know yet who 
he Is." 

Since "BrowTi" or "Atkins" was ar- 
rested no one has Inquired about him, 
or about anyone ^tvoawerlng his de- 
scription. 



MISERS 



How Some Famous Ones Have 
Lived— A Misers' Feast — A 
Bargain for Prayers — Not an 
Insanity. 



days, and even yet, where towns spring 
up about a promised industry, the sa- 
loon is the first thing to get a foot- 
hold. Then there are probably a dozen 
more saloons, and then come the 



recognize the conditions created by 
the treaty between Greece and neigh- 
boring countries. 

The premier concluded his address 
with the declaration that the Greek 



shacks The shacks generally are the | ppopip stood ready to oppose efforts of 
only thing that the men can afford *^ ^ - . ^ .^. 



to live In after the saloon has had its 

inning. 

"It is certainly a pleasure to see 

such a community as Morgan Park, es- 
! tablished for a big industry like the 

Minnesota Steel company, provide homes 

for employes. The place is a revela- 
1 tion to me. I have been in a number 

of new towns throughout the West, but 

never before In a community that can 

equal this district." 

Mr. Baker Is interested In farming 

in Western Missouri. 



POPULATION LESS 

THAN EXPECTED 




Safe Diabetes Remedy 

In dlabete? the nutrition is impaired 
— this results in un excess of sugar 
in the blood, and the failure of the 
food to nourish, hence a gradual 
wasting away while eating well. 

Symptoms of this disease are in- 
creased thirst, excess of urine, 
emaciation and dry skin often with 
sweetish odor. 

"I had diabetes and was given up 
by all doctors of my town. I took 
Warner's Safe Diabetes Remedy and 
am now perfectly well." — Rev. Al- 
vin H. ivr^rton, Sand Point, Idaho. 

Sold by all druggists or sent post- 
paid on receipt of price, $1.25. 
Write for sample and Information. 

Warner's Safe Remedies Co., 
Dept. 375. Rochester. N. Y. 



Committee Favoring Street 

Car Extension to Suburbs 

Disappointed. 

According to unofficial reports g-iv- 
en out, resulting from the recent In- 
vestigation of the population of Gary 
and New Duluth, there are about 2,100 
people living in the suburbs. These 
figures were obtained after a count 
w^as made at the instigation of a com- 
mittee of citizens interested in getting 
the Duluth Street Railway company 
to make its extension to the suburbs 
in the near future. , ,, . , .^ 

"The number of people living in the 
suburbs is smaller than was expected," 
said a resident of the suburbs today. 
"We thought there were about 3,500 



any other nation to obtain a predom- 
ination in the Balkans. He hoped an 
understanding could be reached 
promptly which would permit of si- 
multaneous demobilization by Greece 
and Bulgaria. 

Former Premier Gounarls, leader of 
the minority which has favored a pol- 
icy of netitrality, approved the declara- 
tion of the government. 



ANDERSON GOES TO 
HOUSING MEETING 



Deputy Building Inspector 
Will Attend National Con- 
vention in Minneapolis. 

For the first time In the history of 
the West, the National Housing asso- 
ciation will hold Its annual conven- 
tion this year at Minneapolis. The 
gathering will open next Wednesday 
morning for a three-day session. 

Mayor Prince announced this morn- 
ing that Adolph Anderson, deputy 
building Inspector, will represent the 
city of Duluth at the convention, and 
that he will leave for Minneapolis 
next Monday evening. Mr. Anderson 
will be gone all w^eek. 

The convention this year Is the 
fourth since the housing association 
was organized and city and state of- 
ficials from all parts of the country 
will be In attendance. There will be 



people residing in the district. With 
the present rate of Increase In popu- 



two general meetings every day, with 
1 an Inspection trip of the city to study 
the present rate or increase m popu- 
lation, it will be but a short time be- 
fore that number do reside here." 

It Is expected to have the official 
figures and data ready within a few 
days. A canvass of the district was 
conducted by two men. one of whom 
represented "the street railway com- 
pany and the other being in the em- 
ploy of the committee. Data relative 
to the number of people who go back 
and forth between the suburbs and 
Duluth, and the number of trips made 
during the week or month, are also 
said to be among the facts procured. 

The extension of the car line from 

Seventy-first avenue to Morgan Park 1 

will be made this fall, according to ! 



CENTRALSSt'L''/li 

so EAST StTKRIOR ST., DUIiUTH. 

NEW CLASSES IN ALL 
DEPARTMENTS OCT. 4th 



official announcement made by the 
company. It Is also probable that this 
line will be further extended to Gary 
and New Duluth next summer. The 
company is now setting up poles along 



Day and evening sessions. Full sten- 
ographic and commercial courses. 
Same work given In night school as in 
the day school. Remember the open- 
ing day, Oct: 4. 

BARBER & Mcpherson. 



Dr. Charles W. Burr In the Journal 
of Nervous and Mental Diseases: In any 
study of misers the Dancer family 
naturally comes first, because It has 
become Immortalised in serious litera- 
ture and beoaus© In it miserliness ex- 
tended over three generations, though 
Daniel was the inoBt notorious. 

The grandfather, father and all the 
brothers and sisters of Daniel Dancer 
were alike misers. Of the oldest gen- 
eration Uttlei Is kjnown except that they 
were landlords ajid ought to have been 
people of snch character as to have 
been held in esteem and to have had 
positions of responsibility and respect 
in their compiunity. They were held In 
contempt. 

Said Nothing: of Hidden Money. 
Daniel was born near Harrow. Eng- 
land, in 1716, and was the eldest child. 
His avarice, it Is said, appeared only 
after the death of his father, from 
whom he Inherited a comfortable for- 
tune. He believed that the old man had 
concealed more than $7,500 In the house 
and was afraid his brothers would find 
It and not give It to him, the heir, and 
consiQuently kept quiet. Two years 
later, in removing an old grate, about 
one thousand dollars was found. The 
remainder of the hidden money. If 
there was any, was never found. He 
lived with his sister, whose nature was 
like his own. 

His rooms were never cleaned. He 
never had a light in his house except 
a candle to see him to bed. Once bur- 
glars broke Into his house, but got lit- 
tle. Afterward, however, he sent much 
of his gold to a safer storage place. 
Warmed HIm i^ah in Bed. 
Once Lady Tempest, who was always 
kind to him, sent him a trout stewed in 
claret. It congealed from the cold and. 
In order to warm It lest eat«n cold it 
should make his decayed teeth ache, he 
took it to bed with him and .''o warmed 
It. His house was a miserable building, 
but after his death money was found 
scattered everywhere. Notwithstanding 
his extreme avarice he was never dis- 
honest, but absolutely straight in all 
his financial transactions. He seemed to 
want gold for the mere pleasure of hid- 
ing it, fondling It, playing with It. and 
he would rob one pot to enrich an- 
other. He died at 78 years. 

James Taylor was bom In Leicester- 
shire, started life «is a weaver and lat- 
er became a stock broker. In which 
business he anmssed fl, 000,000. His 
raiment was ragged, his food Indiffer- 
ent and scanty, and his bed was rags 
and straw on the bare noor in a house 
which scarcely protected him from the 
wind and storm. 

Once he .Invitftd his friend Daniel 
Dancer to d»«e wUh him and two bank- 
er's clerks to take part in the "feast." 
The acolytes of finance found him on 
their arrival boiling a single mutton 
chon in a dffn. of water to make soup 
for the "feaift."' While he was out of 
the room they tfcrew some candle ends 
in the pot. The mess was eaten by 
the two queer cronies, but meeting the 
clerks latere "Dafceer had them arrestM 
for stealing his candles. 

BarKsined en Soul's Salvation. 
He alwayf-bou^ht a two penny steak, 
in the market, j^ sorry outside piece, 
grown btsrAc by; the wind, fly blown 
and odr \mj Hfe used to say "meat 
was nothin^unleiBS it smelt as well as 

tasted." '^ » . , . 

He even 4rovf a hard bargain with 
the church.' for the salvation of his 
soul. He -wias "Hll., av'' fearing death 
•sent for the Wt»tr ch ^ officials. He 
paid them "IS.OOO for prayers for the 
rest of his soul, but made them return 



Headquarters for Silks 




ART NEEDLE GOODS DEPT.— THIRD FLOOR 

Free Lessons in Crocheting 

€very Tuesday and Friday from 1 to 5 p. m. Come 
t.nd let our expert instructor teach you free of 
(harge This department is simply overflowing with 
Iiew Fall and Winter NoveiUes. 



Friday Basement Bargains 




Cray 

Granite 

Tea Kettles 



Regular 65o 
value for Fri- 
day only — 

39c 




lOO'Piece Dinner Sets 



Wash 
Boilers 

Regularly 
sold at 
$1.75. for 
Friday — 

n.i9 




Regularly sold at 
$15.00, for Friday . 



$9,98 




Gray 

Granite 

Rice Boilers 

Regrulajr 85c value — 
for Friday OQ^ 




Electric 
Lamps 

15-Watt ) Tunffsten 
2<)-Watt f liamps, e*., 
25-Watt f ,_, ^^ 
40- Watt) 9M ^jQ 




Bread Boxes 

White Enamel Bread Boxes, regu- 
lar 75c value, for QQy* 
Friday only %^%7%^ 



Wash Tubs 

Galvanized Wash Tuba, medium 
size; regular 85c /?0/* 

value, Friday .C#£^C^ 

Casseroles 

Iligh-grado 
Casseroles; 
* regular $3.00 
values, for Fri- 
day only — 

$1.98 




Cedar Oil Mops 

Here's a great snap; 
regular 7 5c O A ..• 
value, Friday. ^4rlJ 





Star Cut 

Glass Water 

Jugs 

Regularly sold at 
11.25, for Friday 

69c 




Clothes Baskets 

Extra large size Baskets, Qfi/* 
regular $1.25 value ^OC' 




Bath Shelves 



Glass Bathroom Shelves with nickel 
clamps, 16 and 18- 
Inch. special 



25c 



Duluth's Greatest Drug and Sundry Sale 

Continues Friday and Saturday— come and get your share of 
the wonderful bargains offered in standard toilet articles. 



$1.00 Size 

Listerine 

at 

67c 



$3.50 Size 

Horlick's 

Malted Milk 




$1 Lydia 
Pinkham's 
Compound 

68c 



$1.00 Size 
ScotVs Emul. 
Cod Liver Oil 

67c 



35c Size 

Fletcher's 

Castoria 

23c 



Solid Back Good 

Bristle Hair 

Brushes, Extra 

Special at 




$1 Size Sanitary 

Rubber Sheeting 

—put up in sealed 

packages 54x54 

89c 

36x36 Size ...43c 



I'lb Roll Hygien- 
ic Absorbent 
Cotton 

25c 

Rubber Bathing 

Caps, values 

to$l 

39c 



Miscellaneous 



25c Mum 

for only • 

$1.00 Glyco Thyme 
line 



$2.00 De Miracle 
Hair Remover . . . 



..18c 

.89c 

$1.69 



$1.00 De Miracle Hair OR a 
Remover OwU 

25c Eversweet for 
Perspiration 

50c Non-Spi for 
Perspiration 

5c Blue Seal Vase- 
line 

10c Blue Seal Vase- 
line 



18c 

43c 

4c 

8c 



$1.00 Pompeiian Olive Oil 

^nly"""'.'" .85c 

SOc Pompeiian Olive Oil 
— 1 pint for AOg^ 

only t«|l« 



1 lb 20-Mule Team 
Borax 



U pint Best Witch 
Hazel 



10c Camphor Ice, tube Op 
or cake Ow 

25c Bathasweet I7c 

25c Roman Bath Powder. 15c 

2 oz. Glycerine 8c 

50c Sal Hepatica 35c 

25c Seidlitz Powders 29c 

25c Lysol 19c 

SOc Listerine 39c 



1 pint Best Witch 
Hazel 

1 quart Household 
Ammonia ■ • . 

1 pint Household 
Ammonia 

2 oz. Glycerine and 
Rose Water 

4 oz. Hydrogen 
Peroxide 

8 oz. Hydrogen 
Peroxide , 

14 oz. Hydrogen 

Peroxide 

25e Extra Bay Rum 1 7c 

25c Carbolic Salve 15c 

10 lb bag Sea Salt 17c 



lie 

lOc 

15c 
15c 

..7c 
..7c 
..6c 
.13c 
.21c 



50c Java Rice 
Powder 

35c 

25c Cuticura 

Toilet Soap 

for 

19c 

50c Hinds^Honey 

Almond Cream 

for 

35c 

2Sc Lyons* Tooth 
Powder 

17c 



50c Size 

California 

Syrup o/Figs 

33c 



50c Doan's 

Kidney Pills 

at 

37c 



$1 Pierce's 

Favorite 
Prescription 

67c 



50c Wil- 
liams' Pink 
Pills at 

33c 



$1.00 Sal 

Hepatica 

at 

69c 



him a year's Interest by way of dis- 
count for cash payment. 

In classifying the type It must be re- 
membered that a miser is not merely a 
man extremely stingy; miserliness Is 
not mere avarice. Again, a man may 
deprive himself of everything except 
the bearest necessities, even live in 
filth and yet not be a miser, because 
his motive is purely altruistic, purely 
a desire to do good duringr life or after 

death. . . , 

A genuine miser Is a man who col- 
lects money for the mere enjoyment of 
Its possession, not for what It buys 
either in pleasure or power, but just 
as a magpie collects things. 

Why Their Gre«t AfpesT 
Several things strike one In studying 
these people, especially the great age 
to which many of them live. Indeed, if 
any one wanted an argument to prove 
that we of today have become too 
dainty and nice In all the things the 
worshipers of the god hygiene de- 
mand, he has at hand a plausible argu- 
ment In the longevity of ml.sers. 

Of course the real explanation is 
that only the sturdy can be misers and 
aurvive. Their longevity does prove, 
however, that, given a man of strong 
constitution, he can survive under the 
hardest conditions of life. 

Social standing has no bearing on 
the causation of miserliness, since its 
victims are found In all ranks of so- 
ciety. Children of rich and poor, 
learned and unlearned, of good and 
bad. al lallke may come to the same 

end. _ ,. 

No* an InsanltT. ^^ , , , 

That the condition Is pathological 
goes without saying, but It is not an 
Insanity In the technical, restricted 
meaning of the word. It Is not an ob- 
■e.sfllon, because the obsessed are af- 
fected against their wills, fight the 
obsessions, and are made unhappy by 
them while misers enjoy. It Is In a 
certain sense a perversion of the 
esthetic sense, as is shown in the 
pleasure obtained in eating de^cayed 
food and the enjoyment from shiver- 
ing in a freezing room. That is to 
say raisers get pleasure from sensa- 
tions which give the normal man 
pain. 

SOON AS POSSIBLE. 
Baltimore American: Paddy Dolan 



bought a watch fro 
with a guarantee 1 
Paddy took It bai 
stopped. 

"You seem to ha 
with It," said the j> 

"A small one, sun 
two months ago I v 
and it fell Into th< 

"But you should 
fore." 

"Sure, mc man, I 
as I could. We c 
yesterday." 



n the local jeweler, 

keep it In order. 
;k because it had 

ve had an accident 
jweler. 

1 enough, sir. About 
ras feeding the pig, 
■■ trough." 

lave brought it be- 

brought It as soon 
nly killed the pig 



ARBITI 
Philadelphia Pu 
peaceable man In 
Pennsylvania came 
fighting. "Let me 
earnestly sought, ' 
pute by arbltratio 



ATION. 

blic Ledge ••: A 
a steel town of 
upon two youths 
beg of you," he 

to settle your dis- 

1. Each of you 



choose half a dozen friends to arbU 
trate." 

Having seen the twelve arbitrators 
selected to the satisfaction of both 
sides, the man of peace went on his 
way r.^joicing. Half an hour later he 
returned that way, and was horrified 
to find the whole street fighting, whUa 
In the distance police whistles could 
be heard blowing and police rushing 
to the spot from all quarters. 

"Merciful heavens! What's the mat- 
ter now?" the peacemaker asked of 
an onlooker. 

"Shure," said the man, "the arbitra- 
tors are at work!" 



The annual cut of British Columbia 
timber is approximately 2,000.000,000 
feet. 

The commerce of the world in 1911 
amounted to $24.80 per capita. 



D. H., 9-30-15. 



Forward's Pillow Sale 




Banner Pillo-w's — 

All feathers, g(^od, 
strong ticking; 
regularly $1.50 per 
pair, sale price — 
CHcn ••••••••« ••• 



Our G. D. Pillows — Sanitary brand, full size and 
weight ; regularly $5.00 per pair, sale price, each. . 



M. 



$1.50 



We have a very fine line of Comforts and Blankets. 
us before the real cold weather arrives. 






YOUR 

CRKDIT 

IS GOOD. 



Look for Forward's Electric Sign. 



122 AM> 124 

E. SIPEKIOR 

STREET 



:a"«^ 



1 



.M. 



tf 





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1 








1 




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1 


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I 




Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 30, 1S16. 



■ 

> 
I 

I 



/ 



1^ " — * >■ 



, — • 






Dress Well! 

NEVER MISS THE MONEY! 



The man who buys 

his suit at this store is cor- 

rectly dressed 



Qualify, Taiioring, Style and Finish are em- 
bodied in oar garments. See our 

New Fall and 
Winter Suits 

A T 

$15 $18 
$20 $25 



Every 

Garment 

Guaranteed 




BULUTM— SUPEfiiaS— ViflQlfiiA— ililBlia 




"BEYOND THE POINT OE ROCKS" 

BllA5rCH MA\AGERt HERMAN OLSON. 18S3 ^Veat Sap«H«* Street. 

Advertistngr Subacr ptlon Distribution 




Open an 
Account. Your 
Credit Is Good 




DIFFERENCE 
OFJPINION 

Garden Contest Committee 

Uncertain as to Time 

for Inspection. 



Prizes Amounting to $100 

Will Be Given Youthful 

Gardeners. 



DUIUTHIANS 
TO DRESS UP 

First Week in October Is 

Set Aside for This 

Purpose. 



Autumn Will Have Gay Rags 

Period Same as Spring 

Month. 



Beptember house-cleanings are over. 
Now for "Drees Up" week. 

Duluth, noxt week, will be in the 
midot of a "dress up" campaign which 
be generally Maged throughout the 
country. This Idea of "sprucing up" 
and donning new, fresh personal 
adornments Is a national one and the 
word is being passed around in prac- 
tically every city of the United States 
to get In readiness for "dress up" 
week, Oct. 4 to 9. 

The plan was indorsed at a meet- 
ing of the Duluth merchants yester- 
day. It was decided to make special 
style displays at all of the department 
Btores and at all shops that cater to 
the clothing trade. 

There are many reasons why the 
first week in October is picked as an 
opportune time for "dress up" week. 
First of all, it Is the accepttd begin- 
ning of fall. Vacations are over, 
•choola have opened, and. anyway. It's 

logical time to think of fall clothes. 



tertainments are Just starting and 
"dress up" Is the logical word. 
"Eamter" ot Autumn. 

The spring season has it-s "sprucing 
up" period at Easter time, but for 
fall, there has been no such date. It 
Is the plan of those who are behind 
the movement to make "dress up" 
week an annual institution, so that the 
first day of fall will mean as much 
as Easter does to the dresser. 

The "dress up" .week Is not meant 
to be only for the men. The hint will 
also be thrown out to the women. 
Only a suggestion is neded. 

"Women." said one merchant, "like 
to be told they should dress better. 
They like good clothes — it's half their 
existence. Just give them an excuse 
to buy and they will." 

Then there is another reason 
pointed out. A "dressed up" city helps 
to restore business and prosperity. A 
well dressed crowd on the street is a 
good advertisement for any place. A 



Considerable difference of opinion 
seems to prevail regarding the inspec- 
tion of gardens In the contest instituted 
In the West end last spring. One com- 
mitteeman announr^d today that the 
inspection was well under way and that 
the committee would soon be able to 
award the prizes. Another man promi- 
nently connected with the contest, 
made a similar statement. 

Other members of the committee do 
not agree with these statements. Victor 
P. Juten, mentioned as a member of 
the committee, said this morning: 

"I am not a member of the commit- 
tee. I don't know a thing about It." 

"Yes, I am a member," said Emll 
Gustafson of Gustafson Bros., "but I 
have not done any Inspection yet. We 
expected to start thl.'? morning. Mr. 
Fares is making the arrangements." 

Leonard Peterson of Peterson Broth- 
ers, said he was not a member of the 
Inspection committee but had promised 
to take the committee to the various 
districts of the West end and the Hill- 
side when it made its inspection tour. 

"I have had no word as to when the 
inspection ia to begin," he said. "I 
have not been approached on the sub- 
ject lately." 

Dr. Orodson said that a meeting of 
the committee was to be held in the 
near future to collect the prizes and 
get them ready for distribution. 

"The gardtns will be Inspected all 
right," he said, 
at It at once 

nounce the prize winners soon." 
Gardens "Going to Pieces." 

Several boys have Inquired of The 



now being arranged and preparations 
being made for the affatri 

West"IndBrie^. 

"Church Officers" Will toe the sub- 
ject at the mid-week service at the 
Central Baptist church. Twentieth 
avenue west and First street. Rev. 
Milton Fish will speak. 

Rev. W. E. Harmann. pastor of the i 
St. Peter's Episcopal church, and Mrs. | 
Harmann are expected to return to- I 
morrow from Minneapolis, where Mr. ' 
Harmann has been conducting mission i 
services. I 

Mrs. A. W^. Brown. 312 Restormel I 
street, returned yesterday from Ash- t 
land. Wis., where she has been spend- | 
Ing several days visiting relatives. 

The Rebecca Guild of St. Peter's 
Episcopal church Wiia entertained this , 
afternoon at the home of Mrs. V. P. ' 
Juten, 2716 West Fourth street. , 

The Borean Club of the Central Bap- 
tist church will be entertained tomor- i 
row evening at the home of Miss AvUa i 
Glover of the Osborne apartments. 

STEELlRAOE 
AT HIGH TIDE 

E. H. Gary of Steel Corpora- 
tion Regards Outlook as 
Encouraging. 



Plants Operating at Ca- 
pacity in All Sections 
of Country. 



That the steel business of the coun- 
try is at high tide and the outlook 
encouraging, was the statement made 
by E. H. Gary, chairman of the United 
States Steel corporation** board of di- 
rectors. In the course of a recent In- 
terview at Chicago. 

Mills in both the Eastern and West- 
era centers are running at high speed 
and are crowded with orders. Steel- 
making plants which Include blast and 






, "We are going to get of^^'hcarth furnaces are being opcr- 
We will bo ready to an- *^^^ '^^ beyond normal capacity, every 

pound of material possible being 

turned out from them. Most of the 

H^rVld Ts to"'when'the"contest was^ toi'"'"^*^^® ®'"® reported to be sold up 



community that is kept clean and neat terminate. One of the winners of a I Into January, and there Is thought to 

unci u/nncA rk#:)/^rili.-> tnlra ^cmiknlal r»rln*a , ... ....... ' - "^ 



and whose people take especial pride 
In their personal appearance invar- 
iably is better than the town whose 
slovenly dwellings are Inhabited by 
dowdy people. 

Next week Is considered the logical 
time. The present business condi- 
tions, the fact that enormous crops are 



prize In the contest held last summer 
under the auspices of the West End 
Commercial club, said that his garden 
was "going to pieces" and he wanted to 
have it inspected before it entirely dis- 
appeared. 

Prizes in cash and merchandise, val- 
ued at nearly $100 have been promised 




prosperous. 



Drnggiots Klect Om4>ers. 

Santa Barbara, Cal., Sept. 30. — The 
national wholesale druggists selected 
Baltimore as the 1916 convention city 
and elected tne follofwlng officers: 
President, Charles Gibson, Albany, N. 
Y.; first vice president, C. F. Michaels, 
San Francisco; treasurer, Samuel E. 
Strong, Cincinnati; general secretary, 
F. N. Ilolllday, New York. The con- 
vention went on record as opposed to 
further tax on medicine, but urged 
more effective pure food and drug 
laws. 



money will be given in checks of $6, 
$5 and $4 to the winners designated 
by the committee. 



CiViC BETTERMENT 

WIU BE TOPIC 



J. J. Hill io Loan to Germans. 

St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 30. — Besides 
participating in the credit loan to 
England and France, local banking 
interests controlled by James J. Hill, 
will subscribe to the third German 



.^ _ loan being offered In this country. It 

Fall sports and fall evening social en-' was officially announced last night. 



A "No-Cost" 
Demonstration 
for the asking 




Traffic Regulation and 

Snio!<e Nuisance Will 

Be Discussed. 



Traffic regulation and the smoke 



be practically no idle capacity In any 
part of the countrj'. All the leading 
companies are endeavoring to Increase 
their outputs of unfinished steel In or- 
der to take care of the war orders 
that continue to pour In, Efforts are 
being made to increase outputs by 
remodeling obsolete plants and through 
new construction. Due to ah enor- 
mous Increase of business th^ Frank- 
lin, Pa., works of -the American Steel 
Foundries have been put on double 
turn, and arrangements are being 
made to start that company's only Idle 
plant In the Sharon district. 

Railroad Buying^ Better. 

A /significant feature in the Iron 
and steel trade is the Increased in- 
terest being shown by -the railroads 
In the acquiring of rails and equip- 
ment. Orders for 160,000 tons of rails 
recently placed by tlie Efle, Atchison, 
Atlantic Coast line and E«ulsvllle & 
Nashville have given encouragement to 
rail makers, and It Is now expected 
that the New York Central and Penn- 
sylvania will shortly place contracts 
for next year's requirements, aggre- 
gating about 300,000 tons. 

The majority of these companies are 
paying much more than $28, the quo- 
tation for the standard article that has 



Semi' Annual Drug Sale 



m%% Block 




nuisance will be the subject of dls- Prevailed for several years Prices of 
.. , , ^ ' ., , rails for export are also slowly going 

cusEion this evening at the monthly . . - . 



Extra Attachments 
Per Set— 



Learn the economical 
Frantz Way of using the 
labor-saving electricity that 
flows past your home. 

Today — NOW — without 
price or obligation, ask to have 
a Frantz Premier Electric 
Cleaner sent to your home. Mv^a^va ^0^^ ^^ 

^ ^-r\ t PRICE $25.00 

^ " Electric Cleaner 

Prove for yourself how the Frantz 
Premier saves cost of "special" cleanings — 
saves furniture and rugs — saves your hands, your eyes, 
your time, your energy. 

Weighs only 9 pounds. One hand operates it. Soon pays for itself. 

Let us show you how it takes handfuls of 
dirt out of rugs you thought were clean 

NOW IN 100,000 HOMES 

Already in over 100,000 homes. Made by the World's largest makers of 
electric cleaners. Simply sign and mail the coupon. No obligation to buy 

The MOORE COMPANY 

319 WEST FIRST STREET 
DULUTH, MINN. 

Melrose 6860 Grand 20S4-X 



meeting of the Garfleld Avenue Im- 
provement club to be held at the Madl. 
son school building, 800 Garfleld ave- 
nue. Reports of committees relative 
to putting a stop to excessive smoke 
of railroad engines in the nearby yards 
as well as useless whistling at all 
times of the day will be given. 

Auto drivers still persist In using 
the thoroughfare as a speedway while 
traveling between Duluth and Superior, 
say residents. In the evening after 
dusk the practice of driving at high 
speed up and down the avenue is said 
to be quite extensive. 

It is probable that action will be 
taken to assist the police In getting 
the numbers of automobiles whose 
drivers persist In this practice. On 
several occasions recently, complaints 
have been made against drivers. 



$7.50 




LODGE INITIATES 
FIFTY CANDIDATES 



Send in 

this Coupon 

TODAY 

Tear it out 
N O W I 



THR MOORR COMPANY, 

310 We«t First St., Duluth, Minn. 

Gentlemen — 

Send me for a no-cost demonstration, > Prantr Premier Electric 
Cleaner. 1 premise to handle it with ordinary care, and to hold 
It at your disposal after the demoostration ha* been made. 



Namt- 



jtddresi. 



Degree of Honor Give Ban- 
quet to 300 
Guests. 

The initiation of nearly fifty new 
members following a banquet, attend- 
ed by more than 300 members of the 
order, featured the closing session of 
the district meeting of the Degree of 
Honor at the Columbia hall, Twentieth 
avenue west and Superior street, last 
night. The afternoon's session was 
devoted to giving Instructions In 
ritualistic work. Mrs. Clara Bender, 
grand chief of honor, presided. 

The open meeting following the Ini- 
tiation was attended by a crowd that 
packed the large hall. Many mem- 
bers of the A. O. U. W. were present 
during this part of the program. 
Musical numbers and readings were 
given by members of the lodge. 

The principal address yesterday aft- 
ernoon was given by Mrs. ?J. Elizabeth 
Schroeder, past grand chief of honor, 
who is state deputy for the order. Her 
address was chiefly devoted to meth- 
ods of increasing the membership. 

TWO SENTENCED 

FO R WHE AT THEFT 

TVheat is selling at about $1 a bushel, 
and labor is worth 60 cents a day, 
when the Judge is estimating the op- 
tion of a fine or Jail sentence in munic- 
ipal court. 

This problem in arithmetic probably 
was solved by the court yesterday aft- 
ernoon for Gabriel Angelo and Martin 
George, each 28 years old, were sent 
to the work farm for sixty days for 
sweeping sixty bushels of wheat from 
Northern Pacific freight cars. Both 
men lived at 922 Garfleld avenue, and 
were arrested Tuesday afternoon. 

Charles E. Worth, 1818 Minnesota av- 
enue and Thomas Johnson, 1030 "West 
Seventh street, arrested In conjunction 
with the theft and accused of receiving 
stolen property, were released upon or- 
der of the court. They explained that 
at the time they bought the wheat, 
they did not know it was stolen prop- 
erty. 

m 

Baptist Musical Festival. 

The musical festival to be given by 
the Central Baptist church this fall will 
be ou Friday, Oct. 8. The program is 



up due to the plants being largely oc- 
cupied In turning out heavy bars and 
other materials that return better ! 
profits than In making ?-ails at the old 
quotations. It \s estimAted that since 
Sept. 1 over 14,750 freight- cars have 
been ordered. and orders for from 
6,000 to 7,000 cars are said tobe pend- 
ing. Railroads which placed orders 
two months ago are reported to have 
saved $200 a car as compared with 
prices that prevailed In 1913. Recent 
quotations are higher, and it is taken 
for granted that the car market will 
be sharply advanced shortly. 

Price* Ilelngr Advaiice'd. 
Prices show further advancing ten- 
dency all along the line. Wire prod- 
ucts were advanced $2 a ton last Mon- 
day, chiefly on account of the heavy 
export demand. Refined iron bars at 
Pittsburgh are up $2 a ton, to 145 
cents, while cut nails, shafting and 
nuts and bolts have also advanced. 
Steel bars, plates and shap^^s are 
quoted at 1.40 cent.i for first quarter 
and the 1.35 cents price, for earlier de- 
livery, fhows signs of disappearing 
within a fortnight or so. ^teel prices 
are already on what would have been 
called in the past a fairly remuner- 
ative basis, btit an Important fact is 
that at the same price the steel com- 
panies show they can make consider- 
able more money than formerlj', 
through the introduction of various re- 
finements and economlps. 



Tiro Days More— Friday and Saturday 

This is one of the big economy op- 
]3ortunities of the year — and one of 
interest to every man and woman in 
Duluth. Cut prices on hundreds of 
standard articles — things you know 
and use every day in the year. 



These Prices Won't Be Repeated 
For Another Six Months! 

$3.75 Horlick's Malted Milk $2.85 

75c Mellen's Baby Food ' 53c 

$1.00 Herpicide 59^ 

$1.00 Swamp-Root 59^ 

$1.00 Danderine 59^ 

$1.00 Listerine 57^ 

$1.00 Scott's Emulsion * 67c 

$1.00 Lydia Pinkham's Vegetable Compound 69c 

$1.75 S. S. S. Blood Purifier V. .$1.28 

35c Fletcher's Castoria 23c 

60c Doan's Kidney Pills 37c 

50c WiUiams' Pink Pills '..'.'.'.'.'. !35c 

36c Rocky Mountain Tea [ * . . .28c 

50c Sal Hepatica 33c 

50c California Syrup of Figs 33c 

1 lb Absorbent Cotton 22c 

25c Sal Hepatica I8c 

5-yard package Medicated Gau.ze ! ! ! ! . .28c 

1 quart Grape Juice 39c 

These Are Only a Few Out of Hundreds of Bargains 

That Won't Come Again Soon. 



T 



i 




Tea Kettles 



Jardinieres 

A complete line of Jar- 
dinieres and Fern Dishes 
in our Basement Store. A 
Jardiniere in the beautllul 
Du Pont ware will aid 
beauty to your home. 8- 
Inch size sells regularly at 
$1.75, Friday <r -f ^3 
only ^1*07 




Tea Pots 

Japanese Tea Pots, 
with strainer, in light 
or blue decoration; 
eells regularly at 39c 
■ — Friday 0*7 

only J^/C 



Large size Copper, 
nickel plated. Tea 
Kettle. This Is a 
guaranteed copper 
kettle that eells reg- 
ularly at ?1.48 — Frl- 
day only 
at 



$1.23 




Floor 
Brushes 




A good quality Floor Brush, 16-lnch size, with 
polished handle; sells at $1.50. (T f /-*o 

Friday only ^ j, ^J^Q 



Carpet 
Sweepers 

"Standard" 
Blssels Sweep- 
er — one that 
cells at $2.25, 
Friday only—- 

98c 




Cups and Saucers 

Plain white, for every day 
use, in our "Pennora" pat- 
tern; Friday only, Ar\ 
a set of six T-/C 



Miscellaneous 



Fire Shovels, long handle . . . • 8c 

Tungsten Lamps 27c 

Parlor Broom 2tc 

Carpet Beater — Just Right • 7c 

Liquid Veneer, 25c Blze \9c 

Alumlnuiu Waffle Irons '. .*. ..$1.12 



SHOP IN THE BASEMENT STORE FOR QITALITY AND SERVICE. 



1 








• 





aEESSSBES^gSEaC 







Fatima sales 
are jumping 



— because every tnan wants 
• SENSIBLE dgaiette. 

There are other eensible 
cigarettes besides Patima — 
bat there are none that also 
just hit the taste of so many 
thousands of smokers am 
Fatimas do. 

Tour taste may be different. 
But if you happen to like 
Fatimas as well as moat 
men do, you can keep right 
on smoking without any 
worry about your tongue or 
throat and vhthont "feeling 
mean" afterwanla. Fatimas 
are Bonuible. 

Try Fatimas today and 
you'll probably understand 
why they're sellkig so Cast. 



^••tT^P^p^W'^^^* I^P^^^^^^^^W^^^^^^ ^^^^ 




Ihe'Eirkish Blend G^aiettd 



MINNESOTA MAN 

RECOVERS BABY 

Curtis Baldwin Gets Child 

Given Away By Mother 

at Birth. 

Chicago, Sept. SO. — A baby boy, 21- 
months-old, was recovered by his 
father, Curtis N. Baldwin of Minne- 
sota, in court here on a writ of habeas 
corpus, disclosing: the fact that the 
mother had griven away the child at 
birth and that another woman had 
adopted it a day later, and presented 
It to her hrsbard as her own. Bald- 
win had never before seen the boy, 
and believed him dead, 'until a few 
weeks ago. 

On Sept. 9, according to William E. 
Mooney, attorney for Baldwin, the 
latter received a letter from his wife, 
Mrs. Genevieve Baldwin, saying that 
she had deceived him in writing that 
the child had died at birth In a ma- 
ternity hospital here. Mr. Baldwin 
came to Chicapro and found his son In 
the family of Mr. and Mrs. William E. 
Stone. 

According to Attorney Mooney, the 
child wa.*? born in a maternity hospital 

tn this city. Immediately after the 
>irth, the child was turned over to 
the hospital physician, who placed it 
In the Stone family. Mr. Mooney said 
Mrs. Stone told him that she had led 
her husband to believe it was her 
child. 

Attorney Mooney refused to state In 
what part of Minnesota Mr. Baldwin 
lived, and also declined to disclose 
the whereabouts of Mrs. Baldwin. He 
said Mr. Baldwin left for Minnesota 
last night with the child. 

CARRANZA LEADER 

HEAD OF AS SAILANTS 

Ban Antonio, Tex., Sept. 30. — The Car- 
ranza commander at Las Peledos, Mex., 
headed the attacking party of Mexicans 
who crossed the border last Friday 
night, and in a fight with American 
•oldlera captured Trooper Richard J. 



Johntjon, whom they shot and then mu- 
tilated by taking his head and ears for ' 
souvenirs, it wai reported to Southern ' 
department het dquarters by Capt. j 
Frank R. McCoy. Guadeloupe Cuellar, ■ 
a Mexican who said he was one of the i 
attacking party, gave the details of i 
the fight to Cai t. McCoy In a sworn 
statement. 



DULUTH PRAISED 
FOR WELFARE WORK 

Miss Meeker Speaks at 

Charities Conference 

at New Ulm. 

Duluth came 1 1 for much praise for 
Its child welfare work at the twenty- 
fourth Minnesota State Conference of 
Charities and Corrections, which was 
held from Sept. i5 to Sept. 28 at New 
Ulm, Minn., accDrding to Miss Edna 
G. Meeker, secre ary of the Associated 
Charltlea, who his Just returned from 
the convention. Miss Meeker was the 
only delegate tT->m this city. 

Miss Meeker addressed the conven- 
tion on the subject of child welfare 
work In this city and aroused keen in- 
terest in the work that Is. being done 
here. Miss Met ker was reelected a 
member of the executive committee 
for the coming year. 



Y^ r\^-^ skill and long 
^^|k ^ experience e n - 
at^ al)le us to test your 

eyes In the very best 

manner. 

C. D. IROTT, Cplomc'rlsl 

6 East Superior Street. 




wanderlust has seized Maki, for he la 
an old offender, and makes a trip to 
the work farm, to sojourn with Supt. 
Ward, every now and then. 

Police aro looking for him, with & 
request that he come back and start all 
over again on the sixty-day "bit." 



What to Do for 

Itching Skins 



[SCAPES WORK FARM 

TO "KEEP A DATf 



When Gust Makl, B3, went to the 
work farm Monday night, starting a 
sixty-day sentence, ne said to his 
friends: 

"I have a 'date' for Wednesday that 
I've got to keep.' 

And he evidently kept It for when 
Rupt. Fred Ward "counted noses" yes- 
terday, Maki wus missing. He was 
sent out with a gang of men to burn 
brush, and after working away from iSkln 
the others, he slipped out of sight and I nient and 



There Is immediate relief for skins 
itching, burning and disfigured by 
eczema, ring-worm, or similar torment- 
ing Hkln-trouble. In 
a warm bath with 
resinol soap and a 
simple application 
of resinol ointment. 
The soothing, heal- 
ing resinol medica- 
tion sinks right in- 
to the skin, stop.s 
itching Instantly, 
and soon clears 
away all trace of 
eruption, even In 

severe and stubborn cases where other 
treatments have had little or no 
effect. 

You need never hesitate to use resi- 
nol. It is a doctor's prescription that 
has been u.sed by other physicians for 
twenty years In the treatment of skin 
affections. It contains absolutely 
nothing that could injure the tenderest 
Every druggist sells resinol oint- 
re^iaol aoay. Samplo^ 












































s»s 


^-^ - 


t 


. 


1 












1 ^ 

1 









made for Duluth to keep his "date." I free, Dept 7-R, Resinol, Baltimore. 
This ia not the first time that the ' Md. 



/ 



-•— "• 






1 ; 



X*n^",yf.. 









^ - 







\ 




v: 



I 



6 



You 'II Do Better at Kelly 's 

Week-End Specials 

Hous«ffumishing Dept. 

Things You Really Need 




Coal Hods 



Steel Coal Hods, ja- 
panned finish; good 
size; special, each. 
Heavy Galvanized Iron Coal 
Hods; extra large 
size; special sale 
price 



19c 

an Coal 

39c 




Stove Boards 

Handsome Oriental finish, 
wood lined board, round cor- 
ners. 

36x36 Inches, apcrlal 91.69 

RaxliS liii>h4-<«, «pe4-ial «1.»9 

30x30 tneh<-M, Npeoial 08c 

2Hx28 InebeH. Npeclal 85e 




Oil Heaters 



Perfection Oil Heaters; alwaya 
give satisfaction. Just the 
thing to use these chilly 
m o r n j n g s and 
evenings; special 
at 



$2.95 




Electric Lamps 



$5.50 brushed brass standard, 
art glass shade, brass trim- 
med, seed bead 
fringe, special 

at 

$11.00 heavy metal standard, 
gilt finish, art glass shade, 
brass overlaid, 
two lights, spe- 
cial 

$13.50 heavy metal standard, 
silver gray finish; verj- hand- 
some shade: two |^#\ Cfl 
lights, pull ctialn 0^««)t| 
sockets, Bpecial. . . ^ 



$3.45 

il standard, 
lass shade. 

$7.50 




stove Pipe 

Heavy weight Steel Stove 
pipe, 6-lnch size; regu- Q^^ 
lar price 15c; special, a 0%J 
length 

Stewart 
Heaiers 

A genuine 
Stewart 
Base Burn- 
ing Heater, 
revolving 
fire pot, du- 
plex grates, 
full nickel 
trimmings. 
Double 
heater and 
a guaran- 
teed Stew- 
art. Tl>e 
kind that 
has been 
used here 
for 30 win- 
ters. Spe- 
cial at — 




$25 



TRRMSt $1.00 PRR l^BCK. 



m 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTU HERALD 



September 30, 1915. 






J 



HAD SOME GOOD POINTS. 

Philadelphia Telegraph: The Smiths 
had been married about four months 
and since wifey could more tunefully 
perform on the piano than on the 
kitchen range. Smith had eaten things 
that reminded him of Fourth of July 
punk. 

"Oh, Harry," enthusiastically ex- 
claimed the wife, carryftig in a dish 
one evening as he seated himself at 
the dining room table, "I have been 
cooking you some old-fashioned crul- 
lers." 

"That was very kind of you, dear," 
responded hubby, taking one of the 
dainties and heroically beginning to 
eat. 

"I got the recipe from a cook book," 
continued wifey, with a pleased ex- 
pressii'u. "How do you like them?" 

"Well," cautiously answered hubby, 
slowly munching the tasteless crumb, 
"the holes couldn't possibly be bet- 
ter." 



Coffee grows wild In (Jernian East 
Africa. 




Mhts 



HADOWS 



D 



OF ^ 

OLICE Court 




^lans Jf ligfjt to tfie Cxjposiition 



/^ITV noAlA/O TUC DIIDCC I near the Rex theater, after she had 
l/l I T UnAWO I nt rUnOt. I attracted a crowd by her antics. 

Aspirants for Pugilistic Honors Draw VIOLATES SMOKE"oRDINANCE. 
Fines of $17 Each. 

Fighting for the "gate" tq while 
away a quiet Sunday afternoon cost 
Gordon Hayes, aged 21, and Arthur 
Juntilla, aged 18, $17 each in municipal 
court this morning. 

Hayes and Juntilla, two aspirants to 
honor in the squared circle, Tvere the 
principals in a mill staged on the q. t. 
last Sunday afternoon before aeventy- 
flve guests of the Bartenders' club. 

Just after the gong rang for the sec- 
ond round. Police Capt. A. G. Fiskett. 
with f>ffirers David Perry and Orlna- 
ger, shouldered their way into the 
room. In addition to the fighters they 
arrested Bert Collins, president of the 
club; Fred Bernard, the secretary, and 
Alfred Stewart. The Judge dismissed 
the case against the last named three 
on motion of City Prosecutor Walter 
Gonska. 

"There was no purse, judge," says 
Hayes, but police said there was $17 In 
the nroroed.'?. 

"The fi?ht was a draw but the city 
won the pnrse," said Capt. Fiskett. 

DID NOTMAKE LOVE. 

Peanut Vender Denies Charge- 
Sadie Red Sentenced. 

"The peanut man made love to me." 

So saying, Sadie Red, aged 38. re- 
sumed her seat in municipal court be- 
fore .Tudge F. H. Cutting, after deny- 
ing that she had been Indulging too 
freely. 

Sadie walks on crutches and is a 
character well known to police. Each 
time she is arrested the police must 
prove her guilt, for she never will ad- 
mit It. 

"Me make love to her? bah!" said the 
peanut man, George Gomoze, who op- 
erates a stand at the corner of Second 
avenue west and Superior street. "She 
was full, judge." 

Officer Bert Duff also said, that In 
his opinion, Sadie was "full," and the 
judge sent her to jail for thirty days. 

Sadie was arrested Tuesday evening 



Globe Elevator Man Admits Guilt Be- 
fore Judge Cutting. 

When a vessel is loading grain an 
elevator chimney amokes more than 
at any other time, according to For- 
mer Alderman Samuel Staples, super- 
intendent of the Globe Elevator com- 
pany.' 

Arraigned before Judge F. H. Cut- 
ting today as the representative of 
the elevator concern, he pleaded guilty 
to a violation of the smoke ordinance. 
Two photographs, taken by Municipal 
Inspector J. W. Schneider at an inter- 
val of seventeen minutes, were sub- 
mitted to the court, but were not 
used, as the defendant changed an 
original plea of not guilty. 

The chimney smoked seventeen min- 
utes, according to Mr. Schneider. 

"Other cities make allowances for 
elevators In a case of this particular 
kind," said Mr. Staples. 

Judge Cutting fined him $7.50. 

JUSTAS CHEAP TOBUY, 

Men Must Serve Day for Every 
Bushel of Wheat Stolen. 

A day a bushel evidently is the rule 
adopted in municipal court for the 
punishment of wteat sweepers who 
have Invaded the railroad yards since 
the fall grain movement started. 

Gabriel Angelo and Martin George, 
were sentenced to the work farm for 
sixty days yesterday. They were 
found guilty of sweeping sixty bushels 
of vrheat. 

John Wikowski, aged 52, was 
brought In last night by Special Of- 
ficer Seawall and Patrolman Kreager. 
and it was estimated that his haul had 
amounted to about ten bushels. The 
sentence imposed was ten days at the 
work farm. 

John Kylmala, aged 31, also brought 
In by Officer Seawall, drew a sentence 
of seven days at tlie work farm, but the 
report didn't show how many bushels 
of grain he had "swept." 



SCHOOL BOARD 

CHANSES ftlEETINS 



IVIonthly Gathering on Sec- 
ond Friday of Montti 
Hereafter. 

Members of the Duluth board of edu- 
cation will hold their monthly meeting 
a week from tomorrow, instead of on 
Friday, Oct. 1, In accordance with a 

new bylaw adopted at the September 
meeting. 

From now on the board will meet the 
first Friday after the first Monday in 
each month, instead of on the first 
Friday as heretofore. 

Several matters of Importance are to 
be considered at the October meeting, 
and all of the directors excepting Mrs. 
T. J. Davis are expected to attend. 

Action on the appropriation to be 
made for playground.s and the city's 
recreational system will be taken, and 
some steps may be made towards pro- 
viding a permanent school building for 
Morgan Park. 

ROYALRQOTERS 

READY TO SHOUT 



against him. He was released on fur- 
nishing a $1,000 bond. 

Mr.s. Durand is a former wife of 
Michaels. They were divorced several 
years ago. Later she married again 
and Is said to have separated from 
her second husband. Of late years she 
has been operating a small hotel In 
Superior. Michaels obtained custody 
of the child after several legal bat- 
tles. Another attempt Is now being 
made by the mother to get legal pos- 
session of her daughter. 



S. H. S. Newspaper. 

"The Northeaster," the Superior high 
school paper, will make Its first ap- 
pearance in Superior next Thursday. 
The paper already has 400 subscribers. 
Copy for the first issue Is now being 
prepared by representatives of vari- 
ous classes of the scliool. All the work 
In connection with the paper will be 
confined to the school building. 



TRUE ENOUGH. 

Philadelphia Public Ledger: Suavely 
pertinent is the criticism of age. Old 
Mr. Blank, who was the guest of a gay 
grandnlece at a haunt of fashion, had 
■watched her on her social round for a 
month. 

One day, unexpectedly, she said to 



$100 Reward, $100 

Tne readers of ihls iMfor will be pleased to Itun 
tbtt tbere is at least one druaded dlaease that 
•clence has been able to cure in all ita stages, and 
that la Catarrh. Hall's Catarrh Cure Is the only 
positive cure now known to the medical fiatentlty. 
Catarrh beliig a consUlutloiial duea^e. requires a 
coustllutlriial treatment. lleira Catarrh Cure is 
taken lutenially. acting directly upon the bluod and 
mucous surfaces of the system, thereby destroying 
the founJailon of the dUeaae, and giving the patient 
•trerugth by building up the oonatttutinn and assist- 
h,g nature In doing Its wort The proprlet-iis hare 
to muoh faith In iU curatlre powers that the>- offer 
One nundi-ed Dollais for any caM that Jt ttiU 
to cure .SMid for llJt of testimoiLlala. 

AddKne F. J- CHl-afEY ft CO.. IVIedo, Ohio. 

B/^ld by all Unigglata. 75o. 

Take Hall's FaiuUy I'Uis for congtipatloo. 



Boston Baseball Entliu- 

siasts Will Accompany Red 

Sox to Philadelphia. 

Boston, Mass., Sept. 30.— The Royal 
Rooters, a band of baseball enthusi- 
asts, who have followed the fortunes 
of every Boston team that has taken 
part In a world series or important set 
of games In nearly a quarter of a cen- 
tury, today made final preparations to 
accompany the Red Sox to Philadel- 
phia for the world series games to b© 
played there next month. 

Having already arranged for reser- 
vations at Braves' tleld for the local 
games, they called on William F. Ba- 
ker, president of the Philadelphia Na- 
tional club, who is here with his 
team, to obtain a block of seats In the 
Philadelphia field. 

A band will go with the rooters, 
whose boast is that they have yet to 
follow a losing team. 

BEANS A RE DlV dRCED, 

Wife Says Husband Got "Stewed" 
on Too Numerous Occasions. 

Permission to shake off the matri- 
monial yoke was granted to Bonnie V. 
Bean, 26. yesterday afternoon in dis- 
trict court af^er she related to Judge 
Ensign the story of her unhappy mar- 
ried life. The court gave her a decree 
of separation from Charles Byron 
Bean, aged 32, on the grounds of habit- 
ual drunkenness and cruelty. 

The Bt-ans were married in Chicago 
Sept. 3, 1904, and are parents of two 
children, Byron Bean. 9, and George 
Bean, 6. Mrs. Bean testified that her 
husband was habitually addicted to the 
use of intoxicants and that he fre- 
quently beat her. She also alleged 
that Bean has a roving disposition. 



TOO LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 



One Cent a Word Each Inserllon. 
No Adverliscinent Less Than 15 Cent 



FOR SALE — MAKE OFFER FOR 500 
share.g Section Thirty Development 
company stock. 603 Providence 
building. 

FOR RENT — FURN'ISHED ROOM, 
light housekeeping allowed. 209 
Third avenue west. 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

Paul M. Parnow and Emalle Brown. 

Peter Burtness and Anna M. Swen- 
son. 

Richard Plltlla and Elean Halllla. 

Frank Bergsen and Anna Dziok. 

Harold E. Brotherton and Katherlne 
M. Poye. 

George A. E. Finlayson and Eva H. 
Busselman. 

Thorwald Emanuel Thorsen and 
Theresa Clementina Otterson. 

William Capen and Emma Marko- 
vltz. 



' '.VV/KDS. PTTRCHASE FIJHN! 
ture, rugs, etc., for your new home 
from Cameron, the factory distribu- 
ter. Salesrooms 2110-2112 West Supe- 
rior St. We save you much of the re. 
tallers' profits. Entire new stock. 



Wedding Announcements — Engraved or 
printed. Consolidated Stamp and 
Printing Co., 14 Fourth avenue west. 



14, 18 AND 22K SOLID GOLD WED- 
dlng and engagement rings made and 
mounted to order at Hen ricksen'a. 

Wedding pictures are a specialty with 
Chrlstensen, 25 We-gt Superior street. 



BIRTHS. 



z^ 



SUPERIOR 



SUPERIO R GETS MONEY. 

State Awards $6,019.71 to Be 
Used in Industrial Education. 

The sum of $6,019.71 was awarded the 
city of Superior by the state board of 
Industrial education which held its 
meeting yesterday at Milwaukee. The 
state aid represents a part of 1125.000 
appropriated for that purpose through- 
out the state. 

The industrial schools are conducted 
for children between the ages of 14 and 
16, who have positions but desire to 
learn a trade. Night courses are also 
given for students. They are required 
to attend school at least five hours each 
week. 

SUPERIOR DETECTIVE 
ARRE STED I N DAKOTA 

Norman A. Luce, a Superior private 
detective, wa^B bound over to the Ben- 
son county district court following a 
hearing on a kidnaping charge held at 
Mlnnewaukan, N. D., yesterday after- 
noon. He is charged with having 
kidnaped Ellen Michaels, daughter of 
James Michaels of Grahams Island, 
N. D. Luce was accused of working 
w^lth Mrs. Martha Durand of Superior, 
the child's mother, and it la alleged he 
took the girl from a school which she 
was attending. Testimony given by 
Luce during the hearing resulted in 
the crlrain&l j;harge belnff brought 



Engraved and printed birth announce 
ments. Consolidated Stamp & Print. Co. 

I Deaths and Funerals I 

M,A'1"1S(_>N' -.idhn Mattson, age 41, 613 
North Fifty-sixth avenue west died 
Sept. 30, at 1 a. m., at the Duluth 
hi'&pital. Funeral arrangements will 
be made this afternoon. 

ZANKO — John, the 4-months-old son of 
Sam Zanko, 329 South Fifty-seventh 
avenue west, died Sept. 80. The fu- 
neral will be held at 9 a. m. Oct. 1. 
Burial In Calvary cemetery. 



MONUMENTS. 



LARGEST STOCK OF HIGH-GRADE 
monuments in the Northwest* call 
and Inspect before buying elsewhere 
P. N. Peterson Granite Co., 2iu B Sup" 



MONUMENTS to order direct from fac- 
torles; you save 20 per cent. Chaa 
Benson. QfTIc^'. 2301 W. 2tid. Lin 334 



FUNERAL FLOWERS A SPEClALtT' 
Duluth Floral Co.. 121 W. Superior 8t 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

To Annie Wiley, dwelling on 
the north side of Tenth 
street, between Eleventh 
and Twelfth avenues east. | 2 00ft 

To Annie Wiley, basement un- 
der dwelling on th-d souti 
side of Tenth street, be- 
tween Eleventh and P/v^elfth 
avenues east 500 

To Mrs. N. H. Witt, dwelling 
on the south side of So iona 
street, between Thirteenth 
and Fourteenth aveaues 
east 4,000 

To Thomas Hanson, dwelling 
on the north side of Sixth 
street, between Twenty- 
fourth and Twenty-fifth 
avenues weat 2M9 




MARJORIE STINSON. . 

The youngest licensed aviatrlce in 
the world is Marjorle Stinson of Texas. 
She Is also the only woman member of 
the United States Aviators' reserve. 
Marjorle holds a license from the Aero 
Club of America. Her sister Katherine 
is also licensed. She is planning a 
cross-country flight to the California 
exposition. 



him: "Well, uncle, what do you think 
of it all?" 

"My dear," he said, after a delicate 
pause. "I am constantly reminded of 
the sage saying, of a clever Frenchman. ! 
'Life would be quite bearable if it were' 
not for Its pleasures.' " 



E 



OBITUARY 



trot. x.iU«.ucJr O. li.iiix'r»oii, coiupodei ol 
churcl\ music and writer of hymns, 
died at Hyde Park, Mass.. Sept. 29, 
aged 95 jVeara. Prof. Emerson, who 
was born in Pajsonfield, Me., published 
seventy-two collections of church 
music, most of which were his own 
compositions. 




Col. Albert B. Cnnnlngbnni, Judge of 
the Baltimore tax appeal court and a 
former newspaper editor, died at Balti- 
more Sept. 29 of cancer at the age of 
69. Col. Cunningham was at one time 
local correspondent of the Associated 
Press. He served with distinction on 
the Confederate side in the Civil war. 



Capt. \%'illtani F. Evans of the steam- 
ship Brazos died at San J^an, Port(4 
Rico, Sept. 29. Capt. Evans was 60 
years old and had been employed in 
the passenger service between Galves- 
ton and New York for over thirty 
year.^. He was the senior captain of 
the Maltory and Clyde lines. 



City Briefs 



Sam Frederlckson of Hibblng, C. W. 
Kircher of Minneapolis, Dave Joidon of 
Milwaukee. 

Alvin G. Bousfleld, manager of the 
Grand Union Tea company, has returned 
from a business trip on which he vis- 
ited most of the cities on the Mesaba 
range. He says business is good in 
the iron fields. 



HAPPfNINGS AT W DUIUTH 

BUSINESS UNIVBtSITY 



Located at 118-120 Fourth Ave- 
nue' West, Christie Bidg. 



LooNC Loaf nitd Filing SuppllcM. 

M. I. Stewart company, stationery de- 
partment. Phones 114. 

Two Dulathlanii CJranted Patent*. 

Matt -*Itrom and E. Hoglund of Du- 
luth have just been granted patents 
on a soil cultivation tool, according to 
information received today from Wasii- 
Ington, D. C. 

91.00 Usterlne, 67e. 

60c Pebecco, 37c; 25c Euthymol, 15c; 
Grave's 25c Tooth Powder. 14c. Gray's 
drug sale. 

m 

Batphclor to Have AtislNtantM. 

Mayor Prince has prepared a reso- 
lution for the council meeting next 
Monday authorizing J. R. Batchelor, 
recreational director, to employ Robert 
Kerr as assistant at a salary of $56 a 
month, and to add other assistants at 
salaries not exceeding |100 a month. 



New classes will be orpranized at the 
college In all departments in day and 
night school on Monday, Oct. 4. 

The following young people have left 
the college to accept the following po- 
sitions: 

Apgelr Larson, stenographer for John 
Manvllle company; Myrtle Hovland, 
stenographer for F. A. Patrick & Co.; 
Ida Flotten. stenographer for Burgess 
Electric company; Marpraret Dunbar, 
stenographer for F. A. Patrick & Co.; 
Elsie Hewett. stenographer and book- 
keeper for Duluth Gas company; Mar- 
tha Thorstelnson. stenographer for 
Smith & Allen; Albln Br.-^flf, stenogra- 
pher and bookkeeper for Western Prod- 
uce company; Edgar Nelson, book- 
keeper for Van Dusen Harrington com- 
pany; Francis Thibert, stenographer 
and bookkeeper for F. I. SaJter; Mabel 
Smith, stenographer for Duhith & Iron 
Range railroad; C^rl Larson, book- 
keeper for Oliver Iron Manufacturing 
company, Hibblng, Minn.; Susan John- 
son, stenographer and bookkeeper for 
American Heating company. 



Schneider In HlnneapoUii. 

J. W. Schneider, smoke and electrical 
Inspector, ip In Minneapolis this week 
attending the annual convention of 
the National Association of Electrical 
Men. He is expected back next Mon- 
day. 

. — » 

Yam Ca»e to Jnry. 

In district court, shortly before noon 
today. Judge Fesler gave the case of 
P. A. Straus & Co. against Israel Garon 
to the jury. The suit Involves a dis- 
pute over a contract to purchase 8,000 
pounds of worsted yarn. The plaintiff 
firm alleges that Garon owes tnem 
$612.40 on account. The defendant has 
a counter-claim for $2,000 damages for 
alleged delay in the delivery of the 
goods. 

m 

Will Mannge Dakota Store. 

Edgar Amundson of Duluth, a mem- 
ber of the local naval reserve, has 
taken a position as manager of a store 
in Grand Forks, N. D., and will make 
his future home there. He has ar- 
ranged with Peter Coyle, local naval 
recruiting officer, to retain his mem- 
bership in the reserve here. 

Rabberset Tooth Bnuhcs, 17e. 

Lyon's Tooth Powder, 17c; Mennen's 
Talc, 12c; 50c Pompeilan Cream, 35c. 

Gray's drug sale. 

♦ 

Service at Temple nuuinael. 

At the regular weekly service to- 
morrow evening. Dr. Maurice Lefkovlts 
of Temple Emanuel, Seventh avenue 
east and Second street, will preach 
on "A Vision Fulfilled." The services 

start at 8 o'clock. 

^ 

80e to* 30c. 

Three cakes Palmollve soap and one 
60c bar of Palmollve cream for 39c. 
Gray's drug sale. 



Z 



Personals 



SnU FAILS TO 

FIND HIS FAMILY 



J. W. Young of Bismarck, III., is In 
the city today, a guest of N. A. Young, 
county superintendent of schools. 

At the Spalding — Charles Newhou3« 
of New York, Alfred Hunt of New 
York, J. A. Peavey of New York, E. (\ 
Little of Chicago. John A. Hanson of 
St. Paul, William O. Barry of Chicago, 
G. S. Spengler of Chicago, Charles R. 
Ahner of New York; E. E. Crane of 
Chicago, F. S. Clarke of Chicago. E. P. 
Hickey ot St. Paul. F. P. Bradford of 
Chicago. 

At the Holland— T. W, Ward of Chi- 
cago. E. fl. Thorson of St. Paul. J. W. 
Trefry of Chicago, J. A. Wernke of 
Chicago, H. R. Shirley of New York, 
Bam Keetz of Chicago, T. Q. Lawson of 
Chicago, R. L. Hall of Minneapolis. 

At the McKay — Fred J. Oakes of 
Raco, Mich., M. B. Johnson of Bayfield, 
H. T. Miller of Grand Rapids, Franklin 
Gill of V^glnJa, J. C. Flood of Flood- 
wood. J. "A, Llngberg of Hlbblnr. 

At the Si. .Louis — Herman H. Stlez of 
New Yor«. M. Marks of New York. H. 
W. Cannon of St. Paul, C. F. Bauglous 
of New York, H. F. Wlllegrent of St. 
Paul, T. F.»HdJiley of Minneapolis. Pred 
Gesell of Chicago. 

At the Lenox — George Wilson of 
Saginaw. Heirry Billings of Floodwood, 



Ambrose Burns' Spree 

Costs Him Home, Wife 

and Children. 

Ambrose Bums lost his wife and two 
children last Thursday, and now po- 
lice think she tired of waiting for 
him and has gone to friends. 

The Burns' family had decided to 
movej and when Mrs. Burns found new 
Quarters, her husband went down town 
last Thursday, Intending to get off 
from his work long enough to help her 
move. 

Meeting a convivial party of friends 
Ambrose stayed downtown all day, for- 
got his new address, couldn't think of 
the drayman's name, and finally asked 
Chief McKercher to find his better half. 
He led the chief to the deserted hearth- 
stone where his wife and "kiddies" had 
been In the morning, but there the 
search ended. 

"I think." said the chief, "that she 
has left town with some one else." 

The bluecoats looked industriously 
for a little blond woman about 27 years 
old, who was 5 feet 4 inches tall, who 
was accompanied by a 3-year-old girl 
and a 2-year-old boy, but finally they 
gave it up. 

Ambrose has not stopped searching, 
but he is commencing to wonder if he 
hasn't forgotten something more, which 
would teJl him where to find his spouse 
if he hadn't been so careless. 

Upon receipt of a report from a 
nearby town that a woman answering 
Mrs. Burns' description had arrived 
there, the police infornat^d Ambrose, 
and now the forgetful head of the 
Burns family is looking outside of Du- 
luth. 



STATE FAIR BOARD 

IN SP ECIAL MEETING 

St. Paul, Minn.. Sept. 30.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — A special meeting of 
the state fair board was held today at 



UMBRELLAS! 

It costs no more to have your 
umbrellas mad© to order in any 
style you desire. Select your han- 
dle, silks, frame and we will 
make it liP ^or you. First-class 
work guaranteed. Re-covering 
and repairing on short notice. 

Gingold's Umbrella Shop, 

— IS NOW AT — 
114 EAST SUPERIOR STREET 



D. H., 9-30-15. 



Fall E-xhibition— Window No. 10 

"Medum weight UNDERWEAR has Us inning next These 
$2.00 Union Suits breathe health and comfort jor daytime, 
as the PAJAMAS displayed in the other haif section oj ihis 
windoi' do Jor the night. " 




"The secret of keeping young is 
never to be too old to learn. " 

Have you learned of the supreme comfort and 
advanta.je of union underwear? We meet many 
older men who cling- to the old kind and shudder at 
the thought of trying something new, no matter 
how great the improvement. Well, we supply what 
our customers want, so we have all kinds of under- 
wear. 

Five of the leading and*most satisfactory lines of Union 
Suits are at The Columbia, selected with the idea of giving 
to every man — to office, store, shop, railroad, outside man — 
just the kind that suits his skin and his job. 

STERLING Union Suits in cotton and wool, both light and 
heavy weights Cotton suits, $3.50 and $4.00. Natural wool gar- 
ments, $3. )0, $4, $5 and $6. 

VASS/.R SWISS Union Suits — a splendid make. Cotton suits, 
$1.50 and $3. Wool, also silk and wool, at $3.30 and $5. 

Gray IMUNSING Union Suits at $2, $2.50, $3 and $4. 

The famous CARTER Union Suits; cotton, $1.50 and $2; wool, 
$2.50 and $3. 

A WIL.SON cotton Union Suit, light weight fleece at $1, 

While the demand for union suits grows from year to 
year, two-piece suits, except in Athletic Underwear, are far 
from a dead issue, and we carry a live big stock of them. 

AMERICAN Knitting Mills, gray, a good warm underwear 
at $1, $1.50 and $2 per garment. DUNHAM'S in gray and white. 
$1.50. COLLINS', tan only, at $2. STEPHENSON'S— a special 
for railrocdmen — gray, at $2. WILSON'S white silk and wool at 
$3 and their red underwear at $1.50 per garment. 

Some n-arm-blooded men can't stand wool. For these we have 
good cotton garments at 50c, $1 and $1.50, And we have silk 
garments and also underwear imported from Saxony. 

PAJ/lMAS, too, a few in the new union suit 
idea, but the bulk in the good old fashion, as the 
union ic.ea is still far from perfection. 

Pajamj.s of Domet cloth, very closelj- woven, so as to give the 
garment :i medium weight and a most lasting quality Several 
colors and stripes. Sizes to fit any man — giant or dwarf — $1.50. 

Other Pajamas of outing flannel or cambric, $1. $1.50 and $2, 
of light soisette at $1, $1.50, $2, $2.50 and $3.50; real silks at $5. 

Maybe you noticed that we skipped Window No. 9. It 
shows the "Big Ten," a new Columbia $10 Suit marvel for 
men, but the manufacturers have been so slow in filling our 
orders that the Ad Man received instructions not to give 
them any publicity, for a while at least. 

Keep the Columbia's UNW^RITTEN GUARANTEE in 
your mird's eye when shopping. It's invisible when you 
buy, but the real thing if aught goes wrong. 



Duluth, 
Idlnn. 




At Third 
Ave. Weat 



Clatiunf Oi 
Foot-Xote: Wear the Columbia $3.50 Shoe. 



NORTHERN 

NATIONAL 

BANK 

OF DULUTH 




Deposits, Capital 
and Surplus— 
$350,000,00 



3 



% 



YOUR PRESTIGE— 

It adds a good deal to the 
prestige of an individual if he is 
able to refer to a strong, well- 
known financial institution as his 
bank. 

The Northern National Bank 
— a conservative, well-known in- 
stitution — invites your account. 

"Safety First, Last and Always" 



the fair erouni 
auditing claims 
receivlng^ report 
cent state fair, 
grross receipts a 
exhibition will 
time. 



Is for the purpose of 
agrainst the board and 
i of receipts of the re- 
It is possible that the 
rid net earnings of the 
be ascertained at this 



PRESIDEN" 
STAY 

Washington, 
quest of the Si» 
F. Ekengren. P 
telegraphed to ( 
asking a stay o 
Hlllstrom. a Sw< 
to be shot in tl 
tlary tomorrow, 
victed of murde 

The president 

?:ram from the 
ng he was co 
not had a fair i 
emment had in 
representations 
The Swedish ml 
lieved insolent 
during his trial 
and jury agains 



r ASKS FOR 
OF EXECUTION 

Sept. 80. — At the re- 
redish minister, W. A. 
resident Wilson today 
tovernor Spry of Utah, 
f execution for Joseph 
dish subject, sentenced 
le Utah state peniten- 
Hlllstrom was con- 
r. 

today received a tele- 
Swedish minister fay- 
ivlnced Hillstrom had 
rial and that his gov- 
stracted him to make 
in behalf of the man. 
ulster said that he be- 
behavior of Hillstrom 
had prejudiced court 
t him. 



PASSING O 
Wall Street J 
nancial men w 
from Loudon w 
saw In the fini 
dor In these wt 
the ereatest su 
was "the pas^ir 
For years the 
the uniform of 
of London. Fro 
drawing his £2 
pes: and most s 
the weurinff of 



F" THE TOP HAT. 
ournal: New York fl- 
lo have just returned 
hen asked what they 
inctal district of Lon- 
Lr times to cause them 
rprlse. answer that it 
g of the top hat." 
high silk hat has been 

the financial district 
m the humble "dark" 
a ^'eek up to the big- 
itning lis^ht in the city, 

the toy hat was uni- 



versal and not one of them would think 
of stirring outside the office without 
donning his "topper." 

Now tlie silk hat has almost entirely 
disappeared. There are many mill* 
tary caps, and a large number of soft 
Alpines and some "derbies," but the 
silk hat when it appears l.s greeted 
with irreverent remark.s and often 
meets the same fate that it would were 
one of the Broad street curb crowd to 
appear in it at the opening of the 
market. It U said the makers and 
sellers of the "toppers" declare that 
after the war Is over the silk hat will 
regain its ascendency, but the general 
opinion is that the silk hat has dis- 
appeared for good from the London 
financial district. 



KENTUCKY BREAKFAST. 

Chicago Herald: "Waitah." said the 
colonel, as he glanced around the din- 
ing room of the big hotel, "will you 
bring me a Kentucky breakfaiit?" 

"And what is that, eirr' asked the 
waiter. 

"Bring me a big steak, a bulldog and 
a quart of whisky." 

"But why do you order a bulldog?" 
asked the waiter. 

"To eat the steak, sah," replied the 
colonel. v 



People Say To Us 

f1 cannot eat this or that food, it doeft 
«ot f^ree with me." Our advice to' 
all of them is to take a 

^^ j^^OO. Dyspepsia 
JySSsSSSm Tablet 

before and after each meaL 25cabox.V 
G. M. Tredwa^. 

















I 


t 






1 








1 










«r 






j 






1 

< 
■ 




is 








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1 






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I 

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i 




Thursday, 



THE DULUTH ^BEKALD 



September 30, 1915. 




ocietp -M oment C foto^ittugic-Biama 



The program at the meeting of the! 

Woman's council, which will be held 

tomorrow morning at 10 o clock m ^ 

the library clubroom will be: 

10:00— Roll call and reports. 

10 15— "The Xeeds of the Open Air 
Schools," Dr. J. H. Andres. 

10:30 — "The Work of the Association 
of Collegiate Alumnae," Mrs. 
L. W. Kline. 

10 45— "The Work of the Matinee Mu- 
sicale," Mrs. J. N. McKindley. 

ll:00_"The Work of the Rotary 
Club," Dr Sarah McClaran. 

11:15— "The Woman's Council of Sti- 
perior," report of the presi- 
dent, Mrs. Harrie Rogers, 
given by Mrs. A. D. S. Gillett. 

11:.30 — Unfinished business. 

12:00 — .Adjournment. 

purged Will IBt <^rabuatfb 

Cfjurdbap 3ifternoon 

The Sisters of St. Benedict have gent 
•ut invitations to the srraduating: exer- 
cises ft St. Mary's hospital training 
school which will be held Thursday j 
afternoon, Oct. 7, at 2:30 o'clock In the I 
Cathedral school auditorium. 

Miss Mary O'Connell of Wabasha, 
Minn., is the winner of the medal of 
honor. The other members of the class i 
are Misses Hildegard V. Kohout, Ash- | 
land. Wis.; Jennie R. Geddes, Carlton. j 
Mlrnr Mary T. Kelly, Quebec, Can.; ; 
Ida A Jaeger, Bralnerd, Minn.; Joseph i 
A. Muelhl. Saxon. Wis.; Helen M. Clulo. I 
Murquette, Mich.; Irene A. Plppy, ) 
Bralnerd, Minn.; Elizabeth M. Shannon,; 
Grand River, Can.; Mary E. Youngr, , 
Cloquct, Minn.; Mary R. Laskowska, | 
Dulu'h; Harriot B. Enrljrht, Virginia, | 
Minn.- Bnnaventure A. Lally, Superior,, 
Wis.; Alfhllda A. Bodln, Dululh, and 
HlHa C. Grytdahl. Duluth. 

The following program will be given 
at the graduating exercises: 
Violin ensemble — 

•'\^olunteer'8 March" I. Ellwood 

*T3oatman'8 Song" 

Misses Julia Adrlhan. Leah Keable, 
Dvanfsrellne Flnnegan and Mac Hood. 
"Violin accompaniment by Misses Mar- 
garet Lydon and Lucelle Filiatrault. • 
Two pianos — "Rustic Dance" . W. Mason 
Misses Agatha Moran and Mary 
Wendle. 

IVo pianos — "To a Wild Rose" 

MarDowell 

Misses Grace McCue and Maria 

Filiatrault. 

Violin accompaniment by Miss Lucelle 

Filiatrault. 

Voice — "Slave Song," .Teresa Del Riego 

MisB Ann Lydon. 

Two pianos — "Military March" 

F. Schubert 

Mrs. F. A." 'Locke, Misses Katherine 
Lydon, Helen Atmore and Margaret 
Decker. ,,, , . 

Violin ensemble — "Sweet Vl^Jet 

Waltz" C. Dorn 

Members of violin ensemble class — 
Ml-^fes Margaret I^ydon, Lucelle Fil- 
iatrault, Ann Fabula and Frances 
McDermott, Victor Filiatrault and 
Clement Tiemey. 
Address, conferring of medals ana 

diplomas ■ ; 

Rt. Rev. James McGolrick. 



Cfjilb Witm Xittle Clothing 
Bebelops! Mionberful (grace 



©ne of ptti^ii^'jJ 
leabing ficautiMf 











Wax 3Romancr; ^oto 

engagement !3nnounreb 

Vancouver, B. C. Sept. 30. — The en- 
g-agement l.s announced of Kathleen 
Dunsmulr, 22 years old, daughter of 
James Dunsmulr, former lieutenant 
governor of British Columbia, and MaJ. 
Beldon Humphreis, deputy assistant 
quartermaster general with the army 
aervioe corps at Havre. 

Both are now with the British forces 
In France, where they first met. Soon 
after the war broke out. Miss Dunsmulr 
raised, among her friends, a fund for 
a motor kitchen and before the end 
of the last year, was at the front pro- 
viding hot soup and other food for the 
injured just behind the firing line. 

^ 

0[r. anb iHrsf. Wihitt entertain 
tor iflisd iBarbon anb iHr. I^igginsf 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer N. Whyte of IB 
North Eighteenth avenue east enter- 
tained at a dinner of fourteen covers 
at the KitchI Gammi club last evening 
in compliment to Miss Winifred Bar- 
don and Ravmond W. Hlggins, whose 
wedding will take place next Tuesday. 
Informal dancing followed the dinner. 
The affair also celebrated the sixth 
wedding anniversary of the host and 
hostess, 

Easter lilies and Mrs. Charles Rus- 
sell roses In a tall vase, which was 
hidden in tulle, formed the centerpiece, 
and there were bows of tulle between 
th»- high candles. There were Colonial 
bouquets of rose buds, mignonettes and 
candytuft for the women and bouton- 
lerea for the men. Bridal features of 
the dinner were a wedding cake which 



VIRGINIA MYERS. 

Society and art circles in New York have been much interested in the 
dancing of a little 0-year-old girl, Virginia Myers. She is the daughter of 
Jerome Mvers, an artist, who has achieved distinction as a painter and etcher. 
What makes Virginia's case the more interesting is the fact that she was a 
"nature baby" — that is she was brought up in the free air, unhampered by 
clothing. 




'Sale oj 
membership 
tickets Sat- 
urday, Oct. 
2, from 10 
to 12 a. m., 
at Smith & Allen, 309 West First St. 



was cut by Miss Bardon and bags of 
rice for favors. 

Mies Bardon was gowned in rose 
colored silk with sliver trimming. Mrs. 
Whyte wore white tulle with gold 
trimming. 

Mr. and M»b. Ray Helm of 2610 East 
Third street will entertain at bridge 
tomorrow evening fur Miss Bardon and j 
Mr. Hlggins. i 

The bridal dinner will be given by 
the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. James ; 
Bardon of Superior, Saturday evening, 
Covers will be laid for twelve. 



John Mann Grocery Co. 

1002-1004 EAST SECOND ST. 

SPECIAL Sbr 

SPUING CHICKENS — J(\f. 

Fresh dresscnl, lb ^^C 

HENS — I>esh JC]^ 

dre<iscd, lb Z,VL 

Jones Sau&agre, meat and link; 
Pranlf, Milwauliee, Sausage. 

B\( ON — Extra mild ^3- 

cured, per lb ^ JC 

APPLES — Wealthy, ^C- 

10 tb for "J>^^ 

PLl M.S — Fancy blue, 3r^ 

per ba.sket • . . "^^^ 

GK.\PES — Fancy rC/- 

Tf)kay. basket J JC 

CORN — Evergreen, OA- 

per dozen ArUL 

SP1N.\CH — t C^ 

Per pec k • * ^*' 

RADISHES AND GREEN C^ 

ONIO.VS — 3 bunches for ^^ 

RIPE TO>L\TOES — fC- 

per basket * ^*' 

POTATOES — pk., 12c; A^^ 

per bu ..... • sn^v 

CABB.VGE — Solid t l/j/» 

head, per Tb . . . , * '^^ 

LARD — Best, fir. 

per lb * *C 

FLOIR — Best patent, tf 4^: 
49 1T> sack »*' * *^^ 

GRAN. SUGAR^- 1 1 l*; 

23 lb sack .4' ^ ♦t J 

PEAS — New Wisconsin, Q^r 
sweet, per doz 7 JL 

PEAS — Sweet sifted, f 3^ 

per can ' OL 

TOMATOES — No. S 1(\ 

extra standard, can »UC 

SOAP — Lenox — 10 <•') or 

bai-s, S2c; 1k>.x. »pX»OJ 

TOILET PAPER — 'jr 

Crepe, 4 rolls for Z.JL 

MATCHES — Largo f Q^ 

25c package for ^ Ot, 

■^Tor the accommodation of 
our customers and to render bet- 
ter service on Saturdays, we will 
run our ad on Thursdays. Good 
for two days and avoid all wait- 
ing for the Friday night ad be- 
fore ordering. 



Jfeberation Committee 

^oitisi Jf inal iHeeting 

The women who served on the com- 
mittees for the convention of the fed- 
erated clubs which was held here last 
week were the guests of the chairman 
of the general committee, Mrs. J. L. 
^Vashburn of 101 Oxford street, at tea 
yesterday afternoon, following a short 
meeting at which business incident to 
the convention was disposed of. 

Mrs. Washburn read letters from 
several of the convention visitors who 
expressed their appreciation of the 
courtesies extended to them. The mem- 
bers of the committee expressed their 
thanks for the sight-seeing trip and 
country club luncheon which was 
given by the Commercial club Friday 
for the visitors. An expression of ap- 
preciation was tendered to t^e press 
for courtesies during the convention. 

m 

Annual iHeettng at 

Cfjilbren'si Home Comorroto 

The annual meeting- of the Chil- 
dren's Home society will be held at 
10 o'clock tomorrow morning at the 
home. The members of the board are 
desirous that associate members at- 
tend the meeting. 

In addition to those nominated for 
th^e twenty-one positions on the board 
by the nominating committee, others 
may be nominated from the floor by 
associate members, who, in this way, 
have an opportunity to have a voice in 
the management of the institution. 
The payment of $1 a year makes any 
one an associate member. 

The Children's home shelters chil- 
dren from infants of a few days to 12 



years old. At the last meeting of the 
board of directors an amendment to 
the by-laws was passed whereby "at 
the discretion of the board of directors 
girls may be retained In the home to 
the age of 16 years." This extension 
will enable the ''Iris to finish school 
and receive in the home training to 
fit them for nursemaidsk waitresses, 
laundresses and general helpers. Be- 
fore the annex was bought lack of 
room nxade It Impossible to keep chil- 
dren In the home after they were 12 
years old. Efforts will be made to 
provide quarters in order that boys 
may be retained after they are 12 

years old. 

* 

HsinZ'^xx WitWn^ in Cfjitago. 

Miss Cathryn B. Lang of Chicago 
and Frank D. Orr of Duluth were 
married Ihia afternoon In Chicago. 
They will be at home after Nov. 16 at 
2420 East Fifth street. Mr. Orr la 
Duluth nvanager for the Du Pont 
Powder company. 

-• 

Veriest ot Wta-Zai^si. 

Mrs. B. Frank Barker of 2401 Lake 
avenue south, gave a tea-talk this aft- 
ernoon at her tea house, O Matsu 
Chaya. Mrs. Barker will give tea- 
talks tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday 
afternoons from 2:30 to 5:30 o'clock 
for her friends who have not attended 
the affairs she gave for various club.s. 
No invitations have been sent out and 
the affairs will be open to all Mrs. 
Barker's friends. 



MRS. ANDREW M. MORELAND. 

Mrs. Andrew M. Moreland, one of the 
most beautiful women in Pittsburgh, 
has been entertaining her sister. Mrs. 
• Jeorge T. Marye, who Is just returning 
to Russia. Next summer, if conditions 
permit, Mrs. Moreland expects to be 
the guest of her sister at the American 
embassy in Petrograd. 



ter and brother of the bride, were the 
attendants. 

The bride, who was given in mar- 
riage by her father, wore white silk 
combined with chiffon and carried 
bride roses. The bridesmaid wore a 
cream colored gown atid carried pink 
roses. Miss Sara Clark , caught the 
bride's bouquet. 

Roses, carnatioae,^ft«ter« and sweet 
peas were the house decorations. 

The" ceremony which was attended 
by only the relatives and Intimate 
friends was followed by a reception. 

The out-of-town guests were th^ 
bride's brother-in-law and sister, Mr. 
and Mrs. H. L. Randall, and daughter, 
Florence, of Minneapolis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Finlayson left for the 
Twin Cities and will go from there 
for a trip in Northern Michigan and 
Wisconsin. They will ^nake their 
home after Oct. 20 at 24 North Fourth 
avenue east. 



Wiil ^ibe ISribge Huntfjeon. 

Miss Irma Levin of 117 West Third 
street will give a 1 o'clock bridge 
luncheon Saturday at the Holland hotel 
in compliment to Miss Dorothy Loeb, a 
bride of next week. Covers will be 
laid for fifteen. 

• — 

Cfturclj iWeettngjf. 

The Glen Avon Missionary society 
will give a tea from 2 to 4 o'clock 
Saturday afternoon in the church par- 
lors. 

« • * 

A "get together*- social Jrill be held 
this evening at the Bethel Baptist 
church. All the branches of the church 
will be represented and eacli member 
I will be expected to make a special of- 
fering of a day's earnings. A short 
program will be given. Everyone will 
be welcome. 



Jfolep^^autfjier. 



Miss Rose Anna Foley, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Foley of 818 
Ninth avenue east, and Henry N. 
Gauthler were married at 8 o'clock 
last evening at the rectory of the 
Sacred Heart cathedral by Rev. Pat- 
rick Lydon. Miss Myrtle Mardorf and 
Alfred Foley were the attendants. 

The bride was gowned in white 
crepe de chine and carried bride roses. 
The bridesmaid wore blue crepe de 
chine. Her corsage bouquet was of 
pink Killarney roses. 

Covers were laid for fifteen at the 
supper which followed at the home of 
the bride's parents. Autumn decora- 
tions were used. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gauthler will make 
their home at 475 Mesaba avenue after 
Oct. 1. 



m^Wi €lnh Will Holb J^eception. 

The Bishop's club will give a recep- 
tion Tuesday evening in the Bishop's 
clubroom to open the season of the 
organization. Mrs. L. K. Da/gherty will 
be the leader for the evening. A 
musical program has been arranged by 
Mrs. Leo A. Ball. 



iBuisielman-Jfinlapgon. 

Mlse Eva Busselman and O. A. E. 
Finlayson were married at 8:30 o'clock 
last evening at the home of the 
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Busselman, 24 North Fourth avenue 
east, by Rev. C. N. Thorp of Pilgrim 
Congregational church. Miss Esther 
Busselman and John Busselman, sis- 



ISoat Club Bance ^aturbap. 

The boat club will have a dance Sat- 
urday evening at the main house. An- 
other dance will be given at the main 
house the following ^turday night, 
Oct. 9, If the weather is favorable. 

entertains! Cdurci) fi^ocietiesf. 

The members of several societies of 
Pilgrim Congregational church were 
the guests of Mrs. William A. Mc- 
Gonagle of 9 Oxford street at luncheon 
yesterday. Covers were laid for forty- 
five. In the afternoon a business meet- 
ing was held and plans were made for 
the annual bazar and rummage sale. 
-.—^ *^— 

iWr«. g>et)eniutf ^oattusi at JBribge. 

Mrs. John Uno Sebenius of Thirty- 
eighth avenue east and London road 
entertained at four tables at bridge 
yesterday afternoon. The rooms were 
decorated with garden flowers. 



5esgj» J^ealiotip'g 0h<itv\iationi 



Girlish Charm of Youth. 

I see more youthfulness and more 
girlish charm In women who long ago 
passed from the ranks of girlhood than 
I do in the 16, 18 
and 21 - year - old f^. 
misses who every- 
where make them- 
selves conspicuous. 
Perhaps one In a 
hundred impresses 
me as being a nat- 
ural girlish crea- 
ture. The rest are 
overdressed, super- 
c 1 1 i o u s creatures 
and almost wholly 
devoid of the sim- 
plicity and natural , 
prcttlness of young 
womanhood. 

We know that the ardent desire to 
become "grown up" is the ruling pas- 
sion In the life of woman from pina- 
fore days up to about her twenty- 
fourth year, and then gradually the 
wish to be thought young, to look 
young and to actually feel young takes 
possession of her and becomes in turn 
the all consuming effort of existence. 

The attempt of the young girl to 
appear grown-up Is quite as disgust- 
ing as It Is lamentable. Why, when 
one's hair Is soft and pretty and easily 
arranged In simple, unaffected fash- 
Ion, stuff it with "rats" pompadours 




and deck It with puffs and braids of 
false hair? Why, when one Is but 16 
to 18 or 20, affect a cold, bored ex- 
pression that repels everyone? Youth 
should be all smiles and naturalness, 
for youth is the time to form the habit, 
pleasant facial expression to be carried 
through life. • 

If we felt that these old-young girls 
would eventually adjust themselves to 
their years and become dignified and 
womanly with the passing of time, 
we might be willing to accept them 
until they came to have an under- 
standing of how becoming was woman- 
liness and unaffected deportment. The 
fear ever uppermost, is that twenty 
years later we shall find these world- 
ly-wise products of our civilization do- 
ing their utmost to appear as sweet, 
innocent things of less than 20. 

There la nothing more tiresome than 
the woman, whatever her age, who is 
affected. I know that the knowledge 
possessed by our young ladles is not 
affected or assumed and that their 
boredom and restlessness Is genuine, 
because they have sought to b^Qjtne 
"grown up" and have pursued every 
avenue open to theW to that end. 

However, they presume Intelligence 
which they may only hope to attain 
by experience and the acquirement of 
the years which irom outward ap- 
pearances one w ut Relieve that they 
had arrived at ^h<&f thus make them- 
selves laughlbg stocks. 



^erifonal iHentfon. 

Mr. and Mrs. George D. Swift and 
Miss Frances Swift of 2730 East First 
street, and F. A. Cokefalr of the 
Spalding hotel, have returned from a 
three weeks' canoe trip In Canada, 
north of Hunter's Island. 

• « • 

Royal D. Alworth of 2605 East Sev- 
enth street, has ^one to Oswego, N. Y , 
where his marriage to Miss Mollle 
Young, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles F. Young, will take place on 
Wednesday. His parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Marshall H. Alworth, will leave 
Sunday night for Oswego. 

* • « 

H. I. Plnneo of 1227 East Third 
street, left last night for the exposi- 
tion at San Diego, Cal. He will be 
away about two weeks. 

* • « 

Mrs. Thomas D. Merrill of Greysolon 
road will depart Friday to Join her 
brother, Harrison Musgrave, In Chi- 
cago. Mr. and Mrs. Henry Russel of 
Detroit. Mich., will go with them to 
Hot Springs, Va., where they will pass 
the month of October. Mr. Merrill will 
Join them later. 

♦ • "* 

Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Schulte of 1321 



eOUBAUO'S 

ORIENTAL 

CREAM 



Gives that 
delicately 
clear and re- 
fined com- 
plexion which 
'^every woman 
desires. 

Keeps away 
$kiA troubles. 

''irr— 



At Druggists and 
Department Stores 



uc 



FERO T. HOPKINS & SON, Props., 
37 Great Jones St.AN.Y.C. 



1 - < 



4 ■■ ■ ■ 



Dear Sister: — 



Duluth, Minn. Sept. 30/15, 
First St, and Third Ave. West 



I want to tell you of a way to keep your house warm 
enough tor the children evenings and mornings without start- 
ing the furnace fire just yet, I learned about it over at 
Brown's the other afternoon. 

It was quite cool— too cool to sew in comfort— so Jane 
got out her new Eriez Gas Heater and lighted it It was 
really wonderful how warm it made that room in just a lew 
minutes, the difference was noticeable the minute she started it. 

Her Eriez seemed such a convenience that I had Jim get 
one for our home. We use it all over the house. In the 
children's room, mornings when it's damp and chilly— the 
kiddies just love it; in the sewing room when it's cool, in the 
living room evenings— everywhere that we want heat quick. 
We wouldn't know how to get along without it and we won't 
have to start our furnace fire until quite late this fall, now 
that we have an Eriez. 

Why don't you have John stop at French & Bassett Co. *s 
and get one— there are several sizes, ours cost $6.75, but 
you can get them for $5. 45 and $9. 00. They 're wonderful 

With Love 

A lice 




I 



London road returned yesterday from 
a ten days' visit In Port Arthur. 

• • • 

Mrs. R. W. Sears and daughter, 
Sylvia, returned to Chicago yesterday 
after a short visit with Mrs. S^rs 
sister. Mrs. R. R. Forward of 2.01 
West Fourth street. 

• • * 

MlM VIoletto Starr Jordan will ar- 
rive Sunday morning from Emporia, 
ICan., to bo the guest for a week of 
Mrs. William B. Chamberlain of 516 
East Seventh street. 

• • • 

Frank T, Fentress of Detroit, Mich., 
who has been visiting at the home 
of his Biter, Mrs. C. Swenscn of 1001 
East Seventh street, has gone to Ta- 
coma. Wash. 

Mrs Carl Tronsen and litle daugh- 
ter, Marion of St. Paul, are the guests 
of Mrs. Tronsen's mother. Mrs. Sam- 
uel Cleveland. 416 Second avenue 
east. . • • 

Miss Leah Sherbaco and Miss I^na 
Marshak have returned to f;f^'°;?.^ 
Wis., after a short visit In tlie city 
during which they stayed at the Mc- 
Kay hotel. m • • 

Mrs Brown McDonald, 727 West 
Second Itrelt and children, Alice and 
Jack left Tuesday for a three montns 
trip to points in Texas, Arizona and 
Californll Including the exposition at 
San Francisco. 




80c for 39c. 



Three cakes Palmolive soap and one 
50c bar of Palmolive cream for 89c. 
Gray's drug sale. 



pi MUSEMENTS I 

I ONIGHT'S ATTRACTIONS. 

ORPHEUM-'sTRAND— "The Blindness 

of Virtue," photoplay. 
REX "The Incorrigible Dukane, 

photoplay. ^ , 

ZEI,DA— "The Cub." photoplay. 
NEW GRAND— Vaudeville and motion 

pictures. 

• 

Theater Gossip. 

No game of chance ever invented is 
as Illusive as the theatrical business. 
Fortunes are won on 
"ON TRI4L." discards and lost on sure 
PLB4.SES things. What is it, then, 
LYCEUM that makes for success 
PATRONS. In playwriting? Elmer 
Lfc Reizenstein supplies 
the answer in his "On Trial," being 
nresented at the Lyceum theater all of 
this week Including a matinee Satur- 
day ni It the traditions of the the&ter 
are'vlolated, not once, but many times, 
vet In twenty-five years the American 
stag« has not known a greater sue- 

"On Trial" wins by Its very daring. 
It Is a novelty, and Its newness and 
freshness Immediately stamped Its 
anthor a genius whose first effort at 
play writing succeeded, while those of 
older and more experienced men re- 
ceived but scant recognition. It Is In- 
evitable then that "On Trial" will 
have many Imitators, but If their ef- 
forts are presented with the cleverness 
of Mr. RelzensteVn's work, which 
leaves nothing to the imagination, 
the American dramatists will rise sev- 
eral rungs on the ladder that spells 
success in the play writing game. 

The week-end bill opening at the 
popular New Grand this afternoon does 
^ ^ not carry a dull mo- 

CI.4SSYNEW ment. From begln- 
SHOW .A.T THE ning to end It runs 
GRAND like clockwork with 

sufficient comedy and 
novelty Ingredients to make it a thor- 
oughly enjoyable entertainment. 

Heading the bill Is Prince Charles, 
one of the cleverest chimpanzees ever 
seen on the stage. He eats with a 
knife and fork, dresses in the latest 
style does many difficult tricks and 
seems endowed with almost human in- 
telligence. , ^ , ^ T 

Jessie Hayward, assisted by Leon 
Hahn and associate players, offers a 
new comedy skit, "The Quitter." The 
act Is a well arranged routine of 
bright, witty talk In the hands of a 
company fully capable In every way of ■ 
doing ample justice to the vehicle. 

Morton and Moore paperology and 
harmonica experts, offer a novelty In a i 
musical way. These talented boys get 
music, and good music out of the old 
fashioned harmonica and add to that j 
some clever stunts with strips of paper 
with which they Imitate a violin. I 

Mexican gingers and dancers are the 
Three Alacrons. Their offering is clean 
and classy Into which they inject 
plenty of life and spirit with good 
results. 

The photoplay feature, "The Eter- 
nal Feminine," tells a charming story 
In two reels. One of the Helen Holmes 
•toriea of railroad lif«, "In Danffer** 



Path"; three t 
always- welcom' 
the Hearst-Seli 
world's happen 
inalnder of an 
ment. 

The five-reel 
Thousand Cane 

FAMOUS STAB 
AT ORPIIEUM 
STRAND. 

ater on Frlda 
mencing with 

Harry Mesta 
star, who won 
for himself be 
fore he forsook 
the screen, as 
and Is support 
plaj'ers as ( 
Charles, Georg 
eon, Forrest R 
son. The stor 
Thousand Can 
"death" of an 
slon In his v 
must not leave 
one year; If h 
the entire fc 
takes up his 
of a cabaret s 
company with 
love with aftei 
father's count 
difficult not to 
finally attends 
home of the g 
covered; thus 
An unscrupulo 
secure the fort 
self, but the ol 
one by coming 
righting matte 
plains that he 
Ing to see how 
after his real < 

Tonight will 

the great mor 

Blindness of \ 

Mayo and Bryz 

t 

John Barrvr 
the Rex in "Th 

LOTS OP GO 

IN "THE 

INCORRIGIBLI 

DUKANE" 

AT THE REX 

the her whom 

There is a '. 
too, and the f 
tor's gang for 
dam is as llvel 
wl.sih to see. 

"The Case oi 
mount product! 
morrow. 

At the Zelda i 
"The Cub" will 

LAST DAY 
FOR "THE CUB* 
AT ZELDA. 

dominate the p 
the cub reporte 
the cause of • 
Whites arid Rer 
pable actor. H 
and his drama 
enacted. Miss SI 
mountain lass Is 
an excellent pa 
Beginning to 
the patrons of t 
to the film pre* 
Carter In the g: 
of Maryland." 
was made unde 
bert Brenon, w 
Daughter." 



omedles. Including the and Ben and Ike were tht-n ^mf ♦« 
' Chariie Chaplin, and ! Alan McDonald's school '"here was a 
of important I rule that no boy who had been expelled 
Ike up the re- ! from any other school could go to Mc- 



g News 
Ings, ma 
exceptional entertaln- 



Donalds. And vou and your two spir- 
ited friends had alnady been expelled- 

• • • from nine tchools each. 

play, "The House of a I "Then you said you went lo the mlll- 
les," which was adapted tary school, where you only lasted a 

from Meredith Nlch- i °ionth. 
. Olson's novel of the . 'Next you told about how vou used' 

• same title, will be the ! ^° come In at 3 a. m., when 11 p m. 

■was the limit, and you gave as an exr- 
cuse that you had rescued a poor un- 
fortunate cat from a relentless sewer. 

^..„„ „ .„, .., .^"" you exhibited a horribly wet and 

yer, the famous Selig ! ^"?.^?'»t^^ ''^it.^s evidence, 
an enviable reputation I .:, i*? /'^" think such fiction Is well 



feature picture at the 

Orpheum-Strand the- 

y and Saturday, com- 

tomorrow's matinee 




Irace Darmond, John 
e Backus, Mary Rob- 
jbinson and Edgar Nel- 
y of "The House of a 
dies" deals with the 
aid squire and a provl- 
111 that his grandson 



ase don't en- 

„, . , ." more of It. 

Ringing the old Kf-ntleman's door- 
bell in the middle of a cold nipht and 
when he came to the door telling him 
that his front gate was open was not 
funny. And the relation of such a per- 
formance is not particularly edifyln» 
to young minds. 




. , , , . talnly was not the right material for 

;nger he formerly kept an older man to furnish a youngster 
and a girl he falls In with. 



coming to his grand- 
y home, he finds \% 



"Why on earth don't you recount 
, ,, your good deeds? Why don't you tell- 
leave the grounds. He , the children of the two boys who 
a masked ball at the fought so bravely at San Juan hill; 
rl he loves and is dls- how one of them was killed while iry-- 
he forfeits the estate. ; Ing to drap the othrr back out of the 
js lawyer attempts to fire? That's the kind of Inspiration for 
uno of the squire him- | boys." 

d man surprises every- i "One kind of yam Is about as true 
■ to life suddenly and ' as another." replied Bob "The trouble- 
rs in general. He ex- Is that I prefer the funny on #; to the 
has only been in hid- sad ones. I have grown to believe 
things would progress those funny one.<; myself, and I would 
leath. I much rather laugh than weep. I uau- 

be the last showing of ally work in tlie sad story to top 
al problem play "The things off and disperse the crowd when 
irtue," featuring Edna I have had enough of them." 
.nt Washburn. 
> • * 

lore, who npnear.s at 
e Incorrigible Dukane." i 
has the gift of droll- 



THE FARM AUTO. 



Fargo Forum: 1 he 



ness. There is some- i done more for the- "back to' 
thing Inexpres.sibly 1 ,, , , 

: comic In the way he ' ™°"^'^"i«"t or rather the "sta 



y a bit as one could 

Becky," also a Para- 
on, follows Dukane to- 

• « • 

oday for the last times. 



automobile has- 
the farm 
y he «"<-'» <^'"cin. iji liiiiitr ine stay on ths- 
clings to the crushed , farm movement" which Is far more Im- 

^tll i^'*L'f.,'^l!f*'t..'i''^^^P°»"*ant than all that has been spoken 
for a token of her — i ... . 

be has never seen. I ^"" written on that subject. The auto 

ot of go in the story has taken away from the farm one of 
ght with the contrac- its former great drawbacks, the isola- 
the possession of the ! tlon and consequent loneliness. 

Here is what one farmer said about 
the auto recently in Farm and Fire- 
side: 

"When the knotter on the binder 
broke, and wind and clouds threatened 
bad weather on the morrow, the motor 
car took you to town and you w^ere- 
be seen. "The Cub" is j back with the new part before ths 
a story of a Kentucky . horses had a good rest, and the field' 
feud. with a love j w^as cut bv sundown. 
• strain running through I "By this speedy and tireless helper 
the whole piece. Com- ' you have a bl^Rer and better market 
edy and thrills pre- for butter, eggs, poultry, fruit vege- 
Icture. John Hines, as tables, all the smaller products of the 
r who is sent to learn ., farm, and you don't need to kill a 
he feud between the i whole dav going to down either Th« 
lows, proves a^ very ca- , boys can go to see moving pictures of 
Is comedy Is delightful 
:ic set 
edmai 
very dainty and makes I "The old home.ctead has become" the 

i most attractive place on earth for both 

Id folks 
spruced" 

eat drama "The W»oft'"*' '"*" vuuii» n/ifvrr. i ury were going 

in Six ,?^ta -The film ' *° '"«*""•' *« ^^^ ^*^>'' ^"^ thought bet- 
r the direction of SlT- '«'•"' It when they bought the car. 



i,,^,^„ ^ ,Y lui* 1 I "Oj» can go LO see moving pictures or 
medy Is delightful , the war, hear a concert of Sousa's band 
lenes are cleverly or can see the state league ball game! 
n as the Kentucky ^ ^hen the work is not too pressing 
dainty and makes] "The old home.ctead has becc 
ror Mr. Hines. j most attractive place on earth f 

[?l"yi'^^o £^Vi ^r?,^.^^'! the boys and the girls. The ol 
/nt«Hn^^fV?r- ^f.i'llliare twenty years younger, and 
T^^^K'':^^^ ^^'^. Ull"!'up like young folks. They wer 



lo produced "Neptune's 



HORRID TALES. 



Chicago Newi 
Dlnkle to her b 
you are talkli 

wouldn't tell t 

you were when 

sets them a vei 

"I heard you 

boys' delight, t 

pelled from nin 

"It wasn't nir 

"Tou said nil 



: "I wish," said Mrs. 

other Bob, "that when 
ig to the boys you 
lem what a 



"Yes, Its a bigger world and a bet- 
ter one. we've discovered. Do without 
a car? Might as well ask us If we'A 
go back and live In our first two-roora 
shack. Our automobile is w^orth a big, 
bubbling life to us." 

That last phrase, about the "big. 
bubbling life" la a good old-fashlone* 
farmer's expression but It means a lot. 
There is a big le.-'son in this little 



scalawag sermon from a farmer who has tried! 
you were a boy. That i the auto on the farm, which North 
y bad example. | Dakota farmers who have not tried it 

telling, much to the might take to heart. Get an auto with 
hat you had been ex- part of the proceeds of the big crop, 
e schools. i this fall, and make j'our life and ths 

e, was It?" asked Bob. life of your family "big and bubbling 
,e. Tou said that you over with joy and happiness." 



Something Different 

can be found In our superb stock of Sterling Hollow "War*. 

"Odd Pieces" for That Wedding Gift 

In great variety. Pleased to show you. 

ERD'S JEWELRY STORE 

29 EAST SUPERIOR ST., DULUTH, MINN. 




,1, 



y^wp f I ■* ii m i M i c r? 



I ■ « L_L LL 



> » l .p 






8 



Thursday, 



THE DULUXB HERALD 



September 30, 1915. 



■ H. II* 



■fcll* 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER 

rubli'thrd rrtrj cTeninK except Snntlay by 

The Herald Company at Uiiluth, Minn. 

Both Telephones — Business Office, 324; 
Editorial Rooms. 1126. 

Entered u second-elua awtter »t th» Duluth poetoffloe urwJW 
the act cf eoncresa of Marrh 3. 1870. 

OFnCIAL PAPER, CITY~OF"mUTH 

SrBSCRIPnoJf rates — By mall, payable 

In advance, one month, 35 cents; three 

months, $1; six months. $2; one year, $4; 

Saturday Herald, $1 per year; Weekly 

Herald, Jl per year. 
Daily by carrier, city and Buburbs, 10 cents 

a woek; 45 centa a month. 

Subscrlberg wlU eoolar a f«»or by maklna known any com- 
plahit of nervlo*. ^ 

When rhanKlnj tha addreas of your ptpw. « ^ important 
to give l^th old and oaw addresses. 

Thft Duluth Herald accepts advertising 
contracts viMth the distinct guarantee that It 
has the largrat circulation in Minnesota out- 
side the Twin Cities. 




PUTTING UP TWENTY-STORY BUILDINGS 
ON ONE-STORY FOUNDATIONS. 

From time to time these columns have 
directed attention to the fevered, specula- 
tion in so-called war stocks that has lately- 
given Wall street the most furious activity 
in years. The purpose, always, has been to 
warn investors to keep out of this whirl- 
pool, v.'hich sooner or later is sure to drag 
thousands of victims down to bottomless 
depths of misery. 

The current number of the World's 
Work brings startling support of these 
warnings: "The most striking fact about 
the war stocks is that the speculative in- 
crease in their value equals the sum of all 
the war orders that have been placed in 
this country!" 

That is, if every cent of the money to be 
paid for war orders were to be profit, 
available for dividends, the rise on the stock 
market price of these war stocks has dis- 
counted it! 

There could be no better evidence that 
the sensational rise in war stock prices has 
been utterly without regard to values, rea- 
son or judgment. 

There could be no better evidence that 
the wise investor will get out of the war 
stock market if he is in, and keep out of 
it if he is not. 



Then there are those persons who would 
have us believe that the world slogan after 
the present war will be "Seize America 
First." 



A VIGOROUS OFFENSIVE. 

There is no longer room for doubt that 
the new movement of the Entente allies 
against the German lines in France and 
Belgium is their long-expected and long- 
delayed attempt to break the year-long 
deadlock. 

Despite the conflict between the reports 
from the two sides, it is evident that the 
allies have made and kept important gains, 
that they have inflicted heavy damage upon 
their opponents, and that they purpose con- 
tinuing the aggressive. 

It means, doubtless, that the war has 
just begun. 

It will be costly. When one side gains 
an important advantage, we hear of the de- 
feated party's losses, but we do not hear 
what it has cost the victor. 

Speaking of Waterloo, Wellington once 
said that there is only one thing more cost- 
ly than a great defeat, and that is a great 
victory. 

The German successes in Russia have 
undoubtedly been gained at a great sacri- 
fice of men, money and supplies. 

We hear now of the great damage in- 
flicted upon the Germans by the new of- 
fensive in the West. We do not hear so 
much of what it has cost the allies to win 
these gains, but it has cost them much and 
will cost them more. The greatest losses 
of the war on both sides are yet to come, 
if the struggle in the West is kept up at 
its present rate. 



Of course there may be no connection be- 
tween Bryan's proposed trip to Europe and 
the possibility that Americans might be will- 
ing to pay well to hear his eloquence em- 
ployed In description of events in the war 
zone. 



THE NEED OF OFFICERS. 

Josephus Daniels, secretary of the navy, 
intends, if congress will let him, to make 
provisions at the Annapolis naval academy 
for two hundred and fifty more pupils, thus 
enlarging the potential supply of naval of- 
ficers. 

This calls attention to a very vital need, 
if the army and navy are to be increased, 
which seems to have had an unduly small 
place in the discussion of increased defen- 
sive preparedness: the need of officers. 

No great standing army, no universal 
service, no conscription or anything like it, 
are going to come out of this discussion. 
Since no enemy threatens, and war is im- 
probable, what the country needs to do and 
doubtless is going to do is to prepare to 
prepare; that is, to provide a skeleton or- 
ganization which, in case of need, can be 
readily filled out to the required propor- 
tions. 

There is no lack of men. In case of need 
there will be no lack of volunteers. There 
wouldn't be many for an offensive war, 
and there shouldn't be any at all. For a 
defensive war there will be all the volun- 
teers required. 

And, during this time of peace, potential 
volunteers can be drilled and partially pre- 
pared through the militia and training 
camps. Governor Hammond's suggestion 
that the fraternal organizations adopt mili- 
tary drill and under proper supervision give 
their members military training is a splen- 
did one. Partial preparedness for enlist- 
ment, which is all that can be expected or 



desired, can easily be arranged on a scale 
so vast that if the need arises a great army 
can be quickly whipped into shape. 

But — and this nearly everybody seems to 
be overlooking — where are the officers to 
come from who are to man this possible 
army of defense? 

Officers cannot be enlisted as readily as 
volunteers. They must be trained through 
a course of years. Their business is as 
highly technical as any business; and it is 
only rarely that a civilian can quickly be- 
come a useful commissioned officer, even 
as a lieutenant. 

The regular army has very few more than 
the officers it needs even in its present 
small numbers. The militia could furnish 
a few, but nowhere near enough. 

The skeleton army that this country prob- 
ably will require will need officers as well 
as men. Where are they to come from, 
when present sources of supply in the mili- 
tary academy and the national guard can- 
not provide ten per cent of the number that 
would be needed if an army of defense 
should suddenly be required? 



Why don't those Mexicans try to get at 
us on the coast lino? Then we could put 
some of our submarines to a real test. 



THE Y. M. C. A. 

Duluth may well be proud of the show- 
ing made for its Young Men's Christian as- 
sociation by the reports heard at a meeting 
of the general committee last night. By 
diversifying its activities along practical 
and helpful lines, it has made itself an in- 
stitution indispensable to the community 
lite. In all of its activities it is progres- 
sive, enterprising and energetic, and under 
the leadership of Secretary B. C. Wade and 
with the support of many practical men of 
affairs it has gained a most enviable posi- 
tion. It has, moreover, become virtually 
self-sustaining while expanding its energies 

in many useful directions. 

• 

It grows increasingly evident that Bur- 
bank should be added to the list of govern- 
ment experts, and be put to work on the 
Mexicans. 



MAKING MORE ROOM IN THE CAPITOL. 

Governor Hammond says that as half a 
million is more than enough to meet the 
needs of the state historical collections, 
room must be made in the new building 
for some of the state bureaus that now 
crowd the new and old capitols. 

Governor Hammond is right beyond 
doubt. Originally the proposal was to 
spend half a million to house the historical 
society and the supreme court. This, 
which was perfectly satisfactory to the his- 
torical society, as it should have been, con- 
templated moving the supreme court room, 
the chambers of the justices and the law 
library to the new building, which would 
have made available a great deal of space 
in the new capitol. At the last session of 
the legislature the supreme court got it- 
self extricated from this proposal, leaving 
the historical society alone in its new 
building. 

The capitols are overcrowded, the his- 
torical collections do not need all of a 
half-million-dollar building, and Governor 
Hammond will have full public support in 
insisting that the new building be shared 
with such state bureaus as can be moved 
into it. 



As to colors untried in women's shoes, 

there remains the plaid. 

• 

A NEW TRIUMPH OF AMERICAN GENIUS. 

Yesterday, for the fir.st time in history, 
men talked with each other from coast to 
coast without the use of transmission wires. 
Over the new wireless telephone, thus sud- 
denly and unexpectedly disclosed as an 
amazing success, men at the naval plant at 
Arlington, Virginia, talked across the wide 
continent with men at the Mare Island sta- 
tion in California, twenty-five hundred 
miles away. Moreover, the success of a de- 
vice for transferring conversation from a 
metallic circuit to the radio telephone was 
demonstrated. 

This great triumph for American genius, 
though only in its infancy, suggests in- 
finite possibilities for future development. 
« 

The country stHl waits In vain for Dr. Cook 
to offer his services to the naval advisory 
board. 



Beaaty Hints. 

Atlantic: If my face is too wide, a beard 
lengthens it: If my face is too narrow, it 
expands as If bj' magic with the addition 
of what have sometimes been affectionately 
called "mutton chops" or "slders;" If my nose 
projects, almost like a nose trying to es- 
cape from a face to which It has been sen- 
tenced for life, a pair of large, handsome 
moustaches ^vUl provide a proper entour- 
age — a nest, so to speak, on which the nose 
rests contentedly, almost like a setting hen; 
If my nose retreats backward Into my face, 
the aesthetic solution is obviously galways. 
A stout man can do wonders with his ap- 
pearance by adopting a pointed beard, and 
a suit of clothes, shirt, necktie and stock- 
ings with pronounced vertical stripes. A 
thin man, on the other hand, becomes at 
once substantial in effect, without being 
gross. If he cultivates slde-whlskers. and 
wears a suit of clothes, shirt, cravat and 
stockings with pronounced horizontal 
stripes. If my face lacks fierceness and 
dynamic force, It needs a brisk, arrogant 
moustache; or If It has too much of these 
qualities, a long, sad, drooping moustache 
will counterbalance them. 



One From Mother. 

New York Times: A Chicago matron of 
great beauty called one day upon a friend, 
bringing with her her 10-year-old daughter,' 
who promises to be as handsome as her 
mother. 

The callers were shown into a room w^here 
the friend had been receiving a milliner, and 
many hats were scattered about. During 
the conversation the 10-year-old amused 
herself by trying these on. She was particu- 
larly pleased by the effect of the last one. 
Turning to her mother, she said: 

"Mother, I look just like you now 
don't I?" 

"Sh!" cautioned the mother, with uplifted 
finger. "Don't be vain, dear." 

« 

Local Pride. 

Buffalo Express: "Is this a first-class post- 
office?" Inquired the stranger. 

"It's as good as you'll find In these parts," 
retorted the native with Justifiable local 
pridtt. 



Mann and Cannon 



__ ii 

By Savoyard. jf 

/ 

Washington, Sept. 30. — (Special to jThe 
Herald.) — According to a special disifatch 
from Illinois the Standpatters of tltat ittate 
have been in conference and decided that 
Senator Lawrence Y. Sherman shAlI have 
the vote of the Empire state of the Wesj^ f or 
president In the Republican natlotv&l con- 
vention next year and Mr. Mann shall have 
the support of the Republicans of the dele- 
gation for speaker of the Blxty-fourth con- 
gress. "Uncle" Cannon and William B. Mc- 
Kinley were prominent in the council, l^d- 
ers of It, In fact, and the Illinois con- 
tingent may be said to be "harmonized." 

It looks like a shrewd move. Everybody 
knows that Sherman has not a ghost of a 
show; and Is It not possible that he is put 
forward until the convention Is wearied of 
balloting, when the name of Mr. Mann will 
be sprung and the delegates stampeded to 
him? It is pretty nearly manifest that a 
dark horse will run away with the conven- 
tion and some very keen politicians believe 
that Roosevelt will be ttx© successful dark 
horse. 

• * * 

On the first ballot these and perhaps oth- 
ers, will have strength: A New York man. 
Root, or Whitman, or Wadsworth; a Penn- 
sylvania man, Brumbaugh, or Knox; Burton 
and, possibly Willis, from Ohio; Weeks, from 
New England; Fairbanks, and possibly Wat- 
son of Indiana; Sherman, Cummins, Hadley, 
Borah and others. Nobody will be in ten 
miles of the nomination, and roll call will 
follow roll call until the auspicious time ar- 
rives for the entry of a dark horse, like 
Garfield in 1880 or Bryan In 1896. 

Napoleon said that in every great battle 
on the field of Mars a moment comes when 
both sides are seized with a feeling of las- 
situde, and then is the time for the com- 
mander to seize his opportunity, and If he 
Is a great general he never fails to profit 
by It and rush on to victory. It Is the same 
In politics. It all depends on the judgment 
and the vigor of the leader in charge of the 
movement. For such occasion Jarnes R. 
Mann Is a very capable fellow, and one 
would do well to have an eye on him. 

• • * 

Some folk will be surprised that Uncle 
Cannon does not aspire to the speakership; 
but Republican precedent is against it. 
CJrow of Pennsylvania and Keifer o£ Ohio 
had been speakers of congress, but when, 
after years of retirement, they were again 
chosen to that body, neither was thought 
of for the chair. On the other hand, Tom 
Reed got the speakership again after an In- 
terregnum, but he had not been defeated 
for re-election to the house, as was th« case 
of Grow and Keifer, and as is the ca.se of 
Cannon. The latter Is the only man who 
ever held the speakershlj) for four full terms 
successively, though Andrew Stevenson of 
Virginia was four times chosen to that dig- 
nity without a break, but he resigned -to be 
minister to England during his last term. 
Henry Clay was speaker of every , congress 
of which he was a member — five-»— but not 
successively. 

Uncle Cannon would have been speaker of 
seven successive congresses had he not 
voted against the Infamous oleomargarine 
tax. That, and the envy of Hopkins, from 
the Elgin district, who was a candidate 
from Illinois In opposition to Uncle Can- 
non, made David B. Henderson speaker. It 
was an outrage, for corruption ran rioter 
under Henderson's speakership than under 
any other of our history since and except 
that of Schuyler Colfax. 

• « • 

Hopkins was a heap better public speaker 
than Cannon and his district produced more 
butter than any other. No doubt he felt 
It patriotic to invoke the taxing power to 
destroy a legitimate and deserving rlv*l pf 
the butter trust. All sorts of demagogy and 
many sorts of lying were resorted to to ^^t 
the bill through. Cannon came from a be^f 
and pork district that supplied the oleomar- 
garine people with some of their raw nia- 
lerial, and thus he was agin the tax. Dal- 
zell, the ablest Republican in congress after 
Tom Reed, also opposed the tax because 
most of the laboring men of Pittsburgh pre- 
ferred oleomarglne to butter as an article 
of food. Grosvenor of Ohio opposed the tax, 
too, but that was the Democracy left over 
In him, for until 1854 he was a furious Dem- 
ocrat, after which he was Just as frantic a 
Republican. 

After years of lobbying, and corrupt lob- 
bying at that, the butter trust got the bill 
through. They even bullied Uncle Cannon 
Into voting for It. And here comes the 
ridlculosity, to employ a word coined by 
Charles Sumner — Southern votes saved the 
tax, though It seriously curtailed the mar- 
ket for cottonseed oil, a more wholesome 
article of food than butter, or lard, or suet. 
It was laughable. The oleomargarine manu- 
facturers under a penalty of 10 centf a 
pound were forbidden to use a harmless 
coloring matter, their own Invention! But 
the butter trust saw to It that the law al- 
lowed that concern to use that coloring mat- 
ter to fix up old, pale, insipid butter and 
cause It to look fresh and golden and palm 
It off on Its customers as real, slmoa pure, 
fresh, nutty, delicious golden butter just 
out of the dairy. 

I have seen a goodly number of rob- 
beries by law In this town, but the oleomar- 
garine tax was the most brazen atid shame- 
less that ever came under my notice. It was 
all done in the name of the farmer and 
not one farmer In one thousand reaped a 
cent of the swag which w^ent to the mil- 
lionaires who composed the butter "trust and 
met at Elgin weekly and fixed the price 
that every urban community in the land 
should pay for butter — who levy a tribute, 
In fact, on every household In every city 
In the Union. 

That Infamous tax is the law today and 
the Democratic party ought to be ashamed 
of itself. 



Wliere Jeans Walked. 

Slowly the warming sunbeams fell, 

Across the quiet way; 
The far-off beat of passing feet 

Fills all the fading day. 
A thrill of war Is In the air, 

And far away a gun 
Speaks shrilly through the evening 
calm. 

And lo: some life is done. 

And yet where blood and smoke and 
flames 

Curl up to meet the sky. 
The Savior walked long years ago. 

Where arnries fight and fly. 
He told men how to live their Uvea, 

And how* In time, to die. 

Perhaps, beneath some crumbled arch. 

He laid his gentle hand 
On one whose life was torn with -strife. 

And said: "I understand!" 
Perhaps, where streets are scarred with 
shot 

And nOises born of hell 
Shriek from afar, the shattered stones 

Of Jesus' love could tell. ^ 

^ ii 

Where dying men gasp out thMr Btes. 

Where rumpled banners sw^; ''"' 
Where blood lies on the dustrf^ ro4d. 

Where hate is fierce today4» 
Perhaps some flower, bloommg, ..'shows 
Where Jesus knelt to pray. * ^- 
— Margaret E. Sangster, Jr., In tli© Chtis- 
tian Herald. 

♦ .**»>' »a4» 

9nr« Thlngl 
New York Times: A couple of w^men were 
talking of the means they woul<| adopt to 
earn a living should their husba'ndp "go 
broke." 

"Well." sa'.d one, "If the worst should- come 
I can keep the wolf from the door by sing- 
ing." ;■ .'; 

"Marie, you can," said the other niatron, 
very earnestly; "that Is. if the Wolf has a 
corrttot car for muAio." 



77(e Crime of the 

Moderate Drinker 



Muxltnillan Foster In Mt<'lure'» Mosa^lne. 



I saw now why there was so much drink- 
ing around me. The world is filled with men, 
women, too, that drink moderately and can 
keep on doing It. They offer no problem. 
Harm they create, of course. In that they 
tempt others less physically fortunate to 
imitate them. They also harm in that they 
look upon the drunkard with scorn. I did it 
myself until I learned that after all drunk- 
enness is only relative. But never mind that 
now; I wish to say something else. It's 
preaching. I know — regular tract mongerlng. 
In my opinion, it's not drunkards that make 
drunkenness; It's the moderate drinker. His 
attitude toward abstinence Is what does It. 

Let me Illustrate. All the newspapers of 
Monroe county. Pa., have recently been car- 
rying the following advertisement: 

_ NOTICE. 

To whom this may concern: 

I hereby give notice to everybody not 
to furnish me with strong drink or cl- 
S!ki.^ a^^ * person of Intemperate 
habits and have no control of myself 
I shall positively prosecute all persons 
who will furnish me drink, as stated 
above, and I hereby request ati „,y 
friends to stand by In my fight to lead 
a sober life. I have also made ar- 
rangements with a few friends to helo 
me prosecute any violations of the 
above written notice. 

EUGENE MILL,, 
o. . , „ , Painter By Trade, 

fetate of Penn.sylvania, 
County of Monroe. 

Personally appeared before me a jus- 
tice of the peace for the aforesaid 
county and state. Eugene Mill, who 
acknowledged the above notice to be 
his act and deed and that he desired 
the same to be published in the Mon- 
roe county papers. 

J. D. WEISS. 

_ ^. , Justice of the Peace. 

Broadheadsvllle. Pa., Jan. 18. 1915. 

The point Is this: I have shown that no- 
tice Qot merely to a dozen persons, but to 
dozens, a hundred perhaps. And in almost 
every case what has happened? Have they 
read in it the drama, the pathos, the tragedy 
that speaks from every line? 

Not much, they haven't! It's a Joke, a 
laugh! Show that notice to a dozen men. and 
ten out of twelve will chuckle. And that's 
why there's a water wagon! There'll always 
bo one — more than that, always the need of 
one — so long as men make a Joke of It! 

My friend, the down-and-out, I put on 
his feet again. What Is more, since then 
I have put a dozen others like him on their 
feet. The lesson, however. Is exact. It's a 
waste of time trying to save anyone who will 
not try tj save himself. Before you can help 
him he must first of all want something else 
far more than he wants to drink. 

And myself, you ask? Well, I took the 
doctor's advice. I hunted up the people that 
neither drink nor yet brag they don't. There 
are plenty of them, It seems, after all. I 
doubt If one of them would advise you to 
quit drinking:. If you'd rather do that than 
somethingr else, all right! That's up to you. 

Five years have passed since I climbed 
aboard the water wagon. I'm still on it 
• — 

Bank Accounts as 

Storage Batteries 

John M. Oskison in the Chicago News- 
Henry Ford has likened the average re- 
sponsible citizen of this country to a street 
car system which gets its power from a 
central station, direct from electrical gen- 
erators. 

So long as the generators are working 
properly the cars move on the current sup- 
plied direct. But in every system, at some 
time, a breakdown of the machinery oc- 
curs. 

If the managers of the system are wise 
they will have foreseen the breakdown, and 
provided power In storage batteries to keep 
the system going until the breaks are 
mended. 

In the life of the Individual, as Mr. Ford 
knows it from close observation In his own 
great plant, strain is put upon the human 
machinery by worry over debts and the In- 
creasing cost of living. 

Such strains "always tend to break down 
the best effort and the best service that men 
are able to render In the battle of life." In 
the case of the debt-worried Individual, the 
breaks occur just when the "storage bat- 
tery" Is Impotent to move the load. 

Mr. Ford found, among the men working 
In his plant, that when they got something 

ahead — a pald-for home or a bank account 

they became more efficient workers. This 
gain ran from 16 per cent to 20 per cent. 
They were actually that much more valuable 
as workers In the Ford factory. 

So the comparison between the man and 

the street car system Is not quite right It 

falls to tell the whole story. 

The worker who supplements his regular 
earnings by a steadfly accumulating savings 
fund Is not only storing up power to run 
himself and his family for a time in case of 
a breakdown but he is doing something to 
make himself a better and actually more 
valuable worker. 

The bank account does stand as the con- 
crete expression of foresight. the Indi- 
vidual's storage battery of power. It Is the 
Individual's notice to the world that a sane 
business management Is regulating his In- 
come and his outgo. 

• . 

Remarkable Renuirk*. 

New York Independent: Rudyard Kipling 

I want to kneel before every Frenchman. 

Dr. Woods Hutchison — No two peas In • 
pod are ever alike. 

King Alpbonso^After the war the nations 
will arm more than ever. 

Agnes ReppUer — History is, and always has 
been, hampered by facts. 

Dr. H. Forbes — The human being belongs 
on all fours. Instead of standing on two legs. 

George Bernard Shaw — I do not think any- 
body Is justified in asking anybody else to 
join the army. 

Francis Hackett — The salt of this Ameri- 
can soil Is Lincoln. When one finds that, one 
Is naturalized. 

Mr. Dooley — Whlnlver I'm called on to fight 
for Gaw^d an' me counthry, I like to be sure 
that the senior partner has been consulted. 

Edwin Lefevre — If I were compelled at the 
point of a pistol to name what In my opinion 
Is the greatest of all novels, I should say 
"Anna Karenlna." 

Lady Randolph Churchill — How many mar- 
riages have been nipped In the bud by the 
premature and Indiscreet congratulations of 
Idle busvbodles. 

Rear Admiral C. F. Goodrich — These, then, 
as I see them, are the chief lessons of the .war 
In Europe, the protean changes in tactics and 
the immutability of strategy. 

Prof. Scott of the University of Michigan — 
To my mind, the speech of Abe and Mawruss 
might easily prove the beginning of a type of 
standard English. 



Progress. 

Life: Is there any better or more logical 
standard by which to measure the progress 
of civilization than the number of things 
used to kill human beings? 

Two or three thousand years ago, when 
everything was more or less crude, these 
were about all they had: 

Bows, arrows, spears and catapults. Fire- 
brands. Stakes. 

Now we have: 

Machine guns. Bombs. Gas. Autos. 
Trolleys. Railroads. Electric wires. Grade 
crossings. Trusts. 

Then, as now. however, they had medicine 

men. 

• 

Her Guea*. 

Yonkers Statesman: Patience — why did 
Wagner write such terribly loud music, do 
you suppose? 

Patrice — Oh. I guess his wife was deaf, 
and b« did it to annoy her. 



Random Views as to 

Political Matters 



Off-year Campaigu Talk of the Minnesota Pree* 



V«*y Well Said, 1 

Gilbert Herald: The Prince 
It is too early to figure on 
candidates to the next Rep 
convention, because It is ji 
Woodrow Wilson may be 
choice of all patriotic Amer 
Bob Dunn! 



fndeed. 

ton Union thinks 
the selection of 

abllcan national 

ist possible that 
the unanimous 

cans. Well said. 



Elbnlnatlnr Jn 

Luverne Journal: Tom Nos 
political writer for the ^ 
swears that Julius Schmahl ^ 
didate for governor next 3 
been giving the Impressli 
months that he was going a 
Noswal's word must be tal 
he has been employed as a 
Schmahl In the secretary of 
some time and has been g 
lot of boosting In his weel 
He predicts that Mr. Schmj 
other term as secretary of 
nobody can beat him, and 
win try it. 



Urns. 

wal. the St. Paul 
orthfleld News. 
vlU not b« a can- 
ear. Julius has 
)n for several 
rter the job. But 
cen as final, for 

clerk under Mr. 

state's office for 
ving his chief a 
cly news letters, 
uhl will seek an- 
state. If he does, 
probably nobody 



He In HVell Worth 

Gully Advance: Governor 
Ing a boom for vice presi 
right, but can Minnesota a 
go? The governor has be< 
tlonal fame for years and 
man Minnesota wants as 
state at least for three y 
come. As a vote getter he 
A. Johnson. 



Keeping. 

rlammond is hav- 
dent. That's all 
fford to let him 
n a man of na- 
he is just the 
executive of the 
ears or more to 
Is a second John 



As to Being Well 

Luverne Journal: The He 
of Minnesota announces tl 
candidate for governor nei 
been twice elected to his pr 
time by a big majority. Thli 
him the Impression that h« 
known over the state and ht 
a good chance of winning, 
name Is Burnqulst. J. A. A 
you remember voting for 1 
then his notion of being "we 
founded, for he has been e 
flclal. Can he win? That's 



A Friendly H 

Mora Times: The Taft me 
little slow In their crltlcU 
men who preferred to aupi 
Taft in the last presldentla 
Taft men were outvoted twc 
sota In 1912 and there Is 
lieve that these voters ha 
the progressive type to sts 



Known. 

itenant governor 
at he win be a 
t year. He has 
ssent office, each 

I latter fact gives 
is already well 
therefore stands 

The gentleman's 

Burnqulst. Do 
lim? If you do 

II known" Is well 
pretty good of- 

hls look-out. 

tnt. 

1 had better go a 
m of our public 
»ort Roosevelt to 
1 campaign. The 
to one In Mlnne- 
no reason to be- 
I'e changed from 
ndpatters. 



Is It ao Bad as ThatT 

Donnelly' Star: Julius Sctmahl Is blossom- 
ing Into a real live candidate for governor. 
Julius Is one of the best *tate officers any 
state ever had, but If he was going to be 
governor It should have ha;>pened years ago. 



Duluth's Doubtful 

Dawson Sentinel: Duluth 
on the other'cities of the sti 
out with the first confess 
governor. This stroke of ( 
forgiven If Duluth will pr 
peat the offense. Another 
rob the Zenith City of sta 



Honor. 

has put one over 
.te — she has come 
ed candidate for 
nterprlse will be 
omlse not to re- 
Raab would quite 
ndlng. 



"Nothing Important'* 



From the Kansas City { 
inventory of the pockets 
diers taken prisoners Is ai 
the beginning of the war, 
discloses anything Importi 
some form Is always to 
often with broken pieces . 
the last thing that is ge 
hesitatingly, from some in 
photograph of a woman c 
York World. 

Even the men who flgli 
are human. It seems. Fror 
fectlveness of the German 
the methods adopted, you 
slon of the German soldle 
fellow. You recall that th 
called them "Huns." 

And then you come acro! 
like the paragraph about v 
German soldiers' pockets — i 
of It gives you a little 
broken chocolate — small, 1 
comforts. And last of al 
from some Inside pocket, a 
woman or a child." Thes 
and file, are not Huns, 
worry about women and cl 
their own. 

Such of the home lettei 
have appeared In American 
shown the humanity of 1 
hear of their lighting 
trees in the trenches — and s 
a catch to your throat. It 
way for Huns to act — It r 
sudden you find yourself 
sympathy for these simpl 
folk, who go through hard 
Ingly, who go to death sin 
belief that they are perlshli 
good. 

They ought to b^ at home 
fields, working In their e 
which turn out honest goot 
be taking care of the wor 
whose pictures they keep 
give up reluctlantly. 



Star: "Paris — The 
of German sol- 
I thorough as at 
though It rarely 
mt. Tobacco In 
be found, mixed 
)f chocolate, and 
lerally produced, 
side pocket. Is a 
r a child."— New 

t for the kaiser 
1 the terrible ef- 
campalgn. from 
get an Impres- 
r as a ferocious 
elr enemies have 

;s a simple thing 
hat they find in 
.nd the humanity 
thrill. Tobacco, 
lomely creature 
1, "hesitatingly, 
photograph of a 
3 men. the rank 
The Huns didn't 
illdren — not even 

s of soldiers as 
newspapers have 
hese men. You 
ittle Christmas 
omehow It brings 
Isn't the proper 
jally isn't. Of a 
feeling Immense 
e-minded soldier 
ship uncomplaln- 
ging in a serene 
xg for the world's 

tilling their tidy 
ccellent factories 
is — they ought to 
len and children 

to the last and 



Canalized Elmo 

Randolph S. Bourne In t 
world seems to be full ( 
called canalized emotions, 
posed" to love one's aunt o; 
er In a certain definite wa 
being "unnatural." One ge 
of the quantitative measun 
Perhaps the greatest trage 
Is the useless energy thai 
the dutiful In keeping thes 
nel» open, and the correct 
rent running. It is exactl 
duces most infallibly the 
younger generation. To he 
to love this or that person 
alty spoken of. as the old 
often speaks of It. as If H 
allegiance to something wl 
er believes In — this Is wh 
ates those forces of mad 
which bewilder spiritual 
guides. It Is exactly the 
of duty and obligation th 
living waters of emotion fl 
Ideal of the younger gen. 
up. They will have no r 
tlonal canals which are n 
duties which are not equa 



tions. 

he Atlantic: The 
f what may be 
One is "sup- 
• one's grandfath- 
y, at the risk of 
ts almost a sense 
ment of emotion, 
dy of family life 

Is expended by 
e artificial chan- 

amount of cur- 
y this that pro- 
rebellion of the 
ar that one ought 
; or to hear loy- 
er generation so 

consisted In an 
ich one no long- 
it soonest liber- 
less and revolt 
teachers and 
se dry channels 
rough which no 
ow that it is the 
'ration to break 
etwork of enxo- 
at brimming, no 
ly loves. 



Wken He Propi 

Life: What ho thought h< 
That he had never seen 
That in some Indefinable 

ways Inspired him to do h 
That every moment he 

her he was In a torment 
That every moment he •< 

was In the seventh heavei 
That they might have to 

way, but he knew this cou 
That his family were all 
That her family might 

him now, but that was o: 

didn't know him. 

That he loved her with s 

over him like the Johnston 
That he simply couldn't 
That he knew he could 
That he never thought c 

from the moment he laid 1 
What he did say: 
He can't remember. 



Med. 

would say: 
ler look lovelier. 

manner she al- 
ls best. 

was away from 
3f black despair, 
vas with her he 
I of bliss, 
begin In a small 
Id not last long, 
crazy about her. 
not understand 
ily because they 

love that swept 
vn flood. 

live without her. 
make her happy, 
f any other girl 
syea on her. 



t Bertk. • 

Dr. Blngs look- 
r In the unlver- 



Looklng in a Sof 

Baltimore American: "Is 
Ing for any particular cha 
slty?" 

"No; any on^ will suit him if only it's an 
easy ohalr." 



Twenty Years Ago 



From The Herald of this dst*. 189S. 



•♦♦President Cleveland Issued an order to- 
day placing Lieut. -Gen. John M. Schofleld 
upon the retired list of the army. MaJ.-Gen. 
Nelson A. Miles has been formally notified by 
the president that he will be appointed to 
succeed Gen. Schofleld in command of th« 
army. 



•♦♦Rev. A. W. Ryan and Thomas S. Wood 
have returned from the East, where they 
went In the Interest of the Duluth bishop- 
ric. Dr. Ryan announces that Bishops White- 
head. Tuttlo and Potter will preach at St. 
Paul's church next month. 



♦♦♦The old French River Mining company** 
property on French river Is to be prospected 
for copper. This company was organized In 
1863 and was reorganized two years ago with 
the present officers: President. H. B. Payne 
of Cleveland; vice president, H. J. Jewett of 
Maryland; secretary and treasurer. James 
Wade of Cleveland; directors. Nathan Myrick 
of St. Paul and S. T. Everett of Cleveland. 
About thirty years ago some work was done, 
but operations ceased after a year or two. 
The company owns 325 acres of land. Mul- 
ford Wade of Cleveland left today with a 
party of workmen for the property. Shanties 
will be erected and work with a diamond 
drill will be continued during the winter. 



♦♦♦Duluth temperature at 7 a. m. today. 38{ 
maximum yesterday, 49; minimum yester- 
day, 40. 



♦♦♦R. B. Doane has resigned his position 
as organist at the First Presbyterian church 
and has gone to Chicago, where he expects 
to reside. 



♦♦♦Charles B. Nichols of Minneapolis, for- 
merly engaged in newspaper work in Du- 
luth, is visiting friends here. 



•♦♦W. C. Kilgore has returned from a five 
weeks' visit at his old home in Ohio. 



••♦Mrs. Alice J. Pavltt. who has been In 
the city several days vi.«iting relatives, re- 
turned to Robinsdale, Minn., this afternoon. 



♦♦♦Mr. and Mrs. L. Roy Wilson have re- 
turned from their wedding trip and are at 
home in the Ashtabula terrace. 



♦♦♦Miss Bella Sang of Port Elgin. Ont.. who 
has been visiting her sister. Miss Annie Sang 
of 320 Twenty-seventh avenue west, has re- 
turned home. 



♦♦♦Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Thornton have gone 
to Atlanta, Ga.. with the editorial excursion. 



•••Mrs. J. Kelly, who has been vl.siting Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph Beck at West Duluth for a 
few days, left yesterday for her home at 
Milwaukee. 



Just a Moment 



Dally Strength and Cheer. 

Compiled by Joha G. Qulnlua, Uia Sunslilna M*a. 

"Restore unto me the joy of Thv salva- 
tion." — Ps. 11, 12. 

My Father, give me back the luxuries of 
Thy Spirit — Its freedom and its joy. I am 
not content with mere pardon; l' am not 
comforted with simple salvation; I want the 
Joy of Thy salvation. It is not enough that 
I am reconciled to Thee; I must be able tJ 
be glad In Thee. Only In perfect Joy shall I 
find perfect freedom. — George Matheson. 



Sit still, my daughter. — Ruth Hi, 18. 

Stillness of saul is what the great ma- 
jority of God's children need. Restlessness 
In Christian service Is often mistaken for 
activity and zeal. The reason of the ex- 
haustion so many experience In working for 
the Lord Is to be found In the lack of In- 
ward rest. Perhaps It is one of the last 
things we think we ought to do, when we 
first enter upon His service, namely, to let 
ourselves down, with all our cares, and rest 
In His Almighty arms. And yet it Is one of 
the first lessons the Good Shepherd con- 
strains His following sheep to learn. "The 
Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want. He 
maketh me to die down in green pastures; 
He leadeth me beside waters of quietness." 
Before we can work without friction, with- 
out exhaustion. and without waste of 
strength, He teaches us to be still. He sets 
us free from the energy of the flesh, and 
from the fret and disquietude of the nat- 
ural man. 

Here, again. Is the secret of all progress 
in our knowledge of God: "Be still, and 
know that I am God" (Ps. xlvl. 10). "Mary 
• • • sat at Jesus' feet, and heard His 
word" (Luke x. 39). — From "Broken Bread." 

Dayton, Ohio. 

• 

lioeal Talent I.Ikes This Stuff. 

Oconto. Wis.. Reporter: Mrs. Hattle Por- 
ter-Orendorff. with voice rich and sym- 
pathetic, liquid and pure, gave some of the 
best songs of Warmer. Schumann, Brahms 
and others. Her exquisite singing soon 
proved a force compelling the quickening of 
every sluggish heart, so that immediately a 
perfect glow of delight radiated from every 
countenance. One could hardly avoid thau 
Impression as the singing proceeded and one 
song followed another that the artist had 
every heart at her will and as though only 
one mighty pulse rolled through the arteries 
of the enchanted listeners. Mrs. P. T. Pren- 
tice, the accomplished artist, gave selections 
from Wlenlawskl, Vieuxtemps, etc.. In a 
most masterly manner, in true art style, 
free from all stage trickery and affectations, 
showing a careful and superb training to 
which her fine violin responded by emitting 
tones of purest silver bathed In liquid gold. 
Mrs. Louise Lindner, the accomplished pi- 
anist, showed herself an artist gem of tha 
purest water. Her technlcque seemed per- 
fect and, to the writer, most marvelous, re- 
minding him of a winding brook, the water 
rippling over the myriad of white pebbles, 
while the sun In the dewy morn overflows 
the whole vista with his sprays of gold just 
dispersing the Impish laughing, singing, and 
since early dawn, dancing fairies, while re- 
flecting all the colors of the rainbow from 
the tiny scales of the thousands of the wily 
and basking minnows swimming hurriedly 
past the beholder, oblivious to his surround* 
Ings. 



Hovr He Got Ereau 

Pittsburgh Chronicle-Telegraph: A busy 
housewife eame Into the sitting room with 
a determined look In her eyes. 

"I really shall have to punish those chlU 
dren," she began. 

"What have the little beggars been up 
to now?" asked father, looking up from his 
newspaper. 

"Why, thej-'ve made a mess of my sewlnj 
room." explained the wife. "Needles, reels 
of cotton, scissors — everything has been hid- 
den away In the most unexpected places. It 
Is really exasperating." 

Her husband laid down his paper and 
smiled benignly. 

"I did that," he said, calmly. Then. In 
answer to a questioning look, he went oni 
"You tidied up my desk so beautifully tho 
other day that I thought It only fair to re- 
turn the compliment. So I tidied up your 

sewing room." 

• 

He Said It. 

Kansas City Star: Very frequently ths 
winter highways of the Yukon valley are 
mere trails traversed only by dog sledges. 
One of the bishops In Alaska, who was very 
fond of that mode of travel, encountered 
a miner coming out with his dog team, and 
stopped to ask what kind of a road he had 
come over. 

The miner responded with a stream of 
forcible and picturesque profanity, winding 
up with: 

"And what kind of o' trail did you have?^ 

"Same as yours," replied the bishop feel* 






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Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 30, IS 15. 



THE OPEN COURT 

(R««der= <,t The Herald are lnvU*«l to make free use 
•( UiU rulumr to extrws their Idew about the toplca p 
•C V»>i<-ral ititfriept, but <ltwiission« of seriarlan rellg- | 
Icus .liffermcTs are t.»rreU. - I.*tte;a must not exceed 
M9 anrils—Uie slioite nhe befttr. Ttiey must he wrU- 
tcn 'in Mie nlile of the pai-er (.nly. and tliey musi be 
•ccorapaii!t<l In p\erj f-a-e t-j the name and address of 
the writer fhouifh ti>«ee need not t* [ubUshed. A 
alffnt-d lerter is always nuKt effective, howe»«r. ) 

WHICH shot^wTllT" 

PENETRATE DEEPEST? 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

Aftr r returninsr from a hunting: trip 
After diifks. several of us got Into an ' 
arfrunxnt about the proper load to be 
upcd, or to be more exact the aigu-; 
merit we would Mke to settle is: 

1. Which shot will penetrate the 
deepest with the same load of pow- 
der at a given object, the distance 
•way being the same. No. 7>4 fine bird 
•hot or K. B. shot? Or will the pene- i 
tration be the same? 

2. Supposing a person stood on the! 
top of the Alworth building and 
dropped two weights of one and two: 
pounds at exactly the same . time, I 
Weijihts being the jsame shape, which i 
would strike the ground first? ! 

Thanking you in advance 1 beg to; 
remain. r( npectfully yours, 

RALPH SNIDER. 
Duluth. Sept. 29. 



Perhaps some reader of the Open 
Court can answer these Questions. 

MANY IN EUROPe'wOULD 

ADOPT AMERICAN SYSTEM 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

At the very moment when the Uttle- 
falth element In thiff country are urg- 
ing us to discard the American system 
of national defense and adopt that 
•whi' h has made Europe Infamous, 
thousand.'' of thoughtful people In Eu- 
rope are t'urning their faces toward 
thf iiKht which shines from America. 

Millions of men in the wrestling 
eouniries have determined to make 
peace their standard — that peace which 
Is »1j*^ strongest defense against ene- 
mies, which disarms every enemy. 

P< rhaps It i." not too much to say 
thnt »v«ry man who looks beyond the 
da.v'.s fighting or the munition supplies 
for tomorrow. Is of this mind. That Is, 
•very one who Is able to give reflective 
thought to the matter is convinced 
that peace Is a more potent defense 
than warlike preparation. And when 
I say peace. I don't mean Just sitting 
• till. I mean being so — (adjective de- 
leted by censor) — peaceable that no- 
body can stand against you. 

Senator Hurton said the ather day, 
thoughtfully, that after this is over, 
either P^urope will be ready to fight 
everybody for any quarrel, or will be 
profoundly disposed to peace. 

That large fraction of Eurooean 
people which follows the Socialist 
banner will be profoundly disposed to 
peace. The opinion of Morris Hillqult 
on what Socialists think will, I take it, 
be received with respect. His etate- 



AMUSEMEXTS 



Al-W AAS 
A <a»(>u 

SHOW 



>r:\v 



GRAND 



11 A. IW. 

U.N'TIL 

11 V. AI. 



World's Mcst MarvHoua Chimpanzee 

PRINCE CHARLES 

THREE ALARCONS--MORTON BROS. 

Jessie Hayward Co. 

IN "THE QUITTER." 

Hrant-8e)la News— Concert Oreheatra. 

Fiiotcplaya De Luxe. 

MUTS.IoT^i^^ NITES I0c-20o 



AIDS TO DIGESTION 

Whatever Improves bodily condi- 
tions In general aids digestion. 

Cherfulness, exercise, freeh air, 
baths and good habits make your di- 
gestion better able to take care of any 
burdens you impose upon it. But the 
greatest aid to good digestion Is good 
blood. Anemia, or thin blood, is a 
common cause of indigestion. Normal 
action of the stomach is impossible 
without healthy, well-oxidized blood. 

Dyspepsia which does not yield to 
ordinary treatment may be quickly 
corrected when the blood is enriched. 
Many people have secured relief from 
chronic forms of Indigestion by the 
use of Dr. Williams' Pink Pills Which 
make the blood rich and red, capable 
of carrying an increased amount of 
oxygen, the great supporter of human 
life. 

Have you ever seriously considered 
giving Dr. Williams' Pink Pills a trial 
to tone up your digestion, increase 
your vitality and make life better 
worth living? If your blood is thin 
and your digestion weak you certainly 
need them.' Send for a diet book. It 
is free and will help you decide. 

Your own druggist sells Dr. Wil- 
liams' Pink Pills or they will be mailed 
postpaid on receipt of price, 50 cents 
per box, bIx boxes $2.50, by the Dr. 
Williams Medicine Co., Schenectady, 
N. Y. 



mfnt In the Tale Review, a sober and 
dignified journal, is entitled to con- 
sideration as firsthand evidence. 

He says the Socialists will move and 
are moving for peace, for permanent 
Peace, for peace sustained by methods 
like those of the American systera of 
national defense. 

War is stinging itself to death over 
in Europe. The more loyally we cling 
to the American system and show our 
trust in it, the more quickly Europe 
will come to adopt It. And then the 
whole world will be proof against war. 
INNOCENT BYSTANDER. 

Duluth, Sept. 29. 

THE GREEK PAGEANT. 



WILL CALL STATE LANff '■ 
CONFERENCE VERY SOON 



Governor Hammond Almost 
Ready for Proposed De- 
velopment Meeting. 



Duluth Asked to Suggest 

Names of Delegates for 

Gathering. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

The Greek pageant staped at the 
Curling club was not given by and for 
the benefit of the Drama league, as 
stated in the Open Court. The Drama 
league was in no way responsible for 



the pageant. It was managed private- 
ly by 
eantry. 



ly by individuals Interested 



pr; 
in 



pag- 



A DRAMA LEAGUE MEMBER. 
Duluth, Sept. 29. 



QUESTIONS AND 

ANSWERS 



TJila depftrtment doee net pretend to lie Irifallibla 
It will eiideaTor. howc-ver, to atiffwer (jubbUpiis Bent to 
It by reederg of The Herald to the liest of Ita ability, 
reserving the right to ignore all that are trifling or 
of concern nnly to the Questioner, or that a«k fcr ad- 
vice on legHl or medical Qucstkns. 

To receive attenilDn, every ln<i;ilry must beer th« 
name and aUdr«« (f tiie person sending It Thla Is 
not wanted for publicaUon, but as an evidence of 
gofid faith. 



A proposed state development con- 
gress, the like of which has never 
been held in Minnesota and one which 
would be representative in a most com- 
prehensive degree, will soon be called 
to meet at St. Paul by Governor Ham- 
mond. 

The movement w^as suggested by the 
governor during the summer, and his 
determination to call auch a conference 

[ was announced in The Herald exclu- 
sively at that time. Governor Ham- 

I mond realized that excejlent results 

I could be obtained by" a grand gather- 
ing of really representative men from 

! every section of the state who would 
discuss development plans for the mu- 
tual advancement of Minnesota as a 
whole, laying aside sectionalism. At 
that time Mr. Hammond expressed the 
belief that the calling of the meeting 
should be left until the harvest season 
had closed and the county fairs were 
over. 

To Develop <he Stat*. 
The plan as outlined is to have a 
meeting of prominent representatives 
from the various development associa- 



TALK WITHOOT 
AID £WIRES 

Human Voice Transmitted 

Across the Continent By 

Wireless Telephone. 



REX 



TlIK TllKATER 
BEAl TlFl'l. 



I.et'M Mee BARRYMORF: tonight In 
gay comedy an "DIKA\K" — they 
Riiy it'H really funny. 
Tomorrow t "THK C.VSE OF BECKY" 

LYRIC "The Popular Playhouse'^ 

Another Keystone Comedy 

"A^IIIFR AND THE WALRUS" 

]''<ir liiiighing purpo«i<-H only. 



John Kosky, Finlayson, Minn. — "Will 
you please give what information you 
may have, or tell me where I can get 
It, about fox farming. Is there money 
to be made by raising foxes? Do they 
live well in captivity? Do they In- 
crease rapidly? What are the furs 
worth? 

Ans. — For information on fox farm- 
ing, write to Robinson Bros., Fox 
Farms, Grand Marals, Minn. The 
business is considered to be very re- 
munerative when well established and 
properly managed. Foxes live well In 
captivity. Each female will produce 
six or seven young each year. Black 
fox furs are very valuable, some hav- 
ing sold as high as $3,000. Fur prices 
are lower since the European war be- 
gan. 



Voice Also Sent From Wires 

Into Space By New 

Device. 




— Tt>D.%Y — 

John llincs and Martha Stedinan 
in the Comedy Drama 




Laushter and Thrills 



Frhlay and Saturday — Mrfi. LiOslie 
Carter in the Greatest Sueees;.s, 
"The Heart of Maryland." 



GRAND JURY PROBES 
CROOKED CATT LE DEALS 

Chicago, Sept. 30. — The Federal grand 
jury yesterday began an investigation I 
into alleged illegal and fraudulent 
cattle brokerage operations involving,' 
It is said, a number of prominent and 
wealthy cattle brokers. Witnesses In i 
the cn-^e were examined, among them 
being M. F. Alderman of Brook Park, 
Minn. 

It is charged in the complaints of 
farmers and stock men In various parts ; 
of the country that the cattle brokers j 
have been selling and shipping cattle, 
Into other states, knowing them to be j 
infected with tuberculosis. 

J. T. Milek of Sturgls, S. D., who! 
was instrumental in having the action ; 
brought, appeared before the jury and j 
testified as to purchases he made which i 
he alleges to have been fraudulently 
encouraged. 



_ c 



SCHOOL "lOURNALISTS" 
HAVE PRESS ROOM 



LYCEUM """"'- 



ALL WEEK 



Night and Saturday Matine*. 25«. Mc, 73o 
$1.00. $l.SO. 



Another Cohan & Harrla 
Succesa 

ON TRIAL 



A Play of Powerful Intensity 



PopMlar 

Matinee 

Wednesday 

Best 

Seats 

tl.OO. 



ORIGINAL CHICAGO CAST. 



Editors and reporters at the Central i 
high school now have a "press" room of j 
their own, for Principal L. A. Yovmg 
has given them permission to use a | 
room on the third floor, which will be 
properly equipped. 

Members of the Zenith board and 
Spectator staff will make this room 
their office and write their "copy" 
there. Desks, chairs and typewriters 
are being installed. 

Jacob Garon, editor-in-chief of the 
Zenith, says a special room is neces- 
sary to perform the large amount of 
work connected with the publication of 
the school annual. 



"Washington, Sept. 30. — Long dis- 
tance wireless telephone communica- 
tion across the continent was accom- 
plished for the first time ye.«terday, 
when experiments extending over sev- 
eral months culminated in successful 
transmission of the human voice by 
radio from the great naval plant at 
Arlington, Va., across the continent to 
the station at Mare Island. Cal.. 2,600 
miles awav. 

The experiments were conducted un- 
der direction of Capt. Bullard, chief of 
the navy's radio service, in co-opera- 
tion with the American Telephone & 
Telegraph company and the Western 
Electric company. 

Secretary Daniels, announcing the 
result, predicted that further develop, 
ment of wireless telephony would 
make great changes in long distance 
communication both for militaiT and 
naval service and commercial usage. 
From Wire to Air. 

Successful operation of a device for 
automatically transferring to the radio 
telephone conversations originating on 
metallic circuits also was accom- 
plished in yesterday's tests. President 
Theodore N. Vail and other officials of 
the American Telephone & Telegraph 
company, at New York, talked easily 
with the Mare Island station, the con- 
versation traveling over an ordinary 
metallic line from New York to Ar- 
lington and thence by radio across the 
continent. 

"The fact that the voices can be 
statted on a land wire -"■* auto- 
matically transmitted to a voice radio 
transmitter," said Secretai^r Daniels, 
"holds out hope that persons Inland 
should readily be put in touch by tele- 
phone with others at sea. through 
some central transmitting station. 
Still Undeveloped. 

"The use of such long distance wire- 
less telephone communication In naval 
or military operations is still ir\ an un- 
developed state, but It is expected val- 
uable use can be made of this wonder- 
ful demonstration, but aside from such 
considerations, the department and its 
officials may well feel proud that they 
have been interested co-operators In 
the first practical development of this 
latest march in the wonderful science 
of radio communication." 



tlons of Minnesota. The delegates must 
be men possessing real business Judg- 
ment and good common sense, men 
who will be able to lend character to 
the gathering and by the use of ability 
and experience be able to determine 
upon the best plan for the reclama- 
tion and development of many thou- 
sands of acres of state land that are 
now Idle and, consequently, not paying 
any taxes. 

Flying-trapeze orators are not want- 
ed at this gathering, according to re- 
ports of men close to the governor, 
for, as he expresses it, the wind-jam- 
mers take up a lot of valuable time, 
shout a lot of stuff about this great 
and glorious republic, about the Go- 

f>her state being the greatest and best 
n the Union, etc.. but who offer few. 
suggestions that could be put to any 
use in the successful development that 
is needed. 

Ch'ooMlBB Delesratlon. 
(Jreat care, it is said, will be ex- 
ercised in selecting the delegates. 
There are development associations in 
the northern, eastern, western, south- 
ern and central districts of Minnesota. 
Representative members of these 
bodies and others who are not so con- 
nected, men who have used keen In- 
sight In state matters in the past, will 
be chosen to act for their respective 
sections. 

It is generally believed by Minneso- 
tans with whom this matter has been 
discussed, that the greatest good in the 
way of state development can be had 
from a gathering of this kind. ' Sec- 
tional differences and Jealousies will 
be dropped entirely during the meet- 
ing and all will work for the adoption 
of a plan that will be for the general 
good. 

Reports in certain Duluth circles to- 
day are to the effect that this city has 
been called upon to suggest men to act 
as its delegates and to give such other 
information as might be of service 
in the advance work of arranging for 
the congress. 



some months ago, but public announce- 
ment was withheld until the greater 
goal, transcontinental communication, 
could be reached-. This statement was 
made by Chief Engineer John Carty of 
the American Telephone & Telegraph 
company. The problem of trans- 
oceanic communication has been solved, 
Carty asserted. The day is near, he 
said, when It will be as easy to talk 
from San Francisco to London and 
Paris as it is today to talk over the 
wire from San Francisco to New York. 



■ li* 




tbi$ (Ueek's Sunday School Cmon 

Written for The Hi raid By Rev, J. S. Kirtley, D. D. 




SUNDAY SCHOOL LESSON i OCT. 3! 



I KIngrs xxl, 11-201 Elijah In Naboth's 
Vineyard. 



To Talk to Europe. 

Ne.w York, Sept. 30.— The transmis- 
sion of audible speech to Europe by 
wireless can be taken as an assured 
fact, in the opinion of officials of the 
American Telephone & Telegraph com- 
pany here. They declared that talking 
from New York across the Atlantic and 
from here to Japan is now' but a mat- 
ter of installing the necessary ap- 
paratus. 



DULUTHIAN LIKES 
NAVY TRAINING SCHOOL 



Fifty Trades Taught Re- 
cruits; Matthew Donahue 
of Duluth, Now a Pupil, 
Says It Affords Great Op- 
portunity for Young Men. 



Talked 2.100 MIlea Before. 

Vallejo, Cal., Sept. 30. — Wireless tele- 
phone communication between Wash- 
ington, D. C, and the Panama canal, a 
distance of 2,100 miles, was established 



The Great Lakes training school for 
sailors situated at Waukegan, 111., is 
one of the best and cheapest Insti- 
tutions for practical instruction that 
a young man can enter, according to 
Matthew Donahue of Duluth, who was 
recently sent there by Officer Peter 
Coyle of the Duluth naval recniitlnjj 
office. In a letter received by Mr. 
Coyle today, Mr. Donahue expresses 
great satisfaction with the whole in- 
stitution. 

"Prospective recruits for the navy 
are taught fifty different trades," says 
Donahue. "Any one of these puts a 
young man Into a position to earn a 
good living and hold a steady Job with 
good opportunities for advancement. 
The boy sare taught how to handle a 
boat, various mechanical trades, elec- 
tricity, such as wireless operating, and 
many other occupations of the most 
] up-to-date and remunerative type." 

Officer Coyle in commenting on the 
school, said: 

I "A young man does, not have to bc\ 
I a sailor to belong (o the navy. There 
are opportunities of many kinds for' 
men of different tastes and ability." 

Mr. Donahue is proud of Company 
C, to which he belongs, and says the 
members are a fine Tot of clean ci.t,( 
ambitious young men. 

All men recruited for the United 
States navy in this district are given 
six months' Instruction in this echool 
before being assigned for duty. 
-• 

No Parole for See. 

Juliet. 111., Sept. 30. — Evelyn Arthur 
See, founder of the so-called absolute 
life cult and its former high priest, 
was denied a parole by the state 
parole board when that body convened 
at the prison. This means that See 
must serve six years and three months 
of an indeterminate sentence for ab- 
duction, for which he was sent to the 
Illinois state penitentiary on April 26, 
1913. 



CONNECTION. 

What about Elijah? He was on the 
watch for opportunity to rebuke sin. 
Things had gone better. Ahab seems 
to have sobered somewhat. After the 
defeat of Ben-hadad and the other 
drunken kings the Syrians were very 
servile. They came and ajsked mercy 
and Ahab. instead of following instruc- 
tions to deal severely with them, made 
a compact with Ben-hadad for which 
a prophet rebuked him and foretold his 
death. Meantime Ahab shows his old 
vlciousness in the Incident which we 
study today. 

Though his home w^as In Samaria, his 
finest palace was in Jezreel. Solomon 
nad a throne of ivory, but Ahab had a 
house lined all through with ivory. 
He had gardens and vineyards all 
around the palace except one beautiful 
little spot, owned by a man named Na- 
both who lived over in Samaria. Na- 
both refused to sell it on the two 
grounds of sentiment and religion. It 
was ancestral land with many sacred 
associations. Besides it was not his 
to sell, for the law of God forbade its 
being sold to any one outside the fam- 
ily. Only in exceptional cases could an 
inheritance be sold and then it must be 
redeemed by the next of kin, but, re- 
deemed or not, the land reverted to the 
family of Its original owners when the 
fiftieth year, the year of jubilee, came 
around. "The land shall not be sold 
forever, for the land is mine." Lev. xxv, 
23. "So shall not the inheritance of the 
children of Israel remove from tribe to 
tribe." Num. xxxvl, 7. 




FRIDAY AND SATURDAY ^%TdIy^^ MATINEE 

A PICTURIZATION OF MEREDITH NICHOLSON'S NOVEL 

HOUSE-u'THOUSANO CANDLES 

A complete change of musical program by the Symphony 
Orchestra of twelve artists, at each new show 

lOc- NIGHTS lUi^^^'^l-sS^s 25c, BALCONY 10c 




MATINEES ALL SEATS 



COMING— Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, ''SINS OF THE MOTHER 



ff 



FAMOUS G[RMAN GENBUl 
FULLY RESTORED TO HEALTH 



THE LESSON. 

I. 

Sncreiisfiil Plot Acaint IVaboth. 11-13. 

"And the men of his city, even the 
elders and the nobles w^ho dwelt In his 
city, did as Jezebel had sent unto them, 
according as it was written In the let- 
ters which she had sent unto them. 
They proclaimed a fast, and set Naboth 
on high among the people. And the two 
men, the base fellows, came in and set 
before him, a^nd the base fellows bare 
witness against him. even against Na- 
both. In the presence of the people, say- 
ing. Naboth did curse God and the king. 
Then they carried him forth out of the 
city and stoned him to death with 
stones." 

1. AHAB POUTINO. — We can under- 
stand how Ahab would desire that 
patch of ground. It would gratify his 
sense of ownership,. please his eye with 
the unity of his ground and possibly 
prove valuable some day for building 
purposes. We can appreciate his fair 
offer, to give Naboth money for it or a 
patch of ground in another place Just 
as good. We can appreciate Naboth's 
reasons for holding to it. But we are 
hardly prepared to find anything but 
amusement in Ahab's pouting disap- 
pointment over it. so that, when he 
went home to Jezebel, his countenance 
betrayed his trouble and, after telling 
her in answer to her questions why 
he was so depressed he couldn't eat, 
he turned his face to the wall in grief. 
Perhaps It was a shrewd way of inter- 
esting his resourceful and unscrupulous 
wife. He was brave in battle but 
weak in self-control. He was brave 
with men but a child in the hands of 
his wife. She had been beautiful but 
was always brutal. She ruled him but 
wanted him to be famous and power- 
ful. He was brutal enough to have 
taken the vineyard from Naboth, but 
may have lacked the nerve. He w^as 
stronger tban this when he first mar- 
ried her. 

2. JEZEBEL PLOTTING— She was 
maliciously masterful. Every mascu- 
line woman has a contempt for her 
puppet husband and Jezebel scarcely 
conceals hers. Her first word is a 
question implying he Is too weak to as- 
sert his rights or too Ignorant. Her 
next word is the assertion of her pow- 
er aid her purpo.se t« get the land 
for him. Poor little man! Disobedient 
to God, then browbeaten by her; yield- 
ing to the stronger will, then scorned 
for doing so; refu.«ing to eat, then 
bidden to eat like a child while she 
went Out to secure for him the covet- 
ed toy. 

Her plot was bold and self-reliant, 
taking no notice of her husband, yet 
using his signet ring; it was hypo- 
critical, for it was In the name of 
God's law, beginning the crime with a 
feast which implied that a horrible 
sin had been committed and that God 
was to be appealed to. Drunken men 
'were to charge the man who was most 
honored In the procession with having 
violated God's law, in cursing God ana 
the king, and then all would stone 
him according to that law. It was 
very regular. It was religious. His 
sons were killed so that no heirs could 
ever claim the property. It was orig- 
inal, bold, shrewd. 

The Confiscation. 14-16. 

"Then they sent to Jezebel, saying. 
Naboth is stoned, and is dead. And it 
came to pass, when Jezebel heard that 
Naboth was stoned, and was dead, that 
Jezebel said to Ahab, Arise, take pos- 
session of the vineyard of Naboth the 
Jezreelite, which he refused to give 
thee for money; .for Naboth is not 
alive, but dead. And it came to pass, 
when Ahab heard that Naboth was 
dead, that Ahab rose up to go down 
to the vineyard of Naboth the Jez- 
reelite, to take possession of it." 

1. PRIDE. — She was as proud in 
receiving word that the man had been 
put in the place of honor in the public 
procession and then treacherously 
killed on a false charge, as if she had 
received word that her son had won In 
the Marathon races. It was a com- 
plex pride — In her own originality and 
shrewdness, in her sense of ascen- 
dency over her husband, in the recog- 
nition which the officers gave to her 
superiority in sending word to her in- 
stead of to Ahab. and in the pleasure 
she would afford her husband, for she 



really seemed to love him, or at least 
love to see hlri have power. 

2. PLEASIFRE. — Although Ahab 

knew some dark and devilish deed had 
been done to secure this ground for 
him, he had aa much pleasure in get- 
ting it as a boy in getting a new top 
or a pair of new^ shoes. Human na- 
ture has not oven yet been developed 
to Its full ca))aclty for brutality and 
perversion. 

m. 

Retribution on tlfte Way. 17-20. 

"And the w ird of Jehovah came to 
Elijah the Ti»hbite, saying. Arise, go 
down to meet Ahab, king of Israel, 
who dwelleth n Samaria: behold, he is 
In the vineyarl of Naboth, w^hither he 
is gone down to take possession of it. 
And thou sha t speak unto him, say- 
ing. Thus salth Jehovah, Hast thou 
killed, and als3 taken possession? And 
thou Shalt speak unto him, saying. 
Thus saith Jehovah, In the place where 
dogs licked the blood of Naboth shall 
dogs lick thy blood, even thine. And 
Ahab said to Elijah, Hast thou found 
me, O mine enemy? And he answered, 
I have found thee, because thou hast 
sold thyself to do that which is evil In 
the sight of Jehovah." 

1. RESPONSIBILITY.— He was re- 
sponsible for tlie deed which he allowed 
and got the b?nefit of. The man who 
knows his henchmen buy his election 
to office Is as guilty as If he did it In 
person. 

2. RETRIBUTION.— God sees. He 
has His me682nger to tell the doom 
of the man, a id Elijah announces the 
bloody end of both Ahab and Jezebel. 
Though delay* d for a while, the sen- 
tence was carried out in all its tragic 
details later on. Ahab was panic- 



TO OBSERVE FIRE 

PREVENTION DAY 



stricken and repented — some; Jezebel—, 
never! 



WHAT THE MASTERS SAT. 

The most striking result of the ao* 
pearance of Elijah was the Impulse n»- 
gave to prophetic activity. The com- 
munities of sons, or disciples, of th« 
prophets, of which there is no men* 
tlon since the earlier years of David, 
appear again in the fullest vigor, cher- 
ishing the ancient faith in the caliik 
and seclusion of their settlements. 
Among these there were not want- 
ing such as Micaiah to stand up bold- 
ly for the truth. The honored serv- 
ant of Elijah, especially takes a grand 
place as tbe champion of Jehovah, 
and, after him. generations of his or- 
der showed, in their zeal and incor- 
ruptible loyalty to God. how deeply 
the example of the Tishbite had stirred 
them. — Geike 

Father Hawley of Hartford wa» 
telling the scholars In a mission 
school of a boy in that city who had 
stolen money from his employer** 
drawer and had been sent to prison 
for his crime. "When he opened that 
drawer so stealthily," said Father 
Hawley, "and looked down on th» 
pile of bank notes there. If only h» 
could have seen written on top or 
them in letters of fire, 'ten years la 
state prison.* wouldn't he hav» 
plammed that drawer to again?" — - 
Peloubet. 



Governor Jrges That Exer- 
cises Be Held in Schools 
Oct. 8. 

St. Paul, Mliin., Sept. 30. — The state 

department has issued 

notice: 

r the first time In the 

history of Minnesota a proclamation 

or will be featured as 
school exercises Friday, 



PERTIXRXT <linESTIO?rS. 

1. How is the power of suggestion 
used In matters of right and wrongT 

2. Is religion •ever used nowaday* 
as a sanction for wrong doing? HowT 

3. Why are you responsible for th* 
wrong you could prevent? 

4. How can weakness be kept from 
becoming wickedness? 

6. Does retribution always follow^ 
sin In this life? 



department can only hope that the co» 
operation of all Instructors will be ex- 
tended to make the observance of Fir* 
Prevention day this year the begin- 
ning of a new era in the elimlnatioa 
of fire waste In Minnesota. 

"The fire marshal urges that this, 
the fourth annual obse^^■ance of th» 
day in this state, be made the occa- 
sion of special efforts on the part of 
all municipal and state offlc( rs a» 
well as civic organizations, women's 
clubs and others to conduct a real 
campaign against the fire menace." 



fire marshal's 

the following 

"Probably f<> 



by the goverr 
part of public 
Oct. 8. 

"The state fl 
has sent to e\ 
ent in MlnneS' 
Hammond's pr 
Saturday, Oct. 
day. Inasmuc 
on the day pr 
sary of the gr 
the governor 1 
cises be held 

"The obsem') 
hoped to be t 
fort to stimul) 
thousands of 
state an Intere 
fire prevention 

"The fire nu 
received the s 
state superinti 
send to the 
schools, mater 
and other exer 
all the school! 
program as ac 
the discretion 

"Special effc 
the fire marsh 
out the mand 
having the scl: 
Impressed wit 
taking precaut 
that lurk in rti 
cumulations ol 
lleved that tl 
will stand the 
future. 

"Naturally t 
as the means 
preseions and 



re marshal's department 
ery school superlntend- 
)ta a copy of Governor 
jclamation setting aside 
9, as Fire Prevention 
1 as there is no school 
jscribed as the anniver- 
eat Chicago fire in 1871. 
aa urged that the exer- 
Lhe day previous, 
ince will mark what Is 
he beginning of an ef- 
ite in the minds of the 
school children of the 
St in proper methods of 

irshal's department has 
inction of C. 6. Schulz, 
>ndent of education, to 
supe»intendents <5f all 
al for essays, addresses 
cises to bo conducted In 
i; whether the proposed 
opted is left entirely to 

of the Instructor, 
rts are being made by 
il's department to carry 
ite of the governor in 
ool children of the state 
h the responsibility of 
ions against the dangers 
atches, gasoline and ac- 

rubblsh, and it Is be- 
e lessons thus learned 
m in good stead in the 

le teacher Is to be used 
of conveying these im- 
the governor and this 



EXTRA CREWS DEMANDED. 



Sidewalks Must Be Built In Contract 
Time, Says Farrell. 

Bondsmen for sidewalk contractorti 
were notified by Commissioner Farrell 
yesterday that unless extra crews wer» 
put on to complete the work befor* 
cold weather sets in, he would call on 
them for indemnity. 

"I notified one firm a week ago that 
It would be necessary to put on anothe^^ 
mixer and extra crew in order to fin- 
ish the work Ln contract time," said 
the commissioner. 

"I have also notified all contractor* 
that lights must be placed wherever a 
sidewalk is fenced off at night durlnsf 
process of construction. This rule wlU 
be rigidly enforced." 



Be Wise. 

Advertise your wants In The Duluth 
i Herald. It is the paper that will give 
j you results. Over 30,000 circulation. 
; There is no "just es gjod.*' 



The Cstre for Runover Heels 



\TRubberHeel 



FOR PRiriTING, LITHOGRAPHING, ENGRAVING, BINDING ! 

QUICK SERVICE AND EXPERT WORKMANSHIP, CALL 

J. J. LeTOURNEAU PRINTING CO. 



221 WEST FIRST STREET, 




GOLD CROWNS — Finest 2?-carat 
— no better at any ^^ f\t\ 

price, for ^«»«W 

BRIDGE "WORK that for weight, 
beauty and luality has tf^^ OO 
never been < xceUed ^^m\M\M 



If You Have Bad Teeth 
You Need a Dentist. 



Take advantage of our 
moderate charges. We 
guarantee to satisfy 
you. Our painless 
methods are always ap- 
preciated. 



NOTE THESE PRICES-. 

SIL^-ER FILLINGS— None CH^ 

better at any price OwC 

WHALEBONE PLATES — 1 15.00 
and $25.00 values — ttC €\t\ 

$8.00 and ^^m\3\3 



We Specialize In Gold Inlays — Odd and AliMninnin Pfatea 

UNION PAINLESS DENTISTS 

Dr. Franklin Greer & Co.. Ovrners. 
815 WEST SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH, MINX. 
€pen from 8:30 a. m. to 1 p. m. Sundays, 10 to 1. 




W^m^^^m^^ff^/^m^ 



W W ^ W 



GEN. VON KLUCK. 

Berlin, via London, Sept. 30. — Gen. 
Alexander P. R. von Kluck, after a 
period of recuperation in the country 
is now fully restored to health suid is 
living in his Berlin home, according to 
an unofficial announcement made here 
last night. It is not known when he 
wUl return to active eervl$«. 



SI!!!!! 




"9 Bill 
BBBlii 



Follow the Rule 

Reach the Goal 

To reach the goal of getting a hundred 
dollars in the bank ,you should follow the 
RULE of saving systematically. 

It is the steady habit of GOING to the 
bank that keeps your account GROWING 
in the bank. 

This bank seeks savers. We are proud to 
have people come here who "Follow the 
Rule and Reach the Goal." We will wel- 
come your deposits of one dollar or more. 



THIE CITY NATIONAL BANK 




DU ILUTH 



ift 



ik 



ikrfhA 



K4INNCSOTA ^ 



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11 



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K^*-^ i)P (ILWllL J_| '«_»/ LL 't' S ' mm ' f ' 



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10 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALU 



September 30, 1916 






tatQG' Cl.%Ya\^^ 



^ 



THK S.OUi: FOli SKHVICK. 
11S-115-1I7-1I» Wewt Superior St. 
Dulotli, Sltnn. 




The Basement 

Store Offers Big 

Attractions 

For Friday and Saturday! 



»i I i< 



f 




WHITE CHINA FOR DECO- 
RATING. 

We advlsi; buying now for later 
requirements as these g-oods will be 
very hard to 8f»*t later Jn the Beaaon. 

A special discount of 10 per cent 
Friday and Saturday. 



UNIVERSAL FOOD 
CHOPPERS. 

A useful household 
refiulsite. 

No. 1, small fam- Q^/% 
ily size at ^^1* 

No. £ largre CI 1 ^ 
family size. . . . V ■ • ■ '^ 



Patented 

Revolving 

WAFFLE 

IRONS. 

Special sale 
price 




69c 





GUARANTEED 
ALARM CLOCKS. 

Special price Friday 
and Saturday at 



59c 




TUNGSTEN ELEC- 
TRIC LIGHTS. 

25. 40 and 60 watts. Spe- 
cial price Friday and 
Saturday. ^ r -, 

choice ^ JC 



COAT AND 

SUIT 

HANGERS. 

'v'^\W "^v 1 r e and 
Wjoden Coat 
Hangers, *-, 
4 for "JC 

J1.50 Suit Hanger Sets. hold« Q^^ 
six aulta aF*/v» 

J3.00 Suit Hanger Sets, •! ^Q 
holds six suits ^ i •■>J7 

12.50 Suit Hanger Sets, • 1 ilQ 

holds six suits V ■ •var 





RADIATOR BRUSHES. 
"With lonjr handle, special ItKr* 

price • JC 



SET POTTS 
IRONS. 

Nickel plated, 
special price 
Friday and 
•Saturday, set — 



79c 




The newest creations In mahog- 
any and metal 




ELECTRIC 

READING AND 

BOUDOIR 

LAMPS. 



Prices from 

$3.50 to 

$25.00 




ALUMINUM PERCOLATORS. 
Eight cups size, special price 0^#* 
Friday and Saturday jr JC 

Extra Specials Friday 
and Saturday 

No phone or C. O. D. Orders taken 
on these Items. 
8 ban K.trk'm Flake 'V%'IiJtc Soap. 25c 

8 roIU I.uxoii Toilet Pai»«r 25c 

Waste Paper Baskets 33c 



Niv/METHOD 
DfHTISTS 

^ 25.W.SUP ST. 




Read The 
HeraldWants 



CLAIM OF SALOON FORCES 
REPUDIATED DY METHODISTS 



Conference Denies Jotin A. 
Patten Has Official Rela- 
tion to Church. 



Endowment Fund of$15,' 
600,000 for Retired Min- 
isters Is Assured. 



Minneapolis. Minn., Sept. 30.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)-^The second busi- 
ness session of the Northern Minne- 
sota M. E. conference opened at 8:30 
this morning with a devotional ad- | 
dress by Bi.shop Berry. At 9 o'clock | 
the business of the conference was i 
taken up. 

Dr. S. M. Dick of Forest church, Min- 
neapolis, Introduced a resolution signed 
by some of the most Influential mem- 
bers of the conference, repudiating the 
claim of the saloon forces of Minne- 
apolia that the presumed relation of , 
John A. Patten of Chattanooga. Tenn., 

with official Methodism commits the 
M. E. church to a position of Insin- 
cerity because of Mr. Patten's connec- 
tion with the Wine of Cardul com- 
pany. 

The resolution was amended to deny 
the Imputation that Mr. Patten had 
any official relation to the M. B. 
church, he having resigned all such 
positions Immediately upon litigation 
being instituted against him. and was 
pas.sed after a most spirited debate en- 
gaged in by many of the leaders of the 
conference. 

Boia Forte MteMoM. * 

The conference ordered the trustees 
to close the deal with the United Statea 
government by which the church se- 
cures a tract of land on Nett lake at 
the Bois Fort(- reservation for a mis- 
sion among the Indians there. 

Dr. "W. H. Jordan, superintendent of 
the Litchfield district, read his annual 
report. The members of the confer- 
ence were all pa-ssed in character with- 
out any objection. Revs. J. H. Den- 
nlston, O. A. Luce, J. D. Manly, R. C. 
Manly, E. H. Nicholson and C. W. 
Stark were continued as supernumer- 
ary members of the conference. Revs. 
L. D. Brown, J. H. Buttleman, R. M. 
Carter, Benjamin Collins, J. A. Crosier, 
M. W. Davis, J. H. Dewart. J. C. Du- 
val, H J. Higgins, Abraham Hopkins. 
Thomas McClary. R. N. McKalg, H. B. 
Molyneaux, C. F. Sharpa, T. L. Swin- 
nerton, S. T. Snow and C. H. Weatt 
were continued as retired ministers. It 
was announced that Rev. William Rice 
of Park Rapids, Minn., one of the old- 
est retired ministers, died recently. 
Bis Fond Assnred. 

Dr. J. B. Hir.geley, formerly of Min- 
neapolis, now of Chicago, but still a 
member of this conference, announced 
that the board of conference claim- 
ants of the M. E. church were now 
assured that $15, 000, OOIT would be raised 
as an endowment fund for the re- 
tired ministers of this church. This Is 
the fund which was ordered raised at 
the general conference at Minneapolis 
three j-ears ago, and was originally 
$5,000,000, but has been again and again 
increai?'^d till now it has reached the 
magnificent sum of $15,000,000. 

This afternoon, Dr. George E. Vin- 
cent, president of the University of 
Minnesota, will address the conference, 
and tonight Dr. Hingeley will give the 
principal address. 

Th« Duluth District. 

Dr. il. P. Burns, superintendent of 
the Duluth diatrict. was greeted with 
much applause on riading his annual 
report. It shows a year of intense 




BISHOP JOSEPH F. BERRY, 

Of Philadelpliia, Who Is Presiding at 

the Conference. 



five flats above. The purchase prtce 
of this proposition was $8,000 for the 
building, of which $5,000 was paid In 
cash when title was received. It will 
Cost $2,000 toi ||t^pair and rearrange the 
rooms so-*a8 tiVaccommodate our mis- 
sion work itttSiis section. The city 
union holds 4 «:&!^s to the ground upon 
which the building stands. This lease 
contains a purchase clause authoriz- 
ing us to purchase the ground at a 
stipulated pric^ of $16,225 at any time 
during the first, four years of the lease 
life. We consider this item of busi- 
ness a very jflfiportant operation, on 
ttie part ot, ^fi^unlon during the pres- 
ent year. 

'A small chvrch building has been 
erected at Kelley Lake and will be 
dedicated inunediately after confer- 
ence. 

B«nerolen;t, Collectioaji Grow. 

"In spit^ of hard times and slow 
money movements, we confidently ex- 
pect a 10 per cent Increase In the 
benevolent collections. The mission- 
ary leaven is operating, how^ever, and 
it will require several summers to 
leaven the whole lump and thus make 
Methodism In this territory, distinc- 
tively missionary. 

"Some thlgns have been done along 
the line of Improvements and debt 
payments. Improvements: Barnum, 
$100; Brook Park. $125; Buhl. $250; 
Chisholm. $600; Coleralno, $250; Cros- 
by, $100; Deerwnod. $160; Deer River. 
$250; Ely, $350: Hill City, $300; Hinck- 
ley, $500; Onamla, $176; Gilbert. $100; 
McGregor circuit, $300; Wahkon. $100; 
Cloquet, $425c Meadowlands. $250; Two 
Harbors. $400; First church. Duluth. 
$1,500. Debts: Gilbert. $126; Bralnerd. 
$2,800; Brookston, $100: Coleraine. 
$200; Eveleth. $4,000; Nashwauk. $125; 
Mora, $800; Pine River. $400; Proctor. 
$2,000; Two Harbors. $400; Virginia, 
$400; Duluth First church. $7,500; Les- 
ter Park. $300. and Merrltt Memorial. 
$125. 

Snnday SriMtol IVorfc. 

"The Sunday sc.hool work is rapidly 
growing both in' numbers and effi- 
ciency. This institution is unquestion- 
ably the largest factor. In the church, 
in the winning of young people to the 
Kingdom of Jesus Christ. Many, even 




REV. DR. M. P. BURNS, 
Superintendent of the Dtiluth District. 



activity tlir..ughout the whole district 
'n the Methodist dennn-lnation, and Is 
really wor:hy of <:aroful reading. His 
report. In part, follows: 

"Another yeax of earnest and de- 
voted endeavor has come and gone. 
Another day of accounting has arrived. 
We stand before " you to If possible 
chronicle the results In human hearts 
aTid in community life on the part of 
Christian ministers. Tne appo'.ntmeuts 
and ministers as classified one year 
ago. by Bishop Shepard, with one or 
two exceptions, still stand. Rev. E. E. 
Satterlee of Brainard was transferred 
by Bishop Quayle to Drayton, at the 
end of the first three months, and Rov. 
Mr. Koch, a returned missionary from 
India, has supplied this charge with 
unusual acceptability. His administra- 



IS YOUR STOMACH 
CLOGGED WITH WASTE? 



Druggrl-Mit Guarantee to Retam the 

Money If Ml-o-na Does Not 

Relieve You. 

It's a pleasure to sell a medicine 
when customers come In afterward and 
tell you how much good It hasr done 
them. 

Druggists everywhere can tell of 
this experience in their sale of Ml- 
o-na, the well-known stomach remedy. 
And that Is the reason why they are 
alw^ays glad to sell and recommend 
Ml-o-na. It does the work and ends 
all stomach distress Just like the Ml- 
o-na people say it will. As a result of 
this success most every druggist goes 
a step further and sells Mi-o-na on a 
positive guarantee that unless it helps 
the purchaser he can have his money 
back. Tha.t mv se«;n rMh. but customers hare salil so 
many goud words in Mt-o-ni*» favor that very f»w 
paokagSB are likely lo be returned. 

Anyone who bas dj-apepsia, who9« forjd Ootm not di- 
gest well, and who lias to take thought as to what 
he can eat. and wli«ii. can l«i»e 50 cauts depoall 
at any druc -atore and take homa a Ivnc '>f Ml-o-n* 
and If the remedy doen not regulate hia dtgeuion and 
help hla dyspepsia he cxa withdraw hU money. 

TMs shows great faith In the merit of Ml-o-na. It 
la really a most unusual medicine and the rarld In- 
creaM of aales since It was Introduceil In Duluth 
shows that It d<)«8 all that It Is claimed to 
do — relieves dyspepsia. reeulat«a digestion and enablM 
tbi>se who use It to eat just what they want with no 
fear ofc trouble after. Sold by Boyce Drug Stora and 
aoy oUmt leading druggist la this flctulty. 



tlon has been a special benediction to ' among the smaller schools are Install 
our people. Rev. A. A. Myres was ; Ing the graded lesson system. The or- 

' ganlzed class is an exceedingly strong 

feature in the Sunday school work. The 
teachers' training class Is becoming a 
tower of strength, especially Is this 
true In preparing leadership for the 
different departments. 

"The league is constantly developing 
a richer life aA^ a more effective serv. 
ice. A strong district convention was 
held at Cloquet. The state institute 
held each year at Groveland is becom- 
ing a tremendous uplift and Inspira- 
tion. 

"Our Sunday schools practically all 
secure their supplies from the Book 
Concern. The church papers are becom- 
ing year by year more widely circu- 
lated and read. There Is a distinct im- 
provement In the matter of our people 
reading our church literature. Hence 
our people are becoming more Intelli- 
gent Christians and Methodists and 
will continue so to become Just in 
proportion as they continue to Increase 
their reading along this line of litera- 
ture. 

Inereaae In Membership. 

"The religious Interest throughout 
this part of God's heritage Is Intensify- 
ing. Larger and more interested con- 
gregations are in attendance upon the 
church services. More effective and 
gracious teviyals have been held dur- 
ing the past yeer perhaps than ever 
before. Greater efforts with more pro- 
nounced results have been put forth 
by all the ministers, each In his own 
individualistic way to comjnlt men to 
the way of God, and to lay the pres- 
.sure of Christian responsibility upon 
their hearts perhaps than during other 
years. And the results in each case 
justify the efforts. As nearly as can 
be tabulated the following numbers 
have Klentifled themselves with the 
church during the last twelve months: 
Duluth First church, 145; Endlpn, 65; 
Lester Park, 60; Asbury, 10; Grace. 32; 
Merrltt Memorlf*!. 13: Aitkin. 38; Ait- 
kin circuit, 14; Barnum, 9; Brook Park. 
25; Cohasset, 10; Deerwood. 6; Cutlar 
circuit. 88; Eveleth. 30; Grand Rapids, 
12; Hlbblng. 107: Hinckley, 30; Mar- 
ble circuit, 80: McGregor, 30; Mora, 6; 
Ogilvle, 6; Bralnerd. 9; Onamla, 34; 
Palisade circuit,^ 15; Pine River. 18; 
Proctor. 81; Sandstone. 11; Two Har- 
bors. 34; Vlrglnlfl. 33: "Wahkon. 23. and 
Ely 10; together with several other 
places having received smaller num- 
bers, making in all a total of acces- 
sions on the district of about 927. This 
number does not quite reach the re- 
quirements of our district motto, how- 
ever It supplies us ■with a reasonably 
consistent and conscientious endeavor 
to reach said motto. 

Hamltne Students. 

"Hamline university has quite a 
number of students in attendance from 
the territory covered by the Duluth 
district. Students returning from Ham- 
line are enthusiastic for the institu- 
tion. They certainly make good ad- 
vertisers. Dr. Kerfoot attended the 
District F.pworth League convention 
and has circulated thfough the terri- 
tory generally. He Is very popular 
and greatly admired. He Is a winner 
and Hamline Is destined to develop and 
build up a great college under hlff wise 
and aggressive l^^adershlp. 

"The settlement of the Deaconess 
Home situation has been a disturbing 
factor in the life of Duluth Methodism. 
It was believed that the building now 
owned and operated was altogether too 
expensive a proposition for the city to 
carrv. After several meetings In 
which the situation was thoroughly 
discussed, it was determined by the 
board to sell the present building and 
rent one more nearly In the center of 
the city and operate a free dispensary 
In conjimctlon with the deaconess 
work. The arrangement will probably 
be con8ummnt«»d immediately after the 
conference. If any contingency should 
Inject Itself so as to make it Impo.sslble 
to carry out this scheme then there 
will be a concluding chapter In rela- 
tion to the deaconess proposition In 



transferred from Grand Rapids to 
Caledonia in the Minnesota conference, 
and Dr. M. M. Hursh, a resident physi- 
cian, has supplied with much efficiency 
and pleasure to this charge. Rev. 
George E. Sllloway was overtaken In 
March by a nervous collapse and was 
compelled to cease active work and 
has been recuperating until the pres- 
ent time. Brother F. L. Callendar, a 
student from Athens. Tenn.. finished 
out the year at Grace church and 
comes to the seat of this conference 
with splendid reports showing himself 
to be a workman that needeth not to 
be ashamed. 

New Church at Altktn. 

"In spite of ttnanclal handicaps, for- 
ward movements have occurred all 
along the line. Early in the confer- 
ence year the beautiful new church 
at Aitkin, costing about $15,000, was 
completed. On Sunday, Nov. 16, the 
Christian sanctuary was dedicated to 
the worship of Almighty God. with 
sufficient reliable subscriptions to cover 
all Indebtedness. The building of this 
church Is certainly an expression of 
devotion on the part of the pastor. 
Rev. A. L. Richardson, and also of his 
loyal and consecrated following, which 
is multitudinous in this community, 
where he has served as pastor for .six 
years. On Sunday, May 30. a little 
Finnish church was dedicated at 
Aurora, costing $1,300. This makes a 
neat little building for the Finnish 
people of this town. It is altogether 
free from debt, built chiefly from the 
proceeds of the sale of a hail previous- 
ly owned by the society. Brothers 
Maltt Lehlonen, Finnish missionary, 
and J. W. Schenck, pastor of the Eng- 
lish church at Aurora, were respon- 
sible for the manipulation and culmi- 
nation of this proposition. 

"The Gary church Is still waiting 
for consecration. The steel plant Is 
pushing the wark looking toward 
completion and operation. When oper- 
ation begins, this part of the city will 
rapidly fill up, and then this church 
will have a great opportunity. 
%ett Liake Mission. 

"The building of our Xett Lake In- 
dian Mission church has been hung up 
during the entire year. Eighteen 
months ago the national legislature 
pushed through a bill granting the 
Methodist church a forty-acre tract of 
land In connection with this Indian 
agency for missionary purposes. This 
action was sent to the interior depart- 
ment, with fcnstructions to Issue a title 
to our conference corporation, but 
for some reason the deed has not been 
forthcoming, and hence the church has 
not been built. Rev. Frank H. 
Pequette. our Indian missionary, has 
labored faithfully and persistently 
during the whole year on this propo- 
sition, but has not yet been able to 
reach a satisfactory conclusion. The 
matter will come up later in this ses- 
sion, when we shall seek further light 
on the entire situation. Sufficient 
money Is practically on hand to con- 
struct the building. A $1,200 church at 
Holyoke is In process of erection. It 
will be a very nice little building, 
plenty large to accommodate the needs 
of the community. It will be free from 
debt when finished. Rer. J. F. Roper 
is the pastor. 

•Rev. W. A. Parkinson is furnishing 
leadership In the matter of buUdihg 
a new church at Kettle River. This 
enterprise is being carried forward as 
rapidly as possible, and when com- 
pleted, will cost $1,200. 

Ti»e E-veleth Problem. 

"For twelve vears Eveleth has been 
the problent or the conference. It Is 
entirely useless for me to undertake 
to deliniate the joys and sorrows of 
this loyal and devoted body of Chris- 
tian people. We have never seen any 
greater devotion on the part of peo- 
ple who were laboring under such 
trying conditions. Last spring the city 
authorities condemned their building, 
which originally cost $19,000, and pro- 
claimed it to be an unsafe place in i 



Which to meet for public worship. This t^** report of the superintendent^ of the 

was the proverbial straw. It looked Duluth district one ye«r hence. 

at first as though the struggles of Yesterday afternoon a session of the 



truggl 

years on the part of this institution 
would be vitiated and the organiza- 
tion would disintegrate. However, the 



conference was full of Interest. The 
delegates have all arrived, and many 
of the laymen are here for their con 



pastor. Rev. O. D. Cannon, sent out the ference although It does not convene 
call and a few faithful souls respond- till Friday 



ed. and at once began to seek a so- 
lution. After a six months' campaign 
the Board of Home Missions and 
Church Extensions forgave a debt of 
$4,000. This was the art which caused 
the dry bones to rustle In the valley 
of Eveleth. life was restored, hope was 
again revived and faith In God and 
In the future compelled activity. The 
old building was razed to the ground, 
and even a part of the basement wall 
had to be torn out. Then a new temple 
of worship was erected where the old 
one had stood. This new building has 
been finished and was finally opened 
to the congregation and public for 
Christian worship on Thursday night, 
Sept. 23. The pastor and people are 
happy In this accomplishment and a 
great opportunity stretches out before 
this church In the coming years for 
Christian service. May the 
especially bless the Meth 
at Eveleth 

The Woodland Church. 
"The Methodist Social Union of Du- 
luth decided last fall to biilld a church 
In the Woodland district, a new and 
very promising residential portion of 



Dr. Kerfoot Talks. 

Dr. Kerfoot." president of the Ham- 
line vinr,ver?ltv. addressed the confer- 
ence, and reported that Hamline was 
just starting out uoon one of the most 
successful years of Us entire history, 
having enrolled the largest number of 
freshmen since Hamline began to do 



A Real Flesh Builder 
For Thin People 

WHO WOULD INCREASE H'EIGHT. 

Thin men and women who would 

1 i.'k^^A^ r^^A Ulke to Increase their weight with 10 

,^.n»; _ ^^3 or 15 pounde of healthy "stay-there" 

oaist crowd jj^^ should try eating a little Sargol 

with their meals for a while and note 

results. Here is a good test worth 

trying. First weigh yourself and 

measure yourself. Then take Sargol — 

one tablet with every meal — for two 

the city. This program was carried Tt^fil^l'^^'ieltlo^'o^f^hoTt^oTloXo'V 

forward during the conference year " \8" ^ \.?H-t ^n..r fH^H- «iv o«h 

ildlne haq been com- 'ee^ o^ what youi friends say and 

uaing nas oeen com- ^^ink. The scales end tape measure 

will tell their own story. Many peo- 
ple, having followed these simple di- 
rections, report weight increases of 
from five to eight pounds with con- 
tinued gains under further treattuent. 
Sargol doe» not of itself mak^ fat 
but. mixing with your food, its pur- 
pose is to help the digestive organs 
turn the fate, sugars and starches of 
what you have eaten. Into rich, ripe, 
fat-producing nourishment for the tis- 
sues and blood — prepare It In an eas- 
ily assimilated form which the blood 
can reddlly accept. A great deal of 
this nourishment now passes from thin 

discovered and correlled. After a pa- P^'^P^®'* ^^'^^1*„*fh.»^^*,S» n^T^^^-Jf 
tlent canvass of the situation suffl- desfgned to stop the waste and m«Uk^ 
1 —1. «.._.3- _..._» *^^fu.^^^^t^ — t« A. _ the fat-rro<tuchiB eontents or tm Tery same meau 
?I?"*^*J^^"*^^.^^^® forthcoming to Jus- i ";• '^^^ ^^ ^^e,^ ^^^^ .„4 ^„^ 
tify the union In purchasing the old ^°"hJjS>, n«^ between your .Ida and bone.. Sargol 
canal block on Lake avenue. Thig Is , ,, non-lnjurlftus, .pleasant, effldent and InexMoslr* 
an Ideal location In w^hlch to carry Boyoe Drug store and other leading dnigglsu are 
forward the work contemplated. The auUioritad to sell tt In Urge boxv — fort/ ubista to 
building Is a brick block with five a package— on a. guaraiite* of weight luoreas* ot 
storerooms helow, SO by 75 each, and money back m f<Aihd in •ftrj packaga 



and the new bu 
pleted and Is now ready for dedlca 
tion, which will take place" as soon 
after the close of this conference ses- 
sion as possible. This enterprise is 
costing about $3,000 In real estate, 
construction and furnishings. 

"Our Finnish mission w^ork In the 
city has been for years a perplexing 
problem. This perplexity was occa- 
sioned chiefly because we had no plant 
in which to operate. The City Social 
union was again called upon to devise 
ways and means. After careful con- 
sultation It was decided to Invest a bit 
of money In this department of city 
w^ork. provided the money could be 



business in the educational worid. In j 
the absence of Dr. Andrew Gillies of i 
the Hennepin Avenue cnurch. Rev. Dr. 
Elgar Blake of Chicago addressed the 
ministers, dealing with some of the 
vital matters which will be up for dis- 
cussion before the whole church at the 
next session of the general conference. 

MOST MODERN GUNS 
USED BY TH E FRENCH 

(Continued from page 1.) 

The protecting caves were filled. As 
to the network of barbed wire — It was 
torn up everywhere or destroyed. 
Supplies Cut Off. 

"Our fire covered the entire length 
of the first position, and with long 
range cannon bombarding routes and 
railroads, certain German units found 
their supplies cut off and remained 
forty-eight hours without provisions. 

"The morale effect was no less pow- 
erful. Even the interruption of the 
bombardment increased the nervous- 
ness of our adversaries, who uselessly 
began a concentrated artillery and 
musket fire. , .. 

"The clear sky of Sept. 22 and 23 
permitted precise regulation of obser- 
vation on the land and in the air. <^n 
the morning of Sept. 25 the gray 
clouds were very low. At 9 a. m. 
rain began to fall and at 9:15 o'clock 
the attack was ordered. 

"This human wave, which, on a front 
of more than fifteen miles at the 
same moment, and with the same dash 
burst upon and covered the enemy's 
trenches, comprised Frenchmen from 
all parts of France and her colonies. 
Junvped into Trendtes. 

"In several minutes, our n_^n, at the 
cost of small losses. sn>il nearly 
everywhere, jumped into fne German 
trenches, mastered their defenders, and 
continued their course forward with 
audaciousness* despite the soggy 
ground, despite the resistance of the 
enemy who rapidly with their reserves 
arranged intermediary positions, or 
who, under the support of perpendicu- 
lar communicating trenches, directed a 
fire from machine guns and infantry 
on the flanks of our troops during their 
forward movement. 

"At three points, the advance was 
particularly rapid. Near Souain, we 
directed three divergent attacks, cap- 
tured several works and entered 
trenches called Von Kluck and Von 
Tlrpita. Then we entered trench 
William IL 

To the east the African troops In a 
single bound crossed the German lines 
and fought In the wood in the direc- 
tion of Soualn-Tasure road, where they 
captured the field railroad camps and 
depots. 

"To the right, other contingents In 
eighteen minutes, captured an enemy 
salient called the Pocket. Further 
fighting and noon .and found them 
passing the Soualn-Tasure road and 
attaining the slopes of Hill 193. 
Take Five Lines. 

"North of Beause Jour, while the 
German resistance was being main- 
tained on the heights of La Butte Du 
Mesnll, we had taken in vast glacis in 
the wooded region in Fer De Lance and 
Demi Lune an entire fortified system 
comprising no less than five successive 
lines 400 meters (about 1.200 feet) In 
extent. This gain permitted us to rush 
on along the road from Perthes to 
Cernay as far as the Maieon De Cham 
pagne. 

"In the eastern part of the attack 
Ing front we did not pass the first 
position. wTTlch was particularly 
strong at certain points. The colonial 
Infantry In a dash captured the bas- 
tion formed by hill 191. of which the 
ravines and promontories formed ex- 
actly the fingers of a hand. In less 
than an hour the 'hand' of Massigea 
belonged to them. 

At Second dierman Position. 

"At the end of the day we had ar- 
rived to the north of Souain. and north 
of Perthes In contact even with the 
second German position supporting it- 
self on the Butte of Souain and the 
Butte of Tahure. Our batteries, fol- 
lowing the progress of the Infantry, 
crossed the communicating trenches, 
and installed themselves on the height 
of our departing line. 

"At dusk, on roads that had formerly 
been battered by enemy artillery, thou- 
sands of prisoners escorted by terri- 
torials were being taken toward the 
rear. 

"Despite the penetrating rain and the 
fatigue of the trying day, there cotild 
be seen on the faces of all our men joy 
and legitimate pride of victory." 



NOTICE! 



Pinal notice in hereby gi^en to 
all pentouM v»ho had I mbrellas 
for repair at the store of A. (;i:V- 
GOI.D, 125 East Superior Street, 
Dulutia* Alinn.. tliat .name rvlU be 
sold for rharRcs uule.sm railed 
for before Friday, Oct. 1, 1915. 

Umbrolins may be obtained at 
«.*{{ Manhattan Bldg- Duluth, 
Miun. W. O. DERBY, 

Trustee. 



TE N KILL ED 

(Continued from page 1.) 

throughout the night. 

At 9:30 o'clock the hurricane had 
subsided. 



Central Over MlMslsKlppl, 

Washington, Sept. 30. — The West In- 
dian hurricane has centered over the 
Interior of Mississippi this morning but 
it had greatly diminished In force. The 
storm, however, is not over, as It main- 
tains considerable Intensity and is 
causing general rains throughout the 
South Atlantic and East Gulf states and 
"Tennessee. 

During the night It caused winds of 
hurricane force on the Middle Gulf 
coast and the weather bureau ordered 
a continuance of storm warnings along 
the gulf coast from Mobile to Cedar 
Keys. Fla., and on the Atlantic coast 
from Jacksonville to Wilmington, N. C. 

Indications are that the storm is 
moving In a north-northeasterly direc- 
tion and that it will cause rains dur- 
ing the next thlrty-sIx hours every- 
where east of the Mississippi river, ex- 
cept in the Upper Lake region. 

^ 

Conuuunlcutl^n Lost. 

Mobile. Ala., Sept. 80. — All communi- 
cation with New Orleans, by wire, 
w^lreless and rail, has been cut off by 
the tropical storm since 2 o'clock this 
morning. > , ^ , 

A wireless message received at Gal- 
veston today at 2 a. m. Indicated that 
the storm had passed and that the wa- 
ter in the street* of New Orleans was 
receding. The death list is not ex- 
pected to exceed ten in New Orleans, 
but the property damage probably 
will be heavy. 

Telephone and telegraph companies 
began work this morning repairing 
the damage. Linemen succeeded In 
restoring the fallen wires to within 
twenty-three miles of New Orleans. 

The wind here during the night av- 
eraged from 26 to 60 miles an hour. 
Mobile river early today was two and 
a half blocks up in the wholesale dls- 
trlct. One fishing smack Is misslny. 
A younr man going to work early this 
morning was electrocuted when he 
stepped on a live wire which had been 
blown down. 

m 

No Fears for Train. 

Houston, Tex., Sept. 30.-— Southern 
Pacific officials today asserted that 
the road's limited passenger train to 
the Pacific coast from New Orleans, 
known as the Sunset Limited, which 
did not arrive here last night on 
schedule, did not leave New Orleans 
because of the st"™^. . 

Train No 8, with 100 passengers for 

New Orleans, Is marooned at Avon- 

I dale Ferry, La., but no fears for Ita 

safety are expected. , . , . ^ . 

Train service is maintained out of 
Houston toward New Orleans. 
— - — • 

Plant May Be Damaged. 

Washington. Sept. 80. — The nary 




Womld You Believe It? 

A THERMOMETER on the wall, head high, and 
one on the base board of your room will show 10 
to 20 degrees variation in winter, in a home heated 
by the avei-age ba'se burner. 

A difference of twenty degrees of heat will turn com- 
fort to discomfort. 

Twenry degrees difference is more than enough to 
give the bsby and children severe colds and worse. 
Heat lip this cold floor, this danger zone, with • 

COLE'S 

Brilliant Radiant 
Hard Coal Heater 

QWith Magazine Feed) 

and make it a safe playground 
for the little ones. 

Of- easy draft control, it pouri 
out a flood of warmth and comfort, 
hour after hour. 

• 

Every square inch of its highly 
polished steel jacket and boiler steel 
bottom is a heat radiating surface. 

Not a particle of heat is wasted. 
Not a particle is absorbed by heavy, 
useless cast iron. Nor is there dan- 
ger from coal gas, that much feared 
b)'- product given off by every heater 
not equipped with Cole's Hot Blast 
System for consuming gas. 

When jou buy this heater, you are buying one with a record. You 
are getting a iieater that produces results. 

That ij the 'only kind we are selling. Come for yours today. 



See thai the name "Cole's** is on the 
front door* None genuine without it* 

■■■^ Coopleto i tmKiui u Miert 




KMiA&lQ, 

JH^F 226-328 W. Superior SL '^HP 




222 



wireless station at Arlingrton has been 
unable to comriunicate with the wire- 
less station at the New Orleans navy 
j'ard since 6 o'clock yesterday morn- 
Ingr and officiiJs fear that the trop- 
ical storm daniagred the radio plant 
there. 



San Antoi 

San Antonio, 
less message fr 
station at Fort 
this morning s 

"Report cond 

A message i 
relayed from G 

"Last heard, 
from streets o 
down rapidly." 



tio Has Itfmsases. 

Tex., Sept. 30. — A wire- 
om New Orleans to the 

Sam Houston at 10:10 
ays: 

Itlons are not bad." 
■eeelved at 7:30 a. m., 
alveston, said: 

w^ater nearly drained 
f New Orleans. Going 



VETERANS PUT 
IN A l»ISY DAY 

Members (if Grand Army of 

Republio Received By 

Piesident. 



Members Exhausted By 
. March, Active in the 
Day's Festivities. 



Washington, 
200 Civil war 
pltals yesterdi 
exhausted In tl 
fully recovered 
for participate 
the anual reu 
Jorlty of the 
march from th 
House, but oth' 
out of line 1 
Hospitals and 



Sept. 30. — Most of the 
veterans taken to hos- 
ly when they became 
le G. A. R. parade, had 
today and were ready 
m In th-e remainder of 
lion program. A ma- 
aged men stood the 
e capitol to the White 
!rs were forced to drop 
►ecausc of exhaustion, 
emergency relief sta- 



tions establislied along the route of 
the parade on Pennsylvania avenue 
w^ere kept busy, but there were no 
fatalities. Most of the ca.ses were 
treated and immediately dismissed. 
Bnsy Day In Sif?ht. 

The veterans had a busy day be- 
fore them with a reception at th« 
White House by President Wilson to 
the surviving officers of the Civil war, 
a business session at Camp Emery, 
headquarters of the G. A. R. and th» 
dedication of a Jubilee tablet at 
Manassas, Vau Among those expected 
to attend the White House reecption 
were Col. David J. Palmer, com- 
mander-in-chief of the G. A. R. and 
three surviving commanders-in-chief 
— MaJ. Leo Rossleur, Capt. Beers and 
Lieut. Ell Torrance. 

Other Interesting events Included 
camp reunions, exhibitions and drills 
by the signal and medical corps of the 
United States on the White House lot; 
camp fires and dog watches. The day 
was to be brought to a close with « 
meeting of the resolutions committe* 
and a reception to Commander-in- 
Chief Palmers by the Daughters of 
Vetera- 

Recelved By President. 

President ^V^lson received several 
thousand members of various G. A. R_ 
organizations, including the National 
Association of Ex-Piisoners of War, 
the Paterson. N. J., delegation and th» 
Women's Relief corps. 

The reception was in the East room 
and the president waS accompanied by 
his military aide In full uniform. 
• 

Smoke La Delia and Alvaro cigars. 



SCARCITY OF LABOR 

IN T HE COK E REGION 

Connellsvllle. Pa., Sept. 30 — Scarcity 
of labor In the coke region is begin- 
ning to be felt by producers, but In th« 
face of this condition some 300 oven* 
were this week added to the activ* 
list. 

The labor shortage Is due to the faot 
that when the European war cam* 
on scores of coke w6rk<^rs were at 
their home* In Italy and Austria. They 
did not return, neither has there been 
the usual influx of new labor from 
those countries. 

Production and shipment of cok« 
continue at approximately 390.090 long 
a week, with a material increase ex- 
pected next week. 




for Infants and Children, 

The Kini You Have Always Boug^lit has borne the sigrna*^) 
tuT« of Chas. H. Fletcher, and has been made under his 
personal superrision for over 30 years. Allow no one 
to decjivo you in this. Counterfeits* Imitations and 
•* Just-»s-grood** are but Experiments, and endanger tho 
health of Children— fixperience ag^jLnst Experiment. 

The Kind Tou Have Always Bought 

Bears the Signature of 



^ 




■"♦• 



it 




^f^ 







-V 








k 




1 


» 




' 






1 






I 




































i 

































1 ' 

» ■ ■ I ■ ■■ 

■ 

I 1 I ■■ II I I !■ 




-ia*j3^" r. 'I — ifc 



m. 



Thursday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



September 30, 1915. 



U 




ANOTHER FOOTBALL 
LEAGUE FOR BOYS 



county, last Friday. Col. Plxley said 
he was absolutely satisfied th** deaths 
were not caused by suicide, but were 



murders. 



! ^ Tfc ^ IJC 

I * 
* 

* 



^ ^ ^^ J^ Jft ^^ ^ ^ ^ T* T* 

* 
NEW CVHfK-W I,AW 

^%'ILL GO INTO EFFECT 

SATIRDAY EVENIXG. 



Recreational Director Or- 
ganizes Boys Under Sixth 
Grade; Play Monday. 

Duluth now has another graa'e school 
football league. 

J. R. Batchelor. recreational direc- 
tor, announced this afternoon that 
■even teams have already entered the 
Junior Football league, which is open 

to all classes of the sixth grade and ^ ,..«.,,,..». :j£ 

*■" ,^ . . J , 111 i,„ I * moiitlui and after 9 o>Iock In tKe « 

under in the city. A schedule will be ^, .vlnter. but par«>ntii are held lla- * 

prepared within a day or two, he said, "" 
and the first game probably played 
next Monday afternoon. 



Dalatk'H curfew ordlHan^e wtll 
become effective on .Saturday. 

The meaxure 'wan paxn^d on 

Auk. 30 at the nngsrHtloa of the 

city attorney, ivho Maid at the % 

time that the old curfew la'w ^ 

could no* f>e enforce*. In vlevr of -Jk 

the fact that it had never been ^ 

properly advertiaed and pub- ^ 

« liMhed. ^ 

^ >ot only are ciUldren -pro- ^ 

^ hiblted from the BtreeU after Oi^O ^ 

^ o'clock durliiKT the Hummer ^j 



III 






SOUTH AMKICA'S GREATEST 

POET IS UNKNOWN IN U. S. 



So popular Is the Grade School Foot- 
ball If ague, the flr.'Jt games in which 
w^ere played yesterday afternoon, that 
the bovs'in tho schools having only 
B\x grades requested Mr. Batchelor to 
organize another league. L<a3t Satur- 
day notice.^ were sent out to these 
8«'h')ol3 and seven have already en- 
tered. Mr. Batchelor expects one or 
two more to join before Saturday. 

The schools now Ir. the leapue fol- 
low: Jackson. Lalteside, Franklin, 
Hunger. Fairmont, Irving and Salter. 
The last two have eight grades, but 
the older br- - are playing In the 
eenior league. 

It is Director Batchelor'a i>lan to 
havp the Junior boys play every dav on 
the same grounds with the teams from 
the senior league, so that the two 
leagues can complete their schedules 
on Nov. 4. The younger boys will play 
between halves, in order that the di- 
rector and his aattlstants will be able 
to supervise all the games. 

WISCONSIN MAY OFFER 
REWARD FOR M URDERER 

Madison. Wis.. Sept. 30.— Col. R. B. 
Ptxlf-y of thp governor's staff, left for 
Kilbourn today to meet Governor 
Philipp for a conference with regard 
to the offer of a reward of $500 for the 
apprehension of the murderers of Capt. 
and Mrs. Robert Mueller, who were 
elain at Puck.-iway lake. Green Lake 



bic, according 
the ordluance. 



to provLilonH 



n 



^ot(ie;Cl&¥cni^ 



The Store for Service. 
113-115-117-119 Wcm Superior 
Uuloth. Nlnn. 



St., 




Only 



Two More 
of the 
Semi-Annual 



Days 



Drug Sale 



. . . . 9Z.su 

67« 



Lay in a liberal supply now, 
and here at the lowest prices 
for another halt year. 

Mail orders filled if accom- 
panied by remittance. Goods 
will be sent by express, charges 
collect. 

Horlkk's Malted Milk, hospital 

.size $2.80 

SI. 00 LLsterlne \ 

$1 lM>ttle Horpklde. . . . F 

$1.00 Danderine i 

$1 I»ierce'8 Prescription ) 

25c Tiz for Tired Feet • 18c 

50c DoanV Kidney Pills 37c 

50c Sal Hepatica 39c 

25c Sal Hepati<-a 15c 

$1.00 Sal Hepatica 85c 

HoiT'8 25c German Liniment. . . . i5c 
Can>enter's 10c Liquid Court 

Plaster • . . 7c 

50c Bronio Seltier S4c 

Horlick's Malted Milk — 

$ 1 .00 size 75c 

25c E.vtract of Witch Hazel, ex- 
tra stroug • 15c 

35c Fletcher's Casloria 23c 

Stuart's 50c Dyspep-.ia Wafers. .34c 
50c Califonda Syrup of Figrs. . .33c 

50c Canthrox SOc 

25c Bromo Seltzer 17c 

l_, H» Absorbent Cotton 2'Ac 

Peroxide of 
Irogen 



Hydi 



4 

8 
16 



(Mallinckrodfs) 
oz. bottle.... 7c — regularly 15c 
oz. bottle. . . .15c — regularly 25c 
oz. bottle. . . .27o — regularly 50c 



Prep 



Tooth 
arations 



\7c 



25c Calox Tooth Pow- 
der 

25c Koly-nos Tooth 
Paste 

25c Sozodont Tooth 
Wiwh 

f 25c Rubifoam 
V ^ ^^ ) 25c ^nitol Tooth 
liCi ra«te 

[ 25o Sanitol Tooth Wash 

25o Dr. Graves' Tooth Powder. .14c 

25c Coljcate's Tootli Paste 20c 

60c Pebecco Tootli Paste 37c 

25c Kuthj-mol Tooth Paste 15c 

Tooth Brushes 

35o Rubborset Tooth Brushes. .17c 
35c Prophylactic Tooth Brushes.25c 

Talcum Powders 

25c BabcQCk's Corylopsls Tal- 

ctun . 15c 

25c Jap R*)se Talcum Powder. .10c 

Mennen's Talcum Powder 12c 

25c Hygenol Violet Talcum Pow- 
der 12c 

Ebony and Rostwood 

Hair Brushes 

A special lot of re^idar $1.00 and 
$1.25 Bruslu's, 6pecial. . .... ■60c 



of *, 

eOOD ADVANCES 

IN THE COPPERS 

Strength Is Brought About 

Through Fresh Buying 

of Copper Metal. 

Mining stocks at Boston were 
strongrer and more active than in some 
time back today. Sharp advances were 
scored by some of the leading Issues. 

Copper metal sales were reported at 
18 »^ cents. 

Copper Range was a feature, ad- 
vancing $2.12 to a close of $67.26. 
Granby also developed strength clos- 
ing $1.50 up at $86.50. 

American Zinc closed 25 cents up at 
$55.26; Butte & Superior 63 cents up at 
$60.75; Calumet & Arizona $2 up at $64; 
'-rreene-Cananea 25 cents up at $37.75; 
Mohawk $1.50 up at $74.50; North Butte 
62 cents up at $30.38; Shattuck 60 cents 
up at $27.50 and Anaconda $1.50 up at 
$74. 

« • * 

Lake copper sold at 18 V4 cents at 
New York today. 

* • * 

At St. Louis lead closed strong at 
4.45 cents, and spelter at 14.50 cents. 

* • « 

Paine. Webber & Co. had the follow- 
ing from New York: "It appears that 
the unprecedented favorable underly- 
ing conditions which exists has begun 
to appeal to a widening circle of peo- 
ple, many of whom have never specu- 
lated before. Such conditions carry 
both great promise and serious men- 
ace." 

m * * 

The Carnegie Lead & Zinc company 
Is now operating double shift at its 
property at Cananea, Mex. 

A wire received at the offices of the 
company here from Its president, R. 
P. Burgan. said: 

"Left Cananea this morning for 
home.. All Is well and quiet. They are 
getting out concentrates nicely. Load- 
ed one car of lead. Have two more 
to load and also two cars of zinc and 
nearly a car of copper. The mine is 
running full double shift. The wet 
mill Is going double shift and dry mill 
double first. Twenty-six tons of con- 
centrates were handled In the last 
double shift." 

It Is estimated that the last cars 
shipped from the mine will bring 
$17,100 gross in lead, zinc and copper. 
President Burgan is reported to have 
made a favorable zinc contract with 
the same Interests who took the ore 
before the plant shut down two years 

ago. 

* ♦ • 

Closing quotations of Boston curb 
stocks as reported to Paine, WebbM- 
^ Co.: Bid. Asked. 

Butte & London $ -30 

Bohemia 2.00 

Braden 900 

Big Ledge 2.87 

Calumet & Montana 60 

Alex Scott 8.38 

Coppermlnes I'^o 

Chief 88 

Carnegie Lead & Zinc 

Cliff •••• 

Davis Daly K-'-o 

Denn ,v;A 

Interstate Callahan ^tc^ 

First National 2.60 

Jumbo Extension l,-5 

Kf^ating L7P 

Ntw Baltic 2.87 

Now Cornelia 8.76 

Onondaga lo" 

Rainbow • • • 

San Antonio ^£0 

Stewart 6^ 

Success -87 

Tonopah o°> 

Tonopah Belmont 3.63 

Tonopah Extension ... 
Vorde Extension 



versltles. But the ihterests of our 
neighbors to thte south have been 
greatly enlarged, and now Include the 
United States moi-e than ever before.) 
Growing Eateem 

Ssnor Darlo has borne witness to the* 
growing esteem for Poe, Longfellow 
and Hawthorne in South America. Ac- 
Qualntance with our business enter- 
prises has kindled curiosity as to our j 
general culture. aWd the Increased La- ; 
tin-American attendance at our unl- ! 
versltles has been h^i'table. All this It 
would be profitable to think of recipro- 
cating. 

The broadening stream of South 
American contributions to thought is 
euro sooner or later to draw attention. 
The work of the Argentinean, Drago, 
In International law is known. Educa- 
tors, economists and sociologists South . 
America has. On purely abstract 
grounds it inight be wished that con- 
temporary South American literature 
could find here a summary review like 
that given now and then in Berlin's 
Llterarische Echo. The bureau of edu- 
cation recently reported 278 collegiate 
institutions teaching courses in Span- 
ish, New York alone having twenty- 
five; while there was one high school In 
Brooklyn In which 1,400 boys were 



•Kansas City Times: If literature 
follows the flag of trade, our im- 
proving relations with South Amer- 
ica may result in a better acquaint- 
ance with its literary life. Our 
chilling indifference was illustrated 
recently when her greatest poet, 
Ruben Darlo. paid a visit to New 
York, and the public, . the press, 
and even literary and artistic cir- 
cles took almost no notice. The 
case to the New York Evening 
Post seems aggravated by the fact 
that Darlo came in a seml-publlc 
capacity to strengthen Pan-Ameri- 
can literary relations as well aa to 
lecture on international peace. The 
rebuke Is ironically pointed to by 
the Evening Post In declaring that 
such treatment "argues neglect of 
the literary verdicts even of Eu- 
rope." This may seem worse to 
some than bad manners, comments 
the Literary Digest, Because — 

For years Darlo has been honored 

In his native Nicaragua, In his half 

adopted Argentina, in Madrid, where 

he served as Nicaraguan minister, and 

In Parla. where he has long lived. His 

chief books have been translate^ into 

French. The Atheneum has reviewed 

his writings, and in England a trunsla- j studying the language. Their students.^ 

tion of some Is soon to appear. But | primarily concerned with South Amer- , 

North American indifference to him Is lea, should some day present a field ; 




but a sample of our ignorance of al 
most everything in Latin-American llt- 
ei^ture and art. What does the average 
American know of the literary history 
of our Southern neighbors? Such scraps 
as that Alarcon was born in Mexico or 
that Jose Marti was a man of letters as 
well as a Cuban patriot. 

"Great Ameriean Novel.'' 
Only last year we had Ougiieimo Fer- 
rero's overenthusiostic announcement 
that the great American novel had at 
last been written — In Brazil. He re- 
ferred to the "Canaan" of.Aranha, a 
novel dealing with the Interplay of Old 
World and New World forces, the 
Americanization of Europe and the Eu- 
ropeanlzation of America. It Is true 
that Europe has every reason to know 
more of these writers than we. Up to 
1824 the undisputed intellectual capital 



encouraging the distribution of South j 
American books and periodicals. 

The Interchange of travelers Is year- 
Ij' becoming greater, the number of col- ] 
lege courses in the political and eco- . 
nomlc history of South America is In- | 
creasing, and there are already one or 1 
two vigorous learned societies of a I 
Pan-American characterr The move- 
ment will make head slowly, and prob- 
ably will not have real literary en- 
thusiasm for years. But with the day 
at hand when anything touching In a| 
commercially valuable way upon Latin- 
American affairs is read with avidity, 
literary relationships are sure to be 
established. 

More Thnn Proximity. 

The mere reason of proximity Is not 
the only reason wh^' this Is desirable. 
It is desirable because we can learn 



of South America was Madrid, and i something from South American clvlli- 
since that date its rival has been Paris. ] zatlon, and achieve something in co- 
Dario himself, Jose Maria de Heredia, I operation with it. Our indifference to 
the Cuban bom member of the French I the work of the Latin-American rises 
academy, are typical of a considerable 1 less from their poverty In original 
class of authors attracted abroad not writers than from our ignorance of the 



only for study, but for residence. 
With but a slight debt In science to 



special features of their life. No North 
American would find much interest in 



Germany, South Americana naturally 1 Aranha's tale of Brazilian immigration, 
look for their main Ideas and Inspira- or In a study of society on the pampas, 
tiona to Spain and to Italy and France, ( or in the Amazon forests. The founda- 



3.63 
2.60 



.31 
2.26 
9.25 
3.12 

.62 

v. 8 7 
.90 

2.62 
.40 

1.25 
10.12 

V.75 
1.38 
2.00 
3.12 
9.00 
1.76 
8.75 

' .75 

.89 
6.12 
3.87 
3.87 
2.75 



akin in race and tongue. The cur- 
rents of travel help maintain the 
mutual interest. When the Spanish- 
American writer has time and money, 
he thinks as instinctively of Europe 
as, until recently, young Spanish- 
Americans thought of European unl- 



tlon of common knowledge has been 
wanting. Yet wlthi the tightening of 
commercial and political bo^ids, there 
must come a better social understand- 
ing between the two peoples, and this 
will pave the way to a juster literary 
appreciation on both sides. 




A w»lrd. fantastic alory 1» current In Riialand that 
the BritifiU retreat from Mons \ras fariUtated by th« 
Interrention of a gliosUy host of Eligllnh bowmen— the 
Identlf^l yeomarin'. It arpfars, who won U>« day at 
Aglr.pourt. It Is an iiiteresthig commentary on th« 
naliotiai eta.U of mlnit In nn embattled country that 
this extraordinary story has not (JnJy l»«n honored 
wUU wide creilence by Mat«smen, edentUta, church- 
men and psychologUts. Imt the p^isaltrtlliy of mlrarle^ 
cf the sort ha.n been gravely discussed by BerwaJ con 
aervatlTo joumal-i — the New Sut^sman. for example. 

Moreover, there eeema to tuive been little abatement 
of intereet In tlie story, despite the fact that ArUiur 
Machen. a contributor tn a London evening paper, baa 
confessed that he lUm.wJf waa tlie auUK* ot tt.e 
tal», which he calls a "little easay In allegory." 
"liverybjdy." he aay.i. "would have It that the taie 
was true. Tbo clergy said so. The army eald bo. 
Tlie occultists said so. * • • It was quite a 



( as if they had been shooting at Bis- 

ley. 
I "GaMd Help Uaf 

t Suddenly one of these lifted up his 

I voice in plain English. "Gawd help 

I us!" he bellowed to the man next him, 

j "but we're blooming marvels. Look 

! at those gray gentlemen! liOok at 

Tl them! .They're not going down in 

dozens or hundreds — in thousands it 

Is! Look, look! There's a regiment 

gone while I'm talking to ye!" • 

"Shut It!" the other soldier bellowed, 
taking aim. "What are ye talking 
about?" But he gulped with aston- 
ishment even while Itie spoke, for, in- 
deed, the gray men were falling by 
the thousands. The English could hear 

rs 

nie 

e 




SOORE OF LIVES 

LOST AT FRENiER 

Whites and Negroes Vic- 

trms of Storm Which 

Swept Louisiana. 

Memphis, Tenn., Sept. 30. — Seven or 
eight white persons and seventeen 
negroes were drowned and a score 
more Injured at Frenier. La.. In -yes- 
terday's storm, according to reports to 
the office of the general superintend- 
ent of the Yazoo & Mississippi Valley 
railroad here today. 



BRITISH GRANT SAFE 

CON DUCT T O DUMBA 

"Washington, Sept. 30. — Sir Cecil 
Spring-Rice, the British ambassador, 
personally delivered to Acting Secre- 
tary Polk at the state department to- 
day a safe conduct under which Dr. 
Constantln Dumba, the Austrian am- 
bassadolh, will return to Vienna. 

The department asked for the safe 
conduct some days ago, when Dr. Dum- 
ba telegraphed from the summer em- 
bassy at Lenox, Mass., that he had 
been ordered home and requested that 
arrangements for his safe conduct be 
made. 

SIX ZEPPELINS FLY 

TOWARD ENGLAND 

London, Sept. 30. — Six Zeppelin dirig- 
ible balloon* were sighted today over 
Aerschot, twenty-three miles northeast 
of Brussels. The airships Jfere bound 
in a westerly direction. This infor- 
mation was contained in a dispatch 
from Amsterdam to the Central News 
agency. 

Due west of Aerschot lies Dover and 
the English channel. 



♦- 



^ 



CABLES TO FRANCE 

WI LL BE DELAYED 

New York, Sept. 30. — An announce- 
ment that may be fraught with signi- 
ficance because of the military activity 
in France, was made by the cable com- 
panies here today. ^ m . , . 

It stated that the French administra- 
tion has given notice that on account 
of military necessities cablegrams to 
France and through that country will 
be subjected to indefinite delay. 
• 

Aaaerlrans Decorated. 

Nish, Serbia, Sept. 30, via London. — 
Crown Prince Alexander has decorated 
forty-three American physicians and 
sanitary engineers In recognition of 
their services in stopping the epidemics 
which broke out in Serbia after the 
war began. The Americans decorated 
are representatives of the Rockefeller 
foundation and the Amerlcaa Red 
CroSfc 



Uie August number of the North American Rovlew by 
the Hon. Mrs. St. John Mlldnia.y. a relief worker 
auiimg Uie wounded in London. In her yeislon of the 
romanUc liioldent, Mrs. Jnidmajr makes no mention 
of the facts in the preceding paragraplM, nor doea 
she mwOlou anj Mr. Maclien. bin auota» the stnry 
frum "a leUcr xthidi lies liefore me now," ostensibly 
wriUeu by a soliUer at liie front. The conteiiU of 
the letter are aa follows: 

During the retreat of the 80,000 on 
that most awful day of an awful time, 
when ruin and disaster came so near 
that their shadows fell over London 
far away, without any certain news, 
the hearts of men failed them and 
grew faint, as if the agony of their 
brothers on the battle field had en- 
tered into their souls. 

Three hundred thousand Germans In 
arms, with all their artillery, swelled 
like a flood against the little English 
anny, and not only was 'It at time of 
danger, not merely of defeat, but of 
utter annihilation. ♦ • • 

The men joked at the shells and 
found funny names for them, and 
greeted them with music hall songs, as 
they screamed in this terrible cannon- 
ade laying low the flower of the Eng- 
lish army. They saw from their 
trenches a tremendous host moving 
against these lines. Five hundred of 
the thousand who held the crucial posi- 
tion remained, and as far as they could 
see the German infantry was pressing 
on agalpst them, column by column, a 
gray world of men, 10,000 of them, as 
it appeared afterward. 

No Hope at All. 
Tliere was no hope at all. Some of 
our men shook hands. One man Im- 
provised a riew version of the battle 
song, "Tipperary," ending, "and we 
shan't get there!" And they all went 
on firing steadily. The officers point- 
ed out that such an opportunity for 
fancy shooting might never occur 
again; the Germans dropped line after 
line, while the few machine guns did 
their best. Everyone knew it was of 
no use. The dead gray bodies lay In 
companies and battalions, but others 
came on a»d on, swarming and advanc- 
ing from beyond and beyond. 

"World without end. Amen," said one 
of the British soldiers, with some Ir- 
relevance, as he took aim and fired. 
Then he rememJaered a vegetarian res- 
taurant in London, where he had once 
or twice eaten queer dishes of cutlets 
made of lentils a^d nuts that pre- 
tended to be steaks. On all the plates 
in this restaurant a figure of St. 
George waa printed In blue, with the 
motto, "Adsit Anglis Sanctus Geor- 
gius" (May St. George be a present 
help to England.) ^ , , _ t *i 

The soldier happened to know Latin 
and other useless things, so now, as 
he fired at the gray advancing mass, 
800 yards away, he uttered the pious 
vegetarian motto. He went on firing 
to the end, till at last Bill, on his 
right, had to clout him cheerfully on 
thehead, pointing otit as he did so 
that the king's ammunition cost 

'"°"®^* Felt the Presence. 

Now as the Latin scholar uttered his 
Invocation he felt something between 
a shudder and an electric shock pass 
through his body. ^ The roar of tho 
battle died down In his ears to a 
gentle murmur, and Instead of It, he 
fays he heard a great voice, louder 
than a thunder peal, crying "Array! 

Array!" 

"St. George: 
sire. Ha' 



Quick to our aid! St. George help us 

The singing arrows dark-ened the 
air, the heathen hordes melted before 
them. "More machine guns!" Bill 
yelled to Tom. "Don't hear them!" 
Tom yelled back, "but thank God, 
anyway, they have got it in the 
neck." 

No ^^''onndii Dlsocemlblr. 
In fart, there were 10,000 dead Ger- 
man soldiers left before that salient 
of the English arm.v, and eonse- 
quently — no Sedan. In Germany, a 
country ruled by scientitflc principles, 
the great general staff decided that 
the contemptible English must have 
employed turpentlte shells, as no 
wounds were discernible on the bodies 
of the dead soldiers. 

But the man that knew what nut? 
tasted like when they called them- 
selves steak, knew also that St. 
George had brought his Aglncourt 
bowmen to help the English in their 
hour of need. 



St. George! Ha; Mes- 
Sweet Saint! Grant us good 
Hpliverancel St. George for Merrle 
Eni^and" Harow! Harowl Monseig- 
neur 8t. George, succor us Ha! St. 
Georce! A long bow and a strong bow. 
Sn°St of Helven aid ust St. George 
for Merrle England! 

As the soldier heard these voices, 
ho saw before him, beyond the trench, 
a Ion? line of shapes with a shining 
about them. They were as men who 
drew the bcw, the long bow of Eng- 
and with another shout their 
of arrows flew s Inglng artd 



CU RIOSIT Y. 

Chicago News: *'I wish you would 
tell me," said Mrs. Vuttfl to her hus- 
band, "why it is that "When Mrs. Bazel 

asks questions you resent it and when 
Mrs. De Light asks them your are 
pleased to explain in detail." 

"Well," responded Vutts, "Mrs. Bazel 
has a collection of mannerisms that 
make her unbearable wl>en she asks 
a question. But Mrs. De Light is a 
peach!" 

"Am I to understand then that ques- 
tions are Impertinent .Vhen asked by 
homely people like Mrs. Bazel and 
therefore warrant snubs, but when 
pretty people ask them they are mere- 
ly showing polite interest that is 
worthy of a polite answer? It that 
the Idear* 

"Something like that. There Is a 
difference between curiosity and po- 
lite Interest. 

"Now, a cow Is an example of of- 
fensive curiosity. The way a cow 
looks at you Is Insulting. She has an 
expression a« she chews her cud 
placidly as if we bored her consider- 
ably, even though she condescends to 
look at us. She wears the expression 
that you and your friend, Mrs. 
Fuschia, have when regarding some 
one who Is 'queer looking." 

"But a dog or a horse never as- 
sumes such" an expression. Theirs Is 
one of polite Interest. They appear 
Interested in us. but not at all critical. 
The difference is in tTie expression. 

"I once knew a man who wore an 
umbrella out lambasting a fellow who 
looked at him In a sa-nsy manner. 

"Th* man was a stranger Just ar- 
rived In a small town. There* were 
some other people who looked at him, 
some girls and others, and he didn't 
get R bit mad. They were not In- 
sulting In their curiosity. But this 
one particular fellow made him so 
angry that he couldn't keep his hands 
off. 

"Once I was a stranger In a strange 
land and didn't like the way a native 
stared at me. He stared at me so that 
I set down the bowl of fish I was 
carrying beside the bird cage and the 
bundle of laundry I had and said: 

" "My friend, there Is no use look- 
ing at me so closely. You are wasting 
the precious moments. I am just an 
ordlnarv Individual and these things 
I am " carrying are Just ordinary 
things.'" 

"Did anv girls look at you? If they 
did I suppose that was all right. From 
a man's point of view a girl is In the 
dog and horse class, her curiosity is 
Interest, even fas<»lnatlon. But a 
brother man is In the cow class. Is 
that it, Mr. Vutts?" 






Bread like this is a staple, every-day food in the homes 
of the healthiest familicts in America. With your 
next order of our white bread get a loaf or two of 

California Raisin Bread 

Made With SUN-MAID Raisins 

It is baked in our chian, modern bakery according 
to a prize recipe which makes it far more delicious 
than any other raisin bread you have ever tasted and 
it is more nutritious than any other bread. 

Your children will eat more bread if you give them 
this kind. They will eat it without butter, like cake. 
It is both good and good for them. Some people are 
not so healthy as they ouj^ht to be because they do not 
eat enough bread. Such people will eat enough bread 
if you give them California Raisin Bread made with 
SUN-MAID Raisins. Try it and see. Order a loaf of 
this bread from your dealer today. 

Zinsmaster-Smith Bread Co. 



mmHimMHrn 



NOTHING COULD STOP 
BRITISH SOLDIERS 

Charge of Troops on Village 
of Loos a Glorious 
Exploit. - 

London, Sept. 30. — A correspondent of 
Reuter's agency sends the following 
dispatch from the British headquarters 
under the date of Tuesday, describing 
the fighting in the great offensive of 
the allies on the western front: 

"The first charge made by our men 
from the Vermelles trenches in th*^ 
gray light of Saturday morning, which 
carried them right through the village 
of Loos and to the summit of Hill 70 
and bey«nd, will rank as one of the 
most glorious exploits of the British 
army. 

"Nothing could stop them. Two 
German trenches defending the vil- 
lage fell first; then a race across open 
country and they were In the streets 
of Loos. Some hand-to-hand fighting 
with bombs and bayonets and then out 
of the village again to the slope of 
Hill No. 70, about half a mile to the 
east. "The last desperate rush toolc 
them to the summit, some going even 
beyond unchecked by a strong earth- 
works defense with numerous machine 
guns. 

"One man said that In the trenches 
around the town, the German dead in 
some places were piled four deep. 
Many cellar.? contained Germans seek- 
ing protection from the bomlwirdment, 
and Into the houses dashed the bomb 
throwers. They pulled up the flap of 
the cellars and drcjpped In a couple of 
bombs. In one dugout a German offi- 
cer w^as found with a telephone re- 
ceiver at his ear. He had been direct- 
ing the fire of the German artillery on 
the village after the British occupied 
it. The village itself was badly dam- 
aged." 



COULD YOU HICCOUGH WAY 
FROM NEW YORK TO CHICAGO? 



INSPECTOR WITNESS 
IN THE ROBUN CASE 



land, 
cloud 



whirring through the air toward the 
?^».l^or, hn.^t. The other men In the 



German host. 

trenches were firing 

They had no hope, but they aimed Just 



all the while. 



HERALD ADS AND 
RESULTS ARE TWIN 
BROTHERS - 



L. Villeroy Gives Evidence 
on Lumber Used in Build- 
ing Caissons. 

Winnipeg. Man., Sept. 30. — L. Ville- 
roy, one of the government inspectors 
on the parliament buildings construc- 
tion, was a witness today at the pre- 
liminary hearing of Sir Rodmond Rob- 
lin and three other former cabinet 
ministers charged with conspiracy to 
defraud the province In erecting these 
buildings. 

Mr: Villeroy testified that not more 
than 60,000 feet of lumber and forty 
tons of iron had been used in the con- 
struction of the caissons. It was the 
custom, he said, to use the lumber 
which lined the caissons and the rings 
which encircled them more than once. 
Kelly & Sons, contractors, claimed to 
have' used 2.300,000 feet of lumber and 
797% tons of Iron in this work. 

Under cross-examination Mr. Vil- 
leroy said his figures were mereiy es- 
timates and that he had no exact 
knowledge. . x,. x ,. -^ m 

Mr Villeroy testified that he had 
helped measure the caissons and none 
had exceeded five feet In depth. The 
concrete used was In the proportion 
of one part cement to eight 01 aand, 
gravel and stone. He believed between 
18 000 and 19.000 cubic yards of con- 
crete went Into the caissons. 

F W Simon, the English architect, 
did not complete his evidence and will 
be called ag ain tomorrow. 

FOREIGN POLKTToF 
PRESi DEMT INDORSED 

Omaha, Neb., Sept. 30. — After heated 
discussion. In which charges of "treason- 
able utterances" were made, the Farm- 
ers' National congress today adopted 
resolutions indorsiing President Wil- 
son's foreign policy. The resolution In- 
troduced by Frank Q. O'Dell of Omah. 
waa adopted. 



One Man Did II 
Fifteen Mil 
meters She 
New York. 

John N. Whi 
Sun: Pedomet 
say at their cl 
around New Y 
You cin't alw; 
wearing one tc 
pulent folks *' 
but still the be 
them, especiall; 
are a little bit 

"I'm awful a 
declared a man 
took the longei 
this week, and 
pedometer whe 
morning. Wei 
the distance an 
when I go hom 
health and too 
afternoon all r 

It isn't old- 
more. The dO' 
progress on Sh 
man feel like c 
or a woman 11 
sulfragist, so t! 
ed. 

Some P 

The standard 
every day is 
the usual preS' 
most of the d: 

The pedomet 
not unlike a v 
generally hung 
line. It is ac 
stride as the . 
to the size of t: 
I have been to 
adjusted to ch< 
speedometers 
motion of the 
meter up and d 
the rest. 

A friend of 1 
health in wall< 
it one night wl 
terlng machine 
made twenty n 

"I don'h thin 
today," he mus 

"Where did 
asked him. lik 
ways looking 

"With Irvin 
have you hear- 
about his expei 
Laugh* 

" 'Why, thej 
chance to be ii 
Glared Cobb, 
been there foi 
are walking 1 
all the time w 
and some of t 
too. A man 
privacy than a 



, and Another Laughed 
es, or So Their Pedo- 
ved— The Fad Has Hit 



'ol^r in the New York 
ers, so the physicians 
ub,' are all the fashion 
ork and environs now. 
lys get a man who Is 

admit it, like the cor- 
iio put on health belts, 
3t dressers are affecting 
r the best dressers who 
Dver weight, 
ore at myself tonight," 
confidentially to me. "I 
t walk today I've made 

I forgot to put on my 
n I got dressed this 
1, I'll have to guess at 
J set it ahead that much 
) tonight. I put on some 
it off some weight this 
ight." 

fashioned to walk any 
;tors have asserted that 
ink's old mare makes a 
tiallenging Jess Willard, 
ke becoming a militant 
le sidewalks are crowd- 

['doiuetem Cheat. 

distance to be walked 
;en miles, according to 
;rlptlons handed out by 
seeming "docs." 
er is a small machine, 
"^rist watch In size, but 

on or about the waist 
justed to the wearer's 
?peedometer Is adjusted 
le motor car wheel. But 
Id some pedometers are 
:at, as, indeed, are some 
and taximeters. The 
Dody joggling the pedo- 
own with each step does 

nine who Is looking for 
ing couldn't understand 
en he took off the regis- 

and discovered he had 
lies that day. 
t I have walked that far 
ed. 

,-ou eat your dinner." I 
e William J. Bur^s, al- 
'or a clew. 

Cobb." he replied. "And 
i that new story of his 
ience In the hospital?" 
d F^lfteen Miles. 

don't give a guy a 
I a private hospital,' de- 
You know he has just 

an operation. 'Nurses 
n and out of the room 
Ithout being announced, 
nem very pretty nurses, 
doesn't have any more 

goldfish, and a goldfish 



in a glass aquarium Is the last word 
in exposure." " 

"Did you think that funny?" I asked 
my friend. 

"The best thing I've heard In 
years." he replied. "I laughed until 
my sides ached." 

"And you probably laughed about 
fifteen miles right onto your pedo- 
meter incidentally," I told him. 

"I never thought of that," he an- 
swered. 

Hiccoughed Himaelf to Chicago. 

Of course, a lot of these followers 
of the latest craze do not take all 
conditions into consideration. Some 
of them dance, which runs up thf^lr 
standing In the league. Others fre- 
quently walk with young women and, 
in accommodating a stride to the 
length and rapidity of the young 
woman's, the pedometer Just races. 
Also marking time on the pavement 
outside a stage door runs up the clock 
the same as when a taxlcab stands 
still with the motor going. 

Various other elements confuse the 
returns. Tliere is the case of the man 
with the hiccoughs who hiccoughed 
himself as far as Chicago before h« 
got himself under control. 

ESIght Miles at Dice. 

It Isn't hard to fool the pedometer. 
A friend of mine who la in the latest 
stvle got to shaking d'.^e one evening 
rrid the pedometer sho , ed eight miles 
when he got through. But if he had 
had a cash register to note his win- 
nings it wouldn't have been bothered 
at all. It might as well have been 
di-ai. He didn't need any. 

This pedometer thing is not a bad 
idea in many particulars. If you can 
induce your wife to wear one and get 
her enthusiastic you will save a 'ot of 
carfare. It Is worth trying, as tha 
Initial Investment Is not large. Phe 
might like it as well as dancmg. al- 
though I doubt It. 

Don't be surprised If you should se« 
a man or a woman pounding his heels 
a little hard when he walks. They ara 
trying to emphasize the steps and got 
them positively registered. Aa I hav» 
said, it is a tend<^r subject, as is a 
boy's first love aff.-ilr or a health celt. 
It is a sort of secret. But when pedo- 
,neter wearers do gather and talk of 
their accomplishments, golf play^r.q, 
poker experts and summer lesort gos- 
sips have nothing on tli^m. 

BERLIN TAKES .ADVANCE 
OF ALLIES SERIOUSLY 

Copenhagen, Sept. 30, via London. — 
"News of the offensive on the west- 
ern front Is taken very seriously here." 
says the Berlin correspondent of th* 
Politiken. 

The Tageblatt remarks that nothing 
would be more foolish than to over- 
look the terrible seriousness of th« 
recent battles in the west and that It 
would be equally wrong for German* 
not to have fullest confidence in their 
troops and leaders. 




te:e;th 

THAT FIT-THAT WEAR 
THAT LOOK WELL 



^ 



If we make you a set of teeth you can be 
sure of lasting satisfaction. We know how 
to constrict a plate that will restore your lost features. These plates 
are knowr. as Refetoratton Plates. The prices range from $5.00 to $8.00. 
Gold Crowns and Fillings will restore badly decayed teeth to normal 
usefulness. See us at once if you require dental work. All work guar- 
anteed fo:: ten years. 
GOLDCflOWNS .. 
WHITE CROWNS.. 
BRIDGE WORK.... 




PLATES $5 and $8 

FILLINGS (Silver)... 50c 



^ 



BOSTON DENTAL CO. 

Telephone — Melrose 7259. 
216 V^EST SUPERIOR ST.— Opposite Grand Theater. 



:^ 




1 



-JE>*"- 



*'^ ■« V.^il LJTOB 



y wi ^ ta ^i^sfww 



I ■ ■ ■ -1 i . ■ 







r\ 



^* 






12 



Thursday, 



tHE DULUTH HERALD 



September 30, 1915. 



Baseball 
Rowing 




News and Views of the Sport World 



B II-.L.I AlRDS 



GOLF 



B O W LINO 



^>i 




PARAGRAPH COMMENT 
OF THE SPORTING FUSS 




BY BRUCE. 

0\V. gentlemen,, we have the 
plaint of Sammy Harris. 
Who is Sammy Harris? 
Why he is the manager of 
"that well known and sterling 
little man. Kid Williams, a Dane like 
Battling Nelson, and tough like the 
Battler. Well, what about Harris? 
He wants to re-match Williams 
against Ertle and declares his will- 
ingness to wager $10,000 that Will- 
iams wili 5^top Ertle. if the bout is 
scheduled for tweTity rounds. Friends, 
take this from us: If these boys ever 
meet over the twtnty-round route, 
take the ccf^k stove out and hock it 
and bet the net returns on Williams. 
This little Baltimore Dane is one 
of the realest fighting men you ever 
saw. He had I£rtle beaten when they 
• • ■* well when they told Will- 
iams that he had been disqualified. 

We have a very high regard for 
Johnny Ertle: he's a great little fel- 
low — but say, it's our candid opinion 
that he never saw the day he could 
lick this fighting firebrand from the 
East. There are a lot of persons in 

St. Paul v.ho think the same way. 

♦ • • 

Mercy, Clarence! 

"I won' I win!" the boxer cried, "I 

* surely won the match. 
"For tec I give dear Freddy there a 

very painful scratch." 
But Freddy made a hot reply, that 

rose above the strife. 
And in loud and angry tones declared 

he got it from his wife. 

♦ * ^ 
More Experimenting. 

PrtMdcnt Louis D^w of the Capi- 
tal City Athletic club of St. Paul is 
quoted as saying that the next show- 
given by the Saintly City boxing or- 
ganization will be staged at popular 
price:- 

One and two dollars will be 
charged, according to the announce- 
ment cut loose from its leash. By 
reducing the prices the officials of 
the club hope to pack the spacious 
auditorium to its solid oaken doors. 

Lt-ckstenped v.ith the announce- 
ment of the reduction of gate money, 
lopcb along the statement that Al 
Palzcr will probably figure on the 

next card of the club. 

• • ♦ 

They Were Both Good Boys. 
Kid .\lcxander roved the plains in 

days that used to be, 
And ch.ised the Persians and the 

Greeks, says dear old History. 
But Aleck didn't have a thing on a 

guy that bears his nan>e — 

The one who whiffs the batters in the 

well known baseball game. 
« « • 

Reports from Chicago state that 

Paci^ey McFjifland cleaned up $30,- 

o«<o r,n a bull movement in steel. We 

were aware of the fact that Packey 

had cleaned up a lot of money on a 

bv.ll movement in the boxing game. 

• * • 

Speaking of bull movements, what's 

become of Tom Tones since he of- 

ferrd to bet $10,000 on Ad Wolgast? 
« * « 

The quickest way to start civil 



warfare between Nebraska and Iowa, 
would be to match Frank Gotch and 

young Joe Stecher. 

* * • 

They say English fighting men 
don't know when to quit. We have 
the case of Bombardier Wells in 

mind. 

* * « 

Hugh Fullerfon declares that he 
can generally pick winning baseball 

teams. Well, then, why don't he? 

* « * 

He swings, he jabs, he pounds my 

face, and all the time I laugh; 
W'hy no, I'm not exactly scared, and 

yet I stand the gaff; 
For listen, get me, understand, he's 

only eight month's old. 
My Kid? Why sure, the greatest 

yet — but then I guess I've told. 



WORKING HARD FOR 
TWO HARBORS GAME 



NATIONAL LEABUE~| 




TONIGHT 

AT OLD ARMORY 

Given by Co. E. Helmers orches- 
tra. 50c per couple. Door rights 
reserved. 



Fight Getting Close. 

Pittsburgh, Pa.. Sept. SO.— With the 
defeat of Pittsburgh by Chicago yes- 
terday and the victory of Kansas City 
over St. Louis, the Federal league race 
haa become clo«er, only half a game 
separating the local club from the 
other two. The score here yesterday 
was 6 to 3, the locals losing the game 
owing to the wlldness of the pitchers 
and Kclley's two errors. 

With the score 3 to 1 In Pittsburgh's 
favor at the openlaig of the sixth. Allen 
got the first two rnen j,ut, then Zwill- 
Ing singled and stole second. Wilson 
was passed and Handford, batting for 
Pfckous, was al.so walked, filling the 
bases. Conistock relieved Allen arid 
after passing Mann, who forced Zwill- 
Ing in, frave way to DlcksoTi, who 
walked Fischer, forcing Wilson over 
with the tying run. Kelly then 
dropped Doolan's long fly, and Hand- 
ford and Mann scored, giving Chicago 
four runs on one hit, a pass and an er- 
ror. Score: R. H. E. 

ChJcago 010410 0—6 5 

Pittsburgh 10011000 0—8 7 2 

BatlerlfS — McConnell, Brown and 
Wilson, Fischer; Allen, Comstock, 
Dickson. Barger and O'Connor. 



Buffalo Beats Brooklyn. 

Brooklyn, N. Y.. Sept. 30. — Buffalo 
took the first game of the series from 
Brooklyn, 7 to 6, yesterday. The game 
w^as replete with poor fielding and in- 
effective pitching. Score: R. H. E. 

Buffalo 4 1 0*0 2 0—7 7 2 

Brooklyn 05 0010 00 — 6 9 1 

Batteries — Bedient, F. Anderson and 
Blair; Finneran, Walker and H. Smith. 



Kawfeds Score Shut-out. 

St. Louis, Mo., Sept. 30.— St. Louis 
•was def<-atfd by Kansas City 1 to 




Mellow-Sweet 

— like the toothsome 
taste of a ripe fig — is 
the rich, juicy flavor 
you get in a chew of 

Spear Head. 

No other plug tobacco 
is so mellow, so luscious 
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PHILLIES WIN 
THE PENNANT 

Their Defeat of Boston 

Cinches Championstiip 

of National. 



cinnatl National League club for the j 
recovery of $1,250 which he asserts is , 
still due him as part of his contract [ 
salary for the 1913 seAson with the 
Cincinnati club. 



PAL BROWN PLANS 
TO LIVNN DULUTH 

If Chlsholm Boxer's Eyes 
Improve He Will Move 
Here; Ritchie and White 
to Meet; Mike Collins Has 
Made Good as Promoter. 



ST. PAUL TO 
PLAY IDULUTH 

Mechanics Arls and Cen- 
tral High Teams Are 
Scheduled. 



BY BRUCE. 

Pal Brown may make 



his future 



Superior Central Decides to 

Place Football Crew 

in Field. 



63 to 0. Pennsylvania ran through the- 
line and around the ends at will. Penn- 
sylvania 'resorted to straight football 
and made many changes In tiie team-, 
in order to give the men some prao- 
tlce. 



MARY PUTNEY GETS 
HEALTHY PURSE 



While the Central high school foot- 



Boston. Mass., Sept. 30. — The Phlla- 
delphians yesterday won the National 
league championship for 1915, with 
Alexander pitching a one-hit game 
against the present title-holding 
Braves. The score was 5 to 0. The 
defeat of the Braves makes It possi- 
ble for the league leaders to lose all 
their remaining games and atlll have 
clear title to first place. 

Among the spectators of the game 

pllylrl,°'^L°probabl?"fompeuTo7i^^ aggregation. Mechanics Arts school 



home In Duluth. It all depends ^a'l machine is beinfr groomed for the 
whether the Injured optics of the lit^jTwo Harbora game on Saturday, the 
tie pugilist yield to a course of treat- 1 initial scholastic scrap of the local 



ment he Is undergoing at the present 
time. Brown Is being treated la Du- 
luth. The Chisholm boxer believes 



season, the supportens of the Red and 
White eleven will te agreeably sur- 
prised when they learn of the new ad- 



that he will be back in the game ditions to the scheilule of the local 



Philadelphia in the world se'rles. Man- j If Pal docs come back — and makes 
ager Carrlgan of the Red Sox watched 1 g^ood — why he is going after Bom« of 
the play carefully. the twenty-tound bouts. 

"It seems to be a well rounded com- 1 Pal Brown started fighting in 1909. 
binatlon, but I'm sure we can beat ' So you see he has been in the ring 
them," he remarked during the game, six years. From the drift of his talk 

It was "Patsy Moran day" at the one would infer that the Chlsholm boy 



of St. Paul, with on<! of the strongest 
scholastic elevens In the Twin Cities, 
and Superior Central have at last 
been decided upon as teams that will 
be met this season. 

Lack of interest among the students 




Speedy Fall River Trotter 
Wins Horseman's Futur- 
ity in Handy Style. 

Columbus, Ohio, Sept. 80. — Charles* 
Valentine's pacers Judge Ormonde and 
Dwight Logan, shared with Mary Put- 
ney, 3-year-old trotter, honors of yes- 
terday's Grand Circuit racing. Neither 
n^cer won, each race being unflniehed. 
but Judge Ormonde did a mile In 2:02^ 
In the th'lrd heat of the Arch City rtakt- 
and Dwight Logan got two heats of tht- 
2:13 pace, stepping the second on© Ir 
2:06'^. Mary Putney earned $6,200, and 

a 1600 cup for her owner, Chauncey 
Sears, of Pall River, Mass., when she 



THE STORE FOR SERVICE. 

113-115-117-119 VVc^ Superior St^ 
Duluth, Mliiiu 



CAPTAIN PHIL WARNER. 



yesterday In a pitchers' duel. Pack- 
ard held St. LouLs to four scattered 
blngles and won his own game in the 
sixth with a home run drive over the 
right field fence. Davenport also was 
effective, allowing but four hits, but 
his teammates were unable to hit with 
men on bases. The visitors had but 
two men left on base and barring 
Packard, not one reached second. 
Score: R. H. E. 

Kansas City ...00000100 0—1 5 

St. Louis 00000000 0—0 4 

Batteries — Packard and Easterly; 
Davenport, Crandall and Hartley. 



The now champions clinched their 
honors In the first inning. Bancroft's 
single to right, and Rudolph's pass to 



"If my eyes can be cured,' said 
Brown In speaking of his plans for 
the future," 1 intend muvinj; to Da- 



Packert, was followed by Cravath's 1 luth and going after the bc-^t boys in 
home run, which brought the latter's I the game and some real monev. Its 
home run record to 23. A triple • by ; time that I started providing for the 
Paskert sent another home in the future. I'm anxious t) rctur 1 to the 
fourth and Cravath cracked a double ring, my condition is great, but I still 

see double. It s up to the doctors — 
if they can fix me. alright if they 
can't, why I guess it's back to the 
farm for Pal Brown." 

Ritchie and Whftis „^,,,, 

The announcement that Millie 
Ritchie and Charl«^y White will prob- 
ably meet again, recalls the fact that 
White so narrowly missed becoming 
the lightweight champion of the world 
that it must give the little Hebrew 
and Manager Nate Lewis a sick feel- 
ing every time they recall the Mil- 
waukee bout. , , J, 
In the first round V/hlte hooked 
that Justly famous left of his to 



to left and Ludoras a single there for 
a fifth run in the swenth Inning. 
Score: /; - R. H. E. 

Philadelphia ...300100100—510 1 

Boston 00000000 0-0 1 2 

Batteries — Alexander and Burns; 
Rudolph and Gowdy. 



Philadelphia, Sept. 80. — A wave of 
wild enthusiasm swept through the 
bijslness section of this city yesterday 
with the announcement, flashed on 
many scoreboards, that the Phillies 
had finally clinched a pennant and 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 



would be contenders for the world's 

baseball title. Old and middle-aged i i;[ij^hl'e"s head." The then lightweight 

men who have been faithful rooters | ,,jiamplon of the world was practically 

for the local club for thirty-two years, dead to the world, there to let. Only 

hugged each other when the electric 

lights on the scoreboard which had 



Tigers Still in Race. 

Detroit, Mich., Sept. 30. — CraA'ford's 
double to the right field fence in the 
ninth, scoring Cobb and Veach, gave 
Detroit a 3-to-2 victory over St. Louis 



told the story of the game to a multi- 
tude of spectators, flashed Compton's 
final fruitless swing. 



Cubs' Late Climb. 

Chicago, Sept. 30.— Chicago went into 
fourth place yesterday when they won 



yesterday. Had the Tigers lost the i the fifth straight game of the series 
game, the Amertcan league pennant from Cincinnati, B to 4. Three home 
would have been clinched by Boston. I runs bv the locals, making seven in 
The teams play here today to decide 1 two davs, won the game today. Zlm- 
another postponed game. Score: | merman made the first homer in the 

ci.T . Aft«-.,n/<«n ?• ■^- ^- I sixth and Schulte tied the score in 

St. Louis SHHSaSS""^ I 5 'the eighth, when his homer following 

Detroit ....000010002—3 8 2 ; ^ pass to Fisher netted two runs. Good 

Hamilton and Agnew; i batted for Archer in the ninth and 



Batteries- 



Lowdermilk, 
Stanage. 



Oldham, Boland and 



White Sox Win. 

Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 30. — Ineffec- 
tive pitching by recruits, erratic field- 
ing and base-running on the part of 
Cleveland, allowed Chicago to win the 
last game of the season In Cleveland, 
13 to 6. Score: R. H. E. 

Cleveland 10 110 12 0—613 3 

Chicago 204 203002—13 17 2 

Batteries — Garrett, Carter, Brenton, 
Collaniore and O'Neil; Cicotte and 
Mayer. • 

Double STaugTiter. 

Washington, Sept. 30. — Washington 
overwhelmed Philadelphia in both 
gamea of a double-header here yester- 
day, 10 to 2 and 20 to 6. equaling the 
season's record for runs scored in the 
second contest. Williams got five 
straight hits out of six time« at bat 
In the second game, including a triple 
and a double. Scores: -o xi- -c^ 

First game — R- H. E. 

Philadelphia ..20000000 0—2 9 4 
Washington ...30302200 x— 10 11 

Batteries — Davis and Perkins; Avery 
and Henry. „ „ t^, 

Second game — „ V' ?1' , A 

Philadelphia ..10000004 0—6 6 10 
Washington . .1 1 5 5 5 3 x— 20 21 4 

Batteries — Sheehan and Perkins; Gal- 
lia and Williams. 



the fighting Instinct of Ritchie kept 
him going. Instead of going in and 
finishing Ritchie and annexing the 
championship of the world. White 
hung back and allowed a thoroughly 
beaten champion to come back. 

Charley White is one of the greatest 
lightweights of the ring, but lacking 
the fighting Instinct in the same de- 
gree as Nelson and Wolgast, or even 
Ritchie there is considerable doubt 
whether the once pride of Chicago will 
ever become the titleholder. 

Some Evening For Mike. 

This morning's mall brought in a 
letter from Mike Collins. According to 
the boxing Impresario, everything 
looks great for a large night In Eau 
Claire, Wis., Friday evening. 

Let us add that Collins will hax^e 
his worries on that occ 



tied the count again with a homer. 
Herzog's fumble of Vaughn's grounder, 
a sacrifice. Infield out. and a single by 
Schulte scored the winning ran. 

Score: R. H. E. 

Cincinnati 100 20 001 — 4 9 2 | gj^ould Fulton be whlppe 



rior contest would be missing. This 
game is always the best paying card 
of the local schedule and the Duluth 
officials were not anxious to lose it. 
The wires over the jay were kept hot 
and the dejected managers were finally 
convinced that they had not taken the 
right course. 

Superior Encouraged. 

As a result the big hurry-up call 
for candidates will again be issued 
through the Purple and White halls, 
and on the first Satirday in November 
the annual spectacular sight of thou- 
sands of hilarious -ooters will grace 
Hislop park, Superior, where two of 
the best high school football teams In 
the Northwest will clash in their an- 
nual battle to decida the gridiron su- 
premacy of the two cities, if not of 
the entire Northwest. 

Announcement of the fact that the 
local management has carded 3Iechan- 
Ics Arts of St. Paul for the Saturday 
following the Two Harbors game, will 
be received with gr.;at Joy by the lo- 
cal enthusiasts. Tils school never 
fails to develop one of the very be5« 
scholastic elevens In the state each 
year, and they sho ild certainly fur- 
nish one of the best, if not the fea- 
ture battle, on the schedule of the 
Central team this fa.ll. The students 
will turn out to a -eal game, and as 
tills contest will n<?ceRsitate the ex- 
penditure of a corsiderable sum of 
monev, it will be ui> to them to back 
up the athletic association in its at- 
tem»pt to pull off sone real battles at 
Athletic park. 

Renewing Olcl Relationn. 

It has been many years since Cen- , 
tral and Mechanics Arts have met on 1 
the gridiron and tht renewal of these j 
athletic relations has been met with ; 
ro small amount cf joy among the 



Chicago 00000102 2—6 11 4 

Batteries — Lear and Wlngo; Zabel, 

Vaughn and Archer. 

— . ^ 

Dodgers Beat Neighbors. 

New Tork, Sept. 30.— Nap Rucker let 
the Giants down with four hits at the 
Polo grounds yesterday, Brooklyn win- 
ning the opening tilt of a four-game 
series by a score of 2 to 1. 

Score: R. H. E. 

Brooklyn 01010000 0—2 7 1 

New York 00100000 0—1 4 

Batteries — Rucker and Miller, Mc- 
Carthy; Herbert. Schupp and Kocher. 

FEDERAL RAGE 

FOUR-CORNERED 



BASEBALL STANDINGS 



Pittsburgh, Chicago, St. 
Louis and Kawfeds Are 

« 

Contenders. 



National League. 



Philadelphia 87 

Boston 78 

Brooklyn 79 

Chicago 71 

Pittsburgh 71 

St. Louis 70 

Cincinnati 69 

New York 67 



Won. Lost. 



60 
67 
69 
78 
79 
79 
81 
79 



Chicago, Sept. 30. — With the Federal 
pennant race only four m.ore days to 
run, the position of the three leaders 
last night was so close that Pitts- 
burgh had only 6 points advantage in 
the percentage column over St. Louis, 
which was crowded into third place 
by losing to Kansas City, while Chl- 
638 eago defeated Pittsburgh. 
!b34 So close are the leaders that today's 
!477 games might upset all three positions. 
.473 If Pittsburgh should lose and the other 
470 I two teams win, Chicago would lead and 



Pet. 

.692 



Istic house of cards will come turn 
bling down around his ears. 

In the short* space of two years 
Mike Collins has worked himself up 
to one of the leading boxing managers 
In the country. As a promoter Mike 
leaped to prominence in one short 
season. The Gibbons-McGo< 
was one of the big match 
season and one of the m 
promoted. 

Now Collins has turned his atten- 
tion to handling fighters. By hustle 
and his ability to iv.ake and keep 
friends, Mike has brought Fulton to 
the front and has established work- 
ing connections with every promoter 
and fight manager in the United 
States. 

A bud manag«r is nothing less than 
a parasite; a smart, able and ener- 
getic manager is the greatest asset a 
boxer can have. You can name prac- 
tically all of the latter kind of boxing 
managers on the fingers of' one hand. 

MOLLAliJURSTlDT 
IS CRACK PUYER 



aslon. If Ful- Capital City stu-dent ?. The team froni 

iran- one tough I this school has seve -a! veterans in its 

v deluged with lineup this year, and they will be trav- 

" )moter8. On eling north next week with the grim 

e argument, ! determination of giving the local boys 

d his pngil- a sweet licking. Ccach Blake Is just! 

1 come turn- as determined that • hey will not. and. 



ton whips this Tim Logan 

bird— Mike will bo fairly deluged wiin xin^uu "^'"f, •*^^'- "•^■.'l/i;'"'wifV,'*liV "irrim ' 

offers from various promoters. On ! elmg north next week with the grim 

the other hand of the 



the only result can be a great game. 

With 'Mechanics Arts. St. Paul Cen-; 
traT. Superior, Vlrerlr.la high. Galahad. | 
Ashland and possible one of the best. 
Minnenpoli.s teams among the more , 
noticeable of the CTvpcsitlon for the 




the best elevens thitt they have ever 
turned out at the rarge town next Sat- 
urday, and this contest will give 
Blake's men a good hard game to start 
their schedule with. 



Not Even Good Practice. 

Philadelphia. Pa.. ?ept. 30. — .Mbright 
colleere did not afford the University 
of Pennsylvania tejim good practice 
yesterday, the homs eleven winning 





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Today's Games. 

Brooklyn at New York, clear. 
Cincinnati at Chicago, clear. 
Pittsburgh at St. Louis, cloudy. 
Philadelphia at Boston, clear. 



Yesterday's Results. 

Chicago. 5; Cincinnati. 4. 
Philadelphia, 5; Boston, 0. 
Brooklyn, 2; New York, 1. 

• — 

American League. 

Won. 

Boston 99 

Detroit 98 

Chicago 89 

Washington 83 

New York 67 

St. Louis 62 

Cleveland 57 

Philadelphia 40 



Lost. 


Pet. 


46 


.683 


63 


.649 


61 


.6^8 


65 


.661 


81 


.463 


87 


.416 


93 


.380 


108 


.270 



Today's Games. 

Philadelphia at Washinton, clear. 
St. Louis at Detroit, clear. 



Yesterday's Results. 

Washington, 10. 20; Philadelphia, 
2, 6. 

Chicago, 13; Cleveland, 6. 
Detroit. 8; St. Louis, 2. 



Federal League. 



Won. 

Pittsburgh 84 

Chicago 83 

St. Louis 86 

Kansas City 80 

Newark 76 

Buffalo 73 

Brooklyn 70 

Baltimore 46 



Lost. 

64 

64 

66 

70 

71 

78 

81 
101 



Pet. 
.668 
.666 
.663 
.633 
.614 
.483 
.464 
.308 



Today's Games. 

Buffalo at Brooklyn, clear. 
Newark at Baltimore, two games, 
clear. 

Chicago at Pittsburgh, clear. 
Kansas City at St. Louis, cloudy. 



Yesterday's Results. 

Buffalo, 7; Brooklyn, 6. 
Chicago, 6; Pittsburgh. 8. 
Kansas City. 1; St. Louis, 0. 



Norwegian Woman Cham- 
pion Displays Ability in i 
Boston Tournament, j 

Boston, Mass.. Sept. 30. — Miss Molla i 
Bjurstedt, the young Norwegian wom- : 
an who holds the national women's i 
tennis championship, again yesterday I 
won matches in all three divisions of 1 
play In the annual women's tournament i 
of the Longwood Cricket club. 

Playing with Irving C. Wright of ; 
this city, in the mixed doubles. Miss j 
_ _ Bjurstedt virtually carried all the bur- 

otheVf s\° Lo^'is aVpar^ntly 8houl"S hav^^ of the team, her partner being , 

the best chance for victory as it has decidedly off his ganie. They defeated 
already won more games than the oth- I Miss Ldith Rotch and G. W. Whitman, 
ers and has fewer to play. The stand- Boston, 7-5, 6-4 



^ 



> 



\J^ 



^ THEkpALL OF THE 
^ WOODS ISA CALL 



W 



Dm 



""/y 



W^ 



FOR A WINCHESTER 



"V 



■>l} 14 



St. Louis would resume second place. 
On the other hand, if Pittsburgh and 
St. Louis should win and Chicago lose, 
Chicago would be a poor third. With 
Pittsburgh and Chicago fighting each 



// 



m 



M^ 



[llllUI, 



'III II 



neinniDoi' 



ing of the leaders last night: 

Won. Lost. 

Pittsburgh 84 64 

Chicago- 83 64 

St. Louis 86 66 

Kansas City 80 70 



Pet. 



In the women's doubles, second 
round. Miss Bjurstedt and Miss Anne 



MIDDIES DO NOT 

SHOW TO CREDIT 



568 ' Sheafe of Boston defeated Mrs. Orrie 
665 Bates and Miss R. Nlckerson, Boston, 

:663 6-1 6-0. 

.633 No real upsets were recorded in any 
of the divisions. 



Catholic University ofWasfi- 

ington Holds Navy to 

One Touchdown. 

Annapolis, Md., Sept. 30. — In a prac- 
tice scrimmage here yesterday after- 
noon, during which all the strict rules 
were not observed -aSfll while coaches 
of both sides were, allowed on the field 
and directed thelr^- teams' worjc, Navy 
scored one touchdowi^on Catholic Unl. 
verslty of Washington and failed to 
Icicle coslI 

The showing of th« Middles against 
their much lighter opponents was not 
regarded as encoufaglnff. 

• — 

St. Louis Series. 

St. Louis, Mo., gept 80. — The fall 
series between the St. X-ouls Nationals 
and the St. Louis' Americana will be- 
gin Tuesday, Oct. -{. 

Brown Suing Reds. 

Chicago, Sept. $0. — ^Mordecal Brown, 
pitcher for the Chlii^g© Federal Leagu% 
club. h&B filed s;^^ i^alnst tha Cln- 



i 






If. 



•^i^ 



/ 



MUDGE BEATEN BY 

LONG ISLANDER 






l'^\ 



*rr^«^ 



Chief Cup in Greenwich 
Country Club's Tourna- | 
ment Goes to Carter, j 

Greenwich, Conn., Sept. 30. — Philip j 
Carter of Nassau, L. I., defeated Dud- ; 
ley Mudge of Yale and St. Paul, In the ; 
final match for the chief cup In the ; 
Greenwich Country club's invitation 1 
golf tournament yesterday 6 to 6. 

Mudge showed almost complete re- j 
versal of form after he had beaten j 
Maxwell Marston of Baltuerol In the | 
semi-final round early in the day. On 
that occasion Mudge cracked off a 74, 
while against Carter he could do no 
better than about an 80 clip. 






m 






\"ri 



f/r-^ 









Find Team Tiiey Can Beat. 

Scranton, Pa.. Sept. 80.— The New 
Tork Americans defeated the Scranton 
all-professionals. 3 to 2, in a ten-in- 
ning exhibition game here yesterday. 

Score: ^' W- E. 

New York 200000000 1 — 3 11 4 

Scranton 000000200 0—2 6 2 

Batteries — Vance, Cottrell and : 
Schwertz; Higglns and Giddo. j 



*^-^<. 

'-^-^1^^: 



Hunting Rifles 

There are more Winchester rifles used 
for hunting than all other American 
makes combined. That is because 
they are so generally satisfactory. 
Experienced hunters know that Win- 
chester rifles can be depended upon 
absolutely. Then again, they are 
made in all calibers and styles suit- 
able for shooting any kind of game. 
For a good, reliable rifle, one that 
shoots strong and accurately, and 
gives years of service, no rifle equals 
the Winchester. No need of hesi- 
tating as to which make of hunting 
rifle to buy. Get a Winchester and 
you will never regret it. They are 

THE FIRST CHOICE OF 
EXPERIENCED HUNTERS 



:; 



3 



^ 



m 



.^B^ 



SBS^sss: 



1 



^ r- ■ -1 . 



r*-— • 



<|^ 



»w* P 



"^p 



/ 







Thursday, 



THE DULUTH. HERALD 



September 30, 1915. 



13 



1 



TTon the Horseman's futurity that had] 
an apgreg-ate value of $10,000. i 

Mary Putney, was favorite In a field \ 
of twelve for the futurity racp. At 
the start of the first heat, she was on 
a break, and did not right herself un- 
tlll all others were ahead. By trotting 
the last half In 1:02 '/4 she finished 
eixth. In the next two heats the filly 
was on good behavior and won im- 
pressively. In the first winnlngr mile, 
ehe lowered ber record to 2:07^4. 

Russell Boy was thought to have the 
Arch City stake at his mercy and fold 
a 10-2 favorite over the entire field. 
With the Geers pacer barred, Hal Boy 
was the choice and he won the first 
heat by having more brush than Rus- 
sell Boy. Judge Ormonde became a 
factor In the second heat, winning 

§ulled up when Ru.ssell Boy went to a 
reak at the last eighth post. 
The third heat was hardest. Judge 
Ormonde standing a severe drive and 
finishing a length ahead of RusspU 
Boy, who, for the place, nosed out 
Hay Boy and The Beaver. In the last 
few yards of the fourth heat Judge 
Ormonde faltered and Russell Boy won 
by half a length. I 

Camtlia w^as the favored member of | 
the 2:13 pacing field, but in two heats,' 
failed to be a contender against Dwight \ 
LfOgan, who. in turn was rushed home 
by Grace D., and Tramp-a-Bit. This 
race, like the Arch City stake, could j 
not be finished. Ames Albingen dropped I 
«he first two heats of the 2:18 I 
trot on account of breaks made when i 
he was leading easily through the ' 
stretch. He was steady in the last three 
miles, taking a record of 2:08^ In the 
first he won. 

On account of a chilly north wind, 
neither Peter Volo nor Etawah was 
prepared for an attempt against their 
trotting records. They are to try 
tomorrow If conditions are right. 

Late In the afternoon. Margaret 
Druln nuide a successful effort against 
her mark of 2:04'-4. Lameness i.t likely 
to force Directum I to be idle here. 



BEAVERS TO 
PLAYJIGERS 

Boat Club Athletes Will Be 

in Lineup of Former 

Team. 



» ) K»») ! (»»*»*H(3 i (»»] i oK»»»»» ^(HNHMf 



* 
■* 



HB WHO LAUGHS LAST! 



* 

*; 



* Three inemb^-r!* of Pat Moraii*« 
¥^ PltJllies wlU Houu laugh tbem- 
^ selvrti nick. 

•# They are Al nemaree. tbe well- 
■* kniMvn rarto«nl.«t; Milton Stook 
4(f and George AVIUttcd. MeGraw 

■* considered ♦h*' former pair drlft- 
■* wood, »o he cut thorn loose lant 

* season »\hllc the Giants were 
■* lending the league with *verT 

* proopfct of fInlMhIng flr«t. Stock 
■* anil Ilpinaree were pretty peevlxh, 
-* a<« tlify figured they were being 
■* cnt out of a world series melon. 
-M When the Glantn didn't win the 
•i|( pennant tl»ey nnlckered audllvly. 

* And now tliat It appearn Mc<.raw 
4jf traded them to a certain winner, 

* they're guffawing outright. 
•*■ Whitted'» case is almoitt the 
■jje name. George was sore when 
•ij( Stalling^ sold him lawt winter to 
Ma the Phils in the Magee deal, for 
•Jfe the Braves looked nure t«» re- 
•ife peat. >'ow George has Joined the 
■^ clM>rtltug choruj*. 

s »*** »»**»» *»»*******»**» 

DANCE PLA!\!NEd70R 

CHA MPION EDISONS 

The IXlluth Amateur Baseball asso- 
ciation officials win hold a dance at 
the Lincoln park pavilion, Friday eve- 
ning, Oct 8, in honor of the Duluth- 
Edison baseball team, the amateur 
champions of the state. Tbe money re- 
ceived win go to defray some of the 
expenses Incurred during the past sea- 
eon by the league. 



* 



Manager Cub Lajoy of tha Duluth 
football team has aj*ranged a pr«- 
limlnary game as a curtain raiser to 
the big gridiron battle of next Sun- 
day between the local team rud the 
crack Kent team of St. Paul. 

With Harney, Hargraves, Rowland, 
Swanson and Elsted of the champion 
Duluth Boat cTub crews In Its lineup, 
the Beavers will battle with the Wost 
Duluth Tigers. 

The preliminary game will start at 
2 o'clock and will serve as an apP^" 
tizer to the big doings that are sched- 
uled to take place between the col- 
lege football aggregation ^ that the 
Rents are bringing here, and the crack 
Duluth team, rated as the fastest 
eleven that has been turned out here 
in \'^A.rs 

D'ougherty, the former Cathedral 
basket ball and football star. Is ex- 
pected to prove a ground gaining 
shark In the game of Sunday. The 
open field running of the Cathedral 
crack is expected to keep the col- 
legians on the jump and draw out the 
reputed strong ends of ^he St. Paul 
tf 3.rTi 

La.st evening Coach Caulklns ran his 
warriors through two strenuous hours 
of practice In preparation for the con- 
test of Sunday. According to "Corky," 
the Duluth aggregation will be fit for 
a real battle. 

»— 

* TEX EYCK HOLDIXG * 
« RJiGATTA IN SECTIOXS. * 

* — t4t 

^ It appears that Jimmy Ten Eyek ^ 
^ Is l>elng compelled to run his fall ^ 
^ rowing regatta off In seetionn ^ 
■^ I<a.*tt evening Ro\tlnnd'.<* four de- -^ 
^. fcated Vincent's four, the con- •# 
^ test being rowed In semi-dark- ^ 
•k nes*. The flniwh was sen.natlonal, ^ 
^ tiie winning crew croKsing the tI^ 

Siine but a fraction of a boat's # 
len^rtii in advance of its spurting -% 

* rtval. ' * 

* %%'eatber permitting. Ten Eyck ^ 

Swill run off the eight race and ^ 
three other club contests on Sat- -^ 
^. urday afternoon. ^ 

* f 



Is nearly completed, the Grand league 
is lining up for the winter season, and 
plans are oeing made for the organi- 
zation of a CommerciaL Bowling league, 
which. It is believed, will prove a real 
success from the start. 

Practically the same teams that were 
In the Major and Grand leagues are 
expected to be in the race again this 
season. The Commercial league organ- 
izers are seeking to enlist the Interest 
of the F. A. Patrick company, the Rust- 
Parker-Martln, Stone - Ordean - Wells, 
Kelley-How-Thomson and others. 

The approaching season is expected 
to be by far the greatest In the history 
of the pin game. More players will be 
in the game, according to present in- 
dications, and more teams will b© in 
the field. 

^ IF A MODERV RIP *' 

« SHOULD RHSiaBX AGAIX. * 

it Rii> Van \%'inkle dropped into ^ 
^ the village l>arber'H shop after Ikls -^ 
■it tweoty-ycar sleep. W. 

^ "Ho^v's everything in tlie big iHf 
^ leagues thcMe days?" he asked the ^ 
•k vlilagc barber. •Jjt 

* "Same as ever." 
^ "Cobb Ntill leading tli« Amer 
■In lean leagrnef" 




BY W lliAM BRAD T. 

The Nails 




BOWLING TEAMS 



BEING LINED UP 



Pin Game Activities Ex- 
pected to Start Within 
a Few Days. 

Bowling Is expected to be flourishing 
In Duluth within a week. The sched- 
ule of the Major Bowling league teams 




llllllillllllllllillllitlllllillllltlllllllllltltS 







Theodorm 
Roosevelt says: 

Every Amer- 
ican ^vho can 
possibly do so 
should visit it 
(the Panama- 
Pacific Expo- 
sition). Fath- 
ers and moth- 
ers should 
bring the chil- 
dren. 

Marcus M. 
Marks, Presi- 
dent of the Bor- 
ough of Man- 
hattan, feels: 

I would lath- 
er a child of 
mine should 
lose a term at 
school than 
miss the op- 
portunity of 
instruction 
presented 
here. 



Wm. J. Bryant 
I expected 
much, but th« 
realization is 
far beyond 
my expect** 
tiooa. 



San Francisco I 

and the Great Ex- | 

position are at | 

tlieir best now. | 

Both for actual = 

pleasure and coni' = 

jort, now is the ideal = 

time to visit the PAN- = 

AMA-PACIFIG Exposi- E 

tion, the greatest of all 5 

World's Fairs — the fair E 

that no one can afford to S 

miss — that every young g 

person should see. S 

The summer tourists have come S 

and gone. Neither trains nor hotels s 

are crowded now. California cli- = 

mate is never so glorious as during S 

the golden autumn days. Make up = 

a family party via the great Expo- s 

sition Route— E 

UNION PACIFIC I 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC | 

On the way you will see the E 

Colorado Rockies, scenic Wyo- S 

ming, Echo Canyon with Devil's S 

Slide, Ogden Canyon, Lucin Cut- = 

Off over Great Salt Lake, Truckee = 

Canyon, Lake Tahoe, Emigrant E 

Gap, American River Canyon, Blue — 

Canyon, San Francisco Bay. s 

No additional fare for stop- S 

overs at Denver, Colorado Springs, S 

__ Ogden, Salt Lake City or any- = 

ss where along the route. = 

S Running time saves two extra S 

E days for sight-seeing. Trains most 2 

= luxurious in American service. s 

i dU/lQ Q A From DULUTH I 

I »B)07.7U and Return | 

S This fare also includes a visit to the SS 

S Panama-California Exposition at San Diego S 

2 The coupon will bring you full S 

s information on what you will see S 

E and what the trip will cost. S 



XL T. Carter. D. P. A 
25 8. Third St. 
MiimeaDoUa. Minn. 



W. O. Nelmyer. O. Ju 
65 W. Jnckson Blvd. 
4Chic»Ko 



Visit Southern Pac0c Building. Panama-Pacific 

Exposition. Rest Room, File of Eastern 

Newspapers. Stereopticon Lectures 

g)iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii>...d.». 

— — ^ 1 1 b o u t 




* "Vep. 
^ "Wasmer still playln^r' 
^ "Yep." 

^ "Mat'hewHon Rtill pltchtas?" 

* "Yep." 

^ "MeGravr Htlll beinq: Ba*- 
^ pendedf 

* "Yep." 

* "Evem Htill Kcrapplngr?" 
« "Yep." 

^ "EmHite Mtlll nmplrlner' 

* "Yep," 

^ "JohnHon still bluffing?" 
Mf "Yep." 

* "Kbbetts still ha\1ng: hollday«r' 

* "Yep." 
•m "YaiikH won the pennant f" 

"Nope." 

"Oh, ivell, I eruesH I'll KO back 
to sleep." 






I 

* 
* 

t 

s 



TN'CE prehfstqj^o days the nails i ment Is a light wrapplng^ of gauze 
have been \^hout an Indis- ' soaked in a solution containing: one 
pensable fuKtlon. About all ] ounce of aluminum acetate in ten 
we use thenfcfor today is (1) j ounces saturat^Jd solution of boric 
opening: pen-knives; (2) pinch- ' acid, the whole wet dressing: covered 
Ing: out blackheads; (3) push- I by a loose rubber finger-cot. Severe 
Ing needles through trouser baJidi): (4) 'cases require incision and drainage, 
scratching wherever it may Itch, and, | White specking or marking on the 
on great provocation, (5) defending one nail is due to air bubbles in the nail, 



NEW GYBSNASiUM 
FORMALLY OPENED 



W.E.McEwenMakes Boost- 
ing Address to Members 
of Zenith Club. 

A large crowd was present lajst eve- 
ning to celebrate the occasion of the 
opening of the new gymnasium of the 
Zenith City Athletic club. 

Postmaster W. B. McEwen gave an 
address, in which he dwelt upon the 
benefits to be derived from athletic ex- 
ercise and the boosting spirit that Is 
engendered by athletic associations. 

Many professional and business men 
were on hand and seemingly enjoyed 
the athletic program that wa$ ar- 
ranged by Manager Kane. 

Pal Brown gave a short exhibition of 
shadow boxing, there was some wrest- 
ling and several musical numbers were 
given. The program was a very en- 
joyable one and those who inspected 
the quarters of the new gymnasium 
voted it something that th.e city has 
been wanting for a considerable space 
of time. 



self against an Infuriated sister 

Fingernails are a nuisance and a 
menace to health on the one hand; but 
on the other hand they furnish some 
people an occupation — manicuring. On 
both hands they are a boon to nervous 
Individuals who work off lots of super- 
fluous energy chewing them. We have 
it on the authority of a distinguished 
correspondent that nail-biting can be 
cured by painstaking attention to mani- 
curing; the idea being that a smoothly 
trimmed and pol^hed nail offers no 
subconscious temptation to the teeth. 

An acute Illness leaves a transver.se 
marking or furrow upon the nail, due 
to a feebler output of matrix when tho 
system is weak. 

Persons whose metabolism is paving 
the way for joint disease notice that 
the nails are very brittle. 

Paronchia, or inflammation and sup- 
puration at the edge or base of the nail 
may be an acute Infection or a chronic 
eczema or acquired or hereditary luetic 
Infection. 

Ringworm of the nail Is an occa- 
slonqj condition and an exceedingly 
obstinate one to treat, unless by autog- 
enous vaccines, which «eem to be very 
effective for ringworm of scalp, beard 
or nail. The nail Is raised, thickened, 
split and contorted. 

Ordinary "run around" Is usually a 
streptococcus Infection. A good treat- 



It does not indicate or foretell any 
illness. 

Ingrowing nail is caused by degen- 
erate footgear. Pointed shoes, narrow 
shoes and shoes with diverging inside 
sole lines make Ingrowing nail. Mild 
cases are helped by narrow strips of 
adhesive plaster so applied as to draw 
the sore skin edge away from the nail. 
If there Is granulation tlB.su« in the 
furrow ("proud flesh"). It must be cut 
away, burned away with lunar caustic, 
or shriveled with alum or other astrin- 
gent. Appliances other than correct 
shoes are useless for Ingrowing nail. 
Bad cases require surgical relief at the 
hands of a doctor. 

That poison which the ancients made 
of fingernails was undoubtedly the cul- 
tured microbes the then worthies car- 
ried, as do their modern descendants, 
In the furrow beneath the nails. 



m 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. 
MagneMia or Soda f 

Which is best to take as an ant-acid, 
soda or magnesia? 

Answer— Milk of magnesia is prefer- 
able as a rule. 



Carbon In Cylinders. 

If one gets charcoal in the nose will 
It do any harm? 

Answer — Not more than ordinary 
dust. 



NEW YORK HAS HAD 
ENOUGH BASEBALL 



Proposed Inter-City Series 

Receives Cold Water 

at Conference. 

New York, Sept. 80. — There will be no 
Inter-clty baseball series In Greater 
New York. This was decided yesterday 
at a conference of owners of the New 
York Nationals, American and Brook- 
lyn Nationals held during the ball 
game at the Polo grounds. 

The club owners came to the con- 
clusion that New York has had enough 
of baseball for one season. 

GRADE LEAGUE 

SEASON OPENED 



nr. Ilrndv will a-i^wer ail question, pertaining to Health. If your Question ia of general Interon It will 
be a.;3v.ere<l thwugh tho.*» columns; if not U will he ai^werod pei^^'>nally if 6tan>pe.l ad.lrosse.l euvelopr « 
fnclosed. I)r Urady «1!I li t prescribe fur Individual cases or make dlagnos* Address all letters to Dr. 
Willi»» Biady. <N.re of Tbe H«rald. All Questloiw will t* answered, whetlier they come from people reald 
Ing In Duluth or ouUldo, provided tliey comply with the rules here stated. 

WESTEiliMlEADY 
TO HANDLE ITS OWN CROP 





Banish Foot 
Misery 

BENT bones, corns, 
bunions, ingrown naiU, 
flat foot, and all foot ilk are 
caused by the pincbing pres» 
sure of p<HDted shoes. 

Go "near-barefooted,** 
wbichmeaas— Wear Educator 
Shoes. And Nature will re- 
lieve or free your feet from all 
these blemishes. Educators 
will prevent your children 
from ever having them. 

Get the whole family into 

good-looking, waar-reusting 

Educators today. Price $ 1 33 

to $5.50. 

RICE & HUTCHmS 





DUCATOR, 
SHOE® 



Eo^ry fnu h« 
Educator } aa 
namm atamt *d 
It9r0 on aotm 




Seo that EDUCATOR it 
branded on sole. It guaran- 
tees the cx>rrect orthopaedic 
^pe. Made only by 

Rice & Hutchins, Ine, 
15 High St Boston 

Retailers caa b« iopplied at 
wlioUsale frwB stack on ov flew. 
Ric« k Hatckim Ckicsgo C: 
231 W. Mmtm St., Chiufo. UL 




Bluehmr 
Educator 
for Boym 



*H 






substantially hlgrher railroad freight 



,. I eUDSianiiaiiy ni^ner raiiroau iit^ijjiiL 

Elevators at . Canadian l^^.-f^-y-j.^s-^^^^^^^ are corres- 
Lakes Head Expect No 



Congestion. 



Vesselmen Resent Govern- 
ment's Action Admitting 
American Craft to Trade. 



Salters Defeat Jeffersons 

and Lincolns Best 

Bryants. 

The season of the Grade School Foot- 
ball league of Duluth waa officially 
opened yesterday afternoon, when the 
Salters defeated the JefEersona. 32 to 
18, and the Lincolns scored an easy 
victory over the Bryant eleven by the 

score of 36 to 0. 

The former game was played at the 
Chester park playground, with J. R. 
Batchelor, recreational director, in 
charge, and was witnessed by more 
school children and grown- 



Development of an elevator conges- 
tion at the Canadian Head of the 
Lakes is unlikely this season, accord- 
ing to opinions obtained by a Herald 
representative during the course of a 
visit there this week. 

Storage capacity of the elevators at 
Port Arthur and Fort William Is now 
45,000,000 bushels. In round figures, 
and In addition It Is estimated that 
nearly 75,000,000 bushels capacity Is 
available In the Interior elevators 
through the Canadian West. Though 
It Is now thought that the surplus 
wheat crop available for export In tho 
three Western Canadian provinces 
will exceed 176,000.000 bushels, grain 
operators are sanguine that this enor- 
mous tonnage will be handled without 
difficulty. 

The chartered banks with their head- 
quarters at Toronto and Montreal, and 
with a network of branches through 
every section of the West, are finan- 
cially well equipped to take care of the 
crop movement, and an Increasing dis- 
position is being shown to aid growers 
In holding their grain to enable Its 
marketing to be aihftdnctcd In a more 
leisurely way than would otherwise 
have been possible. Grain operators 
up there entertain the view that a 
further serious slump would be brought 
In the grain markets should farmers 
be forced to rush the^r grain to the 
terminal elevators.- 

Ye««el Me9 Saneuinci. 

Vessel interests at Port Arthur and 
Fort William are sanguine regarding 
their ability to handle an enormous 
grain tonnage up to the close of navi- 
gation. They are protesting strongly 



Elrvators Well Prepared 

H. Sellers, superintendent of the Port 
Arthur Elevator company, a branch 
of the Peavey elevator Interests at 
Mlnnepalis, expressed the view that 
the elevators at the lake ports would 
not be overloaded this fall and winter. 

"Our plant, then of 7,500,000 bushels 
capacity, alone handled 45,000.000 
bushels of wheat during the 1S12 crop 
season," he said. "There is now the 
government elevator, to say nothing of 
the other large houses since built to 
help out, and with our three trans- 
continental railroads prepared to haul 
grain through during the winter 
months, we do not look for any con- 
gestion. The high quality of tlje grain 
being threshed In the Canadian West 
this fall is another factor that is going 
to facilitate handling It." 

The bulk of the wheat marketed so 
far at Port Arthur this season Is 
grading Nos. 1 and 2 northern, and 
unless a prolonged spell of wet weather 
should Intervene, it Is thought that the 
cleaning and drying plants will not 
have much to do this fall. 



I ■ ■ ■ |>0^»»^»^«»%^^»^^^^>^«^>^»^>^>^>^>^M 



Educator 



For Men and Boys 



^^^^^^^^^k^t^ 




-SOLD AT 



Willianisoa A M«adeah«ll 



Wle Sell 

Educator 
Shoes 

The Educator Footwear al- 
lows the foot to develop in its 
natural way. For style, com- 
fort and wear they have no 
equal. Popular prices. 




fiULttTK— SUPCBIOS— ViftBUUA— iiitBlia 



LECTURER SUED FOR 
BREACH OF PROMISE 



Rev. John Wesley Hill De- 
fendant in Action of 
Lucile Covington. 

New York, Sept 30. — The Rev. John 
Wesley Hill, widely know as a* lec- 
turer on politics and peace, was j'ester- 
day named as a defendant In a suit for 
1100,000 for alleged breach of promise 
of marriage brought by Lucile Coving- 
ton of this city, also a lecturer upon 

economics and other topics. 

Dr Hill declined to discuss the suit. 

Dr. Hill was formerly pastor of the 
Metropolitan temple here, and also held 



ups'^ The'cont^est'^waV'a clo^e *o'ne"ln against American steamers J)elngac - 
the first half, but In the second the 




YOUR CHILDREN 
WILL BLESS YOU 



corded coasting privileges this fall, a 
repetition of what was done In 1912, 
as they contend that they can throw 
sufficient capacity Irrto the trade to 
give the elevators at the lower lakes 
and Montreal all they can handle. 

It is hoped, too, that conditions such 
as were encountered at Montreal last 
fall will not be faced this year, as In- 
been received to the 



Salters braced and scored a clean vic- 
tory. The Lincolns at the Chester 
park grounds had an easy time of It 
throughout the game, the reason being 
given that the winning eleven out- 
weighed the losers by fifteen pounds 
to the "man." 

Director Batchelor announced this 
morning that Robert Kerr and Lee formation has _ 

Bartlett, both former stars with the effect that t»^» British authorities have 
Central high school eleven, will assist released a large "umber of freighters 
him in conducting the games In the, for the route from Canadian ports to 
grade school league during tl^ls fall. 

This afternoon at 4:30 o'clock the 
Merrltt and Irving eleven will meet at 
the Fifty-second avenus west grounds, 
with Mr. Kerr In charge, while the 
Eme 
on th 

luth Heights. Mr. Bartlett will offi- 
ciate at the latter game. 

Tomorrow afternoon the Washburns 
and Monroes will play at Harrison 
park, and the Adams and Lakeside 
teams at Chester park. 



Liverpool. 

Fr«l«h« Rntea Ht^h. 

The fact that freight rates are ad- 
vancing both on the lakes and ocean 
Is causing anxiety, however, and many 
rs^n^Loweil gamrwlVl be"played j are not so c^^l/^V «'n ocean TrJlRh^ i 
he Lowell school grounds at Du- ^J^f /J^^ Xntrea!\"o" Lfv^rpo'^t^of 

30 cents a bushel and 7 cents a bushel, 
the prevailing rate at present from the 
Canadian lake ports to Montreal, be- 
sides railroad freight rates from in- 
ternal points to the lake terminals, and 
InsuraJice and war risk charges, it is 
computed that Is costs a Manitoba 
grain grower 53^ cents a bushel to lay 
his wheat down at English ports. Fur- 
ther west growers In . Saskatchewan 
and Alberta are oalled upon to pay 



PUPILS WILL RIDE 

IN HE ATED BUS 

Duluth's special Public School Car 
No. 2 arrived from Richmond, Va., 
yesterday and now Washburn school 
pupils living at ColbyvlU© will not 
have to walk. 

By order of the board of education 
the ColbyvUle school was not reopened 
this fall, and the bus was purchased 
so that smaller children would not 
have to trudge through wet and slush 
during the winter. The bus will be 
put Into service at once and will call 
for pupils at their homes, returning 
with them after school. 

Two such buses were ordered, the 
other one to be used to transport stu- 
dents who formerly attended the Bay- 
view Heights school to the LonefcHow 
or Ely buildings. Th« second on© will 
arrive within a few days. 

Each car has a capacity for twenty- 
one persons and Is heated by a small 
stove placed In the center. The seats 
are upholstered in leather and the car 
Is equipped throughout to Insure com- 
fort of the passengers. 

• — 

Canal to Reopen Oet. 9. 

Panama, Sept. 30. — The canal will be 
reopened to traffic Oct. 6. This an- 
nouncement was made by Lleut.-Col. 
Chester Harding, engineer of main- 
tenance. Col. Harding said It had 
been planned to open the waterway 
Oct. 1 but that there had been an- 
other earth movement which made a 
postponement necessary. 




If you and your wife are saving persons, 
your fondest hopes are that your boys shall 
grow up to be successful men, and your girls 
the wives of such men. 

The greatest advantage you can give your 
children, next to your own teaching, is a 
savings account. Encourage them to save 
and the habit will soon form. When ready 
to tread life's road, they will be solid, 
sensible men and women — the kind that al- 
ways succeed. 

Come in and let us write each name in 
a bank book. 



iriRST NATIOITAL BANK 

Duluth, Minn* 




JO' 



i^S, 



.tU^ 



^^^Kii^ss^ 



tfwT^i^u^^^^^^*^ 



^n^mw'wmimm':^ 



of 



lURIOSRTiKOPHIESr 

Citrarettes fifteoi yean ago 
— areuttofccursof 

Turkish TRdPHiES 

Clg«rettMtod»7l 

smd^fptim^OiarttlafntMlM 



.^tr'ili(iltlill!!llit.''|i|)i!iii; Ni: ii-.,':i''.'' 



REV. JOHN WESLEY HILL. 

pastorates in many cities In the West. 
He was chaplain of the Republican na- 
tional convention In Chicago in 1908 
and 1912. As a peace advocate, Dr. 
Hill visited the Orient In 1911 and 
established the Asiatic branch of the 
International peace forum In Toklo. 

MlsB Covington Is now In Chicago, 
where she was formerly a school teach- 
er, according to her counsel. Nathaniel 
F. Schmidt. Mr. S^^hmidt said his client 
was formerly employed by Dr. Hill and 
that they met in Chicago in 1910. 

DiiUHONOlNIJiG 

IN SOUTH AFRICA 

Pretoria Man Discusses 

Work at Banquet of 

"Tecti" Alumni. 

IMamond mining in South Afrloa 

was described by Charles P. Louns- 

bury of Pretoria, Union pf South 

Africa, In a lecture delivered at the 

first fall meeting of the alumni of the 
Masaachuaetts Institute of Tech- 



nology held at the Kitchi Gammi club 
last evening. 

Mr. Lounabury Is a brother of W. 
C. Lounsbury, superintendent of th© 
water an4. lljrht department at Supe- 
rior, and was a guest of honor at the 
meeting. He is the chief of the de- 
partment of 'mtomology for the Brit- 
ish government in its South African 
provinces and is at present on a tour 
of the world. 

The speaktr told in detail of the 
methods empoyed in the mining of 
diamonds, the labor conditions, the 
railroads and methods of transporta- 
tion and the life of the natives in 
South Africa. Walter J. Croze of the 
Oliver Mlnlnj: company, also a guest 
of honor, delivered a short talk on 
the history cf iron mining In Minne- 
sota and the xiethods of mining ore on 
the various langes. 

Mr. Louni^bury has already visited 
Australia and New Zealand and the 
Panama-Paclllc exposition in his tour 
of tho world. He will leave In a few 
days for Chicago and New York, after 
which ho will sail for London, before 
returning to South Africa. 

The foUov'lng "tech" men were 
present at the meeting: E. Porter 
Alexander, Ciiarles D. Brewer, Leland 
Clapper, Prank Hayes, W. C. Louns- 
bury, Wllllan R. Peyton. D. H. Rad- 
ford, Samuel B. Sheldon, Carroll D. 
Steel and Walter G. Zlmmermann. 



LINDBERGH TO 

BE CA NDIDATE 

Decides to File for Gover- 
nor — Buckman for 
Congressman. 

St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 30. — It wa# 
stated on good authority in St. Paul 
yesterday that Congressman Charles 
A. Lindbergh has dtclded to fire for 

governor, and C. B. Buckman of Little 
Falls will file for congress In place of 
Mr. Llndbergiu 

Mr. Buckman was Mr. Lindbergh's 
predecessor In congress, and was de- 
feated by the latter. 

Friends of Mr. Lindbergh have been 

conducting a canvafis of the state a,ll 

] summer, sounding the senlii^ent nf the 

voters, and Mr. Lindbergh himself has 

! spent a great deal of time visiting In 

\ the northern part of the state. 

It Is said that Mr. Lindbergh and 

his friends have met with sufficient 

I encouragement to warrant the con- 

{ gressman entering the race for the 

I nomination next year. 









TT >VOULD be fine to have someone hand you a large 
■ sum of money ten years from now, wouldn't it? 

If you arc like most of us, however, your only chance 
is to accumulate your own legacy, building it from small 
sums saved regularly. 

But even saving small sums is distinctly worth while 
for one dollar a week saved makes $605.54, and two dol- 
lars ti week amounts to $1,211.43 in ten years. 

Wiy not open a bank account and build your own 
capital. 

WE HAVE A BOOK FOR YOU. COME IN. 



/ 

! 



\ 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK 

OLDEST BANK IN DULUTH. 

:m:yv^^^^^^sv:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^■^^^^^^ssssss: 



























■ 






1 




', 












f 




[ ' ' • 

I 


! 
1 


1 






^^-•■"^•^••-•'.^..rf^*'*"*^^" 



in I _ » II . 



T 



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■ 





14 



Thursday, 



THE DULI5>TH HERALD 



September 30, 193.5. 



QPnni> THE CUB 



Ilfithing 



By ^'HOP^^ 



TH»5 8(VMTRip HA6 MAOE(VAe VGRY 
HAPP^ 5C0O9- <nY lOl/E -YOUR 

<^Re wohde:rfuu- 





AMl<^^IHTY AND ^WEETNE^ 
PLUS ?ROP«HQU»Tr-AH 

PRO-PIN- <5UtTY- 





Woo BBX- 
WEUL X 5H0Our>j 
SAY SO! 





PRO-PIN- QUiTY- VA^MDEie \F TO > 
SOME, SORT OF A REFERENCE 
TO MY STYLE OF BEAUTY-CJCSH; 

1 HATE COMFUKENT^ 

>iAT TAKE A 

COLLEQ-E ^ N-^nkl 

EDUCATION 
,T0 TPAHSLAT^ 




(£) lf/5-- »»~ITT--:SVND— £A»-Tt3-MP ^ 




NEWS OF THE NORTHWEST 



REMOVE KiNKS IN 

RED LAKE RIVER 



be set at a time to take in flllngrs for|pcor. In this locaJity the pastures are 



both tracts. Practically all of the 13,- 
000 acres which were opened for set- 
tlement last winter have been taken. 



Conference Held at Thief 

River Falls Oct. 12 to 

Plan Improvement. 

Thief River Falls. Minn.. Sept. 30.— 
Invitations to thirty or more delegrates 
from the townships affected by the 
hlg^h water during the last spring and 
to delegates In cities along the Red 
Liake river between this city ajid Grand 
Forks. N. D.. will be sent out by the 
Commercial club this week, calling at- 

tention to the big drainage meeting to 
ake place here on Oct. 12, at which 



CHARGED MOTHER- 
IN-LAW BOARD 



green and heavy and stock has plenty 
to eat. There is also any amount of 
wild hay uncut. The two men now 
say they are satisfied to remain In the 
Floodwood district. 



and H. C. Miller, and the active pall- i parsonage and make Improvements to 
bearers v^ere Deputy State Treasurer the church. All of the church so- 
^d K. trickson and P. H. Funk of St. cletles are busy raising funds to de- 
Paul, and A. M. Anderson, William H. \ fray the expense. When the work- is 
Rinkel. M. E. Stone, J. A. Lothl, J. C. completed the church will be a mod- 



Stearns County Court to 

Hear Family Row 

Aired. 

St. Cloud, Minn.. Sept. 30. — Can a 
man charge his mother-in-law board 
while she is visiting at his home? 
That Is a question that the district 



COOK FARMERS 

COMING TO FRONT 



North Shore County Holds 

First Fair at Grand 

Marais Oct. 7-9. 



Hulett and B. E. Miller of St. Peter. 

Flags were at half mast on the pub- 
lic buildings. Business houses In the 
city closed during the funeral. 

LAY CORNERSTONE FOR 
MASONIC TEMPLE 



em structure. 



Devils Lake Fraternity to 

Soon Have $50,000 

Home. 




Devils Lake. ISf. D.. Sept. 30— As the 
closing event of .ceremonies yesterday 
which Included the laying of the cor- 
nerstone for a new $60,000 temple. 
Grand Marala, Minn., Sept. 30. — (Spe- j Minnewauka* lodge. No. 21. A. F. and 
clal to The Herald.) — Cook county will -^- M.. gave a .banquet last night at 
... ._ , ^ ^ hold it«» first annual fa\y Cint "0 All i Which Special guests of honor were 

court will be asked to answer during '^"'^ ^" ""'^ annual fair Oct. ,-9. All | ,^rand Master Harry Lord of Cando and 
the December term sessions at which ; arrangements have been completed and : Grand Secretary W. L. Stockwell of 

the exhibits will be made in the Trad- Fargo, who, represented the grand 
ing Post building. Cook countv has^^^^® °' Nonth Dakota 
been coming to the front. In an'agrl 



the case of B. N. Robinson vs. John 
M. Smith and wife will be tried. Rob- 
inson, a resident of Oshkosh, Wis., is 
administrator of the estate of Harriet 
Lee. mother of Mrs. Smith. 

According to Robinson's complaint, 
Mrs. Lee loaned $1,000 to the Smiths 
who assured Mrs. Smith's mother they 
could secure a good rate of interest 
for her. During several years a re- 
turn of 7 per cent was made. 

Several months ago Mrs. Lee died. 
Her will made no provision for her 
daughter, Mrs. Smith. The estate was 



Lake region Masons, clad in aprons. 



STAGE BIG CROP 

SHO W AT BISMARCK 

Bismarck, N. D.. Sept. 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The annual North 
Dakota Agricultural and Industrial 
exposition, which opens on Oct. 4, for 
a two weeks' fair at Bismarck, will be 
one of the greatest exhibitions ever 
made of the resources of the state. 

North Dakota Is harvesting this year 
a crop that experts estimate Is five 
times as large as that of 1910. with 
practically the same acreage under 
cultivation. The exhibits at the expo- 
sition will be the choicest samples se- 
lected from this harvest. The entire 
state Is being covered; therefore, North 



ernor also appointed W. G. Haddow. 

Ellsworth, (IS district attorney of 
Pierce county, to succed W. D. Knowles, 
recently appc inted county judge. 



Mot tier Superior Dead. 

Racine. Wis.. Sept. 30. — Mother Mary 
Hyaclnthe, 74 years old, formerly 
Mother Supei lor of the St. Catherine's 
colony of Doriinlcan Sisters in this city, 
died suddenly yesterdav of apoplexy 
at the comm mity house here. She had 
been Mother Superior from 1862 to 
1911. Her name was Mary Oberbrun- 
ner. 



been found this fall In the Northwest 
fairs. By actual count twenty-four per* 
sons are known to have had their 

fockets picked of sums ranging froia 
10 to $215. 

Janesville. — Miss Rosa Somero 1» 
seeking information relative to her 
father. Frank A. Somero, and her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Pauline Hasloff. who left Ber» 
lin, Germany, for Janesville and can- 
not be located. 

Madison. — Miss Frances Q. Perklni^ 
Fond du Lac, was appointed to th» 
board of university regents by Gover* 
nor Philipps. 



DAKOTA BRiEFS MIIVNESOTA BRIEFS 



Centerville, S. D. — The council has 
awarded the contract for the con- 
struction of a sewerage system for 
$24,066. 

Irene. S. E. — At the family home in 
this place occurred the death of Her- 




they 



The farmers' conference will be one December. :n December, i^v,, tnev 

of the most valuable and interesting celebrated tlieir golden wedding an- 

fatherings at the exposition. Practical niversarv ^^^ b 
armers from all over the state and 




over 

the Northwest will meet with agricul- 
tural experts of the nation and talk 
over the farm problems most frequent 
ly met with In this state. 



In taking Important prizes at the state 
fairs, which is evidence that the first 
annual fair of Cook county will be 
well worth seeing. W. A. Dickenson 
and N. E. Chapman of the state ex- 



closed up and all claims disposed of. i tension division, will act as the Judges, 

I Then the administrator called upon i and will also give lectures along agrl- 

' the Smiths to account for the $1,000. cultural, dairy and poultry lines. 

! Promptly the Smiths presented a A splendid list of premiums has been 

counter claim of more than $200 for prepared by the fair officers, and a 

board and lodgings given the deceased i keen Interest Is being taken by local 



during her visit at the Smith home at 
Waite Park. 



HON. H. STEENERSON, 
One o f the Speakers. 

Congressman Halvor Steenerson is to 
be present. From the Interest indi- 
cated in the Initial meeting some weeks 
ago, it is anticipated that every town 
«nd city will be represented. 

The meeting has a dual purpose, the 
discussion or ways and means for 
dredging and straightening the Red 
Lake river from above High Landing 
to Kratka, and also the dredging, low- 
ering and control of the waters of the 
two Red lakes in which the Red river 
rises. 



OPEN SMALL TRACT 

FOR SETTLEMENT 



Cass Lake. Minn., Sept. 30. — The 
Unltf-U Stales land office at Cass Lake 
announces the opening to settlement of ! "pianted" 



FIND STARBUCK LOOT IN 
INTERNATIONAL FALLS 

Savings Certificates From 

Robbed Postoffice Picked 

Up in Box Car. 

International Falls. Minn.. Sept. 30. — 
The postoffice at Starbuck, this state, 
was robbed on the twelfth of Septem- 
ber and yesterday laborers at the local 
paper mill found part of the spoils 
of the robbery in sawdust on the floor 
of a box car. Postmaster Lloyd was 
notified and he recovered over $3,500 
of savings deposit certificates taken 
from the Starbuck postoffice. It would 
appear that the certificates had been 
cashed here, as among the stuff taken 
from the sawdust was a bottle of acid 



farmers. 



COMMUNITY FAIR 

AT RAY SATURDAY 



the new structure defying the weather, 
The new temple will be Inclosed this 
fall and rushed to completion, so that 
it may be occupied at th© earliest pos- 
sible moment. 



FARMERS TO BAR 
CHICKEN HUNTERS 



Cass County to Have Game 

Refuge and Others 

Expected. 



Fargo. N. D., 



Ray. Minn., Sept. 30. — The enterpris- 
ing farmers of this community are 
folng to hold a fair at the Ray vil- 
age hall next Saturday under the 
auspices of their farmers' club. There j The Herald.) — Caes county 
was to be a potato and cooking con- 
test on the part of the school chil- 
dren, under the direction of Mr. Van- 
cura. so farmers and their wives 
decided to get busy and make dis- 
plays at the same time. Miss Flor- 
ence Messner of the culinary depart- 
ment of the district schools will look 
after the displays of baking, etc. D 
B. Jewell, county agriculturist, will 
also take part In the program. 



HEADACHE TABLETS 

HAST EN DEATH 

Aitkin, Minn., Sept. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Coroner J. L. Spalding 
returned this morning from the town 



8,000 acres of cut-over lands near Deer 
River. The lands are open to settle- 
ment only, and not to entr>'. The per- 
son who goes first upon a tract, erects 
buildings and performs general acts of 
settlement, nnd who continues to reside 
on the land.<3, gains a prior and pre- 
ferred right over all other persons to 
•nter the lands later on when they are 
finally ready for entry. 

The tract opened is in the same dis- 
trict as that opened in January. 1915, 
when 13,000 acrea were thrown open 
for settlrment. Both tracts are in the 
same class and are governed by the 
•ame rulings. The date to receive 
illngs has not been announced by the 
lepartmtnt, but it is expected it will 



with a local druggist's label and also i ^f qoin Aitb-tr. r.r.„^*,r -u i. 

the business card of a local estab- ?!„^*.^°' Aitkin county, where he was 

llshment. It has been some time since 
the local postoffice safe was "cracke'd" 
and it might have been in line for 
another visit from "yeggmen." as they 
were evidently in this city when they 
the stuff found in the box 



car. Postoffice Inspectors 
charge of the case. 



are 



in 



ITCIIY BUMG 
ALL OVER SCALP 

Disturbed Rest. Scratching 

Irritated. Hair FeU Out. 

Trouble Arrested by 

CUTICURA SOAP AND 
CUTICURA OINTMENT 

* 

"My ailment was scalp trouble caused 
hr bad soap. I had an Itchy, burning sen- 
■atlon aU over the scalp which often dis- 
turbed my re«t. I was also 
troubled with dandruff and 
my scalp was much irritated 
by scratching. My hair did 
not grow and fell out very 
plentifully. 

"The trouble dated back 
to some five years ago and 
continued up to a few months 
ago. I lued fn&ny remadle* 
before I used Cutlcura Soap and Ointment 
which arrested the trouble immediately. 
My scalp is now In a very healthy condi- 
tion and my hair luxuriant and grows very 
mpldly.' (Signed) Mrs. Herman E. Ro- 
iine. 807 Clark St., Evanston, III,, Jan. 37, 
1016. 

Sample Each Free by Mail 

With 32-p. Bkin Book on request. Ad- 
dresi po8t-<-Aid "Cutienra, Dept. T, Bo«- 
t*a." Sold throughout th« world. 



FARGO HOPES TO 

GET CONSULATE 



Representations Made to 
Norway and Dr. Fjelde 
Suggested as Consul. 

Fargo, N. D.. Sept. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The city commissioners 
passed a resolution urging the Nor- 
wegian government to make Fargo the 
location of the vice consulate for this 
district and also recommended the ap- 
pointment of Dr. H. O. Fjelde as vice 
consul to fill the vacancy caused by 
the death of Halfdan Bendeke of Grand 
Forks. 

The matter was presented to the 
commlsFloners by a delegation from the 
Norse society of this city, which had 
previously held a meeting and unani- 
mously adopted resolutions recommend- 
ing the change of the location of the 
consulate from Grand Forks to Fargo, 
and the appointment of Dr. Fjelde to 
the post. The society calls attention 
to the fact in its resolutions that the 
city of Fargo is the center of the larg- 
est Norse population In the Northwest, 
and also calls attention to the gooa 
work that has been done by Dr. :^Jelde, 
who Is one of the pioneers of this sec- 
tion of the state. 



called to investigate the sudden death 
of Mrs. Henry Wei Jo, a Finnish wom- 
an, which occurred Monday. Dr. H. G. 
Collie of McGregor assisted the coro- 
ner in the examination and decided 
death was due to heart disease and the 
excessive use of headache tablets. 

ST. PETER HONORS 

LAT E JULI US BLOCK 

St. Peter, Minn.. Sept. 30. — St. Peter 
where he first attained pollticai 
prominence, paid honor to the mem- 
pry of Julius H. Block, former state 
treasurer, Tuesday. The body arrived 
from Duluth and was taken to the 
v\ oodlawn cemetery, where Rev W 
N. Courtlce conducted the services' 

Honorary pallbearers were Repre- 
sentative Davis. State Senator H. N 
Benson. County Treasurer John Web- 
ster. Charles A. Johnson. M. Dempsey 



The Stearns mill at Odanah shut 

ave nis farm set aside as a game em'^rove°/«l,'''nnno,5tn J.?^ °/.^Yffl?.^^^^! 
»fuee which nermlta him to uqp It in f^^'*'^™? ^", opportunity to attend the 
f: °^^o^ i.f!L?^!l i.Aii/r„J:° "f.! _-„ fair. The Indians at the reservation 

are making use of surplu."' funds de- 
rived from the proceeds of their own 
fair and swelled the attendance. 




FLOODWOOD LAND 

IS HARD TO EXCEL 

Floodwood. Minn., Sept. 30. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — John RuzynskI and 
John Jagello. two new settlers, having 
suffered a loss of their garden truck 
through an unusually early frost this 
fall, became discouraged with this lo- 
cality recently and. being attracted bv 
advertisements of land at several 
points in Northern "^''Isconsin and 
Michigan, decided to Investigate them. 
After spending a week in their search 
and considerable cash, they returned 
home yesterday and declared tliait 
lands which they were shown were 
mostly either hilly or rocky, or very 
sandy at prices from $20 to $25 per 
acre, while $30 per acre was asked for 
a better grade of land and this was 
not half as good as the land around 
Floodwood. which is level, free of 
stone, has good hardwood timber and 
can be bought at $15 to $19 or $20 per 
acre. Neither did they see hatdly any 
grass In the Wisconsin and Michigan 
timber lands, while the pastures were 
•hort and brown and th* stock looked 



ACT QUICKLY 



Delay Has Been Dangerous in Duluth. 

Do the right thing at the right time. 

Act quickly in time of danger. 

In time of kidney danger Doan's 
Kidney Pills are most effective. 

Plenty of Duluth evidence of their 
worth. 

Mrs. T. J. Vint, 2705 Helm street, 
Duluth, says: "I have used Doan's 
Kidney Pills for some time and have 
found them very beneficial for my 
kidneys. Several years ago I had read 
about Doan's Kidney Pills curing Du- 
luth people of kidney trouble and as I 
had the same ailment, I gave them a 
trial. They cured me of backache and 
made me feel better in every way." 

The above statement was given Oct. 
10, 1912, and on Aug. 2, 1915, Mrs. 
Vint said: "I have not had any need 
of a kidney medicine in several years, 
owing to the fine results I got from 
using Doan's Kidney Pills. I have 
great faith in them as a kidney medi- 
cine." 

Price 50c, at all dealers. Don't 
simply ask for a kidney remedy — get 
Doan's Kidney Pills— the same that 
Mrs. Vint has twice publicly recom 



Sept 30. — (Special to 
will soon 
have the largest game refuge In the 
state, application having been made to 
the state game and fish board for the 
turning over of six adjoining sections 
in the vicinity of ArguevilTe to the 
state for this purpose. 

The last legislature made a law 
whereby any farmer in the jstate can 
have his farm set aside 
r< _ 

his usual farming operations but pro 
hiblts the hunting of game on it. by 
the farmer or anybody else for a per- 
iod of ten years. 

The application to the game board 
comes from eleven farmers in the vi- 
cinity of ArgusviUe. who have banded 
themselves together for this purpose 
and intend t6 pat all their land under 
the new la^ aed have it properly 
posted by the board. 

There hav« b«ken quite a large num- 
ber of other applications from indi- 
vidual farmers here and there over 
the state but this Is the first time 
that such a largo territory has been 
asked to be put into a refuge and Is 
probably due to the serious shortage 
of prairie chickena and grouse In the 
Red River vfelley. 

The conditions have become so se- 
rious that gtat^ and Federal Game 
Warden Maurek has made a personal 
appeal to the hunters in this section 
not to kill any old birds, pointing out 
to them that tbe killing of an old 
uralrie hen at this time means the 
loss of at least one dozen young birds 
next season. 



MOORHEAD MAY 

RAISE TAX LEVY 

Moorhead, Minn., Sept. 30. — Next 
Monday, Oct. 4, will be submitted to 
the electors of the city two amend- 
ments to the city charter. 

The first amendment provides for a 
poor fund to be created by levying 
not more than one mill on the dollar 
of the assessed valuation of the tax- 
able property in the city of Moor- 
head. The second provides for an in- 
crease of the tax levy for the general 
fund to fifteen mills, instead of ten 
mills as heretofore. 



BIG CROWDS AT 

ASH LAND FAIR 

Ashland. Wis.. Sept. 30. — It is esti- 
mated that 7,000 people visited the 
county fair here yesterday and an- 
other large crowd is expected this aft- 
ernoon. All the schools in the city 
took a holiday. Student.? and teachers 
celebrated and every store, manu- 
facturing plant and business hoilse In 
the city was closed. 



nl versa ry 

Grand Foks, N. D. — Holt Shaw, 
treasurer of Grand Forks county for 
the last tour years, died suddenly at 
his home in 1 his city of rheumatism of 
the heart. 

Norman, N. D. — W. B. Bowler and 
Miss Marie iivery were united in the 
holy bonds of matrimony. 

Max. N. D. — Miss Marie Augusta 
Stege. youngest daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Herman Stege, became the bride 
of Abby Ols in, at the home of the 
bride's parents at Nicollet. Minn. Mr. 
and Mrs. Ole^n will make their home 
at Max. 

Bismarck. NT. D. — Miss Marie Anna 
P. Decker ard Richard F. J. Mart ell 
both of Ste vartsdale, were married 
at Bismarck. 

Rhame, N. D. — The marriage of Miss 
Alma HelliiiK of Rhame, and Alfred 
Bernhard Landqulst of Amidon, N. D., 
took place ai the home of the bride- 
groom's motl er, Mrs. A. J. Landqulst, 
129 West Fif ;eenth street. Minneapolis. 

Crystal, N. D. — Albert G. Weiss and 
Miss Josephlre K. Sullivan were mar- 
ried at Havie. Mont. Mr. and Mrs. 
^Velss will le at home at DoUard, 
Sask., after the first of October. Both 
are Crystal y^ung people. 

Mott. N. D. — Miss Olivia Marie I 
Guenther of riampbellsport. Wis., and 
Charles A. N ;lson of Mott were mar- 
ried at BLsmarck by Rev. C. W. Harris 
at the Preslyterlan par.sonage. Mr. 
and Mrs. Nelson will make their home 
at Mott after Oct. 15. 



P£IV1N!>IILA BRIEFS 



iRresrannee Plonerr Dead. 

Negaunee. Mich.. Sept. 80. — Capt. 
John Foley, long a resident of Ne- 
gaunee. died Tuesday at Minneapolis. 
He had been sick for more than a 
year. Capt. Foley, who was 82 years 
of age. Is survived by his wife and the 
following sons and daughters: Edward 
of Negaunee; Nina, and Mrs. B. H. 
Bomback of Minneapolis; Mrs. Funk of 
Mankato, Minn., and David of Missoula, 
Mont. The family left Negaunee five 
years ago. 



POLK COUNTY FARM 

HAS BIG YIELD 

Fosston. Minn.. Sept. 30. — One of 
the most phenomenal yields of wheat 
ever grown In this section has Just 
been threshed on the farm of S. S. 
Stadsvold. who. upon a tract of land 
exactly 2 65-100 acres, secured at the 
rate of 55% bushels of marquis wheat 
from each acre. The plot of ground 
was plowed, disced and seeded last 
spring by Nels Omstad. and the grain 
was harvested this fall by John Dor- 
sey. the shocking being done by 
Knute Eiken. 

Olson Bros., the Poplar Lake thresh- 
ermen. did the threshing, the machine 
weight measurement being 148 Vi 
bushels. Taken to the Fosston Eleva- 
tor & Flouring mills and weighed by 
Andy Lukken, the scales showed 149 
bushels and 20 pounds. This wheat 
tested 64^ pounds per measured 
bushel. 

Mr. Stadsvold believes that had this 
wheat been stacked or threshed three 
weeks previous, it would have yielded 
no less than 60 bushels to the acre, 
as the field of shocks had been very 

Eopular with the blackbirds and other 
irds since Its cutting. 

FREE METHODISTS 

CO NVENE IN FARGO 

Fargo. N. D.j^ Sept. 30.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The annual meeting of 
the North Efakota Conference of the 
Free Methodist church convened here 
this aftcrnooji at 2 o'clock, with Bishop 
Hoiige of Chicago presiding. There are 
about fifty delegates present from all 
over the etate. the conference being 
made up of equ?^! numbers of ministers 
and lay delegiiteij. 

The session this afternoon was de- 
voted to ths,natxiing of the conference 
committees and the address by Bishop 
Houge. The aesaions will continue over 
Sunday, meejilngji to be held morning, 
afternoon and each evening. 

In addition to the regular delegates 
there are a nunvt>«r of member visitors 
present from ov«r the state and West- 
ern Minnesota. . 



Barron Paper Sold. 

Eau Claire. Wis.. Sept. 30. — August 
Ender, publisher of the Durand Enter- 
ing Wedge up to a few nxonths ago. 
and formerly connected with the news 
gathering forces of the Telegram and 
Leader, has purchased the Barron 
County Shield, a weekly published by 
W. F. Durnal at Barron. Wis. 

AVlmoonHtn Plam Falls, 

Madison. Wis.. Sept. 30. — Governor 
Philipps has appointed Michael Laffey. 
Milwaukee, as state treasury agent. 
The salary Is $2,000 a year. The gov- 



URGES EVERYONE 
TO QUICKLY GET 
ON WATER WAGON 

Drink Glass of Hot Water Before 

Breakfast to Wash Out 

Poisons. 



Renio«l«I ;Cloqaet Chareh. 



mended. Fostcr-Milburn Co., Props Cloquet, Mina. Sept. 80— The board 
Tlnffalr. M V ' of trustees of tbe Norwegian Lutheran 

uuiiaio, XM. X, I church will r«model the Interior oX the 



To see the tinge of healthy bloom In 
your face, to see your skin get clearer 
and clearer, to wake up without a 
headache, backache, coated tongue or a 
nasty breath. In fact to feel your best, 
day In and day out. Just try Inside 
bathing every morning for one week. 

Before breakfast each day, drink a 
glass of real hot water with a tea- 
spoonful of limestone phosphate in it 
as a harmless means of washing from 
the stomach, liver, kidneys and bowels 
the previous day's indigestible waste, 
eour bile and toxins; thus cleansing, 
sweetening and purifying the entire 
alimentary canal before putting more 
food Into the stomach. The action of 
hot water and limestone phosphate on 
an empty stomach is wonderfully in- 
vigorating. It cleans out all the sour 
fermentations, gases and acidity and 

fives one a splendid appetite for 
rcakfast. 

A quarter pound of limestone phos- 
phate win cost very little at the drug 
store but is sufficient to demonstrate 
that Just as soap and hot water 
cleanses, sweetens and freshens the 
skin, so hot water and limestone phos- 
phate act on the blood and Internal 
organs. Those who are subject to con- 
Btlpatlon, bilious attacks, acid stom- 
ach, rheumatic twinges, also those 
whose skin Is sallow and complexion 
pallid, are assured that one week of 
Inside bathing will have them both 
looking and feeling better in every 
wajr. 



Lake Linden — Word has bein re- 
ceived In Lalte Linden of the sudden 
^eath of Ben:amln Harris at Topeka. 
Kan. 

Marquette — Funeral services for the- 
late Mrs. E. T. Marshall will be held 
this afternoor, from the residence of 
Mrs. F. O. Cirter, sister of the de- 
ceased. 

L'Anse — The old boarding house, a 
landmark on the L'An?e end Pequan- 
ing road, was torn down this week by 
Fred Schultz. the owner. The white 
pine lumber used In construction was 
as good as tie day the building was 
put up. 

Tshpeming — The Ishpeming City and 
Marinette fool ball teams will play in 
their first gume of the season on 
local grounds Sunday. Ishpeming will 
have a strong team, with an average 
weight of 185 pounds, composed of old 
time players. 

Torch Lake — Miss Florence Hart 
was married to Joseph Fountaine in an 
Impressive ce -emony at St. Cecelia's 
church Wedr epday morning. The 
bride was attended by Miss Corinne 
Fountaine, while Louis Hart. Jr.. at- 
tended the grcom. 

Hancock — The library at the Fin- 
nish church has received an addition 
of 342 books given to It from the Sil- 
berg estate at Republic. 

Republic — There was a dearth of 
vital statistics in Republic township 
during the for? part of Septemb«?r. not 
a single birth having been recorded in 
the first fourteen days of the month 
and there not having been a single 
death until llgntning claimed a farmer 
residing south of the village. 

Hancock — Rev. R. M. Pierce, the new 
pastor of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal church of Hancock, is due to ar- 
rive In Hancock Friday evening. 



WlSCOl^SIN BRIEFS 



Milwaukee. — Tuesday was the sev- 
enty-fifth bir hday anniversary of 
George W. Peek. He appeared down 
town as usual with the inevitable red 
carnation and received the felicitations 
of many friend)!.- 

New London, — Fire at Manawa de- 
stroyed the building owned by the Odd 
Fellows' lodge, and used as a public 
hall. The loss will exceed $5,000. The 
origin of the fire is not known. Only 
desperate efforts prevented the burning 
of a large section of the village. 

Ashland. — Ths night shift of the J. 
S. Steams Luiober company at Oda- 
nah has closed down and only the day 
shift is operating at present. It was 
found necessary to close the night 
shift as the river logs were practically 
all cut. 

Madison. — J. SI. Tittemore of Poygan 
was in Madisori to see Senator Robert 
M. La Follette in regard to the freight 
rate question. He claims Senator La 
Follette will discuss this question in 
his forthcomlnj: speeches In the state, 
which means the revival of the railroad 
Isaue by the etnator. 

Ashland. — At a special meeting of the 
Monday club the delegates to the nine- 
teenth annual convention of the Wis- 
consin Federation of Women's Clubs, 
which is to be held at La Crosse, were 
elected. The delegates are Mrs. Wil- 
liam Buckley and Mrs. John Watson, 
and the alternBtes are Mrs. Ed Brown 1 
and Miss Pow< rs. 

Chippewa Fa; Is. — The Northern Wis- 
consin state fair which closed here last 
week proved ti be the best field for 
the APMMKjitlon <f pickpocket* that ha« 



Bemidji—The Bemidjl city council 
has authorized the refunding of un- 
used portions of liquor licensea. on 
account of the Indian treaty, to twelve 
n?S^V * saloonkeepers who signed 
claims for the money 

Ttir.''^°'*?*"v"~^^^- "a«l Griffith of 
?r1nf^^,' }'^^ started suit in the dla- 
rrfiruK"'".^ '"^i^"!'^ h*''" hu.sband. Franl« 
Gnrrith. in which she asks for a di- 
vorce. 

r,no*' £^oud— J. W Denny, who for th* 
past three years has been in the real 
estate business In this citv. died 
Tuesday at the local hospitaf follow. 
Ing a severe attack of appendicitis 
punnell— Charles Theobald, aged 30. 
a farmer residing north of town, wa» 
accidentally killed while helping filj 
a silo on the Lenius Petereon farm. 
He vras standing near the cutter when 
the fan of the blower broke, throw* 
ing pieces of castings hundreds of 
feet one piece hitting him In the 
forehead. 

Mapleton — Miss Mae Taylor of Dele- 
van and Jesee Whitney, cashier of th* 
State Bank of Delevan. were married. 

Winnebago — Miss Mary R. Marston, 
a graduate of Parker college. and 
Francis M. Hardy were married In thl« 
I city. 

Arlington — The marriage of William 
|Westerman of Mayer and Miss Ann* 
I Hedtke of Waconia took place here. 
Cards are out announcing the wedding 
I of John A. Schneider of Victoria ana 
I Miss Helen Kunze of Waconia 
I Hastings — W. M. Gicffer of Hampton 
I and Mi.=s Anna Reinardy of Marshaa 
I were married at New Trier 

Albert Lea — Alex McNiel. suffering 
from an attack of heart failure while 
on a scaffold, fell headlong to the 
ground sixteen feet below. While he 
received serious injury it Is thought 
the fall revived his heart action and 
has given him a chance for recovery. 



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*^0h Look! 

I can eat 'em all — they 
won't hurt me! That's be- 
cause they're made with Calu- 
met — and that's why they're 
pure, tempting, tasty, whole- 
some — that's why they won't 
hurt any kid." 

Receired Highest Award* 

Kta CooJt jB.«i Fr,,—St4 Slit 
in PtunJ Can. 



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Thursday, 



THE DULUTI^ ^HERALD 



September 30, 1915. 



it 




BOND PAYMENT 
CHARTER SNAG 

Virginia Commissioner Fa- 
vors Special Election for 
Vexed Question. 



Unless Separated From 

Charter Latter May Be 

Defeated. 



Vlrgrlnla, Minn., St.pt. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — That the water and light 
bond payment issue, which has been an 
obstacle in the work of the charter 
commissioners, should be allowed to go 
to the people as a separate proposition 
at a referendum election, if 15 per 
c«nt of the voters desire an election, 
waa the sentiment at the commission 
meeting last night at the city hall. The 
meeting was attended by ten commla- 
slonerB, but final action on the mat- 
ter waa deferred until Friday evening. 
Fifteen members compose the commis- 
sion and a large attendance is expected 
at the next meeting. 

Charles C. Butler suggested that the 
water and light Ispue be left untouched 
and his suggestion was popular. 

"I can find littlf sentiment against 
the present method of paying for the 
water and light bonds," declared Com- 
missioner Butler. "If the people want 
to have the bonds paid In whole or 
part by general direct taxation, they 
can decide at a referendum election. 
Only 16 per cent of the voters are re- 
quired to petition for such an election. 
With the bond Issue out of the way the 
charter will have a much better chance 
to pass." 

"If the bonds are paid by general di- 
rect taxation, politicians running for 
office will be elected on a rider," de- 
clared Commissioner McGhee, who Is 
also a member of the city council, 
chairman of the school board and a 
former candidate for mayor. "They will 
favor reducing the water and light rate 
In an effort to bait the voters. I be- 
lieve we should decide the amendment 
proposition no-w. The people are not 
conversant enough with the water and 
light proposition, which is one of the 
most important municipal matters in 
the history of the city." 

A change was made In the charter, 
providing for a primary election two 
weeks before a recall election. 

SGHOOLSORGANIZE 
FOR KIGHT WORK 



a wetk by Miss Evelyn Hansen, super- 
visor in the city schools. 

MlsiB Grace Bacon, w^ho ia in charge 
of the domestic science department, 
will teach cooking five nights a week. 
One-half year instruction will be giv- 
en in sewing by Miss Helen Oberg. 

Miss Eva E. Sorenson. lower grade 
supervisor, will be in charge of the 
girls' playroom in the Southside school 
and will conduct classes Tuesdays and 
Thursdays. Miss Susan Batzer will be 
in charge of the Southside girls Mon- 
day, Wednesdays and Fridays. 

The playroom In the Southside school 
will be used Mondays and Tuesdays by 
the boys, under the direction of 
Nathaniel J. Quickstead. Wednesdays, 
Thursdays and Fridays, C. W. Pfeiffer 
of the high school faculty will direct 
the boys in th» Southside school play- 
room. 

Bernard T. Foley will have charge of 
the Northslde playroom for boys 
Modays, W^ednesdays and Fridays. 
The-Northaide girls" will use the room 
Tuesdays and Thursdays under the di- 
rections of Miss Edna Gould. 

If the enrollment is lair' enough all 
the following teachers will be used to 
give Instruction In English: Edna L. 
Cole, Flora Chisholm. Minnie Crist, 
Agnes Cary, Nora Anderson. Julia Cos- 
tin, Mabel Rud. Stella Robertson. Re- 
gina Stenger. Nell Walte, Helen Good- 
rich, Eliazbeth Malerlch, Anna Ander- 
."on. Laura Govett, Anna Mills and 
Elizabeth Buckbee. 



GiLBERrS NEW HALL 
TO BE MODERN 



CLUB ORGANIZES 
FOR WINTER'S WORK 



Supt. Colgrove of Virginia 

Appoints Faculty for 

Coming Winter. 

Virginia, Minn., Sept. 80 — Supt. P. P. 
Colgrove has announced the teachers 
for the night school team, which will j 
op«n Monday. Eighteen teachers will 
have charge of the classes, and if the 

enrollment Increases, more Instructors 
will be added. 

Miss Kathryn Carey and Alf K. 
Jackson will have charge of the Tech- 
nical high school gjmnaaium. H. J. 
Scharr, Herman J. Wieland and C. O. 
Smith will teach manual training. ^ 

Miss Agnes Melgard will be In 
rhartfe of the stenography and type- 
v/rlting cla.'5se3 and will give Instruc- 
tion four nights a week. Miss Julia 
Carter will teach penmanship, spelling 
and arithmetic four nights a week. 
r»rawlng will be taught three nlghta 



Mountain Iron Business 

Men Elect Officers and 

Have "Smoker." 

Mountalti Iron. Minn., Sept. 30. — 
(Special to The Herald.)— The smoker 
given by the Commercial club this 
week was one of the most enjoyable In 
a long time. The social features were 
preceded by a business meeting at 
which D. A. Mitchell was re-elected 
president, Charles Walker, first vice, 
and J. F. Muench, second vice. Victor 
Frazer was elf-cted secretary and H. J. 
Henderson, Sr., trea.«urer. All the of- 
ficers will serve until the annual meet- 
ing In May. 

Music waa furnished by the band 
and a lunch was served by a commit- 
tee consisting of Mr. Henderson, Mr. 
Cannon and Dr. Parsons. 

A comniittpe consisting of Mr. Wal- 
ker, Mr. Apull and Mr. Frazer was 
named by the chairman to confer with 
the officials of Nicols township in re- 
gard to having certain bridges put in 
on the new road over the divide north 
and west of the village. 

A vote of thanks was extended to 
the band for furnishing music for the 
evening; also to the committee which 
prepared the lunch. The work of this 
committee was so entirely satisfactory 
that it was suggested they be named 
as a permanent standing committee for 
such ocx?ftslons. 

Meetings of the club arr held on the 
second and fourth Tuesdays of each 
month. The dues are $2 a year, pay- 
able semi-annually In advance. 

The secretary was authorized to 
have a number of copies of the con- 
stitution and by-laws of the organiza- 
tion prepared, a copy of which will be 
glvon to each member. 

The following men Joined the club 
at the meeting Tuesday evening: Or- 
niond. Hnnlon, Williams, Blough, 
Quale. Kedman, Burton, Stefanlch, 
Frazer, H. J. Henderson. Charles An- 
der.'^on, John Anderson, Kastinen, 
Berk. Vltfln D. Tacco. 



Rheumatism 

A Home Cure Given bj One Who Had It 

In tlM spring nf 1S93 I wu attacked by 
Uuacular and Inflammatory Rheamattsm. I 
•ulTerort m only those who have It know, for 
o»er three jeaxs. I triod remedy after rem- 
edy, and doctor aftor doctor, but such relief 
u I rocelvpd was only temporal?. Ftually 
I f.'>und a remedy that cured ms completely, 
«nd It has ne^er returned. I bare glren it 
to a number who were terribly affiliated and 
even bedrldcieii with Rheiimatlam, and It ef- 
fected a cure In every case. 

I want e»ery aufTerw from any f<>rm fif 
rheuiuiitlc trouble Ui try tills maneUuifl heal- 
ing power. Don't sond a cent; slmoly mall 
yi)ur name ajid atidress and I will send it 
free to try- After you have used It and It 
h!>* provea it&elf to be that long-looked-for 
msana of curing your Itheumatism, you may 
Mtid the price uf It. one dollar, but. undor- 
Btaiid. I do not wtiit your mon«y unless you 
are perfecUy natlsfled to send It. Lsn't that 
fair? Why suffer any longer when p<i»ltlve 
relief U thus offered you freef Don't delay. 
Write today 

Mark H. Jark«>n. No. 3MB Gum^y Bldg., 
Syracuse. N. Y. 

Mr. Jackson Is reai><^nslble. Aboire stAte- 
laeni truA— Pub. 

mBmmmmmammammmmaBBammmammi 




SPECIALISTS 

WUl Make You \fe\]\ 

Th« true Speclailat never at- 
tempts to do more than he can 
do WELL. Our entire practice 
Is limited to Diseases of Men 
alone, such as STOMACH AND 
BOWEL TROUBLES, SKIN DIS- 
EA.SBS. BLOOD DISORDERS, 
RHKMMATISM. NERVOUS DIS- 
ORDERO, NEURAI.GIA, CA- 
TARRH, PILES. RUPTURB, 
HE.^RT TROUBLIiS. VARICOSE 
VEIN'S, RECTAL TROUBLES. 
BLADDER TROUBLE. STRIC- 
TURE and other diseases of men. 

"«0« nnd 914" for a Complete 

Heaiing of Blood-Dleordrra 

and Blood-Polsoa. 

Our Method of Blectro and 
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M< thud and see how quickly it 
win make you well. Consulta- 
tion free. Offices, No. 1 West 
Superior street, at corner Lake 
A.venue, Duluth. Hours — 9 a. m. 
to S p. m.; Sundays, 10 a. m. to 
i p. m. 

Progressive 
Medical Doctors 



ANOTHER ITASCA 

FA RMER WINS OUT 

Grand Rapids, Minn.. Sept. 30. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — One of the 
"green" farmers of the Grand Rapids 
vicinity who is making good "back on 
the land," and who Is not depending 
on the brawn of others to get his 
farming done. Is Cal Oilman, who for 
years was In the saloon business, but 
who quit that occupation voluntarily 
a couple of years ago to devote his 
time to his forty-acre farm, which he 
owns about two miles south of Grand 
Rapids on the south road to Pokegama 
lake. 

Mr. Oilman has been starting in a 
small way. He did not have much of 
a clearing when he started, and he en- 
larged that until he has today about 
twenty-two acres under the plow, 
about four or five acres of which was 
cleared this year. This work. Including 
hl3 regular farm work, says Mr. Gil- 
man, was all done by himself, practi- 
cally no work being hired. This year, 
Mr. Oilman states that he put In his 
crops, tended to them, and cleared and 
broke over four acres himself with an 
outlay of only $6.50 for labor, which 
he needed at odd times to help him 
with particularly heavy work. His 
clearing, by the way, was in land on 
which heavy pines formerly grew, and 
there were many large stumps, much 
big down timber, and a heavy second 
growth of poplar and other hardwood 
It Is just the kind of land that folks 
will tell you It will take a life time 
to make a farm out of. Mr. Gllman Is 
Just passing middle age, and he Is 
starting out with optimism, and he 
will not have to live much longer to 
realize the fruits of his labor and en- 
Joy comfort on the very acres which 
others have said It would take a life 
time to Improve. 

EVELETH NIGHT 

SCHOO L OPE NS OCT. 5 

Eveleth. Minn., Sept. 30. — Letters an. 
nounclng the opening of night school 
on Oct. 6 have been mailed to former 
and prospective students bv Supt. B. 
O. Greening of the local schools. 

The work will be in charge of Otto 
Schmidt, a member of the Eveleth 
teaching staff, and will Include classes 
for beginners In English and ad- 
vanced English. Commercial work will 
be taught rnd special emphasis will be 
placed on manual training and prepar- 
ation for citizenship. 

The night sessions will sta^t at 
7:30 and will be held in the high school 
building. Extensive preparations are 
being made for the education of those 
who take advantage of night school, 
and a series of social functions will 
be held for their benefit. 



Plans Completed and Build- 
ing Adequate for All 
Departments. 

Gilbert, Minn., Sept. 30. — (Special to 

The Herald.) — The plans for the new 

village hall for which bids have been 

asked, have arrived and call for a 

building which is very complete and 
which should be adequate for some 
time to come. One-half of the ground 
floor is devoted to the fire department, 
with rooms In the rear for a dormitory. 
The police department and township 
clerk also have offices on this floor. 

On the second floor there are coun- 
cil rooms, offices for the village clerk, 
justices, superintendent of the water 
and light and village engineer, with 
vaults for preserving the village rec- 
ords. The building will be handsome 
as well as useful and will be a great 
help to the village officers when com- 
pleted. The plans were prepared at 
the offices of the Oliver Iron Mining 
company in Duluth. 

The village will install some paving 
*nd cement sidewalks next year and 
work is now going^ on to make prep- 
arations for that work. Where fill is 
required under the sidewalks on the 
low side of the street retaining walls 
are being built under the direction of 
Street Commissioner Bodas. The fill is 
al.Ho being placed so as to have it set- 
tled ready for putting on the sidewalk 
next year. 

The work at the waterworks filtra- 
tion plant is being rushed to com- 
pletion by the Butler-Coons Contract- 
ing company as rapidly as possible. At 
the present time the water for the 
village Is being- pumped directly from 
Ely lake without filtration and in- 
struction to householders have been 
Issued by Dr. Strathern of the board 
of health to boil the drinking water 
until further orders. 

The sewage filtration plant has been 
enlarged and thoroughly cleaned out. 
A fence has been built around the 
plant and a gasoline sludge pump in- 
stalled to pump the sludge from the 
bottcrm of the settling tank. This 

sludge when dried Is hauled away by 
farmers and is said to make very 
good fertilizer. Other improvements 
have been made to reduce the labor 
of caring for the plant and make it 
more sanitary for the caretaker. 



FINNISH LABORER 
BURNED TO DEATH 



Frank Solni's Charred Re- 
mains Found in Little 
Swan Shack. 

Hibbing, Minn., Sept. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Frank Solnl, a Finnish 
laborer, recently employed on the roads 
In this vicinity, was burned to death 
In a shack in the Little Swan district 
Tuesday night. The building was not 
destroyed and the body of Soini was 
not found until late yesterday. All 
that remained ■was a few charred bones. 

Solnl had been a member of a Stuntz 
township road crew that was laid off 
this week and on Tuesday walked to 
the Little Swan farming section, where 
he appeared somewhat Intoxicated, at 
the home of S. Koskl and a^ked to 
stay there for the night. There was 
no room at the house and he was di- 
rected to a small building in the neigh- 
borhood. Soinl was addicted to cigar- 
ettes and Is believed to have accidental- 
ly set his straw bed on fire. 

He was 35 years old and Is said to 
have a wife in the Old Country. The 
remains were brought to Hlbblng this 
morning. 

SPRUCE MINER 

D YNAMI TE VICTIM 

Eveleth, Minn., Sept. 30. — (Special to 

The Herald.) — Albert Makl. laborer, 

employed at the Spruce mine in the 

Eveleth district, was Instantly killed 

yesterday when a box of dynamite 

caps he was moving from one location 

I to another was exploded. Maki was 

I disemboweled and died while being 

j taken to an Eveleth hospital. 

Makl was 24 years old and leaves a 
wife and one child. The funeral will 
be held Friday. 

LIBRARY BOARD 

WI LL RE ORGANIZE 

Chisholm. Minn., Sept. 30. — (Ispeclal 
to The Herald.) — The regular month- 
ly meeting of the library board will 
be held at the library on Monday eve- 
ning. Oct. 4, at which time reorgani- 
zation of the board will take place 
and members of the library staff for 
the ensuing year will be elected. 

Miss Frances Gandsey Is now a reg- 
ular assistant at the library, having 
been elected to that position at the 
last board meeting- 




KOUKCA9T TIL.I, 7 JP 
FRIDAY 

For Duluth, 8ui«rl,>r and Tldnlty, 
Imludln* the MesaU and Vermiaon 
ir.n raine.: Partly cloudy weaUiec 
t<«itfhi and Friday; slisia changw in 
Usraiwature; ll«ht to mcdecat* Tft- 
rlable winds. 



MUes Per Hour 

m to 3 

tit air 3 to 8 

lit breeze 8 to IS 

He tweeze....l2 to 18 
ierate Ureez«.18 to 23 

tth breeze 23 to 28 

>oc breeze. ...28 to 34 
.lerate sale. ..34 U) 40 

ah vale. 40 to 48 

;mg file 48 to 50 

ole gale 50 to 65 

nn 63 to TS 

rrlcane Over 75 

W. RICHARDSON. 



EXPLANATORY NOTES. 

Oh«»r»«llo»>» takiti al 8 ». "• , "•tfKly-WUi meri<fian time Air preuuro aedaced to Ka level. IsoaABS f coatimioua Gbm^ nu< lln^.»»i. ~>i.i. ...# __- f .w • • >. . 




I_ ."^^^ warmei 
^ I Diand of weather 
PARTlYClOUDTl «»^"nues and for 
'I «^-*ew minutes this 
— ^— — — — ' .morning it looked 
ia« though the sun 
T*us going to be on 
duty for a time to- 
day. However, the 
Qiouds were too 
much for it; hence 
the sky is blank- 
eted. 

A year ago today 
was sunny and 
Warm. The sun 
rose this morning at 6:0C and will set 
this evening at 5:50, giving eleven 
hours and forty-four minutes of sun- 
light. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

*'The disturbance centered over the 
Gulf of Mexico resulted in hurricane 
winds Wednesday a*d last night at 
New Orleans. Rains fell during 
vVednesday or laat night over Gulf and 
South Atlantic states, Tenneessee and 
the Southwest and Northwest. Frosts 
occurred again last night over New 
York. Ohio. Michigan and Southern 
Wisconsin. Freezing temperatures in 
Wyoming and portions of Montana, 
Eastern Michigan and Eastern On- 
tario." 



night; Friday increasing cloudiness, 
probably rain in south portion. 

Upper Michigan — Partly cloudy to- 
night and Friday. 

Temperature*. 

Following were the highest temper- 
atures In the last twenty-four hours 
and the lowest in the last twelve, end- 
ing at 7 a. m. : 

High Low 



General PorrcnMts. 

Chicago. Sept. 30. — Forecasts for the 
twenty-four hours, ending at 7 p. m. 
Friday: 

Minnesota and Wisconsin — Partly 
cloudy tonight and Friday; not tnuch 
change In temperature. 

Iowa — Partly cloudy tonlg-ht and 
Friday, probably rain i^ south por- 
tion; not much chanf^f in temnera- 
ture. 

North Dakota and South Dakota — 
Generally fair tonight and Friday; 
warmer tonight. 

Montana — Generally fair tonight and 
Friday; warmer In east portion to- 
night; cooler Friday. 

Lower Michigan — Partly cloudy to- 



state to flsh In International waters. 
Illegally netting flsh. When the 
weather cleared they placed Klein un- 
der arrest. He was brought to Vir- 
ginia last night by Game Warden 
Wood, taken to Kinney this morning 
and paid a line of |100 and costs, aftdr 
entering a plea of not guilty to illegal 
fishing In the waters of Rainy lake. 

Klein had frequently made the boast 
that he didn't fear the game wardens. 
Under his state license he was permit- 
ted to use 760 feet of net. The war- 
dens found in his possession 6,625 feet 
of net and two illegal flsh traps. He 
had thirty sections of net in all. The 
entire outfit, with his boats and other 
equipment was seized and will be 
turned over to the state and sold. The 
wardens also confiscated a quantity of 
fish. 



Hlgbliow 

AbUene 70 60 

Alpena 5« 32 

Aniarlllo 62 

BatUeford 60 32 

Bismarck 48 42 

Bclse TJ 46 

Boston 66 48 

Buffalo 60 42 

Cairo 64 

Calgary 66 30 

Charles City 60 

Charleston 78 74 

Chlca«o 56 56 

Conrordla 84 

Paveoport 42 

Oeorer 48 44 

Des Modnes 66 50 

I>evi]a L.aJce 48 44 

Dodse 63 52 

Dubuque 64 46 

LULUTH 44 44 

Edmonton 68 40 

Escanaba 54 40 

Fort Smith 64 

Galveston 90 76 

Grand Haren C2 40 

Oreen Baj 68 44 

Havre 84 32 

Helena 62 42 

Hiiughton 36 

Huron 54 36 

Indiun&polls 44 

Jv^JcsomlUe 84 72 

KamlooiK 66 54 

Kansas City 62 59 

Keokuk 46 

Knoxvllle 88 66 

L* Orr see 60 

Lander 96 

Lo<iUTine T» 52 

tladi3un 60 44 

if i\rquette ....... 50 46 

Medicine Hit . . .68 42 

Meniphig 76 68 

Miles City 58 86 

Milwaukee 58 48 



Minnedosa 48 40 

Mudcna 68 32 

Montgomery 82 72 

Montreal 58 40 

Mdorhead 50 44 

NashyUle 62 

Kew York 68 48 

North Platte 90 50 

Oklaiioma 64 60 

Omahai 64 60 

Parry Sound ....62 ao 

Phoenix 92 58 

Pierre 56 36 

Pittsburgh 86 46 

Port Arthur 50 42 

Portland, Or 78 52 

Prince Albert ...60 34 

Qu'A'velle 46 40 

Raleigh 60 56 

Rai>l(l City 56 38 

Boeebiuv 82 46 

Kosvrell 4S 

St. Ixwto 72 50 

St. PaiU 58 48 

Salt Lake City .54 46 

San IMe«o 70 S6 

San Ftanclsro. . ..83 56 

Sault 8t«. Marie. 58 86 

Seattle . . ; TO 03 

Shertdan ,.M SO 

Slvreveport 82 68 

Sioux CUy 62 46 

Spokane 70 44 

Springfield. Ill 46 

Springfield. Mn 50 

Sw-lf t Current ... 58 M 

Tamt>» 86 74 

Toledo 58 44 

Vaientlne 88 

WaahlngtOB 70 42 

WlchUa 56 

WlUlston 48 42 

Wlimcmucca ....72 84 

Wlnnli>eg 52 44 

Tellowatoua 64 18 



location. Mr. Burt is chief clerk in 
the Fayal office, 



GUbert C 

Gilbert. Minn.. 
club of Gilbert 
dancing party < 
night. The musi 
the Go-Fer orch 



lub to Dance. 

Sept. 30.— The Go-Per 
will give its second 
>f the season Friday 
c wiil be furnished by 
estra. 



WILL AGAIN 
• AAD 



HEAD 
TEMPLE PATROL 



For the fifth c 
[ A. H. Paul was 
head the Arab 
Nobles of the M 
At the annual 
Masonic temple, 
unanimously to 
office another yei 
banks and Che 
; elected first and 
1 apectlvely. 

Reports were i 



onsecutive year, Capt. 
ast evening chosen to 
patrol of Aad temple, 
i^stic Shrine, 
election held at the 
the members vot<M 
continue Capt. Paul in 
ir, while Wallace WeU 
j-les Jones were re- 
second lieutenants, re- 

aade by the officers on 



ANOTHER BIG HAUL 

BY WARD EN WOOD 

Virginia. Minn., Sept. 30. — Marooned 
on an island in Rainy lake for the 
greater part of two days and a night, 
because the lake was so rough that 
It could not be navigated in a canoe. 
Game Wardens George Wood of Hib- 
bing and C. W. Wisard of Interna- 
tional Falls watched J. W. Klein, com- 
mercial fisherman, licensed by the 



SUDDEN DEATH 

FOR EVELETH MAN 



RANGE DOCTORS TO 

M EET A T HIBBING 

Hibbing, Minn., Sept. 30. — The first 
meeting of the Range Medical associa- 
tion since last winter will be held 
here Friday. Oct. 8, at the Carnegie 
library. Dr. Paul B. Magnuson of Chi- 
cago win lecture on fractures. His 
talk will be Illustrated with some 350 
lantern elides. A Virginia physician 
will report on the state medical meet- 
ing to be held at Rochester on Oct. 1. 
A banquet will be given during the 

I evening. 

I The Range Medical association meets 
several times each year. The last one 
was held at Chisholm. Dr. John 
Farmer of McKlnley is president of 
the association and Dr. Henry Michel- 
son of Virginia Is secretary. 
« 

Chl!«hnlm-mwablk Game. 

Chisholm, Minn.. Sept. 30 (Special 

to The Herald.) — The high school 
football team will meet the Biwabik 
eleven on the local field Saturday and 
a good game Is looked for. The lo- 
cal squad has been considerably 
strengthened by the return of Hayes 
to the game. He is heavy, fast and a 
good kicker. 



For Pile 
Sufferers 

Sample Pack- 

«ve 9t the 

F a m o a ■ 

>:^r-"^' ^I^^Hk Pyramid Pile 
^ ^x- .. .saB^^^u Treat meat 

"i V+V^"^ J i^^^n Now Offered 
'^^^^^K Free to Prove 
What It Will 
Oo for You. 

^ JN^;!g^sr Pyramid Filo 
T r eatment 

f rives quick re- 
lef, stops itch- 
I n g, bleeding 
or protruding piles, hemorrhoids and 
all rectal troubles. In the privacy of 
your own home. 50c a box at all 
druggists. A single box often cures. 
Free sample for trial with booklet 
mailed free in plain wrapper. If you 
send UB coupon below. 

FREE SAMPLE COUPON 

PYRAMID DRUG COMPANY, 

529 Pyramid Bldg.. Marshall, Mich. 
Kindly send me a Free sample of 
Pyramid Pile Treataient, in plain 
wrapper. 

Name 

Street 

City State 




Jacob Ridantaa Retires in 

Good Health and Dies 

at 5 o'clock. 

Kveleth. Minn., Sept. 30. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Jacob Ridantaa, a well- 
known resident of this city, died Bud« 
denly at his home early this morn- 
ing from what is believed to bo 
apoplexy. 

Ridantaa retired last night in ap- 

?'arently good health, but at 6 o'clock 
his morning his wife was awakened 
by his moans and before a physician 
could be summoned he was dead. A 
post mortem will be held this after- 
noon. 

Mr. Ridantaa was 40 years old and 
was in charge of the meat depart- 
ment at Pentllla & Matson's store. In 
addition to his wife he Is survived 
by two young daughters. He was a 
brother-in-law of both members of the 
firm for which he worked. 

The funeral arrangements have not 
vet been made, but will be held at the 
Finnish church, of which he -wrsL* a 
prominent member and also auper- 
intendent of the Sunday school. 

VIRGINIA PASTORS 

ARDE NT SP ORTSMEN 

Virginia. Minn.. Sept. 80. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Rev. Gustav Kvlsgaard 
has joined the ranks of Virginia hunt- 
ers. He is pastor of the Norwegian 
Methodist church, and like Rev. Hans 
J. Wolner of the St. John's Episcopal 
church, is an enthusiastic sportsman. 

Others who secured hunting licenses 
here this week are: Dr. P. E. Thomas. 
Gus Johnson, Major Smith, Michael 
Kurtlla, Joseph Ellis, Frank Smith, L. 
T. Martin. John Christlanson, Ever 
Omann. A. H. Braa, Joseph Backus. 
R. Johnson. M. Singer, David Gorman, 
C. J. Johnson, Harry Fuller. O. O. 
EUerick, Frank Laurlch. Ralph B. 
Conoway, August Harry. George Gar- 
vis. D. L* Bruno and Joseph T. Cur- 
tiss. 

Local hardware dealers report the 
sale of many shells. Aijcording to the 
dealers and City Clerk Albert E. Blck- 
ford, more hunting licenses than last 
season are being issaed. 

Twin lakes. Rice lak«. Big Rice lake 
and Denham lake are the north country 
bodies of water that are popular with 

Virginia hunters. 

» ..» 

Mine Offtelal* oil Ranire. 

Chisholm. Minn.. Sept. 30 — (Special 
to The Herald.) — President Olcott, 
Vice President Mitchell. General Man- 
ager McLean and Assistant General 
Manager Hearding, all • of the Oliver 
Iron Mining company, visi*-'' Chis- 
holm Wednesday. Th«y looked over 
the new Section 27 mine and Investi- 
gated the new w«tMr •aystem to the 

■:-Ot-»7 



Myers location, which cost 135.000 and 
supplies but six houses. 

Many 'Travelers on Ranye. 

Virginia, Minn.. Sept. 30. — More trav- 
eling men than at this time last fall, 
are visiting the city, according to local 
hotel managers. Yesterday afternoon, 
after spending several days here and 
at other range points calling on cus- 
tomers, twelve "drummers" represent- 
ing Chicago and Eastern manufactur- 
ers, left for the East. The traveling 
men are receiving larger orders than 
last fail and the manufacturing houses 
are having difficulty in filling orders. 
-^ 

Gilbert ChUd Burled. 

Gilbert, Minn., Sept. 80. — The 2-year- 
old son of Mr. and Mrs. Jalmer Neiml 
of Sparta died Tuesday following an 
Illness of two weeks. Mucus colitis 
was the immediate cause of his death. 
The funeral was held yesterday, the 
Rev. V. Kuusisto of Virginia officiat- 
ing. Services were held at the home, 
and Interment was at the Eveleth cem- 
etery. 




CAPT. A.. H. PAUL. 



Honor Kly Teachers. 

Ely, Minn., Sept. 80. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The annual reception in 
honor of Ely's school teachers will be 
held at the Washington auditorium 
Friday evening. Knutson's orchestra 
will furnish the music and the domes- 
tic science class will provide the re- 
freshments, and an enjoyable tinae is 
looked forward to. 



School Class Blects. 

Gilbert, Minn., Sept. SO. — Irving Hoa- 
king waa elected president of the class 
of 1916 at an election held in the high 
school this week. Dewey Rutherford 
was chosen vice president, Beatrice 
Connors secretary, and Aima Hill 
treasurer. 



the pilgrimage t> Seattle last July and 
plans outlined toe the coming winter. 
Drill work. Capt. Paul announced, will 
start the latter iiart of next month. 

During the ev^enlng Lyonel Ayres, 
potentate of Aad teniple. addressed the 
patrol and Invited the members to par- 
ticipate in the itnnual fall ceremonial 
on Nov. 5. 



Ehreleth Newlywreds Honte. 

Eveleth, Minn., Sept. 80. — Mr. and 
Mrs. Mason Burt have returned to Eve. 
leth following a two weeky honey- 
moon spent at Minneapolis and Lake 
Pepin. They will take up their resi^ 
dence in the home formerly occupied 
by Dr. W. E. Harwood In the Fayal 




FARMERS DIVIDED ON 
PRESlDI:NrS POUCY 

Some Oppcsition to Reso- 
lutions Presented at Na- 
tional Congress. 

Omaha, Neb., Jlept. 80. — The question 
of Indorsing Preiildent Wilson's foreign 
policy is causinir heated discussion at 
the convention of the Farmers' Na- 



Tlnt your hair to the shade desired 
with "Brownatone." This new prepa- 
ration is far superior to any mixture 
that contains hennsi, sulphur, silver, 
lead or similar preparations. 

There is no danger of an itching or 
poisoned scalp when you use "Browna- 
tone." for this simple preparation posi- 
tively contains no lead, mercury, silver, 
sulphur, zinc, aniline, coal-tar prod- 
ucts or their derivatives. You just 
brush or comb it into the iialr and 
presto! — your gray hairs instantly 
disappear — your hair Is a beautiful 
and uniform color throughout — the 
ends are as dark as the balance and 
you have any shade desired from a 
light brown to a black. Just a mo- 
ment's "touching up" once a month 
and no one can ever detect it. 

No rubbing, or washing off — no fad- 
ing. 

Prepared In two shades — one to pro- 
duce golden or medium brown, ths 
other, dark brown or black. Two sizes 
— 25 cents and $1.00. 

We will send absirfiitely free, for a 
short time only, a sample bottle of 
"Brownatone" if you will send us your 
name and address accompanied by 10c 
to help paj' postage and packing. No 
samples at dealers. This offer Is made 
for you to try "Brownatone" Hair 
Stain, and And for yourself just how 
superior it is to all so-called "dyes." 
combs, etc. The Kenton Pharmacal 
Co., 627 Pike Street. Covington, Ky. 

Sold and guaranteed in Duluth by 
Orpheum Pharmacy. Second avenue 
east and Superior street; Lyceum 
Pharmacy and other leading dealers^ 



tional congress n 
It was made the 
morning's sessio 

A resolution i 
duced by Frank • 

"Resolved, by 
congress, represi 
this country, w 
nvust feed our p 
war must fight t' 

"That we com 
icy of President 
at the head of 
during one of 1 
tryinsr periods o 

"Resolved, Thi 
dence In his pa 
diplomatic abillt; 

'^'Resolved, Ths 
unswerving supp 
defend the rightf 
and to mailntaln 
Ity of this netio 

Mr. O'Dell led 
lution and John 
the opposition, 
by Charles Wc 
President Wilson 
weak. "He's a 
nations," declare 

A test vote, ta! 
tabling an am 
Schmidt resulted 
in favor of the 
Wilson. 



leetlng here this week, 
special order for this 
n. 

Ui follows was Intro- 
Jt. O'Dell of Omaha: 
the Farmers' National 
anting the citizens of 
lio in time of peace 
eople. and in time of 
lelr battles, 
nend the foreign pol- 
Wllson who has stood 
the American nation 
he most critical and 
'. its history, 
t wc express confl- 
triotism, courage and 
r. 

,t we pledge hlra our 
ort in his endeavor to 
t of American citizens 
nviolable the neutral- 
1." 

the fight for tho reso- 
Bchmldt of Wahoo led 
Schmidt was seconded 
oster. who declared 
's foreign policy to be 
big bully — a bully of 
3 Wooster. 

ten on the question of 
endment offered by 
In a vote of 215 to 48 
resolution supporting 



OVER 600 NEW YORK 

SALOONS WILL QUIT 



New York, Sep 
ISOO in the stat( 
fees, which bee* 
row, will force 6( 
ness in Manhatt 
reduce the city's 
about $360,000. a 
of the officers < 
ers' associations, 
the cost of the 11 

The excise com 
tan said today h 
are not drinking 
past years and 
moving pictures 
loona. 



.. 30. — The increase of 

1 retail liquor license 

mes effective toraor- 

'0 saloons out of busi- 

m and Brooklyn and 

share in this revenue 

ccording to estimates 

)f retail liquor deal- 

The Increase brings 

censes up to $1,500. 

missloner for Manhat- 

3 believed that people 

as much now as in 

that in his opinion 

keep men from sa- 



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■^..'W .oi^ip— I tm Jt*U<^^ ^'"A 



DELINQUENT 
FIRST TIME 

Gas and Water Main Exten- 
sions Not All Paid 
Up. 



Old Plan Demand Sub- 
scriptions; New Provides 
Assessments. 



Delinquent assessments for gas and 
water extensions during the last yeai 
were reported this morning for the 
first tlTOe in the city's history by D. 
A. Reed, manager of the water and 
light department. 

According to the charter, all delin- 
quent asseasments for improvement! 
of any sort must be reported to the 
council by Oct 1 and these then cer- 
tified to the county auditor ao that 
he can place them on the tax list, with 
a lO-per-cent penalty, for collection the 
following year. In the past the wa- 
ter and light department secured sub- 
scriptions from property owners de- 
siring gas and water extensions, but 
a year ago this fall the new plan of 
assessments for all the property bene- 
fited, whether Improved or not, was 
adopted and as a result assessments 
were levied. 

The delinquent list filed this morn- 
ing with City Clerk Borgen includes 
extensions completed since Sept. 1, 
1914. and in his communication Mana- 
ger Reed states that these lists will 
be prepared each year In the future. 

The total amount involved Is $436.68, 
afTectlng ninety-nine parcels ol city 
property, according to the list. The 
extensions were made In the following 
streets: 

Property Benefited. 

Sixth street, between Fortieth and 
Forty-first avenues east. 

Faribault street, between Shakopee 
and Allendale avenues. 

Sixty-second avenue west, between 
Raleigrh a«nd Redruth streets. 

Peabody street, between Superior 
street and Forty-seventh avenue east. 

Glendale street, between Fiftieth 
and Fifty-first avenues east. 

Third street, between Thirty-fifth 
and Thirty-sixth avenues east. 

Eleventh street, between Fifth and 
Seventh avenues east. 

Lakevlew drive, between Victoria 
and Laurie streets. 

Laurie street, between Lakevlew^ 
drive and Snively road. 

Water street, between Twenty-third 
and Twenty-third and One-half ave- 
nues east. 

New alley, between Seventeenth and 
Eighteenth avenues west 

Grand avenue, between Common- 
wealth and One Hundred and First 
avenues west. 

Palmetto street, between Highland 
and Niagara avenues. 

Oakley street, between Fiftieth and 
Fifty-first avenues east. 

Ninth street, between Twenty-third 
and "Twenty-fourth avenues west. 

Dodge street, between Forty-sev- 
enth and Forty-ninth avenues east. 

MELOYlS HELD CM 
CONSPIRACY CHARGE 



Alleged to Have Secured 

Passport for German 

Wine Merchant. 

New York, Sept. 30. — Andrew D. 
Meloy, charged with conspiring with 
Franz Rlntelen, a German wine mer- 
chant, to defraud the government in 
securing a passport for Rlntelen to 
Switzerland, was arrested by agents 

of the department of Justice today 
when he arrived from Liverpool on the 
Nie_uw Amsterdam. 

He was arraigned before United 
States Commissioner Houghton and 
held In $10,000 ball for a hearing on 
Oct. 7. 

Meloy, his secretary, Miss Hattie 
Brophy, and Franz Rlntelen, alias E. V. 
Gasche, were taken off the stoanur 
Noordam at Kirkwall by British mili- 
tary authorities early In August. 
Rlntelen was sent to an English de- 
tention camp, where he still is. 

Meloy and Miss Brophy, who said 
they were en route to Switzerland, 
when detained at Kirkwall, were re- 
turned to this country at the insti- 
gation of the department of Justice. 
Miss Brophy will be held a^ a material 
witness. 

Rintelen sailed on the Noordana with 
a passport stating he was a citizen of 
Switzerland. Meloy Is alleged to have 
w^rltten a letter staling that he know 
Gasche to be a citizen of Switzerland. 



PLANS SELECTION CF 
RECRUITS BY BALLOT 



Kitchener Prefers, How- 
ever, to Have Volunteer 
System Continued. 

London, Sept. SO. — Preference for 
continuation of the volunteer system 
is said to have been expressed by 
Earl Kitchener at a meeting of labor 
executives yesterday. He said, how- 
ever, that the present rate of recruit- 
ing was not equal to tho needs. 

Earl Kitchener explained that lils 
own plan, which had not yet been au- 
thorized by the government, was to 
apply the system of the military ballot. 
Every district would be required to 
furnish Us quota of men. In cat^e this 
quota could not be obtained by volun- 
tary enli.stment the required number 
would be selected by ballot from 
among the men of military age and the 
enlistment of those thus chosen would 
be compulsory. The secretary added 
that there had been no slackening of 

the pressure to bring out recruits. 

* 

Seats for All Passengeni. 

Chicago, Sept. 80. — The state pubito 
utilities commlselon today ordered the 
Chicago surface car lines to provide 
seats for all passengers during non- 
ru.sh hours. In rush hours cars must 
be operated at such Intervals a.8 will 
seat eighty-five out of every 100 paa- 
sengers. 

FlrMt Snow in Wales. 

Txjndon. Sept. 30. — The first snow of 
the season fell this nuimlng. . The 
mountains of North Wales and the 
peaks of Derbyshire are thickly capped 
with white. 



We Recommend That You Uss 



*&xaJlL 



•'93"HairTon!o 



G. AL Tredwsy. 



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Thursday, 



THE DULUXH HERALD 



1 



September 30, 1915. 



OFFICIAL, PnOCEEDINGS. 

Council <"'hamber, 

Duluth. Minn.. Sept. 27, 1915, 3 p. m 

Rt-ertilar meeting. 

Roll call: 

Present — rommissioners 
Merritt. Silbersteln. Voss, 
Prinfe — 5. 

Absent — None. 



Farrell. 
Mayor 



upon the following: vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell. Mer- 
ritt. Silbersteln, Voss. Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 



adoption, and it was declared adopted rltt, Silbersteln, Voss, Maj'or Prince — 6. rlpon's BrookTaTe^dlvision, to Piedmont I be changred to read, "discontinue one 

,.rsr.^ ^v,^ *„,.„_..__ ..„.-. >.„„_ xr avenue. 'per; arc llsht on old Gary road near third 

Resolved fuYttfeV, That said work be I turn," and that said resolution as so 
done by day, 'htTSor, unless otherwise changed, be and the same is hereby 
ordered by the, council, the cost ' 

I of to be paid, from the permane 



On motion of Mayor Prince the min- 
utes of the meeting of Sept. 20, 1915, , 

Wfre approved as published In pam- *^'»J/ •'"'Iberstein, Voss, Mayor Prince — 6. 



The question being upon the adop- 
tion of the ordinance. Mayor Prince 
moved "its adoption, and it was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell, Mer- 



Nays — None. 

Passed — Sept. 27, 1916. 

Approved — Sept. 29, 1915. 



there 
ent im- 



phlet form, upon a vote by acclamation. 



PRESENTATION OF PETITIONS AND 
OTHER COMMUNICATIONS. 
Miscellaneou.i blJls and roqulsltions 
of city officers and department Noa. 
4566 to 4700, Inclusive. 



Nays — None. 



APPLICATION FOR DIVISION AND 
EXTENSION OF ASSESSMENTS. 

Mnneer Improvement club, regarding 
labeling of city automobiles. — Com- 
miF«!inner of public affHirs. 

Summon.s and complaint in the case 
of the Heinibach Lumber company vs. 
the City of Duluth. on account of SoiV-h 
First avenue east grade. 

Summons and complaint In the case 
of Matt Newman vs. the City of Duluth, 
on account of South First avenue east 
grade. 

J. J. Colburn, claim for damages. — 
City Attorney. 

P. <?. Phillips, regarding semi-month- 
ly payday for city employes. — Commls- 
slrner of public affairs. 

The A'nlk company, et al., for the 
con.<!truction of a sanitary sewer In 
Gary street from Commonwealth ave- 
nue to One Hundred First avenue west. 
— Conimispioner of public works. 

Applioations for cigarette license as 
follows: 

\V. A. Abbott at 101 West Fourth 
street, 9.S2 East Second street and 219 
West Superior street; Tony Scirrocla 
at 523 West Michigan street, W. Simon 
company at 125 East Superior street. 
Commercial club at 400 West First 
street. M<ls. E. P. Juntilla at 260 South 
First avenue east. 

Applications and bonds for liquor 
license a.=i folK-ws: 

Norman G. Smith at 522 "V\'est Supe- 
rior .<!treet. Frank Muccilli at 629 West 
Superior street. 



MOTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS. 
The resolution by Commissioner Far- 
rell granting an extension of time to 
A. N. Nelson on his contract No. 1600 
for the Improvement of Woodland ave- 
nue, was laid over for one week, in 
order to Insure that the bond had been 
extended. 



The resolution by Commissioner Far- 
rell, asking to have the city treasurer 
cancel the assessment levied against 
lot 21, block 7, Seiburn Park for the 
construction of a sidewalk In 1913, was 
laid over for one week for further 
consideration. 



The resolution by Commissioner Far- 
rell, ordering that the plat for the 
vacation of Fifth alley In block 9. 
Highland Park division be filed of 
record in the office of the city clerk, 
was laid over for a week for further 
consideration. 



By Commissioner Voss: 

Resolved, That the city treasurer is 1 prov"ement revoking fund which cost 
hereby authorized to accept the has been estimated at $318^5 by t" 
IgalnsS iL '^%srl^rLr^nor2\fy.'\ ^"^'"-^^ «ni it fs hlVeVy' dfr^ecl 
bfock 2 and lot 3 block 2 Mvers ' **"** ^ assessment be Levied upon the 
Pa'rk! for'cost of c'onsUu'c^^ing' ^^^ul':\llZ""'tl.^iv'^ll\A\rA /n^fJslvV 
tary sewer In Park place, also against | B,ock 72 HkVrL^'^.o* r? JLl^« ^ vf' 
lots 9 to 16 inclusive, block 114, I^n- "/on 'oVdlnJ^ f^* K^'^^m'^V^f^In' 
don addition, for the cost of construct- fod'efravfh^^^JK \^^ benefits received 
ng a sanitary sewer in Dodge street *° Mother otrJ^J?*"^^ ^'"^^ *i?*''%*'>f- ^'^'* 
Tom Forty-third avenue east to Su- vU,on« nf th^'^^*!*^' ^" .""'*^'" ^^k ^^°' 

Msions of the. city charter may be aa- 

sessed. 

Commissioner Farrell moved the 
adoption of the resolution, and It was 
declared adopted- upon tlie following 
vote: 

Yeas — CommlKsloners Farrell, Mer- 
ritt, Silbersteln, Voss. Mayor Prince — 6. 
Nays — None. 
I'assed Sept. 27 1916 
Approved Sept. 29 1915. 



approved. 

Commissioner Merritt moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
ted vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell, Mer- 
ritt, Silbersteln. Voss, Mayor Prince — -6. 

Nays — None. 

Passed Sept. 27, 1915. 

Approved Sept. 29, 1916. 



fror 

gerior street, together with $1.60 to 
e paid by each owner for the esti- 
mated cost of publishing this reao- 
lution. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and It was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell, Mer- 
ritt, Silbersteln, Voss, Mayor Prince — *. 

Nays — None. 

Passed — Sept. 27, 1915. 

Approved — Sept. 29, 1915. 



REPORTS OF OFFICERS, 
^ity alforney. recomntending settle- 
ment of claim of Oliver Brown against 
the city of Duluth. 

Recommending .settlement of claim of 
J. H Brigham, against the city of Du- 
luth. 

City assessor, certifying asse.S3ment 
rt)lls a.« follow.*: 

Assi fjsment levied to defray In part 
the co.st of paving and other-wise im- 
proving Colorado street from Fifty- 
first avenue east to Fifty-fourth ave- 
nue east. 

As.'sessnient levied to defray in part 
the cf>.«t of paving and otherwise Im- 
proviner West Sixth street, from Twen- 
ty-fir.«!t avenue west to Twenty-fifth 
avenue wf'St. 

Cf.mml.«'.«s)oner of public utilities re- 
porting <^ff«^r of .Tohn H. Brigham to 
sell Fond dii I.,ac water plant. 

City encrlnrer submitting cond^^mna- 
tlon plat of Fifth alley In block 9, 
Highland Park division. 

Cf)mriiipsioner of finance submitting 
e.stlm.'ite on budget for the next ensu- 
ing year. 

I'NFINTSHED BUSINESS. 

The r« .solution by Commissioner Voss 
coTifirmlntr the as.cpssment levied, to 
defray In part the expense of con- 
structing a storm sewer In Exeter 
street fame up for action and upon 
motion of CommL-'sloner Voss, It was 
laid upon the table. 
By Cr,mmi.«>sioner Farrell: 

Resolved. That the contract for the 
ET railing. t>;vving and otherwi<!e improv- 
Ine: of Fifty-eighth avenue west, from 
E'inor street to Eighth street, be and 
the Fame hereby Is awarded to A. Hed- 
enberg on his bid of $4,0 79.55 for one- 
course concrete pavement. 

Commissioner Farrell moved the 
Adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
Vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell Mer- 
ritt. Silbersteln, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Navs — None. 

Pa.'^.'sed Sept. 27. 1915. 

Approved Sept. 29. 1915. 



By Mayor Prince: 

Whereas, the need of a public com- 
fort station at the northerly approach 
to the aerial bridge is by 'this coun- 
cil, hereby declared, and 

Whereas, The United States govern- 
ment engineer in charge, has recom- 
mended the installation of such pub- 
lic comfort station at government ex- 
pense, be it therefore 

Resolved, That the commissioner of 
public works be and he hereby is au- 
thorized to construct the necessary 
sewer manhole, the cost thereof to be 
paid from the general fund 

Resolved. Further. That the cost of 
maintaining such public comfort sta- 
tion shall be borne by the city of Du- 
luth. and payable out of its publir- 
welfare fund. 

Mayor Prince moved the adoption of 
the resolution and It was declared 
adopted upon the following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell, Mer- 
ritt, Silbersteln, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5 

Nays — None. 

Passed Sept. 27, 1915. 

Approved Sept. 29, 1915. 



By Commissioner Voss: 

Resolved, That the assessment lev- 
ied to defray In part the expense of 
paving and otherwise Improving East 
Sixth street from Fifteenth to Eigh- 
teenth avenue east, and Sixteenth 
avenue east from Sixth street to 
Eighth street, be and the same Is 
hereby confirmed. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution. 

An opportunity was offered for any 
one to be heard relative to said as- 
sessment, but no one appeared who 
objected to the same. 

The question being upon the adop- 
tion of the resolution, it was declared 
adopted upon the following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell, Mer- 
ritt, Silbersteln, Vo&s, Mayor Prince — 6. 

Nays — None. 

Passed — Sept. 27. 1915. 

Approved — Sept. 29. 1915. 



By Mayor Prince: 

Resolved, That the city attorney be 
directed to settle the case of Oliver 
Brown, as administrator, etc., vs the 
city of Duluth. now pending in the 
di.strict court of St. Louis county foi 
six hundred and twenty-five dollars 
($625). to be paid out of the general 
fund of the city of Duluth| 

Mayor Prince moved the adoption 
and it was declared adopted upon the 
following vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell, Silber- 
steln, Voss, Mayor. Prince — 4. 

Nay.s — Merritt — 1. 

F'assed Sept. 27. 1915. 

Approved Sept. 29. 1915. 



By Commissioner Farrell: 

Re.«olved. Tliat the contract for the 
Improvement of Third avenue east from 
Seventh street to Eighth street, be 
and the same is hereby awarded to J. 
D. O'Conr.ell. on his bid of $2,193.60, 
for class *'C" macadam paving. 

Commissioner Farrell moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell, Mer- 
ritt. Silbersteln, Voss, Mayer Prince — 5. 
Nays — None. 
Passed. Sept. 27. 1915. 
Approved, Sept. 29, 1915. 



INTRODUCTION AND CONSIDERA- 
TION OF ORDINANCES. 
The following entitled ordinances 
took their second reading: 
By Mayor Prince: 

"An ordinance granting to the Min- 
neapolis. St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie 
Ftailway company, permis.sion to con- 
ftruct. maintain and operate an over 



By Commissioner Voss: 

Resolved, That extension of time is 
hereby granted to the owners of prop- 
erty for the payment of the remain- 
ing portion of assessments herein- 
after mentioned, such payments to be 
made in not to exceed three install- 
ments, payable in one two or three 
years; the first payment to be due and 
payable Oct. 1, 1916. 

Assessment against J. H. Rlddell 
owner of the east one-half of lot 2 
and all of lot 3, block 19. Walbank's 
addition. 

Assessment against Wm. McLellan 
(By Anglina McLellan. agent), owner 
of lot 4, block 17, Walbank's addition. 

A.ssessment against Nelson Perry 
owner of lot 5, block 19. Walbank's 
addition. 

Assessment against the estate of 
John Bergholm (By T. F. Upham, ex' 
ecutor), owner of lots 11 and 12. block 
23. Walbank's addition. 

Said assessments being levied for 
the expense of paving Exeter street. 

Assessment against Edward Fride 
(By I. Friemuth, agent), owner of lot 
1, block 10. Gordon & Whiting's divi- 
sion. 

Said assessment being levied for ex- 
pense of paving East First street 

Assessment against Alex Newman 
(By Mrs. A. Newman, agent), owner 
of the southerly 60 feet of the north- 
erly 95 feet of lots 1 and 2. block 25. 
Lake view addition. 

Said assessment being levied for the 
expense of constructing a sewer In 
East Tenth street. 

Assessment against William E. Rich- 
ardson, assignee, American Loan & 
Trust company, owner of lots 13 and 
14. block 23. Harrison's division. 

Said assessment being levied for the 
expense of constructing a sanitary 
sewer In Greysolon place. 

Commissioner Voss moved the adop- 
tion of the resolution and it was de- 
clared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell. Mer- 
ritt. Silbersteln, Voss, Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed Sept. 27. 1915. 

Approved Sept. 29. 1915. 



By Commissioner Farrell: 

Resolved, That it is hereby ordered 
that a sanitary sewer be constructed 
In Fifth alley from Forty-eighth ave- 
nue west to Fifty-fourth avenue west, 
and In Fifty-fourth avenue w^est to 
Elinor street. 

Resolved further. That said work 
be done by day labor, unless other- 
wise ordered by the council, the cost 
thereof to be paid from the permanent 
improvement revolving fund; and it Is 
hereby directed that an assessment be 
levied upon the property benefited by 
said improvement, according to the 
benefits received, to defray the cost 
thereof, with such other expenses as 
under the provisions of the city char- 
ter may be assessed. 

Commissioner Farrell moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell, Mer- 
ritt. Silbersteln, Voss. Mayor Prince — 5. 

Nays — None. 

Passed — Sept. 27, 1915. 

Approved — Sept. 29. 1915. 



By Commissioner Farrell: 

Resolved. That the construction of 
the following sidewalks be and hereby 
is canceled: 

On the north side of Pittsburg ave- 
nue from Second to Third avenues 
west. 

North side of Luveme street from 
Forty-second avenue east to Forty- 
third avenue east. 

Commissioner Farrell moved the 
adoption of the resolution and it was 
declared adopted upon the following 
vote: 

Yeas — Commissioners Farrell,- Mer- 
ritt. Silbersteln, Voss, Mayor Prince — 6 

Nays — None. 

Passed — Sept. 27. 1915. 

Appr